You are on page 1of 23

 

Glossary of Terms 

Absolute Instability – The condition that exists when the temperature of the air above a level is colder 
than both the saturation and dry adiabatic lapse rates. (2‐97) 

Absolute Stability –The condition that exists when the temperature of the air above a level is warmer 
than the saturation adiabatic lapse rate. (2‐97) 

Absorption bands – The areas of the electromagnetic spectrum that are absorbed by the atmosphere 
(4‐3). 

Accretion – Process of fusing together of small droplets that collide (1‐41). 

Actiniform clouds – The skeletal remains of closed‐cell stratocumulus (4‐29). 

Active Sonar – A type of sonar that employs a transmitter to send out sound pulses and a receiver to 
record returning echoes. (3‐30) 

Aircraft Condensation Trails – Elongated clouds composed of water droplets or ice crystals that form 
behind the aircraft when the wake becomes supersaturated with respect to water. (2‐91) 

Albedo – The amount of reflectivity of an object (4‐5). 

Algorithm – Logical functions (if‐then‐not) to identify features (4‐11). 

Altimeter Setting – A simplified sea‐level pressure in inches that may be “dialed” into an aircraft’s 
altimeter (1‐47). 

Alto – The prefix that identifies most mid‐etage cloud genera (1‐8). 

Altocumulus (AC) – Clouds are composed of super‐cooled water droplets and ice crystals when located 
above the freezing level (1‐19).. 

Altocumulus Castellanus – The tops and edges of the buildup may appear ragged and lack the smoother 
rounded appearance or cauliflower like tops (1‐20). 

Altocumulus Lenticularis Clouds (ACSL) – Clouds that are typically described as lens, almond, or cat‐eye 
shaped, and have a windswept appearance (1‐22). 

Altostratus (AS) – A mid‐etage cloud with features similar to stratus clouds (1‐17). 

Altostratus and nimbostratus – Extensive sheets of stratiform cloudiness found in the mid‐layers that 
are found in the eastern portion of surface cyclones and on the leading edge of frontal system (4‐31). 

xxi 
 

Ambient noise – The part of the background noise created by surface‐ship traffic, wave action, 
precipitation, ice, and certain forms of marine life. (3‐37) 

Antarctic Circumpolar (Sub‐Antarctic) Water – A combination of mixing and vertical circulation in the 
region between the subtropical and Antarctic convergence.  (3‐18) 

Antarctic Intermediate Water – Encircles the Antarctic continent and is the most widespread of all the 
intermediate water masses; forms during winter at the convergence formed by the Oyashio current and 
the Kuroshio Extension. (3‐17) 

Anvil Cirrus – A cloud formation that is exhausted from the top of a thunderstorm that forms a sharp 
upwind edge with a fuzzy, diffuse downstream edge (4‐36). 

Arc Clouds – A curved line of cumulus clouds formed due to a thunderstorm downdraft of cold air (4‐
31). 

Arctic Intermediate Water – Similar to sub‐Arctic water but forms only in small quantities and in 
relatively small area east of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. (3‐18) 

Ash – Heavier volcanic ash particles or solid particles precipitating and falling from  industrial smoke 
plume, forest fire, or debris from nuclear mushroom cloud (1‐32). 

Atmospheric Pressure – The pressure exerted by the column of air on any point of the earth’s surface 
(1‐45). 

Atmospheric windows – The areas on the electromagnetic spectrum where the atmosphere is 
transparent to specific wavelengths (4‐3). 

Atolls – Are seamounts or guyots that have broken the surface, and coral deposits have up built up 
around the rim.  The coral forms a reef around a shallow body of water.  (3‐3) 

Attenuation – The energy loss that occurs in propagated sound waves due to scattering and absorption.  
(3‐30) 

Attenuation – The loss of energy due to absorption and scattering of terrestrial radiation by 
atmospheric elements (4‐12). 

Auroras – Luminous phenomena that appear in the high atmosphere in the form of arcs, bands, 
draperies, or curtains (1‐44). 

xxii 
 

Azimuth Bearing – Wind direction is always reported using a 360° azimuth circle with 000°/360° 
representing True North (1‐54). 

Baroclinic leaf – A mid‐ and upper‐level cloud pattern associated with a system that is just beginning to 
develop (4‐41). 

Baroclinic zone cloud system – A large, extensive area of multilayered clouds which are associated with 
a baroclinic zone (frontal zone).(4‐41). 

Barometric Pressure – The pressure read directly from a precision aneroid barometer or a tactical 
aneroid barometer (1‐46). 

Bathythermograph Temperature – Method for recording temperature of sea surface (1‐51). 

Billow Clouds – Are regularly spaced clouds that advect with the wind and usually only last for a few 
minutes at a time (4‐36). 

Bottom Bounce – A type of deep‐water transmission that uses angled ray paths to overcome velocity 
gradient changes from the downward directed sound energy.  (3‐34) 

Bottom Topography – Consists of five major bottom provinces: continental shelf, continental slope and 
rise, ocean basin, and mid‐ocean ridges.  (3‐1) 

Breaker Angle – The angle the breaker makes with the beach and is a critical factor in the creation of a 
littoral current.  (3‐86) 

Brightness temperature – Energy output when referring to meteorology (4‐8). 

Bucket Temperature – The temperature recorded by using the bucket drop method (1‐51). 

