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FINAL

THE REPORT OF THE 18TH MEETING OF THE NATIONAL FOCAL POINT


FOR THE ASEAN COCOA CLUB (ACC) ON ASEAN COOPERATION
AND JOINT APPROACHES IN AGRICULTURE AND FOREST PRODUCTS
PROMOTION SCHEME
7 8 May 2015
The Berkeley HotelPratunam, Bangkok, Thailand

INTRODUCTION

1.

The 18th Meeting of the National Focal Point for the ASEAN Cocoa Club (ACC) on
ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion
Scheme was held on 78 May 2015 at the Berkeley HotelPratunam, Bangkok, Thailand.

2.

The Meeting was attended by 56 delegates from the government and private sectors of
eight ASEAN member countries namely Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar,
Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam. The list of delegates is in Annex 1.

OPENING CEREMONY

Opening Remarks from the Chairman of the ASEAN Cocoa Club (ACC)

3.

The Chairman of the ACC, Datuk Dr. Lee Choon Hui, Director General of the Malaysian
Cocoa Board (MCB) welcomed and thanked all delegates from Indonesia, Lao PDR,
Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam for attending the 18th
ACC Meeting.

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4.

He expressed his appreciation to Thailand and especially to the Department of


Agriculture, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, Thailand for hosting the 18th ACC
Meeting. He also thanked and congratulated the ACC Secretariat and the Local Organizing
Committee of the Horticulture Research Institute, Department of Agriculture, Thailand
for their hard work, support and team cooperation rendered in ensuring the success of the
Meeting.

5.

He also congratulated the ACC Technical Working Group on Food Safety (ACC TWGFS)
and ACC Technical Working Group on Good Agricultural Practices (ACC TWGGAP) for
successfully concluding their meetings on 6 May 2015.

6.

In his welcoming remarks, the ACC Chairman highlighted that more than 4.37 million
tonnes of cocoa beans was produced last year. About 0.42 million tonnes was from
ASEAN countries, accounted for 9.6% of the world cocoa beans supply. The total cocoa
grindings in ASEAN was estimated at 681,600 tonnes. As a whole, the ASEAN accounted
for 16% of the total world cocoa grinding in 2013/2014. Cocoa is a virtuous crop that
creates jobs and generates income for millions of workers around the world including the
developing region of ASEAN.

7.

He also highlighted that the key challenges facing the cocoa industry include low
productivity and quality, infestation of pest and diseases, aging trees stocks, complex trade
flows and changing taxation climate, land pressures, aging farmers, improper use of
chemicals, low farmer income and poor labor practices as well as health and social issues.
All these challenges have negative impacts on cocoa especially the productivity and quality
of cocoa as well as the environment. As such, revitalizing the cocoa sector will require a
large financial investment, matched with industry cooperation and an innovative approach.

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8.

He emphasized that the role of the ACC is very important as one of the platforms for the
ASEAN member countries to act collectively in formulating policies and strategies to
overcome issues and challenges facing by cocoa industries and at the same time strengthen
and enhance further the intra-ASEAN trade on cocoa and cocoa products. The full text of
his opening remarks is in Annex 2.

Opening Speech from the Deputy Director General of the Department of Agriculture,
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, Thailand
9.

Dr. Suwit Chaikiattiyos, the Deputy Director General of Department of Agriculture,


Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, Thailand expressed his special tribute to the
ACC for once again choosing Thailand as the venue for the 18th ACC Meeting. He also
welcomed members from Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines,
Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam to Bangkok, Thailand and to the 18th ACC Meeting.

10.

He highlighted that the cocoa industry in Thailand has been growing. The total area was
832 hectares with a production of about 100 tonnes per year. Thailand also imported
20,000 tonnes cocoa bean per annum.

11.

He also highlighted that the ACC role as a working group level on specific sector under the
frame of ASEAN cooperation on agriculture is to initiate and implement areas of
cooperation that would be beneficial to the ASEAN member countries. Therefore, the 18th
Meeting of the ACC in Thailand is a good opportunity for member country representatives
to gain understanding and perception on cocoa production, processing and trade situations
as well as seeking ways to strengthen cocoa trade within and outside the ASEAN region.
The full text of his speech is in Annex 3.

