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NexSys Workstation

Users Guide - 2.0

TEC DOC # LIT-TD-2038 04/2001

Table of Contents

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 1.3

Electronic Systems USA, a wholly owned subsidiary of Johnson Controls, Inc., reserves the right to update
specifications when appropriate. Information contained in this document is based on specifications believed to
be correct at the time of publication.

Echelon , Coactive, Windows NT, and General Electric are registered trademarks and service marks of
companies other than Electronic Systems USA. FSC, CPL and NexSys are trademarks of Electronic
Systems USA.

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

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All Rights Reserved

Copyright 1999 Electronic Systems USA, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Rev 1.3

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Chapter One - Computer Basics

SWO-5

Overview ..................................................................................................................... SWO-6


The Computer .................................................................................................. SWO-6
Keyboard ............................................................................................... SWO-6
Mouse .................................................................................................... SWO-6
Basic Mouse Actions .............................................................................. SWO-7
Cursor .................................................................................................... SWO-7
Scroll Bars ............................................................................................ SWO-8
Basic Window Concepts ............................................................................................. SWO-8
Opening/Closing a Window .............................................................................. SWO-9
Re-sizing a Window ......................................................................................... SWO-9
Moving a Window ............................................................................................. SWO-9
Maximizing a Window....................................................................................... SWO-9
Restoring a Window ......................................................................................... SWO-9
Minimizing a Window ....................................................................................... SWO-9
Selecting an Open Window .............................................................................. SWO-9
Basic Menu Concepts ............................................................................................... SWO-10
Pull-Down Menus ........................................................................................... SWO-10
Selecting a Pull-Down Menu ............................................................... SWO-10
Exiting a Pull-down Menu ................................................................... SWO-10
Selecting a Pull-Down Menu (with the Cursor (Arrow) Keys) ............... SWO-11
Selecting a Pull-Down Menu (with the Text keys) ................................ SWO-11
Canceling a Menu Selection (with the Text keys) ................................. SWO-11
Pop-Up (Shortcut) Menus ............................................................................... SWO-11
Selecting Pop-up Menus (with text keys) ............................................. SWO-11
Dialog Boxes .................................................................................................. SWO-12
Keyboard Shortcuts for Dialog boxes .................................................. SWO-12
Mouse Operation in Dialog Boxes ....................................................... SWO-13
Getting Help Inside a Dialog Box ......................................................... SWO-13
Windows NT Overview .............................................................................................. SWO-14
Desktop .......................................................................................................... SWO-14
Windows NT Help ................................................................................ SWO-15
My Computer ....................................................................................... SWO-15
Network Neighborhood ........................................................................ SWO-15
Recycle Bin ......................................................................................... SWO-16
Shortcut Menus .................................................................................... SWO-16
Create a Folder .................................................................................... SWO-16
Delete a Folder .................................................................................... SWO-16
Move an Object .................................................................................... SWO-16
Copy an Object .................................................................................... SWO-16
Rename an Object ............................................................................... SWO-16
Task Bar .......................................................................................................... SWO-16
Start Menu ...................................................................................................... SWO-17
Windows NT Explorer ............................................................................................... SWO-17
Copyright 1999 Electronic Systems USA, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Find an Object ................................................................................................ SWO-17


Printer Setup ........................................................................................ SWO-18
MS DOS Window ........................................................................................... SWO-18
Shutting Down the System ............................................................................. SWO-19
Emergency Shut Down ........................................................................ SWO-19

Chapter Two - NWS Software Architecture

SWO-21

NexSys Software Architecture ................................................................................... SWO-22


NexSys Workstation (NWS).........................................................................................
SWO-23
LNServer ........................................................................................................ SWO-23
LNS ................................................................................................................ SWO-23
OPC LonWorks Server ................................................................................... SWO-23
M-Series Workstation ..................................................................................... SWO-23

Software Overview Index

SWO-25

Software Installation and Startup (ISU)


Chapter One - NexSys Software Installation

ISU-31

Four Types Of PC Configurations ................................................................................ ISU-32


Installation Checklist .............................................................................. ISU-33
Before You Begin Installing: ........................................................................................ ISU-34
Installing A Network Adapter Or MS Loopback Adapter .................................... ISU-34
Installing Network Protocols ............................................................................. ISU-36
Installing NexSys For The First time ............................................................................ ISU-38
Configuring LNServer ....................................................................................... ISU-39
Opening The LNServer Configuration Wizard ....................................... ISU-39
Configuring LNServer For A Local Location ........................................... ISU-40
Configuring LNServer For A Remote Location ....................................... ISU-43
Installing Remote Access Services (RAS) ................................................................... ISU-46
Setting RAS Server To Automatic Start ............................................................. ISU-50
Creating A User With RAS Login Privileges ..................................................... ISU-51
Setting Up A Client To Access The Server ........................................................ ISU-53
Setting Up A Modem ......................................................................................... ISU-56
Dialing The Server From A Remote Site ........................................................... ISU-58
Disconnecting A Remote Site From A Server PC.............................................. ISU-59

Chapter Two - Hardware Installation

ISU-63

Introduction .................................................................................................................. ISU-64


Disabling And Removing The Full-Size PCLTA Card ................................................. ISU-65
Installing The Hardware Drivers .................................................................................. ISU-66
Installing The PCLTA-10/20 Card ................................................................................ ISU-73
Installing The PCC-10 (Laptop Only) .......................................................................... ISU-73

Chapter Three - Getting Started

ISU-75

Start-Up Procedure...................................................................................................... ISU-76


Add ESUSA Resources To Catalog ................................................................. ISU-76

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Copyright 1999 Electronic Systems USA, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Adding ESUSA Resources To Catalog .................................................. ISU-76


Starting NexSys Workstation (NWS) And LnServer .......................................... ISU-78
Starting NWS And LNServer Together ................................................... ISU-78
Starting NWS ......................................................................................... ISU-78
Starting LNServer .................................................................................. ISU-78
NWS Main Window ..................................................................................................... ISU-79
Title Bar ............................................................................................................ ISU-79
Version Number Of NWS software ................................................................... ISU-80
Resizing The NexSys Windows ....................................................................... ISU-80
Menu Bar .......................................................................................................... ISU-80
Toolbar .............................................................................................................. ISU-81
Physical Tree .................................................................................................... ISU-81
Working Panels ................................................................................................ ISU-81
Server Status Bar ............................................................................................. ISU-82
Exiting NWS ................................................................................................................ ISU-82
Exiting LNServer ......................................................................................................... ISU-82

Installation and Startup Index

ISU-85

System Setup (SSU)


Chapter One - Common Node Functions

SSU-95

Overview ....................................................................................................................SSU-96
Node Menu .................................................................................................................SSU-96
Node Commands ............................................................................................SSU-96
Wink ......................................................................................................SSU-96
Offline ...................................................................................................SSU-97
Reset ....................................................................................................SSU-98
Test .......................................................................................................SSU-98
Plug-Ins ...........................................................................................................SSU-99
Registering A Plug-In ............................................................................SSU-99
Running A Plug-In ...............................................................................SSU-100
Move ..............................................................................................................SSU-101
Add ................................................................................................................SSU-102
Setup Node ...................................................................................................SSU-103
Check Box Explanations.....................................................................SSU-104
Replace Node ...............................................................................................SSU-105
Edit/View Binding ..........................................................................................SSU-106
Delete ............................................................................................................SSU-107
Config Data Set .............................................................................................SSU-107
Set Time/Date On Node .................................................................................SSU-109
Rename ......................................................................................................... SSU-110
Load Firmware .............................................................................................. SSU-110
MultiNode Operations .................................................................................... SSU-113
Connection Description Template (CDT) ....................................................... SSU-114
Adding A Connection Description Template (CDT) ............................. SSU-115
Modifying Connection Description Templates (CDT) .......................... SSU-117
Copyright 1999 Electronic Systems USA, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 1.3

Deleting Connection Description Templates (CDT) ............................ SSU-117


Node Configuration Wizard ........................................................................... SSU-118

Chapter Two - Setting Up a Router

SSU-119

Overview ..................................................................................................................SSU-120
Router Classification Types ...........................................................................SSU-120
Far-Side Transceiver Types ...........................................................................SSU-121
Echelon Routers ......................................................................SSU-121
Adding a Router to the Physical Tree ............................................................SSU-121
Coactive Routers .....................................................................SSU-121
CTI Routers ..............................................................................SSU-121
Commissioning a Defined Router ..................................................................SSU-123
Adding Nodes To A Router ............................................................................SSU-124
Commissioning the PEC.....................................................................SSU-125
Check Box Explanations ..........................................................SSU-126

Chapter Three - Setting Up an FSC/FLC

SSU-129

Setting Up an FSC/FLC ...........................................................................................SSU-130


FSC Overview ...............................................................................................SSU-130
FLC Overview ................................................................................................SSU-130
Adding an FSC or FLC to the Physical Tree ..................................................SSU-130
Defining an FSC/FLC .........................................................................SSU-131
Commissioning the FSC/FLC .............................................................SSU-132
Check Box Explanations ..........................................................SSU-133
FSC/FLC Configuration Wizard .....................................................................SSU-134
FSC/FLC Wizard Page 1 - Configure FSC Time Values ...............................SSU-135
FSC/FLC Wizard Page 2 - Enable Daylight Savings Time ............................SSU-136
FSC/FLC Wizard Page 3 - Configure Daylight Savings Time........................SSU-136
FSC/FLC Wizard Page 4 - Select FSC Modules ...........................................SSU-137

Chapter Four - Setting Up a VAV

SSU-139

Setting up a VAV ...................................................................................................... SSU-140


Adding a VAV to the Physical Tree ................................................................SSU-140
Defining a VAV....................................................................................SSU-140
Commissioning the VAV .....................................................................SSU-141
Check Box Explanations ..........................................................SSU-142
VAV Configuration Wizard .............................................................................SSU-143
VAV Wizard Page 1 - Room Sensor Type ...........................................SSU-145
VAV Wizard Page 2 - Thermostat Configuration .................................SSU-146
VAV Wizard Page 3 - Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters ...SSU147
VAV Wizard Page 4 - Setpoint Configuration ......................................SSU-147
VAV Wizard Page 5 - Thermal Load Parameters ................................SSU-148
VAV Wizard Page 6 - K-Factor ............................................................SSU-149
VAV Wizard Page 7 - Flow Parameters ..............................................SSU-151
VAV Wizard Page 8 - Accept Air Flow PID Parameters? .....................SSU-152
VAV Wizard Page 9 - Flow PID Parameters .......................................SSU-152
VAV Wizard Page 10 - Fan Type ........................................................SSU-154
VAV Wizard Page 11 - Reheat Parameters .........................................SSU-154

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VAV Wizard Page 12 - Floating Reheat ..............................................SSU-155


VAV Wizard Page 13 - Electric Reheat ...............................................SSU-156
VAV Wizard Page 14 - PWM Reheat ..................................................SSU-156
VAV Wizard Page 15 - Broadcast Damper Inc Output? .......................SSU-158
VAV Wizard Page 16 - Broadcast Damper DEC Output? ...................SSU-158
VAV Wizard Page 17 - Broadcast Fan Output? ...................................SSU-159
VAV Wizard Page 18 - Broadcast Reheat INC/ST 1 Output? ..............SSU-159
VAV Wizard Page 19 - Broadcast Reheat DEC/ST 2 Output? ............SSU-160
Advanced Point Editing .................................................................................SSU-161

Chapter Five - Setting Up a Heat Pump

SSU-163

Setting up a Heat Pump ...........................................................................................SSU-164


Adding a Heat Pump to the Physical Tree .....................................................SSU-164
Defining a Heat Pump.........................................................................SSU-164
Commissioning the Heat Pump ..........................................................SSU-165
Check Box Explanations ..........................................................SSU-167
Heat Pump Configuration Wizard ..................................................................SSU-168
Heat Pump Wizard Page 1 - Room Sensor Type...........................................SSU-169
Heat Pump Wizard Page 2 - Thermostat Configuration .................................SSU-169
Heat Pump Wizard Page 3 - Default Setpoints & Thermal Load Parameters SSU-170
Heat Pump Wizard Page 4 - Setpoint Configuration ......................................SSU-171
Heat Pump Wizard Page 5 - PID Parameters For Thermal Load ...................SSU-172
Heat Pump Wizard Page 6 - Local Emergency Shutdown ............................SSU-173
Heat Pump Wizard Page 7 - Economizer Type.............................................SSU-173
Heat Pump Wizard Page 8 - Economizer Enable ..........................................SSU-174
Heat Pump Wizard Page 9 - Local Economizer .............................................SSU-174
Heat Pump Wizard Page 10 - Mixed Air Parameters .....................................SSU-175
Heat Pump Wizard Page 11 - Low Limit Shutdown Parameters ....................SSU-176
Heat Pump Wizard Page 12 - Fan Controller Parameters .............................SSU-177
Heat Pump Wizard Page 13 - Number of Stages For Compressor? ..............SSU-178
Heat Pump Wizard Page 14 - Compressor Controller ...................................SSU-179
Heat Pump Wizard Page 15 - Reverse Valve Setup ......................................SSU-180
Heat Pump Wizard Page 16 - Loop Enable ...................................................SSU-181
Heat Pump Wizard Page 17 - Broadcast Output For Damper? ......................SSU-181
Heat Pump Wizard Page 18 - Broadcast Output For Fan Output? .................SSU-182
Heat Pump Wizard Page 19 - Broadcast Output For Reverse Valve? ...........SSU-182
Heat Pump Wizard Page 20 - Broadcast Output For Compressor 1? ............SSU-183
Heat Pump Wizard Page 21 - Broadcast Output For Compressor 2? ............SSU-183
Heat Pump Wizard Page 22 - Broadcast Output For Compressor 3/EH? ......SSU-184

Chapter Six - Setting Up a PEC

SSU-185

Setting up a PEC ......................................................................................................SSU-186


Adding a PEC to the Physical Tree ...............................................................SSU-186
Defining a PEC ...................................................................................SSU-186
Commissioning the PEC.....................................................................SSU-187
Check Box Explanations ..........................................................SSU-189
Configuration Wizard (PEC) .....................................................................................SSU-190
PEC Wizard Page 1 - Room Sensor Type .....................................................SSU-191

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PEC Wizard Page 2 - Thermostat Configuration ...........................................SSU-192


PEC Wizard Page 3 - Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters .......SSU-193
PEC Wizard Page 4 - Setpoint Configuration ................................................SSU-193
PEC Wizard Page 5 - PID Parameters For Thermal Load .............................SSU-194
PEC Wizard Page 6 - Local Emergency Shutdown .......................................SSU-195
PEC Wizard Page 7 - Economizer Type ........................................................SSU-196
PEC Wizard Page 8 - Economizer Enable ....................................................SSU-196
PEC Wizard Page 9 - Local Economizer .......................................................SSU-197
PEC Wizard Page 10 - Mixed Air Parameters ...............................................SSU-198
PEC Wizard Page 11 - Low Limit Shutdown Parameters ..............................SSU-199
PEC Wizard Page 12 - Fan Controller Parameters .......................................SSU-200
PEC Wizard Page 13 - Discharge Air Reset From Thermal Load .................SSU-202
PEC Wizard Page 14 - Discharge Air Reset ..................................................SSU-202
PEC Wizard Page 15 - Number of Valves .....................................................SSU-203
PEC Wizard Page 16 - Winter/Summer Controller ........................................SSU-204
PEC Wizard Page 17 - Local Winter/Summer Controller ...............................SSU-205
PEC Wizard Page 18 - Heating Type ............................................................SSU-205
PEC Wizard Page 19 - Floating Heating Parameters ....................................SSU-206
PEC Wizard Page 20 - Discrete Heating Parameters ....................................SSU-206
PEC Wizard Page 21 - Cooling Type ............................................................SSU-207
PEC Wizard Page 22 - Floating Cooling Parameters ....................................SSU-208
PEC Wizard Page 23 - Discrete Cooling .......................................................SSU-209
PEC Wizard Page 24 - Broadcast Output For Damper? ................................SSU-209
PEC Wizard Page 25 - Broadcast Output For Fan Output? ...........................SSU-210
PEC Wizard Page 26 - Broadcast Output For Cooling Increment? ................ SSU-211
PEC Wizard Page 27 - Broadcast Output For Cooling Decrement? ..............SSU-212
PEC Wizard Page 28 - Broadcast Output For Heating Increment? ................SSU-212
PEC Wizard Page 29 - Broadcast Output For Heating Decrement? ..............SSU-213
Advanced PEC Editing ............................................................................................SSU-214
Editing Points ................................................................................................SSU-214
Editing Point #1 - Discharge Air Temp (Analog Input) .........................SSU-214
Editing Point #2 - Mixed Air Temp (Analog Input) ................................SSU-214
Editing Point #3 - Space Temp (Analog Input) ....................................SSU-215
Editing Point #4 - Outside AIr/Supply Water Temp (analog Input) .......SSU-215
Editing Point #5 - Fan Status Input (Digital Input) ...............................SSU-215
Editing Point #6 - Emergency Shutdown (Digital Input) ......................SSU-215
Editing Point #7 - Space Temp Controller ...........................................SSU-215
Editing Point #8 - Indoor Air Quality Controller ....................................SSU-215
Editing Point #9 - Outside Air Temp ....................................................SSU-215
Editing Point #10 - Manual Occupancy Controller ..............................SSU-215
Editing Point #11 - User Setpoint Controller .......................................SSU-216
Editing Point #12 - Override Controller ...............................................SSU-216
Editing Point #13 - Application Mode Controller .................................SSU-216
Editing Point #14 - Manual Reset .......................................................SSU-216
Editing Point #15 - Low Limit Shutdown .............................................SSU-216
Editing Point #16 - Local Emergency Shutdown .................................SSU-216
Editing Point #17 - LON Emergency Shutdown ..................................SSU-216

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Editing Point #18 - Setpoint Controller ................................................SSU-217


Editing Point #19 - Mixed Air PID Controller .......................................SSU-217
Editing Point #20 - Emergency Command Controller .........................SSU-217
Editing Point #21 - Winter/Summer Controller ....................................SSU-218
Editing Point #22 - Temp PID Controller .............................................SSU-218
Editing Point #23 - Economizer Controller ..........................................SSU-218
Editing Point #24 - Fan Controller .......................................................SSU-218
Editing Point #25 - Heating/Cooling Controller ...................................SSU-218
Editing Point #26 - Analog Output .......................................................SSU-218
Editing Point #27 - Digital Output #1 Fan Actuator Output ..................SSU-218

System Setup Index

SSU-1219

Programming (PRO)
Chapter One - Binding Network Variables

PRO-231

Overview ................................................................................................................. PRO-232


Editing and Viewing Bindings ...................................................................... PRO-232
Refresh .............................................................................................. PRO-233
Adding A Bind .................................................................................... PRO-234
Deleting a Bind .................................................................................. PRO-235

Chapter Two - Using CPL

PRO-237

Overview ................................................................................................................. PRO-238


CPL Pages Subtree ...................................................................................... PRO-238
Working With Individual Pages .........................................................................
PRO-239
CPL Page Menu Commands ............................................................. PRO-239
CPL Blocks .............................................................................................................. PRO-241
Block Types ....................................................................................... PRO-242
Arithmetic Blocks .................................................................... PRO-242
Comparison Blocks ................................................................. PRO-242
Constant Blocks ...................................................................... PRO-242
Function Blocks ...................................................................... PRO-242
Global Variable Blocks ............................................................ PRO-243
Logical Blocks ......................................................................... PRO-243
Point Blocks ............................................................................ PRO-243
Time Blocks ............................................................................ PRO-243
Block Colors ...................................................................................... PRO-243
CPL Editor ............................................................................................................... PRO-243
CPL Editor Toolbar ....................................................................................... PRO-244
Selection Mode .................................................................................. PRO-244
Zoom Modes ...................................................................................... PRO-244
Best Fit ............................................................................................... PRO-244
Show Grid .......................................................................................... PRO-245
Monitor Mode ..................................................................................... PRO-245
Zoom Control Box ......................................................................................... PRO-246
CPL Block Menu ........................................................................................... PRO-247
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Creating And Editing CPL Pages ............................................................................ PRO-247