Central Water – Normally found in relatively low latitudes although its source region is in the region of 
the subtropical convergence.  (3‐16) 

Channels – Instruments that measure radiation in specific, narrow wavelength bands (4‐3). 

Cirriform – Clouds that are thin, wispy and hair‐like (1‐9). 

Cirro – The prefix that identifies high‐etage cloud genera (1‐8). 

Cirrocumulus (CC) – Clouds that are very similar in appearance to the high AC clouds and cover less that 
1% of the sky (1‐21). 

Cirrostratus (CS) – Clouds that usually appear as a thin white veil over the sky (1‐21). 

xxiii 
 

Cirrus (CI) – High‐etage cloud type that are composed of ice crystals (1‐20). 

Cirrus Streaks – A cloud formation that consists of small isolated patches of cirrus generally occurring 
away from other clouds (4‐34). 

Cloud Ceiling – The height‐above‐ground level of the lowest broken or overcast layer (1‐26). 

Cloud Element – Is the smallest cloud that can be seen by a satellite image (determined by the 
resolution of the satellite sensor (4‐22). 

Cloud Etage – The three layers of the atmosphere in reference to clouds: Low, Mid, High (1‐8). 

Cloud Fingers – Narrow cloud bands, less than one degree latitude in width, which develop as a result of 
low‐level convergence (4‐22). 

Cloud Genera – Another way to refer to cloud type (1‐8). 

Cloud Layer – Clouds and/or obscuring phenomena aloft, either continuous or composed of detached 
elements, with bases at approximately the same level (1‐24). 

Cloud Lines – Cloud formation that primarily develops off the east coasts of continents where a 
continental polar air mass moves over warmer waters during the wintertime (4‐22). 

Cloud Shield – Large extensive areas of clouds most commonly associated with large‐scale synoptic 
comma cloud systems (4‐23). 

Cloud Streets – Random cumuliform cloud formations where the cloud development is less than one 
degree of latitude in width (4‐22). 

Cloud Type – A form of cloud seen in the sky (4‐21). 

Clouds – The visible form of water vapor, and consist of minute suspended droplets of liquid, water, or 
ice particles (1‐33). 

Coastal System – A relatively uniform drift that flows roughly parallel to shore that is composed of tidal, 
wind‐driven, or local density‐driven currents. 

Cold Air Funnels – A turbulent action along the cold air outflow boundary that may produce small‐scale 
vortices on the ragged base of the roll cloud (1‐13). 

Combined Waves – The combination of wind waves are super‐imposed on swell waves; this interaction 
produces larger waves.  (3‐59) 

xxiv 
 

Comma head – The northwest portion of the cloud system (4‐40). 

Comma tail– The long and relatively narrow band of clouds that extends southward from the main 
comma (4‐40). 

Conditionally Unstable – The condition that exists when the temperature of the air above a level lies 
between the saturation and dry adiabatic lapse rate. (2‐98) 

Conduction – The transfer of heat energy through contact (1‐7). 

Contamination – An occurrence in satellite imagery when energy reaches the satellite sensor from two 
or more sources (4‐13). 

Continental Rise – Is found seaward of the continental slope in approximately 500 fathoms of water.  (3‐
2) 

Continental Shelf – The first province offshore with an average width of 40 miles.  (3‐1) 

Continental Slope – Resembles a steep cliff that has been eroded by heavy rains and is roughly 20 times 
greater than that of the continental shelf. (3‐2)  

Continuous Precipitation – Precipitation that falls for a long period of time over a specific area (1‐40). 

Convection Condensation Level (Heated Method) (CCLp) – The height to which a parcel of air, heated 
from below, will rise adiabatically until saturation occurs. (2‐94) 

Convection Condensation Level (Moist Layer Method) (CCLml) – The height used when there is highly 
variable moisture content in the lower layers of the troposphere. (2‐94) 

Convective Lift – A process that occurs when cool air is heated at the surface and rises (1‐6). 

Convective Mixing – This process is slower than mechanical mixing and occurs as a result of changes in 
water stability.  (3‐13) 

Convective Temperature (Heated Method) (Tcp) – The temperature the surface must reach for 
convection to begin. (2‐93) 

Convective Temperature (Moist Layer Method) (Tcml) – The temperature at which convection would 
begin when using the moist layer method. (2‐93) 

Convergence – An occurrence when wind flow at a particular level forces air to “pile up” in a general 
area, which creates a lifting action (1‐7). 

xxv 
 

Convergence Zone – The zone that receives the refracted rays of sound about 30 miles from the sound 
source.  (3‐33) 

Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) ‐ A use of time to prevent confusion between the different zones and 
types of time (1‐4). 

Corona – A bright ring of light that may appear to rest on the moon if seen through a veil of clouds 
composed of spherical water droplets (1‐18). 

Cumuliform – Puffy clouds that have distinct elements or cells (1‐9). 

Cumulonimbus (CB) – Generated by large cumulus congestus clouds and have massive appearances and 
extensive vertical development (1‐10). 

Cumulus (CU) – Translated from Latin, means “heap”.  Form from convection action and the height of 
the base is directly related to the amount of moisture (1‐9). 

Cumulus Fractus –Smaller, ragged or fragmented elements that are frequent under the base of the 
dissipating cumulonimbus (1‐11). 

Cusp – The pointed region on the southern edge of the deformation zone cloud system (4‐40). 

Cut‐off lows – Small, deep pools of cold air located equatorward of the main polar front jet (4‐47). 