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AGENDA ITEM 1: OPENING REMARKS

12.

The Chairman of the ACC, Datuk Dr. Lee Choon Hui, the Director General of the MCB
expressed his sincere gratitude and appreciation to all the delegates from Indonesia, Lao
PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam for attending
the 18th ACC Meeting.

He also thanked the Local Organizing Committee of the

Horticulture Research Institute, Department of Agriculture, Thailand and the ACC


Secretariat for their hard work, undivided assistance and support in successfully organizing
this Meeting.

AGENDA ITEM 2: ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN AND VICECHAIRMAN

13.

Datuk Dr. Lee Choon Hui, Director General of the MCB was unanimously elected as the
Chairman of the 18th ACC Meeting and Mrs. Peyanoot Naka, Assistant Director of
Horticulture Research Institute, Department of Agriculture, Ministry of Agriculture and
Cooperative, Thailand as the ViceChairperson.

AGENDA ITEM 3: ADOPTION OF AGENDA

14.

The Meeting adopted the Agenda of the 18th ACC Meeting as in Annex 4.

AGENDA ITEM 4: BUSINESS ARRANGEMENTS

15.

The Meeting was held in plenary.

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AGENDA ITEM 5: COUNTRY PRESENTATION ON THE LATEST DEVELOPMENT


OF THE COCOA INDUSTRY IN THAILAND

16.

Mrs. Peyanoot Naka, Assistant Director of the Horticulture Research Institute, Department
of Agriculture, Thailand presented the latest development of the cocoa industry in Thailand
which covered the following:
i.

Cocoa Production

ii.

Thailand Cocoa Standard

iii.

Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs) on pesticides residue

iv.

The status of cocoa industry and trade

v.

Importing and exporting issues

vi.

Future prospect

vii.

Cocoa research and development

Her slide presentation appears in Annex 5.


AGENDA ITEM 6: MATTERS ARISING FROM THE PREPSOM36TH AMAF, 2022
SEPTEMBER 2014; PREPSOM14TH AMAF PLUS THREE, 22 SEPTEMBER 2014;
36TH AMAF, 23 SEPTEMBER 2014 AND 14TH AMAF PLUS THREE, 24 SEPTEMBER
2014 IN NAY PYI TAW, MYANMAR
17.

The ACC Secretariat presented the report of these meetings provided by the ASEAN
Secretariat. As reported by the ASEAN Secretariat, there was no ACC related matter
arisen and there was no followup needed by the ACC for PREPSOM36th AMAF, 2022
September 2014; PREPSOM14th AMAF Plus Three, 22 September 2014; 36th AMAF,
23 September 2014 and 14th AMAF Plus Three, 24 September 2014 in Nay Pyi Taw,
Myanmar.

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18.

In the 36th AMAF Meeting held on 23 September 2014, for Cooperation in Agriculture, the
Meeting noted that good progress has been achieved in enhancing ASEAN agriculture. The
meeting endorsed several documents for crops including ASEAN Standards for Cocoa
Beans (ASEAN Stan 34: 2014). For Cooperation in Trade in Agricultural and Forestry
Products, the Meeting noted that the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on ASEAN
Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme
(2010-2014) expired in 2014. The Meeting discussed and agreed to sign the new MoU on
ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion
Scheme (2015-2019).

AGENDA ITEM 7: MATTERS ARISING FROM THE 21ST MEETING OF THE JOINT
COMMITTEE ON ASEAN COOPERATION AND JOINT APPROACHES IN
AGRICULTURE AND FOREST PRODUCTS PROMOTION SCHEME, 78 JULY 2014
IN PHUKET, THAILAND

19.