To Add A New CPL Page: ............................................................................. PRO-247
Adding CPL Blocks ............................................................................ PRO-248
Editing CPL Blocks ....................................................................................... PRO-249
Editing Multiple Blocks ...................................................................... PRO-249
Direct/Reverse Acting ............................................................. PRO-250
Deleting A Block................................................................................. PRO-250
Deleting Multiple Blocks .................................................................... PRO-251
Moving A Block .................................................................................. PRO-251
Moving Multiple Blocks ...................................................................... PRO-252
Block Connections .................................................................................................. PRO-252
Connecting Blocks ....................................................................................... PRO-252
Multiple Inputs .................................................................................... PRO-253
Deleting A Block Connection ............................................................. PRO-253
CPL User Library ..................................................................................................... PRO-254
CPL Library Window ..................................................................................... PRO-254
Accessing the CPL Library from NWS ............................................... PRO-255
Closing The CPL Library.................................................................... PRO-255
Library Pages Window ................................................................................. PRO-255
Library Pages Toolbar ........................................................................ PRO-256
CPL Library Block Editor Window ................................................................. PRO-256
Creating A New CPL Library Page ..................................................... PRO-257
Importing A CPL Library Page ............................................................ PRO-257
Exporting A CPL library page ............................................................. PRO-257
Summary Of Blocks ...................................................................................... PRO-258

Chapter Three - CPL Blocks

PRO-261

CPL Blocks .............................................................................................................. PRO-262


CPL Block Settings ....................................................................................... PRO-262
Ignore Error Check Box...................................................................... PRO-263
Entering Block Information - Constants......................................................... PRO-263
Analog Constant ................................................................................ PRO-264
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-264
Digital Constant ................................................................................. PRO-264
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-264
Entering Block Information - Functions ......................................................... PRO-265
2-Position ........................................................................................... PRO-266
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-266
Accumulator ....................................................................................... PRO-267
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-267
Calculation ......................................................................................... PRO-267
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-268
Counter .............................................................................................. PRO-269
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-269
Dial Provider ...................................................................................... PRO-269
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-269
Enthalpy ............................................................................................. PRO-270
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-270
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Error - Analog (A-error) ....................................................................... PRO-270


Settings ................................................................................... PRO-270
Error - Digital (D-Error) ....................................................................... PRO-271
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-271
Hi/Lo/Average .................................................................................... PRO-271
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-271
Lead/Lag ............................................................................................ PRO-272
Settings .................................................................................. PRO-272
Min/Max ............................................................................................. PRO-273
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-273
Minimum On/Off ................................................................................. PRO-274
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-274
One Shot ............................................................................................ PRO-274
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-275
PID Loop ............................................................................................ PRO-276
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-276
Timing ..................................................................................... PRO-276
Psychro .............................................................................................. PRO-277
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-277
Ramp ................................................................................................. PRO-277
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-278
Timing ..................................................................................... PRO-278
Relay - Analog .................................................................................. PRO-278
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-278
Relay - digital .................................................................................... PRO-278
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-279
Reset ................................................................................................. PRO-279
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-280
Rolling Average ................................................................................. PRO-280
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-280
Timing ..................................................................................... PRO-280
Runtime ............................................................................................. PRO-281
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-281
Schedule ........................................................................................... PRO-282
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-282
Timing ..................................................................................... PRO-283
Sequencer ......................................................................................... PRO-283
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-283
Descriptor ................................................................................ PRO-283
Startup ............................................................................................... PRO-284
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-284
Start/Stop ........................................................................................... PRO-284
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-284
Time Event ......................................................................................... PRO-284
Settings ..................................................................................................
PRO-285
Entering Block Information - Global Variables .............................................. PRO-285
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Settings ................................................................................... PRO-286


Global Analog Input ........................................................................... PRO-286
Global Digital Input ............................................................................ PRO-286
Global Analog Output ......................................................................... PRO-286
Global Digital Output.......................................................................... PRO-286
Entering Block Information - Logical ............................................................. PRO-287
AND ................................................................................................... PRO-287
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-287
OR ..................................................................................................... PRO-288
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-288
NOT ................................................................................................... PRO-288
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-288
XOR ................................................................................................... PRO-288
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-289
Entering Block Information - Comparison ..................................................... PRO-289
A-Equal .............................................................................................. PRO-290
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-290
A-Not Equal ...................................................................................... PRO-290
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-290
D-Equal ............................................................................................. PRO-290
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-290
D-Not Equal ....................................................................................... PRO-291
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-291
Greater Equal..................................................................................... PRO-291
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-291
Greater Than ...................................................................................... PRO-291
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-291
Less Equal ......................................................................................... PRO-292
Setting ..................................................................................... PRO-292
Less Than .......................................................................................... PRO-292
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-292
Entering Block Information - Arithmetic ......................................................... PRO-292
Add .................................................................................................... PRO-293
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-293
Divide ................................................................................................ PRO-293
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-293
Modulus ............................................................................................. PRO-294
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-294
Multiply .............................................................................................. PRO-294
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-294
Negate ............................................................................................... PRO-294
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-294
Sq. Root (Square Root)...................................................................... PRO-295
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-295
Subtract ............................................................................................. PRO-295
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-295
Entering Block Information - Points ............................................................... PRO-295

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AI (Analog Input) ................................................................................ PRO-296


Settings ................................................................................... PRO-296
DI (Digital Input) ................................................................................. PRO-296
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-296
AO (Analog Output) ............................................................................ PRO-296
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-297
D0 (Digital Output) ............................................................................. PRO-297
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-297
MAI (Multiple Analog Input) ................................................................ PRO-297
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-298
MDI (Multiple Digital Input) ................................................................. PRO-298
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-298
Point State ......................................................................................... PRO-299
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-299
Entering Block Information - Time ................................................................. PRO-299
Constant Time .................................................................................... PRO-300
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-300
Convert Time ..................................................................................... PRO-300
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-300
Current Time ...................................................................................... PRO-301
Settings ................................................................................... PRO-301

Chapter Four - Schedules

PRO-303

SCHEDULING ........................................................................................................ PRO-304


The Schedule Subtree .................................................................................. PRO-304
Viewing Individual Schedules ........................................................... PRO-304
Creating A New Schedule ............................................................................ PRO-305
Adding A New Schedule: ................................................................... PRO-305
Entering Values For A New Schedule: ............................................... PRO-306
Editing An Existing Schedule ....................................................................... PRO-308
Renaming A Schedule .................................................................................. PRO-308
Deleting A Schedule ..................................................................................... PRO-308
Copying Schedules To Another FSC ............................................................ PRO-309
Refresh Schedules ....................................................................................... PRO-309

Programming Index

PRO-311

Operations (OPS)
Chapter One - Workstation Basics

OPS-321

NexSys Work Station (NWS) Window Overview ......................................................OPS-322


Menu Bar .......................................................................................................OPS-323
Tool Bar .........................................................................................................OPS-325
Physical Tree ...........................................................................................................OPS-326
NexSys Network Interface .............................................................................OPS-326
Editing The NexSys Network Interface ...............................................OPS-327
To Access The NexSys Network Interface Editor: ....................OPS-327
NexSys Network Interface Editor Options: ...............................OPS-327
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Connection Description Template (CDT) ............................................OPS-328


Adding A Connection Description Template (CDT) ..................OPS-329
Modifying Connection Description Templates (CDT) ...............OPS-331
Deleting Connection Description Templates (CDT) .................OPS-331
Multi-Node Operations ........................................................................OPS-332
Selecting the node(s): ..............................................................OPS-332
Selecting the options ................................................................OPS-333
Confirming your selections .......................................................OPS-333
Routers ..........................................................................................................OPS-333
Controller Nodes ...........................................................................................OPS-334
Node Pop-up Menu Commands ....................................................................OPS-334
Points ............................................................................................................OPS-342
Adding FSC/FLC points ......................................................................OPS-342
Editing FSC/FLC Points .....................................................................OPS-343
Deleting FSC/FLC Points ...................................................................OPS-343
LMOs (LonMark Objects) ...............................................................................OPS-344
Network Variables .........................................................................................OPS-344
Binding: Connecting NVOs To NVIs ..................................................OPS-345
Configuration Properties ................................................................................OPS-345
Point, LMO, NV, and CP Working Panels ......................................................OPS-346
Additional FSC Subtrees ...............................................................................OPS-348
CPL Pages ..........................................................................................OPS-348
Schedules ...........................................................................................OPS-350
Node Working Panels ..............................................................................................OPS-352
Detail Panel ...................................................................................................OPS-353
Query Options .....................................................................................OPS-354
Trend Setup Panel .........................................................................................OPS-354
Trend During Occupancy .........................................................OPS-355
Sampling ............................................................................................OPS-356
Trend Setup For ASCs .............................................................OPS-356
Trend Setup For FSCs ............................................................OPS-357
Trend Harvest Panel ......................................................................................OPS-357
Trend Channels Window ...................................................................OPS-358
Trend Samples Window ....................................................................OPS-358
Trend Harvest Graph window .............................................................OPS-359
The Harvest Button .............................................................................OPS-361
To View Trending Data:.......................................................................OPS-361
ASG (Application Specific Graphics) Panel ...................................................OPS-361
Occupancy Modes ..............................................................................OPS-362
Occupied ..................................................................................OPS-362
Unoccupied ..............................................................................OPS-362
Economy ..................................................................................OPS-362
Controller Status Data .........................................................................OPS-363
Line Graph ..........................................................................................OPS-363

Operations Index
Appendix A - Standard Network Variable Types

OPS-367
APP-373

SNVTs ...................................................................................................................... APP-374


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Digital Points And SNVTs .............................................................................. APP-374


Analog Points And SNVTs ............................................................................. APP-378

Appendix B - Glossary

APP-381

Glossary ................................................................................................................... APP-382

Appendix C - NexSys Architecture

APP-393

Overview Of NexSys And LNS Architecture ............................................................. APP-394


NexSys Software ........................................................................................... APP-394
NexSys Workstation (NWS) ................................................................ APP-394
LNServer ............................................................................................ APP-395
LNS 3.0 Architecture ...................................................................................... APP-395
LCA Object Server ActiveX Control ..................................................... APP-395
Network Services Server (NSS) .......................................................... APP-395
Network Services Interface (NSI) ........................................................ APP-395
Example Of NexSys Software Interaction ...................................................... APP-395

Appendix D - LNServer

APP-399

Overview Of LNServer .............................................................................................. APP-400


Starting LNServer .......................................................................................... APP-400
Title Bar .............................................................................................. APP-400
Menu Bar ............................................................................................ APP-401
User Connection Window ................................................................... APP-401
LNServer Messages Window ............................................................. APP-401
UI Activity Window .............................................................................. APP-402
Tree Poll Thread Window ................................................................... APP-402
System Status Window ....................................................................... APP-402
Exiting LNServer ........................................................................................... APP-403

Appendices Index

Copyright 1999 Electronic Systems USA, Inc. All Rights Reserved

APP-405

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Copyright 1999 Electronic Systems USA, Inc. All Rights Reserved

SECTION ONE

SOFTWARE OVERVIEW

Chapters
1. Computer Basics
2. NexSys Software Architecture

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Electronic Systems USA, a wholly owned subsidiary of Johnson Controls, Inc., reserves the right to update
specifications when appropriate. Information contained in this document is based on specifications believed to
be correct at the time of publication.

Echelon , Coactive, Windows NT, and General Electric are registered trademarks and service marks of
companies other than Electronic Systems USA. FSC, CPL and NEXSYS are trademarks of Electronic
Systems USA.

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

All Rights Reserved

Software Overview
Chapter One - Computer Basics
5
Overview .............................................................................................................................. 6
The Computer ........................................................................................................... 6
Keyboard......................................................................................................... 6
Mouse ............................................................................................................. 6
Basic Mouse Actions ...................................................................................... 7
Cursor ............................................................................................................. 7
Scroll Bars ..................................................................................................... 8
Basic Window Concepts ....................................................................................................... 8
Opening/Closing a Window ....................................................................................... 9
Re-sizing a Window ................................................................................................... 9
Moving a Window ...................................................................................................... 9
Maximizing a Window ................................................................................................ 9
Restoring a Window................................................................................................... 9
Minimizing a Window ................................................................................................. 9
Selecting an Open Window ....................................................................................... 9
Basic Menu Concepts ........................................................................................................ 10
Pull-Down Menus .................................................................................................... 10
Selecting a Pull-Down Menu ......................................................................... 10
Exiting a Pull-down Menu ............................................................................ 10
Selecting a Pull-Down Menu (with the Cursor (Arrow) Keys) ........................ 11
Selecting a Pull-Down Menu (with the Text keys) ......................................... 11
Canceling a Menu Selection (with the Text keys) .......................................... 11
Pop-Up (Shortcut) Menus ........................................................................................ 11
Selecting Pop-up Menus (with text keys) ...................................................... 11
Dialog Boxes............................................................................................................ 12
Keyboard Shortcuts for Dialog boxes ............................................................ 12
Mouse Operation in Dialog Boxes ................................................................ 13
Getting Help Inside a Dialog Box .................................................................. 13
Windows NT Overview ....................................................................................................... 14
Desktop ................................................................................................................... 14
Windows NT Help ......................................................................................... 15
My Computer ................................................................................................ 15
Network Neighborhood ................................................................................. 15
Recycle Bin ................................................................................................... 16
Shortcut Menus ............................................................................................ 16
Create a Folder ............................................................................................. 16
Delete a Folder ............................................................................................. 16
Move an Object ............................................................................................. 16
Copy an Object ............................................................................................. 16
Rename an Object ........................................................................................ 16
Task Bar................................................................................................................... 16
Start Menu ............................................................................................................... 17

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NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

Windows NT Explorer ......................................................................................................... 17


Find an Object ......................................................................................................... 17
Printer Setup ................................................................................................. 18
MS DOS Window ..................................................................................................... 18
Shutting Down the System ...................................................................................... 19
Emergency Shut Down ................................................................................. 19
Chapter Two - NWS Software Architecture
21
NexSys Software Architecture ............................................................................................ 22
NexSys Workstation (NWS) ..................................................................................... 23
LNServer ................................................................................................................. 23
LNS ......................................................................................................................... 23
OPC LonWorks Server ............................................................................................ 23
M-Series Workstation .............................................................................................. 23
Software Overview Index
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2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Chapter One

Computer Basics

This chapter contains information on:


l Basic Computer Information
l Basic Window Concepts
l Basic Information on Windows NT

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OVERVIEW
Windows NT, the operating system NexSys uses, coordinates the functions performed by the microprocessor to
allow true multi-tasking. You can be working in a spreadsheet, writing a letter in a word processor, and using
NexSys to interface with your building all at the same time. This is an overview of computer basics with
information on the use of Windows NT. Refer to your Windows NT manuals for more information.
NOTE: If you are unfamiliar with Windows NT operations, please see Section XXXX, Windows
NT Help.
The main difference between Windows NT and DOS is multi-tasking. Multi-tasking describes an operating
system that can perform more than one task at a time. With NexSys, multi-tasking is important because it
guarantees that alarms and other critical operations are always given proper attention.

THE COMPUTER
KEYBOARD
There are six types of keys on the keyboard:
Standard keys - These are the keys that correspond to typewriter keys (a, b, 1, 2, SHIFT, TAB, RETURN, etc.).
Use the standard keys to enter and edit text.
Cursor keys - These are the keys to the right of the standard keys. The four arrow keys (Left, Right, Up,
and Down) and the six page keys (Insert, Delete, Home, End, Page Up, and Page Down) are included
in this group.
Keypad keys - These are the keys that correspond to the regular calculator functions (1, 2, 3, +, *, ENTER,
etc.) and are located on the right side of the keyboard.
Function keys - These are special keys located at the top of your keyboard that can be custom defined by
applications. Some applications provide an overlay sheet to remind you of the function key assignments. NexSys has several function keys.
Modifier keys - These are special keys that are used to alter the operation of other keys. The most commonly used are the CTRL (Control) and ALT (Alternate) keys. They are usually held down in a
combination with another key (see the specific application manual for details). The SHIFT and ESC
keys are also frequently used.
Escape key - The ESC (Escape) key is used to abort an application. While in a dialog box, it is the same as
choosing Cancel.

MOUSE
The mouse (Figure 1) is a small hand-held device which allows a user to interface with the computer. The mouse
lets you move an on-screen cursor over the entire screen. The mouse has two buttons, the left and the right.
Buttons
Cable

Roller Ball

Figure 1. Mouse

NOTE: The mouse operates by measuring the rotation of a small rubber roller ball on its bottom
surface. Therefore, the roller ball on the bottom must touching a clean dry surface (the top
of a table or desk, a mouse pad, etc.) for the mouse to work (Figure 2).

Figure 2. Using the Mouse

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BASIC MOUSE ACTIONS


Below is an explanation of the basic mouse actions:
Pointing - Move the mouse until the tip of the cursor rests on a specific item or area. Although the item
may appear highlighted, pointing alone does nothing.
Clicking or Selecting - Point at an item, then press and release the left mouse button. Clicking is used to
select an on-screen item.
Double Clicking - Press and release the left mouse button twice in rapid succession. Double clicking is
used to select an item from a list.
Dragging - Point at an item to be moved, press and hold down either the left or right mouse button, and
then move the mouse (and therefore the cursor-item) to a new location. Release the left or right
button only when the cursor-item is in the correct position.
Swiping (Highlighting) - This is basically the same technique used for dragging, but is used for selecting
text. Point to the left of the first character to include, press and hold down the left mouse button.
Drag the pointer to the right and/or down until the pointer passes the last character to include, then
release the button. Text will appear highlighted.
Right Clicking - Click the right mouse button only. This is used to display the shortcut menu of the item
(folder, window, or icon) that the cursor is positioned on. If no menu exists for that item, none will
be displayed.

CURSOR
The cursor is the on-screen representation of the mouses position. When the mouse is moved to the left, the
cursor will move to the left. When the mouse is moved to the right, the cursor will move to the right, and so on.
Typically, the mouse cursor is used to select objects on the screen ( pull-down menus, push buttons, etc.) and to
select text to be edited. In some situations, the shape of the cursor (normally an arrow) will change to show that
the cursor has a different function. Typically, the cursor will be one of the following shapes:
Arrow

- Used for pointing and selecting

Hour Glass

- Used to indicate that you must wait before proceeding

Double Arrows
reflects
Vertical Line

- Used to change the size of a resizable window (The orientation of the arrows
the window dimension being changed.)
- Used to enter text.

Question Mark

- Used to access help on a topic. When this cursor is present, click on an item you

need information on. See Getting Help Inside a Dialog Box for more details.
Cross Hair Pointer
Hour Glass with Arrow

- Used when moving an object.


- Used to show that the computer is working in the background.

NOTE: The cursor may be customized by clicking


Control Panel (

, selecting Settings, and choosing

>Settings>Control Panel). Double click on the Mouse icon.

Click on the Pointers tab and choose the special cursor set youd like to apply.

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NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

SCROLL BARS
When necessary, scroll bars will appear on the bottom and/or left edges of each window, indicating that the
screen size is smaller than the complete display. A Scroll Bar (Figure 3) is a window control that allows you to
view a document larger than the current window. Scroll bars appear along the bottom and/or right edge of the
window. Scroll bars contain three elements:
Scroll Arrows - The rectangular buttons with arrows on them at both ends of a scroll bar
Scroll Box - A solid rectangle between the arrows of the scroll bar. The scroll box indicates how much of
the window is visible by its placement within the scroll bar.
Page Areas - The areas of the scroll bar between the scroll box and each of the scroll arrows.

Figure 3. Scroll Bar

To scroll through a screen one line or one item at a time, click on the appropriate scroll arrows. To scroll
continuously, hold the arrow down. To scroll through the screen one page at a time, click on the page area of
the scroll bar. To move more quickly through a window, place the cursor on the scroll box and drag it in the
appropriate direction.