Cycle ‐ One complete wavelength.  (3‐23) 

Decibel – Unit used to express relative intensity differences between acoustic sounds.  (3‐23) 

Deep and Bottom Water – Exist in the deep ocean basins below intermediate water and these waters 
form at the surface, sink, and spread out to fill the deep‐ocean basins.  (3‐19) 

Deep Ocean Circulation – Is referred to as a thermohaline circulation because the circulation is 
controlled by differences in temperature and salinity. (3‐19) 

Deep Water Layer – The bottom layer of water, which in the middle latitudes exists below 1,200 meters.  
(3‐23) 

Deformation zone cloud system – An elongated area of multilayered clouds that are being "stretched" 
and "sheared" by an upper‐level deformation zone (4‐42). 

Density Altitude –The altitude at which a given air density is found in the standard atmosphere. (2‐50) 

xxvi 
 

Density of Seawater – Dependent of salinity, temperature, and pressure and is defined as mass per unit 
volume, and is expressed in grams per cubic centimeter. (3‐10) 

Detector – Acts as a receiver of sound and allows us to tell whether the sound has been produced. (3‐
22) 

Dew‐point Temperature – The temperature a parcel of air must be cooled to in order to reach 
saturation (1‐50). 

Dew – Moisture that condenses directly on surfaces (1‐36). 

Dew Point Temperature (Td) – The temperature to which a parcel of air must be cooled at constant 
pressure and moisture content, in order for saturation to occur. (2‐90) 

Differing Level Visibility – Any prevailing visibility observed from an elevation or location other than the 
official observation site (1‐30). 

Direct Path – Direct path sound propagation occurs where there is an approximate straight‐line path 
between the sound source and receiver, with no reflection from any other source and only one change 
of direction due to refraction. (3‐30) 

Directivity Index – A function of the dimensions of sonar’s hydrophone array, the number and spacing 
of the hydrophones, and the frequency of the received acoustic energy. (3‐36) 

Doppler Effect – The apparent change in a sound due to motion . (3‐24) 

Drift – Any movement of ice floes. (3‐65) 

Drizzle – Liquid precipitation that consists of very small and uniformly dispersed droplets of liquid water 
that appear to “float” while following air currents (1‐37). 

Dry‐bulb Temperature – The amount of heat present in the air (1‐49). 

Dry Adiabats – Lines of constant potential temperature that are slightly curved, solid brown lines sloping 
from the lower right to upper left of the chart. (2‐87) 

Dust – Composed of fine solid matter uniformly distributed in the air (1‐31). 

Early Transmission Messages – Brief reports of certain observed upper‐air data, which are sent as soon as 
possible after the radiosonde measures the 500‐hPa level. (2‐80) 

Eddies – Independent circulations or rings of cold or warm water. (3‐54) 

xxvii 
 

Electromagnetic spectrum – A continuum of all the types of electromagnetic radiation (4‐3). 

Energy Loss – Energy is lost as the waves move away from their source and spread out. (3‐23) 

Enhancement curves – This imagery is often color‐enhanced to make subtle differences in gray shades 
more noticeable to the human eye (4‐3). 

Equatorial Water – Is found in the Pacific and in the Indian Ocean and its salinity values are higher than 
those of the water masses found in the North Pacific. (3‐17) 

Equilibrium Level (EL) –The height at which the temperature of a positively buoyant parcel becomes 
equal to that of the environment. (2‐96) 

Equivalent Temperature (TE) – The temperature a parcel of air would have if all its moisture was 
condensed out by the pseudo‐adiabatic process, and then returned dry adiabatically back to the original 
pressure level. (2‐93) 

Error of parallax – When not directly looking down at the top of an object, the reading or position of the 
object will be off from its actual reading or position (4‐14). 

Foehn‐wall (cap cloud) – Formed on the top of mountain ranges, resembling a “cap” on the mountain 
(1‐22). 

Fog – A suspension of small visible water droplets (or ice crystals) in the air that reduces horizontal 
and/or vertical visibility at the earth’s surface (1‐34). 

Foreshortening – The loss of resolution caused by an oblique viewing angle (4‐13). 

Fracture – Any break or crack through the ice sheet. (3‐64) 

Freezing Precipitation – Any precipitation that falls as a liquid and freezes upon contact with an object 
(1‐37). 

Frequency – The number of cycles per second; the higher the frequency, the shorter the wavelengths, 
and vice versa. (3‐23) 

Frequency – The number of waves passing a given point per unit of time, expressed in cycles per second, 
or Hertz (Hz).(4‐2). 

 Frontal Inversion – The transition zone between a cold air mass and the warmer air mass above it. (2‐
102) 

Frontal Lift – A type of mechanical lift that is caused by frontal barriers (1‐6). 

xxviii 
 

Frost‐point Temperature – The temperature, below freezing, that a parcel of air must be cooled to in 
order to reach saturation (1‐50). 

Frost – A layer of milky white ice crystals that sublime directly on the ground or on other surfaces (1‐36). 

Frostbite – The freezing of the skin, which damages the skin and underlying flesh (1‐61). 

Funnel clouds (tuba) – Clouds that usually form on the edge of the wall cloud or near the wall cloud at 
the rear of the storm (1‐14). 

General Heat Stress Index (GHSI) – a measure of how hot the air feels based on temperature and 
humidity (1‐60). 