The ACC Secretariat presented the report of the 21st Meeting of the Joint Committee on
ASEAN Cooperation in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme (JCM) held on
78 July 2014 in Phuket, Thailand as provided by the ASEAN Secretariat. There was no
ACC related matters arisen from this Meeting and no followup needed by the ACC for
JCM.

20.

As reported by the ASEAN Secretariat, the report of the 17th ACC Meeting held on 78
May 2014 in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia has been reported to the 21st JCM held on 7
8 July 2014 in Phuket, Thailand.

21.

The JCM also discussed and endorsed the draft MoU on Joint Committee (JC) on ASEAN
Cooperation in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme and the Meeting
requested the ASEAN Secretariat to report to SOMAMAF Leader the MoU for final
endorsement and sought confirmation to sign the MoU at AMAF Meeting in September in
Myanmar.

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AGENDA ITEM 8: ENHANCE INTRA AND EXTRAASEAN TRADE AND LONG


TERM COMPETITIVENESS OF ASEANS FOOD, AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY
PRODUCTS/COMMODITIES
8.1

Tariff and NonTariff Barriers on Cocoa Beans and Cocoa Products

8.1.1 ASEAN Trade in Goods Agreement (ATIGA)

22.

Indonesia reported that as of 2015, seven ASEAN member countries namely Brunei,
Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand have implemented
zero import tariffs on cocoa beans and products with the exception of Cambodia, Myanmar
and Viet Nam. These countries still impose import tariffs between 05% for several cocoa
products. The ATIGA tariff reduction schedule for 2015 is in Annex 6.

8.1.2

23.

ASEAN Free Trade Area (FTA) between ASEAN and other countries

Indonesia reported that the tariff imposition on cocoa beans and products in 2015 is zero
percent for ASEANAustralia and ASEANChina.

For ASEANKorea, the tariff

imposition on cocoa beans and products will be zero in 2016. Under the ASEANNew
Zealand, the import tariffs impose on chocolate and other food preparations containing
cocoa is 5%. The import tariff for ASEANIndia is 10% for cocoa butter, fat and oil. The
tariffs schedules for ASEAN FTA with Australia, China, Korea, India and New Zealand
appear in Annex 7.

8.1.3

24.

Most Favoured Nation (MFN) Tariffs

There is no update report on the MFN tariff rates from the ASEAN member countries.

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8.1.4

25.

There is no update report on the NTBs from the ASEAN member countries.

8.2

26.

NonTariff Barriers (NTBs)

Technical Working Group on Good Agriculture Practices (TWGGAP)

Dr. Divina M. Amalin the Chairperson of the ACC TWGGAP presented the report of the
4th Meeting of the ACC TWGGAP.

27.

She informed the Meeting that the 4th ACC TWGGAP Meeting was held on 6 May 2015 at
the Berkeley HotelPratunam, Bangkok, Thailand. The Meeting was attended by 20
delegates and observers from ASEAN member countries. The ASEAN member countries
present were Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines and Thailand.

28.

Dr. Divina M. Amalin from the Philippines was the designated Chairperson of the ACC
TWGGAP and Mr. Panit Ngangoranatigar of the Department of Agriculture, Ministry of
Agriculture and Cooperative, Thailand was unanimously elected as the Vice Chairman.

29.

The Meeting was informed that the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand has reported the
current activities on GAP for cocoa in their respective countries.

30.

She also informed the Meeting that the Working Group is able to come up with the draft of
the ASEAN GAP for cacao which was drafted during the 3rd ACC TWGGAP Meeting held
at Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia in 2014. However, since most of the ACC TWGGAP
members were not present in the meeting, the ASEAN GAP document is still being
finalized. This document will be presented to the ACC Meeting after it has been endorsed
by the designated members of the ACC TWGGAP in their next meeting.

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31.

The Meeting noted the appeal by the ACC TWGGAP for the members present during the
meeting to confirm the designated ACC TWGGAP members for each member countries
comprised of 2 technical members and 2 non-technical members. This will facilitate the
finalization of ASEAN GAP for cacao. The full report of this meeting is in Annex 8.
8.3

32.