BASIC WINDOW CONCEPTS


The window environment is a rectangular area of the computer screen that applications used to display information. Depending on the application, several windows can be displayed at the same time (Figure 4). Windows can
be opened and closed, minimized, or re-sized according to User needs.

Figure 4. Multiple Windows Displaying

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OPENING/CLOSING A WINDOW
A window can be opened in three ways:

Double click on the windows icon.

Highlight the icon by clicking once and then press Enter.

Select the item from a pop-up menu.

If the window is already active, you can bring the window to the foreground by clicking on the windows button
on the taskbar, or anywhere on the window itself, if a portion of it is visible.
A window can be closed in three ways:

Click on the

Double click on the Windows system menu icon

Click once on the Windows system menu icon


down menu and choose Close.

on the right side of the title bar.


on the left side of the title bar.
on the left side of the title bar to display the pull

RE-SIZING A WINDOW
To make a window smaller or larger, place the cursor on the windows border. When the double ended arrow
appears, drag the edge or corner of the window to re-size appropriately. Dragging the edge of a window will
change only one dimension of the window. Dragging the corner of the window will change both the width and
the height of the window.

MOVING A WINDOW
Move a window on the screen by placing the cursor on the title bar and holding down the left mouse button
while dragging the window to a new position.

MAXIMIZING A WINDOW
The window can be maximized to take up the entire screen. Click on the
side of the title bar.

(maximize button) on the right

RESTORING A WINDOW
To restore a maximized screen to the original size, click on the

(restore button) on the right side of the title

bar.

MINIMIZING A WINDOW
By clicking on the

(minimize button), the current window can be hidden. It will continue running in the

background, and can be accessed by clicking its button on the taskbar.

SELECTING AN OPEN WINDOW


Any open window can be brought to the front of the viewing screen by clicking on any visible part of that
window. In Windows NT a window may be brought to the front by clicking on its button on the taskbar.

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BASIC MENU CONCEPTS


Windows NT uses toolbars, shortcut keys, and toolbar buttons to execute menu commands. It also uses these
tools to access information through dialog boxes, and to manipulate the window environment.
A title bar is located at the top of each window. Below the Title Bar appears the Menu Toolbar. Menu commands
are listed in logical groups. These groups can be located in the menu bar, and are also accessed from within the
application. Both pull-down and pop-up (shortcut) menus are available. A right pointing arrow at the right of a
command indicates a submenu. A submenu contains a list of nested commands for the item you selected.

PULL-DOWN MENUS
One way to access commands is through pull-down menus (Figure 5). Pull down menus are groups of related
commands which are not visible until a menu name is selected. When the User selects the Menu Name, the
pull-down menu of commands is displayed. Click on a command to execute.

Figure 5. Pulldown Menu

NOTE 1: Unavailable menu items will be displayed in gray (or a light shade of the current menutext color).
NOTE 2: If other options exist within a menu, selecting a given menu item may lead to a submenu. Items with submenus are marked with an arrow.

SELECTING A PULL-DOWN MENU


1.

Point to the appropriate menu name.

2.

Click on the menu name. The menu is displayed with the menu name highlighted.

3.

Point to the appropriate menu item. The item will highlight to indicate selection.

4.

Click on the menu item to be selected by pressing once on the left mouse button.

5.

If the selected item has a submenu, repeat steps 3 and 4 for the submenu command.

NOTE: Each menu has a default selection which can be chosen by pressing the Return or Enter
key on the keyboard. The default selection will be the highlighted command. This is also
true for toolbar buttons: the default selection will be the raised button.

EXITING A PULL-DOWN MENU


1.

10

Place the mouse anywhere outside of the menu area and click the left mouse button. The pull-down
menu disappears.

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SELECTING A PULL-DOWN MENU (WITH THE CURSOR (ARROW) KEYS)


The pull-down menus can also be accessed through the keyboard in the following manner:
1.

Press the ALT key and the letter key for the appropriate menu name. Each menu name has one letter
underlined (the N in NWS, for example). The underlined letter is the menus command letter. The
pull-down menu displays with the menu name highlighted.

2.

Use the arrow keys to highlight the appropriate menu item. Press the up or down arrow keys as
necessary until the appropriate menu item is highlighted. If the appropriate menu item is has a
submenu, press the right arrow key to open the submenu, and repeat this step.

3.

Press the RETURN key to select the menu item.

SELECTING A PULL-DOWN MENU (WITH THE TEXT KEYS)


1.

Press and hold the ALT key. Without releasing the ALT key, press the letter key for the appropriate
menu name. Each menu name has one letter underlined (the N in NWS, for example). The underlined letter is the menus command letter. Do not release the ALT key

2.

Press the letter key for the appropriate menu item. Each menu item has one letter underlined (the C
in Close, for example, in Figure 4). The underlined letter is the menu items command letter. If the
appropriate menu item leads to a submenu, repeat this step for the submenu.

CANCELING A MENU SELECTION (WITH THE TEXT KEYS)


1.

Press the ESC key. The pull-down menu disappears.

POP-UP (SHORTCUT) MENUS


Pop-up menus (also called shortcut menus) are another way to access commands. Click the right mouse button
on an item to show its pop-up menu (Figure 6). Or, right click an object or window to access the pop-up menu.
If an no pop-up menu exists, none will be displayed.

Menu Commands

Submenu

Sub-Submenu

Selected
Menu Item
Menu Commands

Figure 6. A Pull Down Menu

NOTE 1: Unavailable menu items will be displayed in gray (or a light shade of the current menutext color).
NOTE 2: If other options exist within a menu, selecting a given menu item may lead to a submenu. Items with submenus are marked with an arrow.

SELECTING POP-UP MENUS (WITH TEXT KEYS)


When an item (a folder, icon, etc.) is highlighted, pressing SHIFT-F10 on the keyboard will bring up the pop-up
menu. For example, if the physical tree is running and a node is highlighted, SHIFT-F10 will bring up the popup menu for that node.
NOTE: Press the Escape key to exit the menu.

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DIALOG BOXES
Dialog boxes are a common way to view and edit information. A dialog box normally contains text fields and
various options particular to its function in which information can be entered or selected (Figure 7).

Dialog Box Name

Text Fields

Radio Buttons

Dropdown List Boxes

Button

Scrollable Lists

Check Boxes

Figure 7. Dialog box

Dialog boxes can contain one or more of the following:


Buttons - Shaded rectangles with a name in the middle.
List Boxes - A rectangular box of text items with a scroll bar along the right side.
Dropdown List Boxes - A small rectangular box with an arrow on the side. Clicking on the arrow causes
the box to drop down an item selection list.
Radio Buttons - Small circles with a name to the side.
Spin Boxes - A small rectangular box with a pair of arrows on the side. Clicking on an arrow causes the
box to spin through the items contained in the box.
Checkboxes - Small squares with a name to the side.
Edit Fields - Short, wide, rectangular boxes, with a name to the side.

KEYBOARD SHORTCUTS FOR DIALOG BOXES


The following keys perform specific functions in dialog boxes:
Return key - The RETURN (ENTER) key closes the dialog box. The dialog box is returned to its default
settings. (Default buttons are signified by a thick border).
Escape key - The ESC or Escape key selects the CANCEL button in any dialog box, and closes the dialog
box.

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MOUSE OPERATION IN DIALOG BOXES


Dialog box items (buttons, checkboxes, text fields, text, etc.) display differently when they are selected from
when they are not selected. Below are descriptions and some examples of the appearance change for each
object:
Buttons - Buttons are spring loaded (when the mouse is released, they change back to the normal state).
When clicked on with the mouse, the shading of the button will change slightly and the text of the
button will be outlined with a dashed line:
Not Selected

or

Selected

NOTE: The default options will sometimes appear with the dashed outline also.
Lists - Lists show the selected item as a reversed image (white-on-black instead of black-on-white).
Menus - A menu selection appears highlighted. Windows NT highlights in blue.
Radio Buttons - When a radio button is selected a small black dot appears in its center:
Not Selected

or

Selected

Checkboxes - When a check box is selected a small check mark appears in its center:
Not Selected

or

Selected

Fields - A small, vertical flashing bar appears at the left side of a selected empty field:
Not Selected

or

Selected

Page Tabs - A dialog box will often contain several pages inside a single window. Access
each page by clicking on its tab at the top (Figure 8).

Tabs

Figure 8. Dialog Box Page Tabs

GETTING HELP INSIDE A DIALOG BOX


Click
at the top right corner of the dialog box. The Whats This? question mark will appear next to the
mouse pointer. Click on the item you want information about. A pop-up window will appear. If you would like to
print or copy the information from the Help pop-up menu, right click inside the pop-up menu box. Select your
option from the pull-down menu that appears (Figure 9).

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Figure 9. Help Pull-down Menu

WINDOWS NT OVERVIEW
When you boot your computer in Windows NT, your display should be similar to the example in Figure 10. The
computer screen has several components, including the desktop, taskbar, and Start Menu.

Figure 10. Windows NT Screen

DESKTOP
The solid color background area of the screen is known as the desktop. It appears when Windows NT is
running. When other programs are running or windows are open, the desktop can still be found underneath
the other windows. Just as the top of your desk is where work is done, the Windows NT desktop area is where
your computer work is done. On the desktop are icons representing the computer, the network neighborhood,
the recycle bin, etc. Icons representing programs, applications, or folders can also be placed on the desktop. A
task bar is located at the bottom of the window. Double click on one of the icons to view the contents of the
folder or start a program or application. From the

button, you can run a program, access the system

setup control panel, open the NT help file, search for an object, logout, or shutdown the computer.

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Figure 11. Windows NT Help

Computer Basics

Figure 12. Start >Help Popup Menu

WINDOWS NT HELP
The Windows NT Help provides detailed information on using Windows NT (Figure 11). The User can search
for Help Topics in three ways: Contents, Index, and Find. To access Help:
1.
Select Start >Help (Figure 12).
2.

The Help Topics: Windows NT Help Window opens (Figure 13).

3.

Select the tab you wish to do your search with (Figure 14).

Figure 13. Help Topics: Windows NT Window

Figure 14. Help File Tabs

MY COMPUTER
By double clicking on the My Computer icon

you can display icons representing hard drives, floppy

drives, CD-ROMs, printers, network access, and other peripherals.

NETWORK NEIGHBORHOOD
If your computer is set up on a network, double-click the Network Neighborhood icon

to view and access

the computers and printers on your network. You do not need to connect to a network drive by mapping a drive
letter. You can also use Network Neighborhood to browse through computers on multiple networks.

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RECYCLE BIN
To delete a program, file, etc., drag the object to the

. To view the contents of the recycle bin, double

click on the icon. To permanently delete the contents of the bin, right click on the Recycle Bin icon and select
Empty Recycle Bin from the pull-down menu.

SHORTCUT MENUS
You can access shortcut/pop-up menus by right clicking. By right clicking on application icons, you may open
them, delete them, rename them, create a shortcut, view the properties window, etc. Right click on the desktop or
in NT Explorer to display a shortcut menu.

CREATE A FOLDER
To create a folder:
1.

Double click on the My Computer icon

or open Windows NT Explorer.

2.

Double click on the drive or the folder where the new folder will be located.

3.

Pull down the File menu located on the Tool Bar, or right click inside the window. Select New.
Choose Folder.

4.

A new folder will display in the window. Enter a name for the folder and press return.

NOTE: A filename can contain up to 255 characters, including spaces. But, it cannot contain any
of the following characters: \ / : * ? " < > |

DELETE A FOLDER
To delete a folder, icon, object, or program, open the window where it is located. Right click on the object to
display its shortcut menu and select Delete. Or, place the cursor over the icon, hold down the right mouse
button, and drag the icon to the recycle bin. A pop-up menu will display. Choose Move Here.

MOVE AN OBJECT
An object can be moved with the drag and drop method. Select the object to be moved. Hold down the right
mouse button as you move the icon to its new location. Select Move Here from the pop-up menu. Or, you may
display the window with the icon to be moved, highlight the icon, and select Cut from the Edit menu. Display
the window of the new location and select Paste from the Edit menu.

COPY AN OBJECT
Using the drag an drop method, you may click on the icon to be moved, hold down the right mouse button, and
drag it to the new location. When the pop-up menu displays, select Copy Here. Or, right click on the object,
and select Copy from the pull-down menu. Open the window where the object is to be copied, right click inside
the window, and select Paste.

RENAME AN OBJECT
To rename an object, right click on its icon to display the shortcut menu and select Rename. Type in the new
name and press enter. Or, click once on a highlighted icon, type in the new name and press enter.
NOTE: All of the actions described can be accomplished in Windows NT Explorer.

TASK BAR
The task bar is located at the bottom of the desktop window (Figure 15). The taskbar displays all programs
currently running. The program running in the foreground will appear recessed. To select a different application
to run in the foreground, click on the appropriate button on the taskbar.
Figure 15. Windows NT Taskbar with two programs running.

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Computer Basics

START MENU
From the

Menu button, you can run a program, access the system setup control panels, open the NT

help file, search for an object, logout, or shut down the computer. Shortcut icons can also be added to the Start
Menu from the desktop or Windows NT Explorer.

WINDOWS NT EXPLORER
To access Windows NT Explorer, click

>Programs>Windows NT Explorer. Or, right click on

, and select Explore. See the sample Window NT Explorer window in Figure 16. Windows NT
Explorer replaces the file manager in previous versions of Windows. Through Windows NT Explorer, you can
view the contents of all your drives and folders. Documents or programs can be opened from this window by
double clicking on them, or by right clicking and selecting Open from the pull-down menu. You can also use
the drag and drop or the cut and paste methods to move or copy objects in this window.

Figure 16. Windows NT Explorer

FIND AN OBJECT
If you would like to search for an object:
1.

Click

and select

Find. The Find window will appear (See Figure 17).

Figure 17. Find File Window

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Software Overview

17

Computer Basics

2.

3.

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Rev 2.0

The Find window offers three different methods to set up the parameters of your search:

Name and Location - Click on the Name & Location tab to search for a file
name. Enter the file name and select the appropriate drives.

Date - Click on the Date Modified tab to search using the date a file was last
modified, and set up the search parameters as required.

Advanced - Click on the Advanced tab to search for a specific text string, a
particular size file, or a specific type of file.

When you have set up the search parameters, click


displayed in the bottom portion of the Find File window.

. A report of the files found will be

PRINTER SETUP
To set up a printer, click

> Settings > Printers:

1.

To add a printer, double click on the Add Printer icon (Figure 18). The Add Printer Wizard
Window (Figure 19) walks you through the setup procedure.

2.

To view the properties window of a printer which was previously added, right click on the printers
icon and choose Properties (Figure 20). Be sure the Auto Form Feed check box in the standard
printer properties window for the history printer is off. Otherwise, each alarm will print on a separate
sheet of paper. Some printers do not have an Auto Form Feed setting.

Figure 18. Add Printer Icon

Figure 19. Add Printer Wizard Window

Figure 20. Properties

MS DOS WINDOW
To access an MS DOS window, click

> Programs > Command Prompt. An MS DOS window will

display (Figure 21).

Figure 21. MS DOS Window Accessed From Windows NT

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Computer Basics

SHUTTING DOWN THE SYSTEM


Windows NT should always be shutdown from the

menu.

1.

Click

2.

The system will ask if you wish to shut down the computer, restart the computer, or close all programs and log on as a new user (Figure 22). Select the appropriate radio button and click

>Shut Down.

Figure 22. Shut Down Window

EMERGENCY SHUT DOWN


If your computer completely locks up, press and hold Ctrl+Alt+Delete. Only take this step when you are not
able to access your system in any way. All unsaved work will be lost.

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Computer Basics

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2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Chapter Two

NWS Software Architecture

This chapter contains information on:


l The NexSys Workstation (NWS)
l The LNServer
l LONWORKS Network Services (LNS)
l OPC LONWORKS Server
l The M-Series Workstation

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Rev 2.0

NEXSYS SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE


NexSys Workstation (NWS) Software architecture is comprised of five main elements:

The NWS LONWORKS Tool

The LNServer

LONWORKS Network Services Architecture

The M-Series Workstation

OPC LONWORKS Server

The combination of NWS, M-Series, and OPC technologies provides a full range of facility management setup,
control, and analysis capabilities, all within a LONWORKSbased environment. Figure 1 below illustrates the
basic architecture.

Please see the M-Series


Users Manual for product
information.

NWS

LNServer

M-Series
Workstation

OPC

LONWORKS
SERVER

LNS

LONWORKS
NODE

Figure 1. NexSys Software Architecture

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NexSys Software Overview

NEXSYS WORKSTATION (NWS)


The NexSys Workstation (NWS) is a LONWORKS tool used for the setup and configuration of the building
automation system. All node configuration, node operations, point binding, and execution of plug-ins is performed with NWS. NWS is also used for writing and editing specialty programs for the Flexible System Controller (FSC) using Control Programming Language (CPL), and scheduling of the FSC.

LNSERVER
LNServer allows NWS to communicate with the LNS architecture. It serves as the interface between NWS and
the LNS Component Object Model (COM) technology. When the user makes a request in NWS, the data is sent
to LNServer using TCP-IP protocol. LNServer then communicates the data to LNS. Information is returned to
NWS and ultimately the user in the same way.

LNS
LONWORKS Network Services (LNS) 3.0 Architecture is a set of network services that provides inter-operability
between tools. LNS features an Active X wrapper that allows it to interface with a variety of applications. LNS
communicates directly with devices on the LONWORKS network using LONTALK protocol, and then passes this
information back to the LNServer.

OPC LONWORKS SERVER


The OPC LONWORKS Server is the plug-and-play interface between the M-Series Workstation and the LNS
Architecture. It utilizes Object Linking and Embedding for Process Control (OPC) technology for plug-andplay software, providing communications between building control systems. The OPC Server accesses data from
the field through LNS, and provides that data to the M-Series Workstation. The OPC LONWORKS Server is
multi-tasking, and communicates with all LONTALK media.

M-SERIES WORKSTATION
The M-Series Workstation is the dynamic graphical display for the building control system. The M-Series
Workstation provides trending, graphics, and alarm features to assist users in analyzing system efficiency and
energy consumption. Users can also add navigation links, issue commands, and set up interactive displays of the
facility. M-Series receives information from the field via the OPC Server.

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Software Overview Index

Software Overview Index


B

Basic Menu Concepts 10


Basic Mouse Actions 7
Basic Window Concepts 8
Buttons 12

Network Neighborhood 15
Nexsys Workstation (NWS) 23
NT Explorer 7

OPC LonWorks Server 23


Overview 6

Checkboxes 12
Clicking 7
Cursor 7
D
Dialog Boxes 12
Double Click 7
Drag 7
Dropdown List Boxes 12
E
Emergency Shut Down 19
Escape Key 6
F
Function Keys 6
H
Highlight 7
K
Keyboard 6
L
List Boxes 12
LNS 23
LNServer 23
M
M3 Workstation 23
Menus 10
Mouse 6
Multi-tasking 6
My Computer 15

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P
Point 7
Pop-Up Menus 11
Shortcut Menus 11
Printer Setup 18
Pull-Down Menus 10
R
Radio Buttons 12
Right Click 7
S
Scroll Bars 8
Scroll Box 8
Select 7
Shortcut Menus 16
Spin Boxes 12
Start Menu 17
Swipe 7
T
Task Bar 16
W
Window
Maximize 9
Minimize 9
Move 9
Resize 9
Restore 9
Windows NT 14
Accessing Information
Pull-Down Menus 10
Copy an Object 16
Create a Folder 16

Software Overview

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Delete a Folder 16
Desktop 14
Find an Object 17
Peripherals 6
Move an Object 16
MS DOS Window 40
Overview 14
Recycle Bin 16
Rename an Object 16
Screen Breakdown
Cursor 7
Scroll Bars 8
Windows 9
Windows NT Help 16

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SECTION TWO

INSTALLATION and STARTUP

Chapters
1. NexSys Software Installation
2. Hardware Installation
3. Getting Started

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Installation and Startup Introduction

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

Electronic Systems USA, a wholly owned subsidiary of Johnson Controls, Inc., reserves the right to update
specifications when appropriate. Information contained in this document is based on specifications believed to
be correct at the time of publication.