Geosynchronous orbit – Satellite that orbits directly over the equator (4‐15). 

GFMPL – (Geophysics Fleet Mission Program Library)  A software library established by Commander, 
Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command that provides environmental, meteorological, 
electromagnetic, oceanographic, hazard avoidance, acoustic and weapon system support software for 
fleet, air, surface, amphibious and antisubmarine warfare operations, and planning purposes. (3‐43) 

Glacial Marine Sediments –Sediments that were once deposited when the glaciers of the ice age 
melted. (3‐5) 

Ground Fog –Fog that has little vertical extent: 6‐20 feet (1‐35). 

Growler – A small fragment of ice about the size of a trunk that is usually of glacial origin and greenish 
color (3‐61). 

Guyots– Are submerged, isolated, flat‐topped mountains that rise 3,000 feet or more above the sea 
floor. (3‐3) 

Hail – A clear to opaque ball of hard ice, ranging in diameter from 1/8 inch or so to 5 inches (1‐39). 

Halo – A ring light encircling and extending outward from the sun and moon (1‐18). 

Hazardous Phenomena – Defined as reported tornadoes, funnel clouds, waterspouts, hail, severe icing, 
severe or extreme turbulence (including CAT), low‐level wind shear, volcanic eruptions or any condition 
that in the judgment of the person entering the PIREPS would present a hazard to flight. 

Haze – Composed of suspended dust, plant pollen, or salt particles that are so small they cannot be seen 
by the unaided eye (1‐31). 

xxix 
 

Heat Stress – The effect of excessive heat on the body, and the inability of the body to get rid of excess 
heat fast enough to maintain an internal temperature balance (1‐58). 

Hydroacousitcs – The study of sound in water or the study of sound energy in seawater (3‐21). 

Hydrometers – Liquid or solid water particles falling through, suspended in, or condensing/subliming 
from the atmosphere, as well as solid or liquid water blown from the surface by wind (1‐33). 

Hypothermia – The lowering of internal body temperature due to prolonged exposure to cold air or 
immersion in cold water (1‐61). 

Ice Crystals – Tiny un‐branched crystals of ice in the form of needles, hexagonal columns, or plates (1‐
39). 

Ice Pellets – Transparent or translucent particles of ice that are either round or irregular and have a 
diameter of .2 inch or less (1‐38). 

Instrument Correction – Determined by the barometer calibration facility during the required 
semiannual calibration (1‐46). 

Intensity‐ is a measure of a sound’s energy (3‐23). 

Intermediate Water – Found below central water in all oceans (3‐17). 

Intermittent Precipitation – Precipitation that occurs for brief periods of time lasting less than one hour 
(1‐40). 

Inversions– A layer in the atmosphere where the temperature is either isothermal or increases with an 
increase in height (altitude). (2‐101) 

Isobars – Lines of constant pressure and are represented by horizontal, solid brown lines logarithmically 
spaced in 10mb intervals. (2‐86) 

Isothermal Gradient – No change in water temperature with depth (3‐65). 

Isotherms – Lines of equal temperature are represented by straight, solid brown lines sloping from the 
lower left to upper right of the chart. (2‐86) 

Lead – A long, narrow break or passage through the sea ice sheet or between floes; a navigable fracture 
(3‐58). 

Lee‐of‐the‐Mountain Cirrus – A cloud formation that is a multi‐layered cirrus cloud shield that occurs on 
the leeside of a mountain range (4‐35‐). 

xxx 
 

Level of Free Convection (Heated Method) (LFCheated) – The height at which a lifted parcel of air first 
becomes warmer, or less dense, than the environment but the surface heating provides the needed lift. 
(2‐95) 

Level of Free Convection (Lifted Method) (LFClifted) – The height at which a lifted parcel of air first 
becomes warmer, or less dense, than the environment. (2‐95) 

Lifting Condensation Level (LCL) – The height at which a parcel of air would become saturated if lifted 
dry adiabatically. (2‐94) 

Liquid Precipitation – Any precipitation that falls as a liquid and remains liquid after striking an object 
(1‐37). 

Lithometeor – Any dry particle suspended in, or falling from, the atmosphere (1‐31). 

Lithometeors – Also referred to as sand and dust and are suspended surface particles carried aloft by 
strong synoptic‐scale surface winds, often for long distances (4‐38). 

Longshore Currents – Also known as littoral currents; Currents that occur in the surf zone and are 
caused by waves approaching the beach at an angle (3‐40). 

Loudness – The effect that sound has on the detector (3‐23). 

Magnetic Wind Direction – a direction based on the 360° azimuth circle with the 0/360° azimuth radial 
aligned with magnetic north (1‐55). 

Main Thermocline – The central layer of the ocean that is found at the base of the mixed layer and is 
marked by a rapid decrease of water temperature with depth (3‐15). 

Mechanical Lift – A process by which a physical barrier forces air aloft (1‐6). 

Mechanical Mixing – Caused by wave action, surface storms stirring up the water (3‐13). 

Mediterranean Water – Formed by the interaction of dense Mediterranean Sea water with waters of 
the adjacent North Atlantic Ocean (3‐18). 

Medium – The element that carries the sound (3‐21). 

Microns – Millionths of a meter (4‐3). 

Mist – A fog condition that reduces prevailing visibility to between 5/8 mile and 6 miles (1‐35). 

xxxi 
 

Mixed Layer – Is the upper level of the three‐layered ocean model; gets the name from the mixing 
processes that bring about its constant warm temperatures; has two mixing processes: Mechanical and 
Convective (3‐13). 