Technical Working Group on Food Safety (TWGFS)

Dr. Sabariah Samsudin, the Chairperson of the ACC TWGFS presented the report of the 7th
Meeting of the ACC TWGFS held on 6 May 2015 at the Berkeley HotelPratunam,
Bangkok, Thailand.

33.

The Meeting was chaired by Dr. Sabariah Samsudin, Director of the Cocoa Downstream
Technology Division, MCB and co-chaired by Mrs. Peyanoot Naka, Assistant Director of
Horticulture Research Institute, Department of Agriculture, Ministry of Agriculture and
Cooperatives, Thailand.

34.

The Meeting was attended by 22 members and observers from Indonesia, Lao PDR,
Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, Viet Nam and Secretariat of the ACC TWGFS.

35.

The highlights of the report are as follows:


i.

Indonesia reported that twenty one (21) pesticide residues namely ametryn, carbaryl,
carbofuran, carbosulfan, chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos methyl, cyfluthrin, deltametrin,
diazinon, dieldrin, ethion, fenitrothion, fenthion, imidacloprid, lambda-cyhalothrin,
lindane, malathion, methidathion, permethrin, profenofos, and propoxur are not
detected in cocoa beans (Limit of Quantification: 0.01 mg/kg).

ii.

Philippines reported on the two (2) training of trainers on the Philippine National
Standards on Cacao Beans and Tablea held on 3-5 September 2014 and 13- 15 April
2015 in two (2) regions.

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iii.

Indonesia informed the Meeting that in 2014, Indonesia issued Ministry of


Agriculture Regulation No. 67/2014 on Quality Requirement and Marketing of
Cocoa Bean. This regulation sets the mechanism for monitoring and quality standard
of cocoa bean.

iv.

The Philippines reported on the Food Safety Act which was signed into law in 23
August 2013. The implementing rules and regulations is awaiting publication this
year.

v.

Indonesia informed that there was no further update pertaining to the establishment
of the maximum levels for cadmium in cocoa and chocolate products imposed by
European Union (EU).

Indonesia also informed that Codex Committee on

Contaminants in Foods (CCCF) has initiated a work on Maximum Levels for


Cadmium in Chocolate and Cocoa-Derived Products.
vi.

Indonesia reported that cadmium was not detected with Limit of Detection (LOD) of
0.0063 mg/kg and 0.13 - 0.59 mg/kg, respectively in cocoa beans and cocoa powder
produced by Indonesia cocoa grinders. The cadmium content for both products is in
compliance with the requirement of Indonesia National Standard of Cocoa Powder
(Maximum Permitted Level: 1 mg/kg).

vii.

Malaysia informed the Meeting that the range value of cadmium content for cocoa
beans from different regions of Malaysia, cocoa liquor and cocoa powder from
Malaysian cocoa grinders are 0.04 - 0.51 mg/kg, 0.03 - 0.31 mg/kg and 0.06 - 0.60
mg/kg, respectively.

viii. Viet Nam informed the Meeting that the highest level of cadmium detected in cocoa
beans is 0.75 mg/kg. This finding is from a single study and in a single sample and
any interpretation should be undertaken with caution.

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ix.

Malaysia informed the Meeting that nine (9) pesticide residues namely ametryn,
chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, cyproconazole, fluazifop-butyl, isazofos, metalaxyl,
oxadixyl and quizalofop-ethyl were not detected in cocoa beans from different
regions of Malaysia.

Malaysia will share the test method of cadmium with

Philippines.
x.

The ACC TWGFS requested the ACC Secretariat to forward the ASEAN Code of
Practice for the Prevention and Reduction of Ochratoxin A (OTA) Contamination in
Cocoa Beans for endorsement by the Joint Committee on ASEAN Cooperation and
Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme.

xi.

The Meeting agreed to have each country presentation on Food Safety Standard and
Regulation related to cocoa and cocoa products in the next meeting as proposed by
Philippines.

xii.