Echelon , Coactive, Windows NT, and General Electric are registered trademarks and service marks of
companies other than Electronic Systems USA. FSC, CPL and NexSys are trademarks of Electronic
Systems USA.

Copyright 2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

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All Rights Reserved

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Installation and Startup Introduction

Installation/Startup Table of Contents


Chapter One - NexSys Software Installation

31
Four Types Of PC Configurations ...................................................................................... 32
Installation Checklist ..................................................................................... 33
Before You Begin Installing: ............................................................................................... 34
Installing A Network Adapter Or MS Loopback Adapter .......................................... 34
Installing Network Protocols .................................................................................... 36
Installing NexSys For The First time .................................................................................. 38
Configuring LNServer .............................................................................................. 39
Opening The LNServer Configuration Wizard .............................................. 39
Configuring LNServer For A Local Location .................................................. 40
Configuring LNServer For A Remote Location .............................................. 43
Installing Remote Access Services (RAS) .......................................................................... 46
Setting RAS Server To Automatic Start ................................................................... 50
Creating A User With RAS Login Privileges ............................................................ 51
Setting Up A Client To Access The Server ............................................................... 53
Setting Up A Modem ................................................................................................ 56
Dialing The Server From A Remote Site .................................................................. 58
Disconnecting A Remote Site From A Server PC .................................................... 59
Chapter Two - Hardware Installation
63
Introduction ........................................................................................................................ 64
Disabling And Removing The Full-Size PCLTA Card ......................................................... 65
Installing The Hardware Drivers ......................................................................................... 66
Installing The PCLTA-10/20 Card ....................................................................................... 73
Installing The PCC-10 (Laptop Only) ................................................................................. 73
Chapter Three - Getting Started
75
Start-Up Procedure ............................................................................................................ 76
Add ESUSA Resources To Catalog ......................................................................... 76
Adding ESUSA Resources To Catalog ......................................................... 76
Starting NexSys Workstation (NWS) And LnServer ................................................ 78
Starting NWS And LNServer Together .......................................................... 78
Starting NWS ................................................................................................ 78
Starting LNServer ......................................................................................... 78
NWS Main Window ............................................................................................................ 79
Title Bar ................................................................................................................... 79
Version Number Of NWS software .......................................................................... 80
Resizing The NexSys Windows ............................................................................... 80
Menu Bar ................................................................................................................. 80
Toolbar ..................................................................................................................... 81
Physical Tree ........................................................................................................... 81
Working Panels ....................................................................................................... 81
Server Status Bar .................................................................................................... 82
Exiting NWS ....................................................................................................................... 82
Exiting LNServer ................................................................................................................ 82
Installation and Startup Index.......................................................... 85
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Chapter One

NexSys Software Installation

This chapter contains information on:


l Types of PC Configurations
l Minimum System Requirements
l Installing a Network Adapter or Loopback
Adapter
l Installing Network Protocols
l Installing NexSys Workstation (NWS)
l Configuring LNServer
l Installing Remote Access Services (RAS)
l Setting Up a Modem

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Rev 2.0

FOUR TYPES OF PC CONFIGURATIONS


There are four possible PC configurations used in a NexSys system:
Server PC which has the NexSys Workstation (NWS), LNServer, and LONWORKS Network Services (LNS)
Remote/Network PC which has the NWS, LNServer, LNS Client, and communicates with a Server PC
over a network (Figure 2).
Remote/Modem PC which has the NWS, LNServer, LNS Client, and communicates with a
Server PC via a modem (Figure 3).
Server PC with LNServer and LNS, and communicates with a remote PC via network or modem. The
remote PC has NWS, LNServer, and LNS (not shown).
Server PC
NWS
LNServer
LNS

Figure 1. Server PC with NWS, LNServer, and LNS

Remote/Network PC
NWS
LNServer
LNS Client

et

ck

So

Server PC

Remote/Network PC

NWS
LNServer
LNS

NWS
LNServer
LNS Client

Socket

Figure 2. Remote/Network PC Communicating with Server PC through Sockets


Modem

Remote/Modem PC
NWS
LNServer
LNS Client

Server PC
NWS
LNServer
LNS

Modem

Modem

Remote/Modem PC
NWS
LNServer
LNS Client

Figure 3. Remote/Modem PC Communicating with Server PC through Modems using RAS

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Software Installation

INSTALLATION CHECKLIST

Use this checklist as a guide through the Installation and Startup procedures, beginning with Step 1. If a step is not applicable to your particular
setup, skip that step and proceed with the one immediately following it.

Step One: Install Network Adapter or MS Loopback Adapter


Step Two: Install Network Protocols
Step Three: Install NexSys Work Station (NWS)
Step Four Install Remote Access Services (RAS)
Step Five: Setting Up A Modem
Step Six: Disable and Remove Full-Size PCLTA
Step Seven: Install Drivers For Your PCLTA/PCC-10 Card
Step Eight: Install PCLTA-10/PCLTA-20/PCC-10
Step Nine: Reinstall Service Pack 6.0
Step Ten: Starting NexSys

Step Eleven: Configure LNServer

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BEFORE YOU BEGIN INSTALLING:


Before you begin your NexSys install, verify that your PC meets the minimum criteria listed below. In order to
successfully install NexSys software, each NexSys PC must have the following:
Windows NT version 4.0
Windows NT Service Pack 6.0
Intel Pentium II 400 MHz processor
128 MB RAM
4 GB hard drive
1.44 MB 3.5" diskette drive
1024 x 768 resolution, 256 color monitor
IBM-compatible mouse
PCLTA-10, PCLTA-20 or PCC-10 (laptop)
Network Adapter, if necessary
CD-ROM drive
NexSys 2.0 Software must be installed in the order given in this User Guide:
1. Install the Network Adapter or MS Loopback Adapter
2. Install the Network Protocols
3. Install the NexSys software
4. Install Remote Access Services (if applicable)
5. Reinstall Windows NT Service Pack 6.0
6. Configure the LNServer.

INSTALLING A NETWORK ADAPTER OR MS LOOPBACK ADAPTER


NOTE: NexSys uses TCP/IP protocol. If your system does not use a network adapter, you must
select the MS Loopback Adapter option described in the following procedure.
1.

Click

and choose Settings > Control Panel.

a. Double click on the icon labeled Network to open the Network dialog box (Figure 4).
b. Click on the Adapters tab to open the Adapters page (Figure 5).

Figure 4. Network Dialog Box, Identification Page

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Figure 5a. Adapter Page Already Set up

Software Installation

Figure 5b. Adapter Page, No Adapter

2a. If you have completed the setup for your network card, the Adapters Page displays it (Figure 5a).
Proceed to the next section, Installing Network Protocols.
2b.

If you have not set up an adapter card (Figure 5b), click

If you already have a network card in the PC, choose the appropriate card from the list.
If you have no network card, select MS Loopback Adapter (Figure 6). Click
2c.

If your adapter does not appear in the list, click

. Insert the manufacturers disk for

the adapter card drivers, and follow the instructions.

Figure 8. Select OEM Option Window

3.

Figure 7. Adapter Card Setup

If you selected MS Loopback Adapter, a window will appear asking for the frame type (Figure 7).
Consult your system administrator for details. When you have entered the appropriate information,
click

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4.

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

The Windows NT Setup window will appear (Figure 8).


a. Enter the CD-ROM drive and I386 directory path (example: D:\I386), insert the Windows NT
CD into the CD ROM drive, and click

b. A few message windows will appear as the computer copies the appropriate files. The Network
dialog box Adapters page opens, with the new adapter displayed in the list (Figure 5a).

Figure 8. Windows NT Setup Window

5.

Click

. The computer will update binding information. Then a window will appear asking if

you wish to restart the PC (Figure 9). Choose


Network Protocols below.

. After the reboot, proceed with Installing

Figure 9. Message Window

INSTALLING NETWORK PROTOCOLS


Since the NexSys software communicates using sockets, TCP/IP must be installed. NetBEUI allows personal
messages to be transmitted between workstations and is optional. These protocols may be set up when NT is
installed, or they may be added after NT is loaded. In either case, the process is identical.
1.

Click

on the NT task bar and choose Settings >Control Panel. Double click on the icon

labeled Network to open the Identification Page of the Network dialog box (Figure 10).

Figure 10. Identification Page

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Figure 11. Protocol Page

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NexSys Workstation Users Guide

2.

Click on the tab labeled Protocols (Figure 11). Choose

Software Installation

. A window similar to the one

shown in Figure 12 will appear.

Figure 12. Select a Network Protocol Window

3.

Select TCP/IP Protocol from the list of network services. A message window will appear asking if you
wish to use DHCP (Figure 13). Choose

. The Windows NT Setup window will appear (Figure 14).

Figure 13. TCP/IP Setup Window

Figure 14. NT Setup Window

4.

Enter the CD-ROM drive and I386 directory path (example: E:\I386) into the text field, insert the
Windows NT CD into the CD-ROM drive, and click
. A few message windows will appear
as the computer copies the appropriate files. Then the Network dialog box Protocol page displays.
TCP/IP Protocol will appear in the list of protocols.

5.

Click

. The computer will review and update the binding information.

6.

The Microsoft TCP/IP Properties dialog box will appear asking for an IP address:
If you are not connected with a network - choose any legal IP address.
If you are connected with a network - you must have an unused network address. Consult
your system administrator.

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The appropriate subnet mask should appear. The default gateway may be left blank. Click
Choose

. A message window will appear asking if you would like to restart the com-

puter (Figure 15).

Figure 15. Message Window

7.

Choose
software.

. The computer will shutdown and restart. You may now install the NexSys

NOTE: To test the system communications, open a DOS window. At the command prompt, type
PING and the IP address of the adapter (example: PING 192.0.0.1). If the system is
functioning, you will get a reply. If you get a Request timed out message, the TCP/IP
settings may not be installed properly. Consult your network administrator.

INSTALLING NEXSYS FOR THE FIRST TIME

Before installing NexSys, you must set up the network. See Installing a Network Adapter or MS
Loop-Back Adapter and Installing Network Protocols in this chapter.

To install NexSys, you must log in to your Windows NT computer under a profile which has system
administrator privileges. You MUST install TCP/IP on all PCs prior to installing NexSys.

Before running NexSys on a network, you must install a PCLTA-10 or PCLTA-20 card in your PC (or
PCC-10 in the laptop) and configure it (See Chapter Two XXXX, Hardware Installation).

NOTE: These installation steps must be performed on every PC, server, and remote PC.

The NexSys software is shipped on a CD ROM. Use the following procedure to install NexSys.
To install NexSys:
1.
2.

Place the NexSys 2.0 Installation CD into the CD ROM drive. Wait 10 seconds.
If the NexSys Autorun does not initialize the software program:
a. Click

and select Run. from the Start Menu.

b. Select the drive containing the NexSys Installation CD.


c. Select the NexSys 2.0 directory.
d. Select Setup.exe and click

e. You will be returned to the Run Window (Figure ). Verify that the file path is correct , and click
. A Welcome screen will display. Click
3.

The LNS Server install will begin. This is an Echelon installation program executed from within the
NexSys 2.0 Install. Follow the instructions on your monitor. If you are prompted to overwrite existing
files, select No To All. When the installation is complete, click

to continue with the

NexSys 2.0 Install program.

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4.

Choose the destination directory where NexSys 2.0 will be installed. The default directory is C:/
NEXSYS2. If you would like to change the directory, click Browse. Select the appropriate destination and click

5.

Software Installation

, then click

Choose the Folder Name for the Start menu. The default name is NexSys 2.0 Main System. To
change the name of this directory, enter a new name into the Program Folders field. Click
.

6.

A window will display all the settings youve chosen for your NexSys 2.0 install. Review the options.
If they are correct, select

7.

. To make changes, click

A message window will pop up telling you that you must install a valid LONTALK card before NexSys
will communicate on the LONWORKS network. Click

NOTE: The Windows NT installation for the PCLTA-10, PCLTA-20, and PCC-10 cards is found in
the PCLTA directory on the NexSys 2.0 Installation CD-ROM. See Chapter Two, Hardware
Installation.
8.

To complete the installation, you must restart the PC. Select the Yes, I want to restart my computer
now radio button and click Finish.

Upon completion of the install, you may press

> Programs > NexSys 2.0 Main System to

display the three necessary NexSys programs. If you like, you may create desktop icons for these programs.
NOTE: Install all hardware (Chapter Two, XXXX Hardware Installation ) and configure the
LNServer (Chapter Three, XXXX Getting Started) before using this application.

CONFIGURING LNSERVER
LNServer uses a Configuration Wizard to guide you through the process. The steps below explain the basic
concepts of each step in the order presented by the Wizard software. Configuration for a local server is explained
first, followed by the steps for configuration on a remote server. Use the

, and

buttons as needed.

OPENING THE LNSERVER CONFIGURATION WIZARD


1.

Click

on the NT task bar and choose Programs > NexSys 2.0 Main System > Configure

LNServer (Figure 16) OR:

2.

Double click on the

3.

The NexSys LNServer Configuration Wizard window (Figure 17) opens. Click

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

icon on your desktop (if installed).


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Figure 16. Start menu for Configure LNServer

CONFIGURING LNSERVER FOR A LOCAL LOCATION

Figure 17. LNServer Configuration Wizard Window

1.

This screen (Figure 18) prompts you for the location of your server. Use the default selection Local
(Your Machine). Click

2.

Figure 18. LNServer Server Location Window

Select your network (Figure 19). You can enter a new network, select an existing one, or delete a
network from this window.
To create a new network:
a. Select the New Network radio button.
b. Enter the Network Name in the text field below. You are allowed a maximum of eight characters.
c. Enter the name of the Database Folder. You are allowed a maximum of 23 characters. You can
Browse button to select your folder.
use the
d. Click

To select an existing network:


a. Select the Existing Network radio button.
b. Using your mouse pointer, click on the network desired.
c. Click

To delete an existing network:


a. Using your mouse pointer, click on the network you want to delete.
b. You will be prompted to verify the deletion (Figure 20). Click
c. Click the

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Installation and Startup

button.

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NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Figure 19. LNServer Select Network Window

3.

Software Installation

Figure 20. Please Verify Deletion Window

Select the Network Interface from the menu on the right side of the window (Figure 21). If your setup
does not have a PCLTA card, select the No NI (engineered mode) . Click

Figure 21. LNServer Select Network Interface Window

4.

Enter the properties for your server (Figure 22) as explained below:

NOTE: If you are not sure of the correct properties, use the default values already shown.
Authentication Key: This value acts as an encrypted code that is used by devices in the field
to authenticate that transmissions received are coming from a valid source.
Domain ID: This value can be 1, 3, or 6 bytes long. It will be assigned as the system domain.
Import Folder: Type in or use the
Browse button to select the path that you want LNServer to follow to find .xif (XIF Image Document) files.
Graphics Folder: Type in or use the
Browse button to select the path that you want
LNServer to follow to find icons and bitmap files.
Resource Catalog Folder: Type in or use the
Browse button to select the path that you
want LNServer to follow to find resource catalog files. These are the files that give LNServer
the information it needs to decode and extracts network variables (NVs) and configuration
parameters (CPs).
5.

When you have entered values for all the fields, click

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6.

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

The Local IP/Remote Channel Settings window (Figure 23) allows you to restrict who can connect to
your network. The permission string specifies the access permission for remote IP clients. It applies
to all remote IP clients with an IP address that satisfies the rules of the permission string.
You can leave the fields blank if you dont want this option. Click

Figure 22. Local Server Properties Window

7.

to continue.

Figure 23. Local IP/Remote Channel Settings Window

Use the Subsystem Selection window (Figure 24) to enter a new or existing subsystem. This subsystem will have all new nodes assigned to it. You can also delete a subsystem with this window.

NOTE: The subsystem can not have the same name as the main system.
To create a new subsystem:
a. Select the New Subsystem radio button.
b. Enter the Subsystem Name in the text field below. You are allowed a maximum of sixteen
characters.
c. Click

To select an existing subsystem:


a. Select the Existing Subsystem radio button.
b. Using your mouse pointer, click on the subsystem desired.
c. Click

To delete an existing subsystem:


a. Using your mouse pointer, click on the subsystem you want to delete.
b. Click the
8.

button.

The Verify and Exit window (Figure 25) is the last step in the configuration process. Once you have
verified that the LNServer configuration information listed is correct, you can select to exit with or
without starting LNServer.
If the listed information is not correct, use the

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button to select the correct parameters.

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Figure 24. Subsystem Selection Window

Figure 25. Verify And Exit Window

CONFIGURING LNSERVER FOR A REMOTE LOCATION

Figure 26. LNServer Server Location Window

1.

This screen (Figure 26) prompts you for the location of your server and other information, if necessary. For a remote server, you must also enter a TCP/IP address and register your network by using
the LNS Remote Configuration Utility (RCU). Follow the steps below:
a. Select the Remote (TCP/IP or NSI) radio button from the NexSys Server Locationmenu.
b. Select the TCP/IP from the Remote Server menu.

Note: The NSI (Networks Services Information) option is not available at this time.

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c. Click the

Rev 2.0

RCU button. The LNS Remote Client Configuration Utility window opens

(Figure 27).
d. From this window, you can add, edit, or delete remote networks. TCP must be selected for the
Default Remote Transport field.

To add a remote network, click

. The Add LNS Network window opens (Figure 28).

Browse to select the Server


Enter the network name and local address (if applicable). Click
Address. The Local LNS Servers window opens (Figure 29). Use the mouse pointer to select
the network address you want, and click

. The Server Port will update to the

selected address.
You will return to the LNS Remote Client Configuration Window, with your network listed in the Remote
Networks field. Click

. Proceed to step 1e.

Figure 27. LNS Remote Client Configuration Window

Figure 29. Local LNS Servers Window

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Figure 28. Add LNS Network Window

Figure 30. Edit LNS Network Window

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Software Installation

To edit a remote network, select the network and click

Edit. The Edit LNS Network

window opens (Figure 30). Make changes as described in adding a remote network above.
When you have made all changes, click

Okay. You will return to the LNS

Remote Client Configuration window, with your network will be listed in the Remote Networks
field. If you select it, the changes will be displayed in the lower field. Click

and

proceed to step 1e.

To delete a network, select the network and click


Click

. The network will be removed.

and proceed to step 3e.

1e. Click
2.

The Network Interface Selection (Figure 31) window opens. Use the default selection Internet in the
Remote Network Interface (TCP/IP) field. Click

3.

The Network Selection window opens (Figure 32). You must use an existing network in this window,
and you can not delete networks. This field is the result of the networks you registered using the LNS
Remote Configuration Utility in Step 3. Click the Existing Network radio button, select the network
you want to use, and click

Figure 31. Network Interface Selection Window

4.

Figure 32. Network Selection Window

The Local IP/Remote Channel Settings window (Figure 33) opens. Leave the Remote Server Settings
Channel field blank, and click

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Figure 33. Local IP/Remote Channel Settings Window

5.

Rev 2.0

Figure 34. Subsystem Selection Window

Use the Subsystem Selection window (Figure 34) to select an existing subsystem. Click
..

6.

The Verify and Exit window (Figure 35) is the last step in the configuration process. Once you have
verified that the LNServer configuration information listed is correct, you can select to exit with or
without starting LNServer.
If the listed information is not correct, use the

button to select the correct parameters.

Figure 35. Verify And Exit Window

INSTALLING REMOTE ACCESS SERVICES (RAS)


All remote site PCs dialing into the NexSys workstation use a modem to dial or receive. Use the Windows NT
control panel to set up and configure each modem per manufacturers instructions. After all modems are set up,
install the Remote Access Services (as described below) on the main workstation PC and each remote PC:
1.

Click

on the NT task bar and choose Settings. Select Control Panel. Double click on the

icon labeled Network to open the Network dialog box (Figure 36).