Mixing Condensation Level (MCL) – The lowest height in a layer, mixed by turbulence, at which 
saturation occurs after complete mixing of the layer. (2‐94) 

Mixing Ratio (w) – The ratio of the mass of water vapor (in grams) to the mass of dry air (in kilograms). 
(2‐91) 

Nearshore System – A complex circulation that is composed of shoreward moving water in the form of 
waves at the surface, a return flow along the bottom in the surf zone, nearshore currents that parallel 
the beach, and rip currents (3‐40). 

Negative Energy Area – The area of the SKEW‐T proportional to the amount of kinetic energy needed to 
move a parcel vertically. (2‐97) 

Negative Temperature Gradient – The opposite of positive gradient, a decrease in water temperature 
with depth (3‐65). 

Net Change – Determined by taking the difference in the station pressure between the current 
observation and the station pressure 3, 12, 24 hours ago (1‐48). 

Nimbostratus (NS) – Commonly called the “rain cloud” and usually forms from the thickening of AS 
clouds and ranges in color from medium to very dark gray (1‐18).. 

Noise Level – Ambient noise and self‐made noise at the location of the sonar (3‐33). 

Ocean Basin – Accounts for 76 percent of the ocean floor (3‐4). 

OPARS – A preflight planning aid that integrates forecast atmospheric conditions with the pilot’s 
proposed flight profile to provide an optimized flight plan that minimizes fuel consumption. (2‐60) 

Orographic Clouds – Several species of low‐, mid‐, and high‐etage clouds are associated only with moist 
airflow over mountainous areas (1‐21). 

Orographic Lift – A type of mechanical lift that is caused by land barriers (1‐6). 

Pannus – The layer of the fragmented elements of the cumulus fractus (1‐11). 

Partial Ground Fog – Fog that covers a substantial part of the station and visibility in the fog that is less 
that 5/8 mile (1‐36). 

xxxii 
 

Partial Obscuration – A phenomenon that allows the sun, clouds, the moon, or the stars to be seen 
overhead but not seen near the horizon (1‐24). 

Passive Sonar – A type of sonar that listens for sounds generated by other ships and submarines (3‐28). 

Patchy Ground Fog – Fog that covers portions of the station: 6‐20 feet (1‐36). 

PC‐IMAT – (Personal Computer‐Based Interactive Multisensor Analysis Training System) The premier 
ocean acoustic analysis and planning tool available on all ASW platforms, including surface ships, 
aircraft, and submarines (3‐39). 

Pelagic Sediments – Sediments that are formed in deep water and are most commonly composed of 
shells and skeletal remains of marine plants and animals (3‐7). 

Photometeors – Consist of a number of atmospheric phenomena attributed to the reflection or 
refraction of visible light in the sky by liquid water droplets, ice crystals, the air, or solid particles in the 
air (1‐44). 

Photons – A beam of electromagnetic radiation resembles a stream of particles (4‐8). 

Pileus – A cap shaped feature that occasionally occurs above the cauliflower of the CU or CB cell until 
the CU cell makes contact with the bulging cloud layer (1‐15). 

PILOT Code –A code that is primarily used throughout the world to report PIBAL‐observed wind 
directions and speeds. (2‐81) 

Pitch – Is a subjective sound quality dependent on the receiver and depends on the frequency of the 
sound (3‐23). 

Plunging Breakers – A breaker type that occurs with a moderate to steep breach slope (3‐79). 

Points of the Compass – Express wind directions in general weather forecasts (1‐53). 

Polynya – Any sizable area of seawater enclosed by sea ice (3‐58). 

Positive Energy Area – The area on a SKEW‐T proportional to the amount of kinetic energy a parcel 
gains as it rises freely in the atmosphere. (2‐96) 

Positive Temperature Gradient – An increase in water temperature with depth (3‐65). 

Potential Temperature () – The temperature that a sample of air would have if it were brought dry 
adiabatically to 1000mb. (2‐92) 

xxxiii 
 

Precipitation – All forms of moisture that fall to the earth’s surfaces, such as rain, drizzle, snow, and hail 
(1‐36). 

Precipitation Character – A term to describe how precipitation falls: continuous, intermittent, and 
showery (1‐40). 

Precipitation Intensity – An approximation of the rate of fall or the rate of accumulation of precipitation 
(1‐39). 

Precipitation Type – The term used to identify various precipitations (1‐37). 

Pressure – important weather analysis and forecasting item used to analyze isobar patterns, or lines of 
equal pressure (1‐45). 

Pressure Altitude – The altitude of a given atmospheric pressure in the standard atmosphere. (2‐46) 

Pressure Tendency – The net change in the barometric pressure during a period of time and the trend or 
characteristic of the change (1‐48). 

Prevailing Visibility – The greatest distance that a known object can be seen and identified throughout 
half of more of the horizon circle (1‐28). 

Propagation Loss – The loss of signal strength between the sonar and the target (3‐33). 

Properties of Seawater – Temperature, pressure, and salinity are the three most important properties 
of seawater, and they determine the other physical properties associated with seawater (3‐7). 

Puddle – A depression in sea ice usually filled with melted water caused by warm water (3‐58). 