The Meeting agreed on sharing information of Mutual Recognition Agreement


(MRA) pertaining to cocoa and cocoa products in ASEAN Consultative Committee
on Standards and Quality Prepared Foodstuff Product Working Group (ACCSQ
PFPWG) within the sovereign rights of every ASEAN country. Thailand agreed to
lead this new initiative.

The full report of the ACC TWGFS meeting is in Annex 9.

AGENDA ITEM 9:
PROMOTE COOPERATION, JOINT APPROACHES AND
TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AMONG ASEAN MEMBER COUNTRIES AND
INTERNATIONAL, REGIONAL, ORGANIZATION AND PRIVATE SECTOR
9.1

36.

Trials on Selected Cocoa Progenies in Selected ASEAN Region

The Meeting was informed that the Joint Progeny Trial Programme in Indonesia started in
December 2005. The objective of the trial is to select the superior genotype clonal material

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resistance to pest and disease such as cocoa pod borer (CPB) and vascular streak dieback
(VSD).

The clonal selection was done by testing some promising cocoa hybrids in

Indonesia and Malaysia using similar progenies.

37.

Indonesia reported that the yield potential based on the pod number per tree during the year
of 20092014 indicated that hybrid combination of C 1038 x BR 25 and PBC 159 x NA 33
are having a higher number of pods per tree.

38.

The Meeting was also informed that the hybrid combination of C 1038 x BR 25, PBC 123
x QH 22, PBC 159 x QH 22, TSH 858 x KW 162 showed strong resistance to VSD
infestation. The full report by Indonesia is in Annex 10.

39.

Malaysia reported that the trial was established in April 2006 under the ASEAN Cocoa
Club Joint Project with an objective to produce hybrids population which possesses good
yield and flavor as well as acceptable bean characteristics. The two institutions involved in
the project are the MCB and Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute (ICCRI).

40.

The analysis of variance of the cocoa pod yield per tree (PYT) and dry bean yield (DBY)
showed that the main effects (progeny and time) were significant at 5% significant level.
However, the interaction effects were not significant. The progeny effects explained that
there were few progenies performed better than others throughout the years and performed
consistently as there were no interaction effects between progenies and years.

41.

The results for cocoa PYT showed that throughout the 7 years of trial from 2008 to 2014,
progeny KW162 x KW163 produced the highest pod yield per tree (6.819) followed by the
KW162 x KEE2 (6.068) while TSH858 x KW163 produced the lowest pod yield per tree
(1.426).

42.

The result for cocoa DBY showed that over the 7 years period from 2008 to 2014, progeny
KW162 x KEE2 produced the highest average dry bean yield (211.30 kg/ha) followed by

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the KW162 x KW163 (200.46 kg/ha) while TSH858 x KEE2 produced the lowest average
dry bean yield (55.74 kg/ha).
43.

For the VSD assessment conducted in April 2014, the statistical analysis on VSD scoring
showed that no significant difference among the progenies in terms of level of resistant
towards VSD in year 2014. All of the progenies have the range between 2.6 to 3.1 of VSD
scores which were categorized as moderate resistant. However progeny KW162 x KW163
had the lowest VSD score (2.618) followed by KW162 x KEE2 (2.633) while only
TSH858 x KW163 had a score above 3.00.

44.

Overall, the result showed that the progenies KW162 x KEE2 and KW162 x KW163 were
the most productive among those tested in this trial. These progenies also possessed
moderate resistance towards the VSD.

45.

Malaysia informed the Meeting that the next step of this breeding programme is to
undertake individual tree selection focusing on high yield potential, good flavour and
acceptable bean characteristics and tolerant to VSD. The full report is in Annex 11.
9.2

46.

Project on Pest and Diseases (P&D) Management

Malaysia informed the Meeting that the three areas of research collaboration are as
follows:

47.

i.

Cocoa Pod Borer (CPB)

ii.

VSD

iii.