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Figure 36. Identification Page

2.

Software Installation

Figure 37. Services Page

Click on the tab labeled Services to view this page (Figure 37). Choose

. A window

similar to Figure 67 will appear.


NOTE: Your system may have additional network services beside what is listed in Figure 38.

Figure 38. Select Network Services Dialog Box

3.

Highlight Remote Access Services and click


(Figure 39).

. The Windows NT Setup window will appear

Figure 39. Windows NT Setup Window

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4.

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

Enter the appropriate CD-ROM drive and I386 directory into the text field (example: D:\I386), insert
the Windows NT CD into the CD ROM drive, and click

. A few message windows will

appear as the computer copies the appropriate files.


NOTE: If your PC has no modem set up, the warning box (Figure 40) appears. You may click
to set up a modem. See the section Setting Up a Modem for details.

Figure 40. Warning Indicating No RAS Compatible Device is Installed.

Figure 41. Add RAS Device Window

5.

Figure 42. Remote Access Setup Window

If a modem is installed, the Add RAS Device window appears (Figure 41). Select the appropriate
device from the drop down list and click
. The Remote Access Setup dialog box (Figure 42)
appears. The contents of this window may vary depending on the setup of your PC.

6.

Select

. The Configure Port Usage dialog box will appear (Figure 43). If the system will

be a server, select the Receive calls only radio button and click
client, select the Dial out only radio button and click
(Figure 42) displays again.

. If the system will be a


The Remote Access Setup window

Figure 43. Configure Port Usage Window

7.

Click

. The Network Configuration window will display. If your PC has been desig-

nated as a server (Receive calls only), the Network Configuration Window for a Server PC (Figure 44)
displays. If your PC has been designated as a client (Dial out only), the Network Configuration
Window for a Client PC (Figure 45) displays, and you can skip step 8, proceeding directly to Step 9.

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Figure 44. Network Configuration Window For A Server PC

Figure 45. Network Configuration For A Client PC

8.

Configuring NetBEUI is optional. Select the TCP/IP checkbox and click

. The RAS

Server TCP/IP Configuration window will appear (Figure 46). Select the This computer only radio
button. Select the Use static address pool radio button. Enter a range of addresses that the server
may assign to the clients. These should be unique TCP/IP addresses. Click
Configuration window displays again (Figure 44). Click

. The Network

NOTE: You will need a minimum of two IP addresses which do NOT conflict with any addresses
on the network. For example, you could set the range to be 10.31.68.001 to 10.31.68.002.
If the system is not connected with a network, the IP address selection is arbitrary.

Figure 46. TCP/IP Configuration Window

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9.

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

You are returned to the Remote Access Setup window. Click

. A message window

appears indicating that the installation is in progress. The Windows NT Setup dialog box will appear
again. The necessary files will be located on the Windows NT CD-ROM in the ..\I386 directory.
Click

10.

. Message windows will appear indicating that file transfer is taking place.

When the installation is complete, the Setup Message window (Figure 47) displays. Click
The Network Services page (Figure 37) displays. Click

. Message windows will appear as the

bindings are updated. The Network Settings Change message (Figure 48) will display. Click

Figure 47. Setup Message Window

Figure 48. Network Settings Change Message

NOTE: Follow the procedures on the next few pages to set the RAS server to start automatically,
create users with RAS Login privileges, and set up the modems.

SETTING RAS SERVER TO AUTOMATIC START


1.

Click

on the NT task bar and choose Settings. Select Control Panel. Double click on the

icon labeled Services to open the Services window (Figure 49). Highlight Remote Access Services
and click

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. The Service window displays (Figure 50).

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Figure 49. Services Window

Figure 50. Service Window

2.

Select the Automatic radio button in the Startup Type section and click

. Click

. Shutdown the computer and reboot.

CREATING A USER WITH RAS LOGIN PRIVILEGES


1.

On the server PC, click

on the NT task bar and choose Programs > Administrative Tools

(Common) > User Manager. The User Manager window appears (Figure 51).

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Figure 51 . User Manager Window

2.

Select New User from the User pull down menu. The New User window displays (Figure 52).

Figure 52. New User Window

3.

Enter the users name and password. Reenter the password into the Confirm Password field to verify
it. Press

. The Groups Membership window will appear (Figure 53).

NOTE: Asterisks displayed as the characters of the password are entered into the Password and
Confirm password fields.

Figure 53. Groups Membership Window

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4.

Highlight Administrators and click


New User window displays again.

5.

Press

Software Installation

or double click on Administrators. Click

. The

. The Dialin Information window appears (Figure 54). Select the Grant Dialin

permission to user checkbox and click


. The new user will appear in the list on the User
Manager window. Close the window. Shutdown the PC and reboot.

Figure 54. Dialin Information Window

SETTING UP A CLIENT TO ACCESS THE SERVER


Once RAS is installed on the host and client PCs, you must set up the client PC to access the host.
1.

Determine the IP Address of the server PC. This can be accomplished in several ways:
a. On the server PC, click
on the NT task bar and choose Settings >Control Panel.
Double click on the icon labeled Network. Open the dialog box to the Protocols page.
Highlight TCP/IP Protocol and click
. The IP address will display.
b. Open a DOS window and type IPCONFIG at the command prompt. The first IP address shown
is the address of the local PC.
c. If you know the network name of the PC, open a DOS window and type PING (NAME) at the
command prompt. NAME must be the network name of the server PC.

2.

Open a DOS window on the Client PC. Type CD WINNT\SYSTEM32\DRIVER\ETC at the command
prompt. Once you have changed into that directory, type NOTEPAD HOSTS. This file maps the IP
addresses to the network names of the PCs in the system. It will look similar to Figure 55.

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Figure 55. Hosts File

Figure 56. Sample IP Address And Server PC Name

3.

At the bottom of the window, enter the IP address of the server PC followed by <spacebar> and the
network name of the server PC (Figure 56). Select Save from the File menu. Close the window.

4.

On the client PC, click

on the NT task bar and choose Programs >Accessories >Dial Up

Networking. The Dial Up Networking window displays (Figure 57). Click

. The pull-

down menu (Figure 58) appears.

Figure 57. Dial Up Networking Window

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Figure 58. Drop Down Menu

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5.

Select Edit entry and modem properties. The New Phonebook Entry window (Figure 59) displays.
Enter the network name of the server PC into the Entry Name field. Enter the phone number of the
server modem into the Phone number field. Be sure to include additional numbers necessary for
obtaining an outside line or reaching an extension. Use commas to designate any necessary pauses.

Figure 59. New Phonebook Entry Window

6.

Software Installation

Click

Figure 60. Modem Configuration Window

. The Modem Configuration window appears (Figure 60). Select the initial speed of

the modem from the drop down list. Select only the Enable hardware flow control check box. Click
.
Click on the Server tab (Figure 61). Select PPP, Windows NT, Windows 95, Internet from the Dial-up
server type drop down list. Select the TCP/IP check box and click
TCP/IP Settings window will display (Figure 62).

Figure 61. Server Page

8.

. The PPP

Figure 68. PPP TCPIP Settings Window

Select the Server assigned IP addresses and the Server assigned name server addresses radio
buttons. Click

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9.

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Click on the Security tab (Figure 63). Select the Accept any authentication including clear text radio
button. Click

Figure 63. Security Page

SETTING UP A MODEM
1.

Click

on the NT task bar and choose Settings > Control Panel. Double click on the icon

labeled Modems to open the Modems Properties window (Figure 64).

Figure 64. Modems Properties Window

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2.

Click

Software Installation

. The Install New Modem window appears (Figure 65). Two options are avail-

able:
. If you let the
If you would like for the computer to detect your modem, press
computer search for the modem, a message window will indicate that the procedure is in
progress.
If you would like to select your modem from the list, select the Dont detect my modem; I will
select it from a list checkbox and click
. If you choose to make the selection, the
Install New Modem window will display a list of manufacturers and models (Figure 66).

Figure 65. Install New Modem Window

Figures 66. Install New Modem Window With Modem List

3.

Highlight the appropriate manufacturer and model. Click


. The Install New Modem
window will ask which ports you would like to install the modem on (Figure 67).

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Figure 67. Install New Modem Window To Select COM Ports

Figure 68. Install New Modem Window When Finished

4.

Highlight the Selected ports radio button. Highlight the appropriate COM port and click
.
The Install New Modem window will indicate that the modem has been installed (Figure 68). Click
. Click
.

NOTE: You may set the baud rate, data bits, parity, and stop bits by selecting

on the

Modems Properties window. Select


to set up the area code, country
you are dialing from, extra numbers which must be dialed, and tone/pulse dialing.
5.

Shutdown the computer and reboot it.

DIALING THE SERVER FROM A REMOTE SITE


1.

On the client PC, click

on the NT task bar and choose Programs >Accessories.

Choose Dial Up Networking. Or, double click on the My Computer icon located on the desktop and
double click on the Dial Up Networking icon. The Dial Up Networking window displays (Figure 69).

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Figure 69. Dial Up Networking Window

2.

Click

. The Connect window will appear (Figure 70). Enter the user name and password

which were assigned at the server PC. Click


. The modem dials the phone number previewed in Figure 68. A message box displays indicating that the modem is dialing and the user is
being authenticated. When a connection has been established and verified, a Connection Complete
message will appear (Figure 71). Click

Figure 70. Connect Window

Figure 71. Connection Message

DISCONNECTING A REMOTE SITE FROM A SERVER PC


1.

On the client PC, click

on the NT task bar and choose Control Panel. Double click on

the Dial-Up Monitor icon. The Dial-Up Networking Monitor window displays (Figure 72).

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Figure 72. Dial-Up Monitor Dialog Box, Status Page

2.

To disconnect from the server, click

Rev 2.0

Figure 73. Dial-Up Monitor, Preferences Page

. Click

NOTE: If you would like to monitor the status of the connection, you may click on the Preferences
page (Figure 73) and select one of the radio buttons in the Show status lights section. The
first radio button displays a small icon next to the system clock on the task bar. When the
second radio button is selected, the window shown in Figure 74 will display on screen.
TX

- transmitting data

RX

- receiving data

ERR - indicates an error


CD

- carrier detect

Figure 74. Signal Monitoring Window

NOTE: You must reinstall Windows NT Service Pack 6.0 after all software and hardware
installation had been completed, or any changes are made to these installations.

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Chapter Two

Hardware Installation

This chapter contains information on:


l Disabling and Removing a Full-Size PCLTA
l Installing the Drivers for Your Card
l Installing a PCLTA-10/20
l Installing a PCC-10

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INTRODUCTION
The NexSys Workstation (NWS) PC uses the internally mounted Echelon LonTalk PCLTA-10, the PCLTA-20, or
the PCC-10:
The PCLTA -10 (Figure 1) comes with an integrated transceiver
The PCLTA-20 is available with:
An integrated transceiver (Figure 2)
A non-integrated board with the 78K bps Transceiver daughter-board (Figure 3)
A 1.25Mbps Transceiver daughter-board (Figure 4)
The 1.25 Mbps Fiber Optic LONWORKS SMX Transceiver daughter-board (Figure 5).
The PCC-10 (Figure 6) Card is for use with a laptop.
NOTE: Since NexSys 2.0 uses LONWORKS Network Services (LNS), the traditional full-size
PCLTA card with piggyback SMX board may no longer be used.
If you are installing a LonTalk card for the first time, proceed directly to Installing The
Hardware Drivers. If you have a full-size PCLTA installed, you will need to follow the
procedure Disabling and Removing the Full-Size PCLTA Card on the following page
before you install a new LonTalk card.

MAYLASIA

ECHELON

LSBR549

FTT-10A
ECH
96-01

MAYLASIA
LSBR549

MAYLASIA
LSBR549

MAYLASIA
LSBR549
MAYLASIA
LSBR549

MAYLASIA
LSBR549

U
L

ECH
96-01

MAYLASIA
LSBR549

Figure 1. PCLTA-10 Board

JP1
ECHELON
FTT-10A
50051
9745A

P1

Figure 2. PCLTA-20 Board With Integrated Transceiver

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J7

JP10

BUS

FREE

JP9
1
0

U9

Figure 3. SMX 78K Transceiver Board

U9

J1

JP9
1

1
JP1

LSBR549

MAYLASIA

ECHELON
506060
946456

LSBR549

MAYLASIA

JP2

TWISTED PAIR MODULAR TRANSCEIVER

J2
1

JP10

J2

JP3

J1

TM

ECHELON

LONWORKS

LSBR549

MAYLASIA

LSBR549

MAYLASIA

ECHELON MODEL 77040 FTM-10 MODULAR TRANSCEIVER

LONWORKSTM

Hardware Installation

J7

Rev 2.0

DS1

ECHELON

Figure 4. SMX 1250 Transceiver Board

LSBR549

MAYLASIA

145B148R

DFG-0 HTRX
PBSFLR41R
5810S

PCC-10 Network Adapter

Raytheon
145B148R

Figure 5. SMX Dual Fiber Optic Module (DFOM) Transceiver Board

Figure 6. PCC-10 Card For Laptops

DISABLING AND REMOVING THE FULL-SIZE PCLTA CARD


LNSTM and NexSys 2.0 do not support the full-size PCLTA card. NexSys 2.0 requires a PCLTA-10, PCLTA-20, or a
PCC-10. However, the Echelon PCLTA driver install program used with NexSys 1.33 and all previous Windows
NT versions of NexSys does not have an uninstall feature. In order to install an LNS compatible card, you must
first disable and then physically remove the PCLTA driver from the NT system.
1.

Open the Windows NT Control Panel by pressing

>Settings>Control Panel. Double click

on the Devices icon. The Devices window displays (Figure 7).

Figure 7. Devices Window

2.

Scroll through the list to find PCLTA. Select it and press


button. Click

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. Select the Disabled radio

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Hardware Installation

3.

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Press

. Select

Rev 2.0

. Your window should look like Figure 8. Click

Figure 8. Device Window Showing The PCLTA Card Disabled

4.

You will have returned to the Devices Window (Figure 7). Click

5.

Turn off your PC, remove the case, and physically remove the full-size PCLTA card.

6.

Reboot your PC.

INSTALLING THE HARDWARE DRIVERS


The PCLTA-10 is a half-size ISA card for a standard PC. The PCLTA- 20 is the PCI version of the card for a
standard PC, and it comes in two varieties; with an integrated transceiver board, or with a piggyback mounted
SMX board.
The PCC-10 is a PCMCIA card for a laptop computer and is equivalent to a PCLTA-10/20 card in a desktop
computer.
No matter which card you use , you will follow the same installation procedure. This is a general guideline for
installing the PCLTA-10/PCLTA-20 or PCC-10 card under Windows NT. To install the driver, you will need the
driver and install files located on your NexSys Install CD in the Pclta10 folder.
1.

Start up Windows NT. Do NOT install the hardware first, as Echelon recommends that you run the
install program prior to installing the card. Place the NexSys Installation CD-ROM into your CDROM drive.

Note: The NexSys Installation CD-ROM contains an Autorun file. If the NexSys Installation program does not does not begin automatically within 10 seconds, skip Step 2 and proceed to
Step 3.
2.

The NexSys Installation program will automatically open to the Introduction Page (Figure 8). Click
. The Exit Setup message window displays (Figure 9). Click

. You should

exit the NexSys Installation Program and return to your PC Desktop.

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Figure 8. NexSys Introduction Page

3.

Press

>Run. Click

Pclta10 ( Figure 10). Click

Figure 9. Exit Setup Message Window

. Double click on your CD-ROM drive, and then select


. Select Setup.exe ( Figure 11) and click

will return you to the Run window, which will be similar to Figure12). Click

Figure 10. Select Pclta10

Hardware Installation

. This
.

Figure 11. Select Setup.exe

Figure 12. Run ..\Pclata10\Setup.exe

4. Choose the appropriate language and click . The LONWORKS Welcome Window opens (Figure 13). Click
. The Software License Agreement displays (Figure 14). To accept the terms, click
.

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Figure 13. LonWorks Setup Welcome Window

Figure 15. Select Components Window

4.

Rev 2.0

Figure 14. Software License Agreement

Figure 16. Select Directory Window

Select the PCLTA-10 or PCLTA-20 or PCC-10 radio button on the Select Components window
. Accept the default installation directory C:\LONWORKS (Figure
(Figure 15) and click
16) and click

Figure 17. Setup Window

5.

68

The Setup window shown in Figure 17 displays. When complete, the Optional Device Name window
shown in Figure 18 will display.

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Figure 18. Optional Device Name Window

Hardware Installation

Figure 19. Setup Complete Window

6.

Since this will be the only LonTalk card in your machine, accept 1 as the numeric base for the device
name and click
. The window (Figure 19) will display. Click
.

7.

The install program will ask you if you want to restart the computer. Select the No, I will restart my
computer later radio button (Figure 20). Click
. A warning message will display (Figure
21). Click

Figure 20. Setup Complete Window

Figure 21. Warning Message Window

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8.

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

Perform a shutdown and remove all power from the computer. Insert the LONWORKS PCLTA-10 or
PCLTA-20 card. Restart the computer. Go to

>Programs >Adminstrative Tools >Event

Viewer. Verify that no errors are associated with the card driver pnplon selected (Figure 22). Go to
> Control Panel > Devices. Confirm that the Status is Started and the Startup is Automatic
(Figure 23).

Figure 22. Event Viewer Window

Figure 23. Devices Window

Figure 24. Control Panels LonWorks Plug n Play Window

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Figure 25. LON1 Diagnostics Window

9.

Go to

> Control Panel. Double click on the

LonWorks Plug n Play window displays (Figure 24). Click

LonWorks Plug n Play icon. The


. The LON1 Diagnos-

tics window appears (Figure 25). Click


. When the PCLTA card is configured correctly, the
diagnostic test will result in a screen similar to Figure 26. Leave the LON1Diagnostics window open.
If the test fails, proceed to Step 11

Figure 26. Example of Results of LON1Diagnostics Test

10.

Connect the PCLTA to the LON. From the LON1 Diagnostics window (Figure 25), click

The message window shown in Figure 27 will display. Click


. The card will now be waiting for
a service pin. Press the service pin on any node on the LON. A ping successful message and receipt
of a neuron ID indicates that the interface adapter can communicate with the field. The installation
process is finished and you can skip the remaining steps of this section.

Figure 27. Message Window

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Note: If the diagnostic test of step 9 failed, you could have either a hardware failure or a resource
conflict. The remaining steps will help resolve resource conflicts.

11.

Go to

> Control Panel. Double click on the

LonWorks Plug n Play icon. Click

. Choose the appropriate tab (Figures 28). This option allows you to select an I/O
range and IRQ.

Figure 28. Plug N Play Preferences Window

12.

The selection of the I/O range and IRQ will vary from machine to machine. To check your current IRQ
settings, click

>Programs >Administrative Tools >NT Diagnostics. Select the Resources

tab. The IRQs which are already in use will display. Select an available IRQ for your LONWORKS card.

72

13.

If you installed a PCLTA-10, select the PCLTA-10 tab on the Preferences window. Select the Interrupt
Request radio button for one of your available IRQs. By selecting a radio button, you change the IRQ
sequence. If you installed a PCC-10, select the PCC-10 tab on the Preferences window. Start by
accepting the default I/O range (0120-0123) and try different IRQs. IRQ 15 usually doesnt work. Try
selecting IRQ 10 and restarting the computer. The PCLTA-20 has no additional settings.

14.

If you changed the IRQ, reboot the machine and run the diagnostic test again. See step 9. Repeat the
procedure until you find an appropriate IRQ. If you still have trouble with the PCC-10, you may need
to select a different I/O port and reset the IRQs again.

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Hardware Installation

INSTALLING THE PCLTA-10/20 CARD


Once the software has been installed, you can now physically install your PCLTA-10 (Figure ) or PCLTA-20
(Figure ) card. Power down the system and mount the board into a 16-bit ISA slot of the NexSys Workstation as
directed below:
1. Power down the system completely, and remove the AC power source.
2. Remove the cover and select on the motherboard:
an open 16-bit ISA slot (PCLTA-10)
an open PCI slot (PCLTA-20)
3. Align the cards edge connector with the PC slot and press the card firmly into place. Be sure to seat the
boards edge connector carefully and securely.
4. Secure the card to the case using the correct screw for that slot.
5. Connect the LON wiring to the boards network terminal block.
6. Replace the cover and power up the NexSys Workstation.