Radiation Inversion – A surface‐based inversion formed by rapid cooling of air in contact with the 
surface of the earth. (2‐102) 

Radiometers – Satellite sensors designed to produce images of Earth, its oceans, and its atmosphere   
(4‐10). 

Radiometric resolution – Sensitivity of the radiometer to small differences in the radiation of an 
observed object (4‐12). 

Radiosonde – a balloon‐borne instrument used to simultaneously measure and transmit meteorological 
data while ascending through the atmosphere.  (2‐61) 

Rain – Liquid precipitation that has a water droplet diameter of .02 in or larger (1‐37). 

xxxiv 
 

Recognition Differential – Pertains to the ability to differentiate target noise from background noise (3‐
32). 

Red Sea Water – Large quantities of warm, saline water from the Red Sea flow into the Indian Ocean, 
where it mixes with Antarctic intermediate water to form Red Sea Water mass (3‐18). 

Reflection – Sound waves that strike solid surfaces have all or a portion of their energy redirected or 
absorbed (3‐27). 

Refraction – As waves move through the sea, they bend in the direction of the slower sound speeds (3‐
25). 

Relative Humidity – A reading that Indicates how close air is to saturation and how dependent it is upon 
both temperature and water vapor content. (2‐91) 

Relative Humidity – The ratio of how much vapor is in the air, compared to the amount of water vapor, 
at the current temperature and pressure that air can possibly hold (1‐59). 

Relative Humidity (RH %) – The ratio (in %) of the amount of water vapor in a given parcel, to the 
amount of water vapor that parcel would hold if it were saturated. (2‐91) 

Relative Wind Direction – Wind direction aboard ship is observed by relative bearing (1‐54). 

Remote sensing – Used to describe the study of something without making actual contact with it (4‐2). 

Removal Correction – The pressure correction based on the difference in height of the barometer and 
the runway or station elevation (1‐46). 

Resolution – Spatial resolution, the size of the footprints, or pixels, that form an image (4‐10). 

Reverberation – A function of source level, range, and surface, volume and bottom reverberation (3‐32). 

Reverberation – A noise or interference at a sonar receiver that is caused by scattered sound energy 
being reflected back to the sonar receiver (3‐27). 

Ridges – The last of the ocean province (3‐6). 

Rip Currents – Currents cause by return flow of water from the beach; resembles a small jet in the 
breaker zone (3‐41). 

Rogue or Freak Waves – Are waves that are abnormally high when compared to the sea heights 
observed prior to the occurrence of this type of wave (3‐54). 

xxxv 
 

Roll Cloud (arcus) – May form along the leading edge of the CB cloud base during a down rush (1‐12). 

Rope Clouds – A could formation that is composed of cumulus or towering cumulus which are organized 
into a line, mostly over water (4‐31). 

Rotor Cloud – Formed downwind from the mountain range by strong winds moving across the 
mountains set up a wavelike action downstream from the mountain (1‐22). 

Salinity – The amount of salt in the water (3‐9). 

Sand – Particles that can be picked up from dry surfaces by the wind and carried to moderated heights 
(1‐32). 

Sand Whirls (Dust Devils) – Rotating columns of dust or sand‐laden air, caused by solar radiation (1‐32). 

Saturation Adiabats – Lines that represent the rate of change in the temperature of a parcel of 
saturated air, rising or sinking, they appear as slightly curved, solid green lines sloping from the lower 
right to upper left side of the chart. (2‐87) 

Saturation Mixing Ratio – Lines that represent the ratio of grams of water vapor per kilogram of dry air 
(parts of water vapor/1000 parts of dry air), they are slightly curved, dashed green lines sloping from the 
lower left to the upper right. (2‐87) 

Saturation Mixing Ratio (ws) – The mixing ratio a parcel would have if it were saturated. (2‐91) 

Sea‐level Pressure – A theoretical pressure at the station if the station were actually at sea level (1‐47). 

Sea Surface Temperature – The temperature that reflects the upper few inches of the sea surface (1‐
51). 

Sea Waves – Waves generated by the wind in the local area (3‐52). 

Seamounts – Are submerged, isolated, pinnacled mountains rising 3,000 feet or more above the sea 
floor (3‐5). 

Seawater Immersion Survivability – The temperature and size of waves considered with of ones 
swimming ability, physical condition, and clothing to determine length of survivability (1‐62). 

Seawater Injection Temperature – The least accurate method of recording sea surface temperature (1‐
52). 

Sector Visibility – The surrounding visibility in each sector and is only reported when it differs from the 
prevailing visibility (1‐30). 

xxxvi 
 

Self‐noise – The part of the total background noise attributable to the sonar equipment, the platform on 
which it is mounted, or the noise caused by the motion of the platform (3‐35). 

Shadow Zone – The zone that is beyond the range of the downward bending sound rays and sound 
intensity is negligible (3‐26). 

Shallow Ground Fog – Fog that covers the station and visibility at eye level (1‐35). 

Showery Precipitation – Precipitation that falls from cumuliform clouds and covers a relatively small 
area (1‐40). 

Signal Excess – The amount of sound energy received from a target over and above the amount 
required to detect it (3‐32). 

Sills – Elevated parts of the ocean floor that partially separate ocean basins (3‐6). 

Sky condition – All clouds parameters estimated or measured by assistant forecasters (1‐5). 

Smoke – Composed of fine ash particles and other by‐products of combustion (1‐31). 

Snow – Precipitation that consists of white or translucent ice crystals (1‐38). 