Black pod diseases (BP)

Malaysia informed the Meeting that only one project proposal on Particle Film Technology
as a Pest Control Strategy in Sustainable Cacao Production has been prepared by Malaysia
and Indonesia. The project proposal entitled Particle film technology as pest control

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strategy in the management of cocoa pod borer was prepared by the MCB and submitted
to the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation (MOSTI), Malaysia in October
2014 for research fund approval. No fund was granted yet as the proposal needs to be
revised and resubmitted with some amendments. The full report is in Annex 12.

48.

Dr. Amalin of the Philippines reported that Philippines has undertaken the project using
fine clay as an agent against cacao mirid bug in the Philippines. Three experiments are
conducted in laboratory, field cage and open field assessments. The experiments in
laboratory and field cage were successfully done. However, the experiment in the open
field was not able to be carried out due to the recent flooding that badly hit the Philippines.

9.3

49.

Training and Exchange of Technical Expertise and Research Materials

Malaysia reported that there are no reports on the training and exchange of expertise and
cocoa hybrid seeds among the ASEAN member countries. The full report is in Annex 13.

9.4

Enhancement of Private Sector Involvement

9.4.1 Cocoa Association of Asia (CAA)

50.

Mr. Richard Fahey, Chairman of the CAA presented the latest development on the
programmes and activities carried out by the CAA in 2014 and are as follows:

i.

CAANam Long University Project that provides technical training to farmers on


best agricultural practices for cocoa farming and proper fermentation techniques

ii.

Attended the ASEAN Cocoa Club Meeting, 7th-8th May 2014, Kota Kinabalu,
Sabah, Malaysia

iii.

Attended the 6th Indonesian International Cocoa Conference & Dinner, 1517 May
2014 in Bali, Indonesia

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iv.

Liason with FCC for clarification on certain bean quality definitions as per FCC
rules

v.

CAA grinds the quarterly grinds (compilation of Malaysian, Singapore and


Indonesian grinds as contributed by CAA members) are ongoing and posted on
CAA website.

The report is in Annex 14.

51.

He also highlighted that the negative 10% growth in Asia grindings in 2014 was due to the
changes in the tax structure in export of cocoa beans in Indonesia as well as tariff
disadvantage on cocoa butter from Asia in European Union as compared to the West
African countries. The processors in Asia will be the first to be hit if there are any drop in
demand of cocoa products in Europe.

9.4.2

52.

Cocoa Manufacturers Group (CMG), Malaysia

The Meeting noted the status development and the activities conducted by the CMG for
2014 presented by Mr. Brandon Tay Hoe Lian, the Chairman of the CMG.

53.

He informed the Meeting that the CMG membership comprises of six cocoa grinders and
Federation of Cocoa Manufacturers as the acting secretariat of the CMG.

54.

Mr. Brandon also presented the CMG activities in 2014 as follows:

i.

MCBCMG quarterly meetings

ii.

Technical Committee Meeting on Cocoa Industry Research

iii.

MCBCMG Meeting with Department of Agriculture Biosecurity

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55.

He also highlighted the cocoa grinding performance in Malaysia. The total cocoa grindings
in Malaysia in 2014 dropped to 244,423 tonnes from 285,608 tonnes in 2013.

He

anticipated that the weak performance would continue in 2015 due to poor demand. His
slide presentation appears in Annex 15.

9.4.3 Indonesia Cocoa Association (ASKINDO) and Indonesia Cocoa Industry


Association (AIKI)
56.

Indonesia reported that the cocoa beans production in Indonesia in 2014 was 400,687
tonnes, 17% lower as compare to last year production of 482,248 tonnes. The production
capacity increased from 150,000 tonnes in 2010 to 391,000 tonnes in 2014 and is expected
to increase further to 461,380 tonnes in 2015.

The increase in the Indonesia cocoa

processing industry has significantly increased the value of cocoa products export to
240,966 tonnes and imports of cocoa beans to 109,409 tonnes in 2014.
57.

Indonesia also reported the following activities carried out in 2014 as follows:
i.

Gernas Program where in February 2015, the House of Representative, DPR has
approved the budget of Rp. 1.1 billion to continue the Gernas Kakao program that
aimed to help in improving the Indonesian cocoa farms.

ii.