INSTALLING THE PCC-10 (LAPTOP ONLY)


Once the software has been installed, you can now physically install your PCC-10 card. Power down the system
and insert the card.
1. Power down the system completely, and remove the AC power source.
2. Insert the PCC-10 into the Type II slot.
3. Connect the network cable that came with the PCC-10.
4. Connect the LON wiring to the boards network terminal block.
5. Power up the NexSys Workstation laptop.

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Chapter Three

Getting Started

This chapter contains information on:


l Adding Resource Files to Catalog
l Start-Up Procedure
l NexSys Main Window
l Exiting NexSys
l Exiting LNServer

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Rev 2.0

START-UP PROCEDURE
NexSys Workstation (NWS) is always run concurrently with LNServer. NWS needs LNServer to communicate
with LNS and ultimately, the devices in the field.
All remote NexSys systems need the LNServer on the main system to be running so that they can communicate
with the network. In accordance with this requirement, the User can open both programs with one command, but
each program must be shut down separately.
NOTE: This chapter gives general information on start-up procedures only. For detailed information on NWS functions, see Section Five, Operations - Chapter One.

ADD ESUSA RESOURCES TO CATALOG


After the NWS installation has been completed but before starting NWS and LNServer for the first time, the
User must first add NWS Resources Files to the LNS Catalog.
ESUSA Resource Files are files that contain the manufacturer-specific information on how to properly display
data on NWS. All additional information on NVs, CPs, and documentation is contained in the files. The Echelon
LONMARK Support Catalog is a software tool that allows NWS and LNS easy access to these files.
NOTE: The User must add the Resources Files when starting NWS and LNServer for the first
time only. Should the User at a later date receive new or updated Resources Files from a
manufacturer, follow the same procedure that is explained below.

ADDING ESUSA RESOURCES TO CATALOG


1.

Click

> Programs > NexSys 2.0 Main (Remote) System > Add ESUSA Resources to

Catalog (Figure 1).


2.

The LONMARK Device Resource Files Editor (Figure 2) opens. Click

Figure 1. NexSys Main/Remote System Menu

3.

Figure 2. Open LONMARK Resource Files Editor

The Open A Catalog window opens (Figure 3). Select the default directory:
C:\Lonworks\Types\User\ESUSA (Double click on User directory to select ESUSA).

4.

The Edit A Catalog window opens (Figure 4). Click

5.

The Choose A Directory window opens (Figure 5). Verify that the default directory
C:\Lonworks\Types\User\ESUSA is selected, and click

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Figure 3. Open A Catalog Window

Figure 4. Edit A Catalog Window

Figure 5. Choose A Directory Window

Figure 6. Catalog Information Section

6.

You will return to the Edit A Catalog window (Figure 4 above). In the Catalog Information section of
the window (Figure 6), verify the Catalog Status. If the Catalog Status text field states Needs a
Refresh (Figure 7), click

7.

The Catalog Status field now reads Up To Date (Figure 8). Click
.

Figure 7. Needs A Refresh Message

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Figure 8. Up To Date Message

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STARTING NEXSYS WORKSTATION (NWS) AND LNSERVER


The User can select the NexSys2 Start command to open both programs simultaneously. Both programs can
also be opened separately.

STARTING NWS AND LNSERVER TOGETHER


This command (Figure 9) will open both LNServer and NWS simultaneously:
1.

Click

> Programs > NexSys2 Start

Figure 9. NexSys2 Start Command

STARTING NWS
Two methods are available for starting NWS:
1.

Double Click on

2.

Click

NexSys Workstation icon OR:


> Programs> NexSys 2.0 Main/Remote System> NexSys Workstation (Figure 10)

Figure 10. Start NexSys Workstation From Start> Programs> NexSys...

STARTING LNSERVER
Two methods are available for starting LNServer:

1.

Double Click on

2.

Click

LNServer icon OR:


> Programs >NexSys 2.0 Main/Remote System > LNServer (Figure 11)

Figure 11. Start LNServer From Start> Programs> NexSys...

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Starting/Exiting NexSys

NWS MAIN WINDOW


The NWS Main window (Figure 12) has two main areas: the Physical Tree, and the Working Panels. At the top
of the NWS window is located the Title Bar, Menu Bar, Operator name, and the Tool Bar. The status of LNServer is also displayed in the lower left hand corner of the window.

Other Working Panels Available


Title Bar
Menu Bar
Tool Bar

Working Panel

Physical
Tree

LNServer
Status

Figure 12. NexSys Main Window

TITLE BAR
The Title Bar (Figure 13) is the horizontal bar at the top of the window. It contains the title of the window, the
NexSys icon, and the

(Maximize),

(Minimize), and

(Close) buttons.

Figure 13. NexSys Title Bar

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VERSION NUMBER OF NWS SOFTWARE


To display the version number of your NWS software:
1.

From the NWS menu bar, select Help > About....

2.

The About NexSys Workstation (Figure 14) opens, displaying the information.

Figure 14. Message Window showing Software Information

RESIZING THE NEXSYS WINDOWS


To make a window smaller or larger:
1.

Place the cursor on either a horizontal or vertical window border. When the double
ended arrow appears, drag the edge or corner of the window to resize appropriately.

2.

Dragging the edge of a window will change only one dimension of the window.
To change both the width and the height of the window equally, drag a corner of the window.

If you resize a NexSys window, the workstation will remember. When the resized window is reopened, it will
retain the new dimensions. Use caution when resizing windows. By making a window smaller, you may
eliminate important information fields (check boxes, radio buttons, text fields, etc.) from the visible part of the
window. Use the scroll bars to view the hidden part of the screen, or resize the window to show all the fields.

MENU BAR
The Menu Bar (Figure 15) contains the names of NWS menus. It appears below the Title Bar. Each menu item is
a pull-down list of available commands. You open a menu by clicking on the menu name. Figure 16 below
shows an example of an NWS Menu Bar pull-down menu.

Figure 15. NexSys Menu Bar

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Figure 16. NexSys Menu Bar Pull-down List

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TOOLBAR
The NWS Toolbar has four shortcut buttons that provide quick access to commands. Holding the mouse cursor
over the Toolbar button causes the name of the button to pop up (Figure 17).

Figure 17. NexSys Toolbar

PHYSICAL TREE
The NWS Physical Tree displays a system tree listing all the nodes in the control system. The tree can be
expanded further, or collapsed. All node commands are initiated from this point. The desired node is selected
from this menu, and the working panels will correspond to the selected node. In Figure 18 below, the VAV-01
node is selected.

Figure 18. NWS Physical Tree with VAV-01 Node Selected.

WORKING PANELS
NWS working panels gives the user specific information on a selection node. In the example below, the ASG
(Application Specific Graphic) working panel shows the temperature for node VAV-01 (Figure 19).

Figure 19. Example of NWS ASG Working Panel

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SERVER STATUS BAR


The Server Status Bar (Figure 20) allows the user to monitor the status of LNServer. LNServer must be running
for NWS to operate.

Figure 20. Server Status Bar

EXITING NWS
There are five ways to exit the NexSys:
1.

Click on NWS from the Menu Bar. Select Exit.

2.

Click

3.

Right click anywhere on the NWS Title Bar. Select Close.

4.

Click the

5.

Click on the NexSys icon in the left corner of the Title Bar. Select Close.

from the NWS Toolbar

(Close) button from NWS Title Bar.

EXITING LNSERVER
There are four ways to exit the NexSys:
1.

Click on File from the Menu Bar. Select Exit.

2.

Right click anywhere on the Title Bar. Select Close.

3.

Click the

4.

Click on the LNServer icon in the left corner of the Title Bar. Select Close.

(Close) button from Title Bar.

The LNServer button on the Windows NT Task Bar at the bottom of the screen will appear as in Figure 21.

Figure 21. LNServer Shutting Down

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Installation and Startup Index

Installation and Startup Index


C

Catalog 76

NetBEUI 36, 49
Network Adapter
Installing 34
Network Protocols 36, 53
NexSys Work Station (NWS)
Exiting NWS 82
Starting NWS 78
NWS Main Window 79
Menu Bar 81
Physical Tree 81
Resizing the NexSys Window 80
Title 79
Toolbar 81
Version Number 80

D
DHCP 37
Dial Up Networking 54, 58
Dial-Up Monitor 59
Dialin Information, RAS 53
E
ESUSA Resources 76
H
Hardware Drivers 66
I
Installation Checklist 33
Installing
PCC-10 73
PCLTA-10/20 Card 73
Installing a Network Adapter 34
Installing NexSys 38
Interrupt Request (IRQ)
Selecting 72
IP Address 55
IPCONFIG 53
L
LNServer
Configuration Wizard 39
Configure for Local Location 40
Configure for Remote Location 43
Configuring 39
Exiting 82
Starting LNServer 78
Status Bar 82
M

P
PC Configurations 32
PCC-10 66
PCLTA Card, Full Size
Disabling 65
Removing 65
PCLTA-10 66
PCLTA-20 66
PING 53
R
RAS
Client 53
Dial the Server 58
Dialin Information 53
Disconnect a Remote Site 59
Installing 46
Setting to Automatic Start 50
User Login Privileges 51
Resource Files 76
Adding ESUSA Resources to Catalog 76
RX 60

Minimum Criteria 34
Modem 56
MS Loopback Adapter 35
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S
SMX
1250 Transceiver Board 65
78K Transceiver Board 65
DFOM Transceiver Board 65
Start-Up Procedure 76
Exiting LNServer 82
Exiting NWS 82
Starting LNServer 78
Starting LNServer And NWS Together 78
Starting NWS 78
Starting NexSys 78, 79
T
TCP/IP 36, 37, 49, 55
TX 60

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SECTION THREE

SYSTEM SETUP

Chapters
1. Common Node Functions
2. Setting Up Routers
3. Setting Up an FSC/FLC
4. Setting Up a VAV
5. Setting Up a Heat Pump
6. Setting Up a Packaged Equipment Controller

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

System Setup Introduction

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

Electronic Systems USA, a wholly owned subsidiary of Johnson Controls, Inc.,


reserves the right to update specifications when appropriate. Information contained
in this document is based on specifications believed to be correct at the time of
publication.

Echelon , Coactive Windows NT , and General Electric are registered trademarks and service marks of companies
other than Electronic Systems USA. FSC, CPL and NEXSYS are trademarks of Electronic Systems USA.

2000 Electronic Systems USA

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System Setup Table of Contents


Chapter One - Common Node Functions
95
Overview ............................................................................................................................ 96
Node Menu ......................................................................................................................... 96
Node Commands..................................................................................................... 96
Wink .............................................................................................................. 96
Offline ........................................................................................................... 97
Reset ............................................................................................................ 98
Test ............................................................................................................... 98
Plug-Ins ................................................................................................................... 99
Registering A Plug-In .................................................................................... 99
Running A Plug-In ....................................................................................... 100
Move ...................................................................................................................... 101
Add ........................................................................................................................ 102
Setup Node ........................................................................................................... 103
Check Box Explanations ............................................................................. 104
Replace Node ........................................................................................................ 105
Edit/View Binding................................................................................................... 106
Delete .................................................................................................................... 107
Config Data Set ..................................................................................................... 107
Set Time/Date On Node ........................................................................................ 109
Rename ..................................................................................................................110
Load Firmware........................................................................................................ 110
MultiNode Operations .............................................................................................113
Connection Description Template (CDT) ................................................................114
Adding A Connection Description Template (CDT) ......................................115
Modifying Connection Description Templates (CDT) ................................... 117
Deleting Connection Description Templates (CDT) ..................................... 117
Node Configuration Wizard ....................................................................................118
Chapter Two - Setting Up a Router
119
Overview .......................................................................................................................... 120
Router Classification Types ................................................................................... 120
Far-Side Transceiver Types ................................................................................... 121
Echelon Routers .............................................................................. 121
Adding a Router to the Physical Tree .................................................................... 121
Coactive Routers ............................................................................. 121
CTI Routers ...................................................................................... 121
Commissioning a Defined Router .......................................................................... 123
Adding Nodes To A Router .................................................................................... 124
Commissioning the PEC ............................................................................. 125
Check Box Explanations .................................................................. 126
Chapter Three - Setting Up an FSC/FLC
129
FSC Overview ....................................................................................................... 130
FLC Overview ........................................................................................................ 130

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Adding an FSC or FLC to the Physical Tree .......................................................... 130


Defining an FSC/FLC .................................................................................. 131
Commissioning the FSC/FLC ..................................................................... 132
Check Box Explanations .................................................................. 133
FSC/FLC Configuration Wizard ............................................................................. 134
FSC/FLC Wizard Page 1 - Configure FSC Time Values ........................................ 135
FSC/FLC Wizard Page 2 - Enable Daylight Savings Time .................................... 136
FSC/FLC Wizard Page 3 - Configure Daylight Savings Time ................................ 136
FSC/FLC Wizard Page 4 - Select FSC Modules ................................................... 137
Chapter Four - Setting Up a VAV
139
Setting up a VAV............................................................................................................... 140
Adding a VAV to the Physical Tree ........................................................................ 140
Defining a VAV ............................................................................................ 140
Commissioning the VAV .............................................................................. 141
Check Box Explanations .................................................................. 142
VAV Configuration Wizard ..................................................................................... 143
VAV Wizard Page 1 - Room Sensor Type ................................................... 145
VAV Wizard Page 2 - Thermostat Configuration ......................................... 146
VAV Wizard Page 3 - Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters .... 147
VAV Wizard Page 4 - Setpoint Configuration .............................................. 147
VAV Wizard Page 5 - Thermal Load Parameters ........................................ 148
VAV Wizard Page 6 - K-Factor .................................................................... 149
VAV Wizard Page 7 - Flow Parameters ...................................................... 151
VAV Wizard Page 8 - Accept Air Flow PID Parameters? ............................ 152
VAV Wizard Page 9 - Flow PID Parameters ............................................... 152
VAV Wizard Page 10 - Fan Type ................................................................ 154
VAV Wizard Page 11 - Reheat Parameters ................................................ 154
VAV Wizard Page 12 - Floating Reheat ...................................................... 155
VAV Wizard Page 13 - Electric Reheat ....................................................... 156
VAV Wizard Page 14 - PWM Reheat .......................................................... 156
VAV Wizard Page 15 - Broadcast Damper Inc Output? .............................. 158
VAV Wizard Page 16 - Broadcast Damper DEC Output? ........................... 158
VAV Wizard Page 17 - Broadcast Fan Output? .......................................... 159
VAV Wizard Page 18 - Broadcast Reheat INC/ST 1 Output? ..................... 159
VAV Wizard Page 19 - Broadcast Reheat DEC/ST 2 Output? .................... 160
Advanced Point Editing ......................................................................................... 161
Chapter Five - Setting Up a Heat Pump
163
Setting up a Heat Pump ................................................................................................... 164
Adding a Heat Pump to the Physical Tree ............................................................. 164
Defining a Heat Pump ................................................................................. 164
Commissioning the Heat Pump .................................................................. 165
Check Box Explanations .................................................................. 167
Heat Pump Configuration Wizard .......................................................................... 168
Heat Pump Wizard Page 1 - Room Sensor Type .................................................. 169
Heat Pump Wizard Page 2 - Thermostat Configuration ........................................ 169
Heat Pump Wizard Page 3 - Default Setpoints & Thermal Load Parameters ....... 170

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Heat Pump Wizard Page 4 - Setpoint Configuration.............................................. 171


Heat Pump Wizard Page 5 - PID Parameters For Thermal Load .......................... 172
Heat Pump Wizard Page 6 - Local Emergency Shutdown .................................... 173
Heat Pump Wizard Page 7 - Economizer Type .................................................... 173
Heat Pump Wizard Page 8 - Economizer Enable .................................................. 174
Heat Pump Wizard Page 9 - Local Economizer .................................................... 174
Heat Pump Wizard Page 10 - Mixed Air Parameters............................................. 175
Heat Pump Wizard Page 11 - Low Limit Shutdown Parameters ........................... 176
Heat Pump Wizard Page 12 - Fan Controller Parameters..................................... 177
Heat Pump Wizard Page 13 - Number of Stages For Compressor? ..................... 178
Heat Pump Wizard Page 14 - Compressor Controller ........................................... 179
Heat Pump Wizard Page 15 - Reverse Valve Setup ............................................. 180
Heat Pump Wizard Page 16 - Loop Enable........................................................... 181
Heat Pump Wizard Page 17 - Broadcast Output For Damper? ............................. 181
Heat Pump Wizard Page 18 - Broadcast Output For Fan Output? ....................... 182
Heat Pump Wizard Page 19 - Broadcast Output For Reverse Valve? .................. 182
Heat Pump Wizard Page 20 - Broadcast Output For Compressor 1? ................... 183
Heat Pump Wizard Page 21 - Broadcast Output For Compressor 2? ................... 183
Heat Pump Wizard Page 22 - Broadcast Output For Compressor 3/EH? ............. 184
Chapter Six - Setting Up a PEC
185
Setting up a PEC .............................................................................................................. 186
Adding a PEC to the Physical Tree ....................................................................... 186
Defining a PEC ........................................................................................... 186
Commissioning the PEC ............................................................................. 187
Check Box Explanations .................................................................. 189
Configuration Wizard (PEC) ............................................................................................. 190
PEC Wizard Page 1 - Room Sensor Type ............................................................. 191
PEC Wizard Page 2 - Thermostat Configuration ................................................... 192
PEC Wizard Page 3 - Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters .............. 193
PEC Wizard Page 4 - Setpoint Configuration ........................................................ 193
PEC Wizard Page 5 - PID Parameters For Thermal Load .................................... 194
PEC Wizard Page 6 - Local Emergency Shutdown ............................................... 195
PEC Wizard Page 7 - Economizer Type ................................................................ 196
PEC Wizard Page 8 - Economizer Enable ............................................................ 196
PEC Wizard Page 9 - Local Economizer ............................................................... 197
PEC Wizard Page 10 - Mixed Air Parameters ....................................................... 198
PEC Wizard Page 11 - Low Limit Shutdown Parameters ...................................... 199
PEC Wizard Page 12 - Fan Controller Parameters ............................................... 200
PEC Wizard Page 13 - Discharge Air Reset From Thermal Load ......................... 202
PEC Wizard Page 14 - Discharge Air Reset .......................................................... 202
PEC Wizard Page 15 - Number of Valves ............................................................. 203
PEC Wizard Page 16 - Winter/Summer Controller ................................................ 204
PEC Wizard Page 17 - Local Winter/Summer Controller ...................................... 205
PEC Wizard Page 18 - Heating Type .................................................................... 205
PEC Wizard Page 19 - Floating Heating Parameters ............................................ 206
PEC Wizard Page 20 - Discrete Heating Parameters ........................................... 206
PEC Wizard Page 21 - Cooling Type .................................................................... 207

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PEC Wizard Page 22 - Floating Cooling Parameters ............................................ 208


PEC Wizard Page 23 - Discrete Cooling ............................................................... 209
PEC Wizard Page 24 - Broadcast Output For Damper? ....................................... 209
PEC Wizard Page 25 - Broadcast Output For Fan Output? .................................. 210
PEC Wizard Page 26 - Broadcast Output For Cooling Increment? ........................211
PEC Wizard Page 27 - Broadcast Output For Cooling Decrement? ..................... 212
PEC Wizard Page 28 - Broadcast Output For Heating Increment? ....................... 212
PEC Wizard Page 29 - Broadcast Output For Heating Decrement? ..................... 213
Advanced PEC Editing ..................................................................................................... 214
Editing Points ........................................................................................................ 214
Editing Point #1 - Discharge Air Temp (Analog Input) ................................. 214
Editing Point #2 - Mixed Air Temp (Analog Input) ....................................... 214
Editing Point #3 - Space Temp (Analog Input) ............................................ 215
Editing Point #4 - Outside AIr/Supply Water Temp (analog Input) .............. 215
Editing Point #5 - Fan Status Input (Digital Input) ....................................... 215
Editing Point #6 - Emergency Shutdown (Digital Input) .............................. 215
Editing Point #7 - Space Temp Controller ................................................... 215
Editing Point #8 - Indoor Air Quality Controller ........................................... 215
Editing Point #9 - Outside Air Temp ............................................................ 215
Editing Point #10 - Manual Occupancy Controller ...................................... 215
Editing Point #11 - User Setpoint Controller ............................................... 216
Editing Point #12 - Override Controller ....................................................... 216
Editing Point #13 - Application Mode Controller ......................................... 216
Editing Point #14 - Manual Reset ............................................................... 216
Editing Point #15 - Low Limit Shutdown ..................................................... 216
Editing Point #16 - Local Emergency Shutdown ......................................... 216
Editing Point #17 - LON Emergency Shutdown .......................................... 216
Editing Point #18 - Setpoint Controller ........................................................ 217
Editing Point #19 - Mixed Air PID Controller ............................................... 217
Editing Point #20 - Emergency Command Controller ................................. 217
Editing Point #21 - Winter/Summer Controller ............................................ 218
Editing Point #22 - Temp PID Controller ..................................................... 218
Editing Point #23 - Economizer Controller .................................................. 218
Editing Point #24 - Fan Controller ............................................................... 218
Editing Point #25 - Heating/Cooling Controller ........................................... 218
Editing Point #26 - Analog Output............................................................... 218
Editing Point #27 - Digital Output #1 Fan Actuator Output ......................... 218
System Setup Index ....................................................................................................... 219

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Chapter One

Common Node Functions

This chapter contain information on:


l Node Commands
l Plug-ins
l Moving a Node
l Adding a Node
l Node Setup
l Replacing a Node
l Edit/View Binding
l Deleting a Node
l Configuration Data Set
l Set Time/Date On A Node
l Renaming a Node
l Loading Firmware
l MultiNode Operations
l Connection Template
l The Node Configuration Wizard

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Common Node Functions

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

OVERVIEW
There are common node functions used in the NexSys Workstation. For example, the same process is used for
winking a Flexible System Controller (FSC), Fan Coil Unit (FCU), Heat Pump Unit (HPU), Package Equipment
Controller (PEC), Rooftop Unit (RTU), and a Variable Air Volume controller (VAV-01, and VAV-02). These
commonalties can be loosely categorized as node information accessible from the Physical Tree window,
features of the Node Configuration wizard, and node commands.