Snow Grains – Very small, white opaque grains of ice similar in crystal structure to snow (1‐39). 

Snow Pellets/Small Hail – White, opaque, round kernels of snow (1‐38). 

Sonic Layer Depth – The depth of maximum sound speed (3‐24). 

Sound Channel – An effect when a negative velocity gradient overlies an isovelocity or positive velocity 
gradient (3‐26). 

Sound Path – As sound energy leaves a sound source, it travels in waves and it is refracted, reflected, 
and scattered (3‐25). 

Sound Production – The three basic elements that must be present for sound production are sound 
source, medium, and a detector (3‐21). 

Sound Propagation – The influences that the sea has on sound as it moves through the medium, which 
in this case would be water (3‐23). 

Sound Speed – Is a function of water temperature, pressure, and salinity and has the primary function 
of the direction or path that sound energy takes as it moves through the water (3‐24). 

Sound Velocity – The account of the speed and direction of sound rays (3‐12). 

xxxvii 
 

Sound Velocity Profile – A graphic representation of speed versus depth (3‐24). 

Sound Waves – Vibrations within a medium that are caused by the wave form of sound (3‐22). 

Source – Any object that vibrates or disturbs the medium around it and the sound source is the initial 
requirement in the production of sound (3‐21). 

Source Level – The intensity of the radiated sound in decibels, relative to a referenced intensity (3‐31). 

Spatial resolution – The ability of a sensor to detect and distinguish small objects and fine detail (4‐10). 

Specific Heat – The number of calories needed to raise the temperature of 1 gram of seawater (3‐11). 

Specific Humidity – The mass of water vapor present in a unit of air.(2‐52)  

Spectral resolution – The number of bands in the electromagnetic spectrum in which the instrument 
can take measurements (4‐11). 

Speed of Sound – The measurement of sound in the air at 0° C is 331.5m/sec (3‐22). 

Spilling Breakers – A breaker type that occurs with gentle and flat beach slopes (3‐78). 

Spilt‐beam Pattern – A pattern that occurs when the temperature gradient in the near surface layer is 
isothermal, and negative below (3‐25). 

Spreading Loss – A type of energy loss due to the moving away from a source, it spreads out (3‐23). 

Squall – A sudden large increase in wind speed that lasts several minutes and then suddenly subsides (1‐
57). 

Stable Air – Air tends to remain at the same level in the atmosphere (1‐7). 

Standard Atmosphere –Lines used to compare the actual atmospheric conditions to standard 
atmosphere and the lapse rate is shown by a heavy brown line in the center of the chart starting at 
1013mb and 15° C. (2‐88) 

Standard Heights – The heights of pressure surfaces in the standard atmosphere are indicated by a 
vertical scale along the right side of the chart. (2‐89) 

State‐of‐the‐sky – A specific term that equates to one of the 27 internationally recognized sky states (1‐
5). 

Station Elevation – The height of the highest point of the runway above mean sea level (1‐46). 

xxxviii 
 

Station Pressure – The pressure value read on the barometer corrected for the difference between the 
height of the barometer and the station elevation (1‐46). 

Straight Rays – Sound rays travel in straight lines only where the speed is constant; no change in velocity 
with depth (3‐25). 

Stratiform – Clouds that develop in the uniform layers and present a smoother appearance (1‐9). 

Stratocumulus (SC) – A type of clouds that appear to be a combination of the smooth, even, stratiform 
cloud, and the puffy cells of cumuliform clouds (1‐15). 

 Stratus (ST) – Clouds that have a smooth, uniform appearance which often appears fuzzy or indistinct 
(1‐16). 

Stratus Fractus – Clouds that are generally indicators of bad weather and usually found below layers of 
NS clouds (1‐17). 

Sub Arctic Water – Similar to sub‐Antarctic water but are different in land and sea distribution (3‐19)..  

Subpoint – The closest point on the Earth’s surface directly under the satellite sensor (4‐10). 

Subsidence Inversion – A mechanically produced inversion formed by adiabatic warming of sinking 
air.(2‐102) 

Sun glint – Caused by the reflection of the sun's rays directly off a water surface into the satellite sensor    
(4‐14). 

Supplementary Cloud Features – Virga, tuba (funnel clouds, tornadoes, waterspouts), incus (anvil tops), 
arcus (roll clouds), wall clouds, mamma (formerly called mammatus), pannus, velum, and pileus are all 
supplementary features (1‐9). 

Surface Duct – Simply a near‐surface layer that traps sound energy (3‐29). 

Surface Layer – Layer with water depths of 100 to 200 meters that is separated from deeper water by a 
transitional layer (3‐16). 

Surface Reverberation – A reverberation that is a product of surface wave action (3‐27). 

Surge region – Where dry, subsiding airflows into the comma cloud (4‐40). 

Surging Breakers – A breaker type that is normally seen only with steep beach slope (3‐79). 

Swell Waves – Seas that have moved out and away from the area in which they were formed (3‐53). 

xxxix 
 

Target Strength – The amount by which the apparent intensity of sound scattered by the objects 
exceeds the intensity of the incident sound (3‐33). 

Temperature – The amount of sensible heat in a substance or as the measurement of molecular motion 
in a substance (1‐49). 

Temporal resolution – The frequency with which a satellite can revisit an area of interest and acquire a 
new image (4‐12). 

Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF) – The governing instruction for all U.S. Navy and Marine Corps 
weather activities that provides information about the expected weather conditions that will occur at 
your airfield or station control. (2‐1) 

Terminator – The actual dividing line between day and night on the Earth (4‐14). 

Terrigenous Sediments – are land derived silts and clays that are carried to sea by rivers (3‐7). 

Text Element Indicators (TEIs) – Slashes that are followed by a two‐letter abbreviation and are used 
in the code to indicate which element is being reported. (2‐24) 

Thaw Hole – A hole in the ice that is caused by the melting associated with warm weather (3‐58). 

Thickness –The distance between two pressure levels and is a function of temperature and moisture 
content. (2‐93) 

Three‐Layered Ocean – A method of visualizing the sea divided into layers: the mixed layer, main 
thermocline, and the deep‐water layer (3‐13). 

Total Obscuration – A phenomenon that is dense enough to hide even the portion of the sky directly 
overhead (1‐24). 

Transmissivity – The ability of the atmosphere to allow radiation to pass through (4‐3). 

Transverse Bands – A cloud formation that consists of irregularly spaced, parallel bands of thin cirrus 
filaments and strands oriented perpendicular to the wind flow (4‐35). 

Trenches – Long, narrow, and relatively steep‐sided depressions that comprise the deepest portions of 
the oceans (3‐6). 

Tropical cyclones – Storms that originate in tropical latitudes; they include tropical waves, tropical 
disturbances, tropical depressions, tropical storms, hurricanes, typhoons, and cyclones (4‐57). 

xl 
 

Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) – A joint mission between NASA and the National Space 
Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan (4‐20). 

True Wind Direction – A wind measured with respect to True North (1‐54). 

Turbulent Lift ‐ Mechanical lift caused by friction between the earth's surface and the air moving above 
it or between adjacent layers within the atmosphere in which wind speed (1‐6). 

Unstable Air – Air rises on its own (1‐7). 

Uprush Zone – The area on the beach where the waves cause the water to temporarily rush up on the 
sand, and then recede on the wave backwash to expose the sand (3‐77). 

Variable Winds – Winds that fluctuate by 60° or more (1‐57). 

Velum – Layers of altocumulus or altostratus clouds that are often seen developing from the mid‐
portion of the CB column (1‐15). 

Virga – Showers that come from CU clouds that evaporate before they reach the ground (1‐11). 

Virtual Temperature (Tv) – The temperature at which a parcel of dry air (RH = 0%) would have the same 
density as a parcel of moist air at a given pressure. (2‐93)  

Viscosity – Resistance to flow; liquids expand and contract when temperature changes take place (3‐12). 

Volcanic Islands – Islands that can form individually or in groups.  Approximately 10,000 volcanoes 
across the ocean floor (3‐6). 

Volcanic Sediments – Primarily pumice and ash deposits from volcanic eruptions (3‐7). 

Volume Reverberation – A reverberation that is caused by scatters or reflectors in the water such as 
fish, marine organism, suspended solids, and bubbles (3‐27). 

Vorticity comma cloud system – Composed of an area of low or middle‐level convective clouds 
organized into a comma shape (4‐42). 

Wall cloud – A sometimes hollow, generally circular patch of cloud with a ragged bottom edge that may 
lower from the base of a CB (1‐13). 

Water Mass – Takes into account a range of temperatures and salinities for giving a reading (3‐16). 

xli 
 

Water Type – Has a single value of salinity and a single value of temperature associated with it (3‐16). 

Wave Direction – The direction from where the wave approaches (3‐51). 

Wave Height – The vertical distance from the crest of a wave to the trough of the wave; usually 
measured in feet (3‐50). 

Wave Length – The horizontal distance from one wave crest to the next wave crest, or the distance from 
one wave trough to the next wave trough (3‐51). 

Wave Period – The time, usually measured in seconds, that it takes for a complete wave cycle to pass a 
given fixed point (3‐51). 

Wavelength – The distance measured in the direction of propagation between two identical points on 
adjacent waves having the same phase (4‐2). 

Wet‐bulb Temperature – The lowest temperature an object may be cooled to by the process of 
evaporation (1‐49). 

Wet‐bulb Globe Temperature – A heat stress indicator that considers the effects of temperature, 
humidity, and radiant energy (1‐61). 

Wet Bulb Potential Temperature (w) – The wet bulb temperature a parcel would have if brought 
saturation‐adiabatically down to 1000mb. (2‐92) 

Wet Bulb Temperature (Tw) – The lowest temperature to which a parcel of air can be cooled by 
evaporating water into it at constant pressure. (2‐92) 

Wind Character – A description of how the wind (speed or direction) changes during the specified 
period (1‐56). 

Wind Chill Equivalent Temperature – The temperature required under no‐wind conditions that will 
equal the cooling effect of the air and the wind on an average sized, nude person in the shade (1‐62). 

Wind Direction – The average direction from which the wind is blowing during a specified period (1‐53). 

Wind Direction Conventions – Are expressed in azimuth bearings or by the 8‐point or 16‐point compass 
(1‐53). 

Wind Gust – A rapid fluctuation in wind speed with a variation between peaks and lulls of 10 knots or 
more (1‐56). 

xlii 
 

Wind Shift – Any change in wind direction by 45° or more during a 15‐ minute time period (1‐57). 

Wind Speed – The average rate of air motion or the distance air moves in a specified unit of time (1‐55). 

xliii