Indonesia Cocoa Day 2014 which was held in Makassar, South Sulawesi on the 14th
September 2014. The 2015 celebration will be held in the city of Yogyakarta in
September. The report is in Annex 16.

9.4.4 Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines (CocoaPhil)

58.

Dr. Divina M. Amalin of the CocoaPhil presented the status development of the cocoa
industry in the Philippines in 20142015.

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59.

She highlighted that there are around 10,000 to 15,000 cocoa farmers nationwide and the
annual consumption in beans equivalent is about 30,000 tonnes. The average production of
cocoa beans in the Philippines is around 10,000 tonnes with a current average yield per tree
is 1.30 kilos dried beans. The value of imports per year for cocoa is USD 42 million
excluding chocolate products and the average value of exports is USD 3.5 million.

60.

She also highlighted that the major cocoa growing regions in the Philippines are in Davao
region, Northern Mindanao, CARAGA, West Mindanao and Eastern Visayas. Davao
region produced 77 % of cocoa beans supply in the last 5 years (2006-2011)

61.

She also reported on various partnerships programmes with both government and private
sectors in cocoa farming. Her slide presentation appears in Annex 17.

AGENDA ITEM 10: OTHER MATTERS

10.1

62.

ASEAN Cocoa Club National Focal Point

The ACC Secretariat updated the Meeting on the current National Focal Points 2015
submitted by the member countries which is in Annex 18.

63.

The Meeting was informed that the total number of memberships of the ASEAN Cocoa
Club National Focal Points in 2015 remains at 27 with the changes in the focal points for
Indonesia, Thailand and ASEAN Secretariat. Change was also made on the designation of
the national focal point of Singapore.

64.

The ASEAN member countries are requested to inform of any changes in their focal points
to the ACC Secretariat.

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10.2 Strategic Plan of Action on ASEAN Cooperation in Cocoa Sector 20162020

65.

The Meeting noted that in line with the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding
(MoU) on ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products
Promotion Scheme for 20152019 during the 36th AMAF on 23 September 2014 in Nay
Pyi Taw, Myanmar, the ASEAN member countries are requested to propose the new
programmes and activities for the Strategic Plan of Action on ASEAN Cooperation in
Cocoa Sector for 20162020. The new SPA on ASEAN Cooperation in cocoa sector will
be discussed and endorsed in the 19th ASEAN Cocoa Club Meeting in 2016.

AGENDA 11: DATE AND VENUE OF THE NEXT MEETING

66.

The Meeting requested Indonesia to consider hosting the 19th ACC Meeting on the ASEAN
Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products Promotion Scheme
to be held tentatively in the first week of May 2016 as proposed by Philippines.

AGENDA 12: ADOPTION OF THE REPORT

67.

The Meeting unanimously adopted the Report of the 18th Meeting of the ASEAN Cocoa
Club on the ASEAN Cooperation and Joint Approaches in Agriculture and Forest Products
Promotion Scheme held on 78 May 2015 at the Berkeley HotelPratunam, Bangkok,
Thailand.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

68.

In his closing remarks, the Chairman expressed his gratitude and thanked to all delegates
for their active participation in the Meeting. It had been a fruitful two days meeting and he
was glad that progress has been made in the programmes and activities planned last year.
He also thanked the Local Organizing Committee and the ACC Secretariat for their
support, hard work and making this Meeting happening in Thailand.

69.

The delegation of Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore,
Thailand and Viet Nam expressed their sincere appreciation to the Thailand Government in
particular the Department of Agriculture, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives,
Thailand for the warm hospitality accorded to them and the excellent arrangements made
for the Meeting as well as the ACC Secretariat and the Local Organizing Committee of
Thailand for their hard work and team cooperation rendered in ensuring the successful of
the Meeting.

70.

The Meeting was cordially held in the traditional spirit of ASEAN solidarity.

Bangkok, Thailand
8 May 2015

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