NODE MENU
The Node Menu (Figure 1) is used to setup nodes and their functions. There are thirteen menu choices on the
Node Menu that help you to configure your system. The following thirteen menus, several of which have
submenus, explain these functions.

NODE COMMANDS
There are four commands available in the Node Commands Menu: Wink, Offline, Reset, and Test. The Node
Commands Menu (Figure 2) is shown below.

Figure 1. Node Menu

Figure 2. Node Commands Menu

WINK
Issuing a Wink command from the Node Commands Menu identifies the selected node in the field. Most devices
flash the Wink LED on that node. However, since Wink tasks are device specific, some 3rd party devices may
include such actions as the flashing of an LED, or sounding of an alarm.
Note: Winking the FSC lights LEDs 1-8 on the 386 CPU.
To Wink a node:
1.
Right click on the nodes icon. The Node Menu appears.
2.

Right click on the Node Commands Menu, the submenu appears (Figure 2).

3.

Click on Wink. The selected nodes Wink LED flashes, the Node Command submenu (Figure 3)
appears and displays Finished in the bottom left corner.

Figure 3. Node Command Submenu

4.

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button to close the Node Command submenu.

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Common Node Functions

OFFLINE
Issuing an Offline command from the Node Commands Menu stops the selected node from executing its
application.
NOTE: A PEC is used in the following example.
To take a node Offline:
1.

Right click on the PECs icon. The Node Menu appears.

2.

Right click on the Node Commands Menu, the submenu appears (Figure 4).

3.

Click on Offline. The Node Command window appears with a Working... message. Once the node
is offline, the message will change to Finished. (Figure 5). The Node Command window closes and
the physical tree appears with the PEC now offline (Figure 6).

Figure 4. Node Menu.

Figure 5. Offline Window with Finished Message.

Figure 6. PEC now Offline.

NOTE: Once you take the PEC offline, the Node Commands menu, for that device only, changes
so you can bring the it online. Use the Node Commands Menu Online command to bring
the node back online.
4.

Click the

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RESET
Issuing a Reset command from the Node Commands Menu resets the selected node.
To Reset a node:
NOTE: A PEC is used in the following example.
1.

Right click on the PEC icon. The Node Menu appears.

2.

Click on Node Commands. The submenu appears (Figure 7).

3.

Click on Reset. The Node Command window appears with the Working message in the bottom left
corner of the window. When the reset is complete, the message will change to Finished (Figure 8).
The Reset window closes and the physical tree appears.

Figure 7. Node Menu

4. Click the

Figure 8. Message Window

button to close the Node Command submenu.

TEST
Issuing the Test command from the Node Commands Menu the tests the selected application device or router.
Testing an application device verifies that the device is able to communicate on the network and that its configuration matches the information contained in the LNS database. To pass the test, an application device with the
expected Neuron ID must exist on the network, contain the expected domain/subnet/node address (if the device
is installed), contain the expected program ID, contain the expected network management authentication setting
(enabled or disabled), and, if network management is enabled, contain the correct system authentication key.
Testing a router verifies the router is able to communicate on the network and that its configuration matches the
information contained in the LNS database. To pass the test, a router with the expected Neuron IDs must exist
on the network, contain the expected domain/subnet/node address (if the router is installed), and contain the
expected program ID.
The Test command assumes that the node's network image is up-to-date. Be sure that the node is up-to-date by
running the Test command only while LNServer is in the OnNet mode.
To Test a node:
NOTE: A PEC is used in the following example.
1.

Right click on the PEC icon. The Node Menu appears (Figure 9).

Figure 9. Node Commands Menu Figure 10. Node Command Window

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2.

Common Node Functions

Click on Test. The Node Command window appears with the Working message. When the test is
complete, the message will change to Finished (Figure 10). The Node Command window closes
and the physical tree appears.

PLUG-INS
Plug-Ins are required configuration files for third party devices. They provide necessary setup information for
the device to function properly on a LONWORKS network. Contact your device manufacturer for the latest plug-in
software for your device. Before you can register a plug-in you must first install the plug-ins to a directory on the
hard drive. Then when you run this option to register them. Plug-ins must be registered before they can be run.
In the Plug-in Register window you select which plug-ins you would like to register or unregister. The Plug-Ins
menu (Figure 10) is shown below.
Note: You can only register a plug-in from the global node. They can be run from any node.
Note: The Node Menu, when selected from the Global Node is different than the Node Menu
selected from any other node.

REGISTERING A PLUG-IN
Note: You must first install your 3rd party plug-ins before you can register them. Remember their
location so you can locate them during the registration process.
To register a plug-in:
1.

Right-click on the global node to display the Node Menu (Figure 10).

2.

Click on the Plug-In Menu, then click on Register (Figure 10). The Plug-In Register screen appears
(Figure 11).

Figure 10. Node Menu

3.

Figure 11. Plug-In Register Screen With Newly Registered Plug-In

Click on the unregistered plug-in you want to register.

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4.

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Click
to register the plug-in. The selected plug-in description changes from Unregistered to Registered (Figure 12).

Figure 12. Plug-In Register Screen With Newly Registered Plug-In

5.

Click

to close the window and display the tree.

RUNNING A PLUG-IN
To run a Plug-In:
1.

Right-click on the node to display the Node Menu.

2.

Click on the Plug-In Menu, then click on Run (Figure 13). The Plug-In Run window appears (Figure
14).

Figure 13. Node Menu

3.

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Figure 14. Plug-In Run Window

Click on a registered plug-in.

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4.

Click

Common Node Functions

to run the plug-in. The plug-in runs and displays (Figure 15).

Figure 15. Run Plug-In Example Result

1.

Complete the Plug-In program and exit to the tree.

MOVE
The Move command is used to move a nodes location on the tree.
Note: A PEC is used in this example.
1.

Right click on the PEC icon (Figure 16). The Node Menu appears.

2.

Click on Move. The Move submenu appears (Figure 17).

3.

Click on Up or Down. The selected device moves in the direction you select.

Figure 16. PEC Selected


New Position
4.

Figure 17. Move Submenu

Figure 18. PEC Moves To

Repeat as required.

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ADD
This command is used to Add a Node or Router to the tree.
Note: A PEC is used in this example.
1.

Right click on the Global Node or Router where the PEC will be located. The Node Menu (Figure
19) appears. Click Add to display the secondary menu, then choose Node, then either Before or
After to set the PECs placement on the tree. The Add Node menu (Figure 20) appears.

Figure 19. Node Menu.

2.

Figure 20. Add Node Menu.

Click on the PEC in the list of devices and then enter a name for the PEC in the New Node Name:
area. This should be as descriptive as possible and indicate the purpose and/or location of the PEC.
For example, this could be PEC 2nd Floor West Wing.

NOTE: This field can have a total of 31 characters.


3.

Click

. The uncommissioned PEC has been added to the physical tree (Figure 21).

Figure 21. Physical Tree with Newly Added Uncommissioned PEC


Note: The PEC must be Commissioned using the Setup Node Menu, to be functional.

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SETUP NODE
After a node has been added, it must be setup to be functional. This process is called commissioning. After the
node had been setup it will be functional, but will have default configuration settings. It is suggested that you run
the Configuration Wizard to properly configure the node. Any node that has not yet been commissioned will
have (Never Commissioned) after the devices name on the tree.
Note: A PEC is used in this example.
1.

Right click on the uncommissioned PEC to bring up the Node Menu (Figure 22). Select Setup Node
to bring up the Node Setup Menu (Figure 23).

Figure 22. Node Menu

Figure 23. Node Setup Menu

2.

If you know the exact Neuron ID for the PEC, type it in the Neuron ID field. The Neuron ID is
specific to the PEC controller you are setting up and is given to the NexSys Workstation when the
service pin is pressed on the controller. If you do not know the exact Neuron ID number, do not type
anything in this field. Go to Step 3.

3.

If you dont know the Neuron ID then click the Service Pin button on the Node Setup menu. Next
press the Service Pin on the PEC you are commissioning. This registers the Neuron ID, Program ID
and associated device specific information. Once you press the service pin on the PEC the Setup
Node Menu displays the PECs Neuron ID and Program ID information (Figure 24).

Figure 24. Node Setup Menu after pressing the Service Pin on the PEC

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4.

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Click
to advance to the next Node Setup pages (Figures 25 & 26). Select any options you want
to configure.

Figure 25. Node Setup Page 2

Figure 26. Node Setup Page 3

The checkboxes on Figures 24, 25, and 26 are described in the next paragraph.

CHECK BOX EXPLANATIONS


The node setup pages contain a number of checkboxes that are used in the configuration process. Their settings
determine the information sent and whether it is sent from the LNS database to the device, or vice-versa.
Choose carefully how you use these commands. If used incorrectly, it is possible to overwrite default values that
are not recoverable.
NOTE:

SEND moves data from the LNS database to the device.


GET moves data from the device to the LNS database.

Send Network Image - Sends the devices network address and bindings to the LNS database.
Send Config. Data - Sends the devices configuration parameters (CPs) from the LNS database to the device.
Force Defaults - Sends the default CPs from the LNS database to the device.
Send Trend - Sends Trend setup data from the LNS database to the device.
Get Config. Data - Gets the devices CPs from the device and sends them to the LNS database. This is used as a
backup in the event the device requires reconfiguration.
Use as defaults - Checking this box gets the devices current configuration settings and makes them the
default CP settings for all similar devices. These settings are stored in the LNS database.
Note: Use this command when you have a number of devices that will be configured the same.
Get unknown only - Gets any unknown CP data, from the device currently being setup, and sends it to
the LNS database. Typically, unknown CP information is associated with 3rd party devices.
Get Trend - Gets Trend setup data from the device and sends it to the LNS database.
Close window when configuring node done - Closes the configuration window and displays the tree as soon as
the configuration process is done.

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5.

Click

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to save your changes to the Node Setup Menu, close the wizard and display the

tree. This will complete the commissioning process and remove the Never Commissioned label from
the PEC on the tree. Click

to abandon your changes to the Node Setup Menu. If you

cancel you will be prompted to confirm your cancellation. Confirming the cancellation closes the
wizard and returns to the tree display. Abandoning the cancellation returns you to the wizard.

REPLACE NODE
The Replace Node command is used when a defective node device, such as a PEC, must be replaced. Since each
node has a unique Neuron ID, simply replacing the device without using the Replace Node command will cause
errors. The defective device must be replaced with the exact same device type. Example: You cannot replace a
VAV-01 with a VAV-02 since they have different Program ID types. You must either replace it with a VAV-01 or
delete the VAV-01 and then add a VAV-02 in its place.
To Replace a Node:
1.

Go to the field and physically replace the defective node device with the new device and reconnect
all wiring.

2.

Right-click on the node you want to replace, the Node Menu appears (Figure 27).

3.

Click on Replace Node. The first Replace Node window appears (Figure 28).

4.

Press the service pin on the new node device or, if you are sure it is correct, enter the Neuron ID for
the new node device.

Figure 27. Node Menu

5.

Figure 28. Replace Node - Window 1

Press the
to move to the second Replace Node window (Figure 29). Uncheck any of the checkboxes you dont want to be executed.
Send Config. Data - Sends the previous devices configuration parameters (CPs) from the LNS
database to the device. This ensures the new node will perform exactly as the old one did.
Exclude Mfg CPs - When selected, this excludes 3rd party manufacturers configuration parameters
from being sent from the LNS database to the new node. The Send Config. Data box above must be
checked for this box to be available.
Send Trend - Sends Trend setup data from the LNS database to the device.

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6.

Press the

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to move to the third Replace Node window (Figure 30).

Figure 29. Replace Node - Window 2

7.

Rev 2.0

Figure 30. Replace Node - Window 3

This window summarizes the replacement configuration settings. Click


to save your
changes, close the Replace Node window and display the tree. This will complete the node replacement process and display the new node device on the tree. Click
to abandon your changes to
the Replace Node windows. If you cancel you will be prompted to confirm your cancellation.
Confirming the cancellation closes the window and returns to the tree display.

EDIT/VIEW BINDING
To open the Binding Editor:
NOTE: A configured PEC-01 is used in the following example.
1.

Right click on the PEC icon. The Node menu appears (Figure 31).

2.

Click on Edit/View Bindings. The Binding Editor displays (Figure 32).

Figure 31. Node Menu.

3.

Figure 32. Binding Editor.

Edit the bindings as required.

NOTE: For more information on the Bind Node Editor, see the Using the Binding Editor chapter
of the Programming section.

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DELETE
This command deletes a node from the physical tree. A confirmation screen prevents accidental deletions.
To delete a node:
NOTE: A PEC is used in the following example.
1.

Right click on the node you want to delete. The Node Menu appears (Figure 33).

2.

Click on Delete. The Delete Node window asks you to confirm the deletion request (Figure 34).

Figure 33 . Node Menu

3.

Figure 34. Delete Confirmation Screen

Click
. The Delete Node window closes and the physical tree appears with the node removed
from the physical tree.

CONFIG DATA SET


The Configuration Data Set (CDS) command allows you to create a device template from a previously configured device. This configuration data set can then be applied as you add other devices of the same type.
For example, you need to configure PECs differently for your North Building, than for the South Building.
You can configure one PEC for the North Building and one PEC for the South Building and save the Configuration Data Set as North Building and South Building. When you need to add a new PEC you can select from the
predefined PEC configurations.
To Add a Configuration Data Set:
1.

Right click on the node to open the Node Menu.

2.

Click on Config Data Set to open the submenu. Click on Add to open the Add CDS window (Figure
35).

Figure 35. Configuration Data Set Window

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3.

Enter a name for the new Configuration Data Set.

4.

Click on the configuration data set you want to add. Click

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to add the CDS.

To Apply a Configuration Data Set:


1.

Right click on the node to open the Node Menu. Click on Config Data Set to open the submenu
(Figure 36).

Figure 36. Node Menu


2.

Click on Apply to open the Apply CDS window (Figure 37).

Figure 37. Apply CDS Window

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3.

Click on the configuration data set you want to apply. Click

4.

Click on Apply.

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SET TIME/DATE ON NODE


This command set the time and date on the selected node.
To set the time and date a node:
1.

Right click on the node you want to set the time and date on. The Node Menu appears (Figure 38).

2.

Click on Set Time/Date on Node. The Set Time/Date Window appears (Figure 39).

Figure 38. Node Menu

3.

Figure 39. Set Time/Date Window

Enter the desired Date and Time for the node.

Note: Pressing the

on the date drop-down box displays a calendar (Figure 40).

Figure 40. Set Time/Date Window with Calendar Displayed

4.

Click

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RENAME
This command renames the selected node.
To rename a node:
1.

Right click on the node you want to rename. This brings up the Node Menu (Figure 41).

2.

Click on Rename, the Rename a Panel window (Figure 42) appears with the current node name
highlighted.

Figure 41. Node Menu

Figure 42. Rename a Panel Window - Old Name

3. Type in the new name and click

to save your changes. The name changes on the tree, Done

appears in the bottom left corner of the Rename a Panel screen and the

button changes to

Figure 43. Rename a Panel Window - New Name

4. Click

to exit the screen.

LOAD FIRMWARE
Loading firmware is used when you want a different software revision on a controller.
WARNING: Use extreme caution when copying firmware to a controller. Sending the wrong
firmware can have disastrous system effects.
WARNING: Before updating the firmware revision on an FSC or FLC, place any critical points in
Fixed mode from the NWS or place the controller in Hand mode from the field. The process of updating the FSC/FLC firmware from the workstation is lengthy, and during the
update time, the NWS will not receive point statuses or alarms, or issue commands. Take
the necessary measures to ensure the safety and comfort of building occupants and protect
equipment. The panel will reset after the update firmware is complete.

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To Load Firmware to a node:


1.

Right click on the node icon. The Node Menu appears (Figure 44).

NOTE: A node must be configured and Online to update the firmware from the NWS.
2.

Click on Load Firmware to open the first screen (Figure 45).

Figure 44. Node Menu

Figure 45. Load Firmware Screen 1

3.

Verify the devices Neuron ID and program ID are correct or hit the service pin to capture it. Click

4.

to move to Screen 2 (Figure 46).


Verify the current hardware and software revision are what you want to overwrite. The current
firmware file path is shown. Click

Figure 46. Screen 2 Showing Old APB File

5.

to open the Select APB Path window (Figure 47).

Figure 47. Select APB Path

Browse to the folder containing the new APB file you need. Click on the APB file you want to
replace the old APB file with, and click
to save. Once the file is saved, Screen 2 reappears
with the new APB file as the default (Figure 48). Click
Existing Nodes (Figure 49).

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Figure 48. Screen 2 Showing New APB File

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Figure 49. Screen 3 - Options For Existing Nodes

Screen 3 sets firmware loading options for existing nodes of the device type you are currently editing, PEC-01 in
this example.
5.

Check the Set Firmware file to box to set all devices on the tree with the device type, PEC-01 in this
example, to use the new firmware file you just selected. This will send the new firmware to every
PEC-01 on the tree when the load checkbox below is checked and the

6.

button is clicked.

Check the Load firmware to devices box to load the selected firmware file to all devices with the
device name ESUSA PEC-01 in this example. The loading process will take place when you press
the

button. Click

to move to Screen 4 (Figure 50).

Screen 4 sets firmware loading options for new nodes. The Use Firmware entry area shows the firmware path
and file name you just selected.

Figure 50. Options For New Nodes

7.

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Figure 51. Summary Screen

Click the Yes radio button to make the new firmware file the default for all new devices, PEC-01 in
this example. Click the No radio button to leave default settings as they are.

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Default: No
8.

Click

Common Node Functions

Option: Yes
to move to the summary screen (Figure 51). Review the settings and arrow back to make

to save all changes and exit to the tree. Click


any changes. Click
changes and exit to the tree.

to abandon all

MULTINODE OPERATIONS
Multi-Node Operations allows you to program multiple nodes at once.
Note: Multi-Node Operations is only available from the Global Node.
To Use Multi-Node Operations:
1.

Right-click on the Global Node to bring up the Node Menu (Figure 52). Click on Multi-Node
Operations, the first Multi-Node Operations screen appears (Figure 53).

Figure 52. Global Node - Node Menu

2.

Figure 53. Multi-Node Operations Screen 1

Click on a node in the Available Nodes window. Use the following keys to select the nodes you want
to configure:
Adds the individual node you select to the Selected Nodes field.
Adds all nodes on the tree to the Selected Nodes field.
Removes nodes from the Selected Nodes field.
Removes all nodes from the Selected Nodes field.
Adds all nodes, having the device type of the node you select, to the Selected
Nodes field.

Multi-Node Operations Screen 2 shows the selected nodes (Figure 54).

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Figure 54. Multi-Node Operations Screen 2

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Figure 55. Multi-Node Operations Screen 3

3.

Click the

, the Multi-Node Operations Screen 3 appears (Figure 55).

4.

Use the checkboxes to select the operations you want to run. Click the
tions Screen 4 appears (Figure 56).

Figure 56. Multi-Node Operations Screen 4

, the Multi-Node Opera-

Figure 57. Multi-Node Operations Screen 5

Note: The information on Screens 4 and 5 will vary depending on which checkboxes are selected
on Screen 3.
4.

Verify the firmware path and files are correct. Browse and correct any incorrect files. Click the
the Multi-Node Operations Screen 5 appears (Figure 57).

5.

Verify the selected operations. Use the


to go back and make any changes. Click
execute the operations and return to the tree.

to

CONNECTION DESCRIPTION TEMPLATE (CDT)


The Connection Description Template (CDT) is the template used to define the parameters of a binding. The
CDT determines the type of addressing and message service to be used, timing parameters, use of authentication
and priority slots, etc. The User can create a new template, or modify existing templates.
The CDT uses five different types of Addressing:
Broadcast - Addresses all the nodes in a subnet or domain.
Neuron ID - Refers to a single node by its unique 48-bit ID
Group -

Refers to numbered group of nodes in the system.

Subnet/Node - Refers to a single node by its domain, subnet, or node (DSN) address (assigned when the
network image is sent to the node for the first time).
Turnaround - Used for connections that take place only within a node.
The CDTs created on the NexSys Network Interface node are displayed in the Connection Description Template
List (Figure 58 ). They will also appear in a scrollable Connection Template list in the Bind To Editor for the
User to select when adding a new bind (please see Section for more information on Binding).
To access the CDTs:
1.

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Right click on the NexSys Network Interface node. The pop-up menu will open.

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2.

Select the Connection Template command (Figure 58).

3.

The Connection Description Template List (Figure 59) opens.

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Figure 58. Connection Template Command Figure 59. Connection Description Template List

ADDING A CONNECTION DESCRIPTION TEMPLATE (CDT)


To add a new CDT:
1.

Open the Connection Description Template List (described above.)

2.

Click

to open the Add Connection Description Template Setting Window (Figure

60).
3.

Enter the Name and a Descriptor (if desired) for the CDT in the appropriate text fields (Figure 61).
This information will be displayed in the CDT List (Figure 62). You must enter a Name.

Figure 60. Add CDT Setting Window

Figure 61. Name and Descriptor Text Fields

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Figure 62. Name and Descriptor as displayed in the CDT List

4.

Enter values for the following parameters:

Addressing:
Force Unicast - Forces LNS to use DSN (domain/subnet/node) or NID (Neuron ID) addressing
where it would normally use group (or broadcast) addressing.
No broadcast - Tells LNS to fail if there is no other way to address the message besides broadcast.
Fail group to broadcast - Tells LNS to use broadcast addressing if it has trouble using group
addressing.
Always broadcast - Tells LNS to always use broadcast addressing.
Service Types:
Service Type Override - Tells LNS that you will choose the service type explicitly rather than
allowing LNS to determine it.
Acknowledged - The message is sent out and acknowledged by the receiver (not to be used for large
group bindings causing failure to received Acknowledge messages.
Unacknowledged repeated - The message is sent out many times to ensure the probability of it
reaching its destination.
Unacknowledged - The message is sent out once.
Request Response - Used only for out-and-back messages (e.g.,. NV polls), not used for binds.
Timing Parameters:
Repeat Count Override - Enter a value for the number of times LNS should repeat an unacknowledged-repeated message.
Retry Count Override - Enter a value for the number of times LNS should retry an acknowledged
message if it does not receive an acknowledgment in time.
Transmit Timer Override - Enter a value for the interval rate LNS waits between retries of
acknowledged and request/response messages.
Receive Timer Override - Select a value that tells LNS the time period within which receiving
devices will treat messages from the same source with the same reference ID as
duplicate messages. Repeats of messages using the above service types all use the
same reference ID as the original to identify them as duplicates.
Repeat Timer Override - Select a value for the interval LNS waits between repeats for unacknowledged-repeated messages.
Other:
Authentication Override - Manually overrides control of the LNS message Authentication option.
Use Authentication - Turns the message Authentication option on, telling NexSys to begin sending
and receiving
authentication packets for messages on the network.
Priority Override - Manually overrides control of the LNS message Priority Override option.
Use Priority - Tells LNS that the binding should use a reserved time slot on the network,
helping the message to arrive more quickly to its destination.

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Suppress Source Address - Tells LNS to suppress the source address.

MODIFYING CONNECTION DESCRIPTION TEMPLATES (CDT)


To modify an existing CDT:
1.

Open the Connection Description Template List.

2.

Click

to open the Modify Connection Description Template Setting Window

(Figure 63). The Name of the selected CDT appears in the title bar, and both the Name and Descriptor appear in the associated text fields (Figure 64) of the window.
3.

Make changes to settings as desired.

Figure 63. Modify CDT Setting Window

Figure 64. Selected CDT Name and Descriptor

DELETING CONNECTION DESCRIPTION TEMPLATES (CDT)


To delete an existing CDT:
1.

Open the Connection Description Template List.

2.

Select the CDT you wish to delete, and click

3.

A Warning box (Figure 65) appears, asking you to confirm the deletion. Click

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Figure 65. Delete CDT Warning Box

NODE CONFIGURATION WIZARD


The Node Configuration Wizard uses a series of editor screens to configure a device. Each device type has a
different editor to address the devices specific configuration. See the configuration wizards for each device in
the following System Setup sections. You are currently in Section 2 of System Setup.
Section 4 - FSC/FLC
Section 5 - VAV
Section 6 - Heat Pump
Section 7 - PEC

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Chapter Two

Setting Up a Router

This chapter contains information on:


l Adding a Router
l Setting up a Router
l Adding Nodes To A Router

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OVERVIEW
This guide is intended for someone familiar with routers, TCP/IP and LONWORKS networks. If you are unfamiliar
with any of these please refer to the:
1. Network Basics book for information on TCP/IP, Router Specifications, and NexSys Networks.
2. Installation and Startup section of this manual for information on setting up TCP/IP.
3. Network Wiring Specifications book for information on LONWORKS network wiring.
Before you begin you should know:
1. Router classification type - How will this router be used?
2. Transceiver type of the router you want to install.
3. A descriptive name for the router that designates a specific location.
4. The Neuron ID of the router should you choose not to use the service pin method.
5. Do you need a plug-in? A plug-in is a software configuration file that may be required for some routers.
NexSys provides plug-ins for several common routers. Confirm that the plug-in for the router you are installing
is provided by NexSys. If not you must have the plug-in file provided by the router manufacturer.
The steps to add a router are listed below:
1. Add the router to the physical tree. This is known as Defining.
2. Setup the router. This is known as Commissioning.
3. Add nodes to the router.
4. Setup the nodes on the router.

ROUTER CLASSIFICATION TYPES


NexSys supports six different router classification types using one of four LONWORKS routing algorithms. During
the router installation process you must choose a classification type from the list shown below:
1. Configured Router - A configured router forwards only messages received on either of the routers
domains. A forwarding table at each end is used for each domain.
2. Learning Router - A learning router forwards only messages that have met specific forwarding rules.
The messages are received on either of the routers domains. Installation is simplified since network
topology information is not required to configure the learning router.
3. Repeater Router - A repeater router forwards all valid messages, in both directions, regardless of the
destination or domain of the message.
Permanent Repeater Router - A permanent repeater router is a repeater router that, once configured,
cannot be readily reconfigured as a standard repeater. It must be deleted, along with all its associated
nodes, and then reinstalled as a standard repeater router.
4. Bridge Router - A bridge router forwards all messages received on either of the routers domains
regardless of the messages domain. Bridges are typically used to span one or two domains.
Permanent Bridge Router - A permanent bridge router is a bridge router that, once configured, cannot
be readily reconfigured as a standard bridge router. It must be deleted, along with all its associated
nodes, and then reinstalled as a standard bridge router.
You will need to know the classification type when you install a router.

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FAR-SIDE TRANSCEIVER TYPES


NexSys sets the near-side transceiver type based on the network backbone channel type. During the router
installation process you must choose a router from the list of supported routers shown below.
ECHELON ROUTERS
TP/XF-78
TP/XF-1250
TP/FT-10
TP/RS485-39
TP/RS485-1250
TP/RS485-78
PL-20C

COACTIVE ROUTERS
Custom
CTI ROUTERS
CustomCTI NCB/IM
CustomCTI NCB/EM
CustomCTI NCB/IS
CustomCTI NCB/RF
CustomCTI NCB/EL

PL-20N

CustomCTI NCB/FL

PL-30
FO-10
DC-78
DC-625
DC-1250

Routers supported by NexSys include the standard, Coactive, NCB (Network Combiner Module), ENCB
(Ethernet Network Combiner Module), and the Raytheon FTR (Fiber Optic/Twisted Pair) router. In addition, 3rd
party routers, if they are LonMark compliant and have all necessary plug-ins should work with NexSys.

ADDING A ROUTER TO THE PHYSICAL TREE


Adding a router to the Physical Tree requires two steps to be carried out in order: defining and commissioning.
Defining - The Add Router Menu is used to define the routers name, classification type and farside transceiver
type. The router being defined can be either offline or online and does not have to be physically attached to the
network until the commissioning stage.
Commissioning - The Node Setup Menu is used to commission the defined router. Commissioning writes the
network image, Neuron ID, and two network addresses (one for each side) to a database. The defined router
must be online and physically attached to the network.
To add a router to the Physical Tree:
1.

Click on the Physical Tree to highlight where the router will be added. Right click on an open area
of the tree to bring up the Node Menu (Figure 1). Click Add to display the secondary menu, then
click Router, then click either Before or After to set the router placement on the Physical Tree.
After you select Before or After, the Add Router Menu list of available router types is displayed
(Figure 2).

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Figure 1. Node Configuration Menu.

Rev 2.0

Figure 2. Add Router Menu.

Note 1: If you select the Global Node as the location to add the router, the Router will be placed
on the Physical Tree directly AFTER the Global Node. If you select any other place to add
the router your choices are either BEFORE or AFTER the selected entry point.
Note 2: Routers are classified by type as either, Configured, Learning, Repeater, Bridge, Permanent Repeater, or Permanent Bridge. See the Router Guide for more information.
2.

Click on the Classification type of the router you want to install. Then select the Far Side Transceiver type from the list. NexSys already knows the Near Side Transceiver type based on the
network backbone channel type.
WARNING: CHOOSE THE CORRECT ROUTER TYPE. YOU CAN NOT CHANGE THE
ROUTER HARDWARE TYPE ONCE THE MENU ITEM HAS BEEN SELECTED. IF THE
WRONG TYPE IS CHOSEN, ALL THE NODES UNDER THE ROUTER WILL HAVE TO
BE DELETED, THE ROUTER WILL HAVE TO BE DELETED, AND THE CORRECT
ROUTER WILL HAVE TO BE ADDED.

3.

Enter a Name for the router. This should be as descriptive as possible and indicate the purpose and/
or location of the router. For example, this could be 1st Floor - Zone #1.

NOTE: This field can have a total of 31 characters.


4.

Click
. This will add the router node to the physical tree. However, it is not yet configured.
You must run the Node Setup menu selection to configure the router.

Delay(ms) Box This value represents the average number of milliseconds required for a packet to get onto
the channel once queued. Certain routers have predefined delay values that are automatically chosen
for the specific router. Many routers have a default value of 0, with valid numbers ranging from 0 to
65535. A delay value of 0 uses the default of two packet cycles based on the average packet size.
NOTE: Coactive, NCB, fiber-optic, and ENCB routers must be added in pairs. The local router
will be added first. When you add the remote router, right click on the local router and
choose Add. The option will be Router (for Coactive), Remote NCB, or Remote ENCB.
So, the remote router will be added to the local router.
NOTE: EVERY time a Coactive router is configured from NWS, you must run RTR_CNF.EXE.
Refer to the Coactive router documentation that came with the router.

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COMMISSIONING A DEFINED ROUTER


One you have defined a router you must commission it. The router must be online for the commissioning process
to work. Routers have two Neuron IDs, one for the near side and one for the far side.
1.

Right-click on the router to be commissioned to bring up the Node Menu (Figure 3).

2.

Click on Setup Node to bring up the Node Setup Menu (Figure 4).

Figure 3. Node Configuration Menu

3.

Figure 4. Setup Node Menu

Click on the
button on the Setup Node Menu and then press the service pin on the router.
The Neuron ID is specific to the router you are setting up and is given to the NexSys Workstation
when the service pin (CSRVC on the NCB or ENCB router) is pressed on the router. The Neuron ID
will appear in the editor when the service pin is pressed.

NOTE: If you do not know the exact Neuron ID number, leave this field blank and wait for the
service pin to capture it. When the service pin is pressed on a standard router, both Neuron
IDs are sent out, but only one is captured. Both Neuron IDs are given to the NWS when
the service pin is pressed. The NCB and ENCB routers have two service pins, the CSRVC
and the RSRVC. Press ONLY the CSRVC pin. Pressing the RSRVC pin will cause
problems.
4.

Click

to advance to the 2nd Node Configuration Menu (Figure 5).

Figure 5. Node Configuration Menu 2

5.

Click the Send Network Image box if you want to send the devices network address to the LNS
database when the
button is pressed (Figure 6).

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6.

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Click

Rev 2.0

to advance to the 3rd Node Configuration Menu (Figure 6).

Figure 6. Node Configuration Menu 3

7.

Click
to save your changes to the Node Setup Menu, close the window and display the
tree. This will complete the commissioning process and remove the Never Commissioned label from
the Router on the tree. Click
to abandon your changes to the Node Setup Menu. If you
cancel you will be prompted to confirm your cancellation. Confirming the cancellation closes the
window and returns to the tree display. Abandoning the cancellation returns you to the window.

ADDING NODES TO A ROUTER


To add a node to a Router:
Note: A PEC is used in this example.
1.

Right click on the Router where the PEC will be located. The Node pop-up menu (Figure 7) appears.
Click Add to display the secondary menu, then choose Node, then At End to set the PECs placement after the router on the tree. The Add Node menu (Figure 8) appears.

Figure 7. Node Menu.

2.

Figure 8. Add Node Menu.

Click on the PEC in the list of devices and then enter a name for the PEC in the New Node Name:
area. This should be as descriptive as possible and indicate the purpose and/or location of the PEC.
For example, this could be PEC 2nd Floor West Wing.

NOTE: This field can have a total of 31 characters.

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3.

Click

Setting Up a Router

. The uncommissioned PEC has been added to the physical tree (Figure 9).

Figure 9. Physical Tree with Newly Added Uncommissioned PEC

COMMISSIONING THE PEC


The second step is to commission the PEC. Any PEC that has not yet been commissioned will have (Never
Commissioned) after the PECs name on the tree.
1.

Right click on the uncommissioned PEC to bring up the Node Menu (Figure 10). Select Setup Node
to bring up the Node Setup Menu (Figure 11).

Figure 10. Node Menu

Figure 11. Node Setup Menu

2.

If you know the exact Neuron ID for the PEC, type it in the Neuron ID field. The Neuron ID is
specific to the PEC controller you are setting up and is given to the NexSys Workstation when the
service pin is pressed on the controller. If you do not know the exact Neuron ID number, do not type
anything in this field. Go to Step 3.

3.

If you dont know the Neuron ID then click the Service Pin button on the Node Setup menu. Next
press the Service Pin on the PEC you are commissioning. This registers the Neuron ID, Program ID
and associated device specific information. Once you press the service pin on the PEC the Setup
Node Menu displays the PECs Neuron ID and Program ID information (Figure 12).

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Figure 12. Node Setup Menu after pressing the Service Pin on the PEC

4.

Click
to advance to the next Node Setup pages (Figures 13 & 14). Select any options you want
to configure.

Figure 13. Node Setup Page 2

Figure 14. Node Setup Page 3

The checkboxes on Figures 12, 13, and 14 are described on the next page.

CHECK BOX EXPLANATIONS


The node setup pages contain a number of checkboxes that are used in the configuration process. Their settings
determine the information sent and whether it is sent from the LNS database to the device, or vice-versa.
Choose carefully how you use these commands. If used incorrectly, it is possible to overwrite default values that
are not recoverable.
NOTE:

SEND moves data from the LNS database to the device.


GET moves data from the device to the LNS database.

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Send Network Image - Sends the devices network address and bindings to the LNS database.
Send Config. Data - Sends the devices configuration parameters (CPs) from the LNS database to the device.
Force Defaults - Sends the default CPs from the LNS database to the device.
Send Trend - Sends Trend setup data from the LNS database to the device.
Get Config. Data - Gets the devices CPs from the device and sends them to the LNS database. This is used as a
backup in the event the device requires reconfiguration.
Use as defaults - Checking this box gets the devices current configuration settings and makes them the
default CP settings for all similar devices. These settings are stored in the LNS database.
Note: Use this command when you have a number of devices that will be configured the same.
Configure the first device the way you want the rest to resemble. Then
Get unknown only - Gets any unknown CP data, from the device currently being setup, and sends it to
the LNS database. Typically, unknown CP information is associated with 3rd party devices.
Get Trend - Gets Trend setup data from the device and sends it to the LNS database.
Close window when configuring node done - Closes the configuration window and displays the tree as soon as
the configuration process is done.

5.

Click

to save your changes to the Node Setup Menu, close the wizard and display the

tree. This will complete the commissioning process and remove the Never Commissioned label from
the PEC on the tree. Click

to abandon your changes to the Node Setup Menu. If you

cancel you will be prompted to confirm your cancellation. Confirming the cancellation closes the
wizard and returns to the tree display. Abandoning the cancellation returns you to the wizard.

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Chapter Three

Setting Up an FSC/FLC

This chapter contain information on:


l Adding an FSC or FLC
l Setting up an FSC or FLC
l Setting the Time on an FSC
l Adding I/O Modules to an FSC

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SETTING UP AN FSC/FLC
FSC OVERVIEW
The Flexible System Controllers (FSC) are microprocessor based controllers that work in conjunction with other
FSCs and all Application Specific Controllers (ASCs) in the NexSys family product line. The FSCs provide
complete flexibility and are user defined. The FSCs can be set up for many purposes. For example, they can be
used to:
Control an HVAC unit that requires more inputs and outputs than are available on an ASC
Provide the time for an entire system
Run custom programs
To determine occupancy for an ASC
The FSC Editor allows you to add 17 point types to the FSC and then program the FSC for your needs. The
programing is done through CPL (Control Programing Language) and gives you the flexibility to program the
FSC to perform the tasks that are specific to your system.
The FSC-01 allows up to eight I/O modules. The FSC-02 allows four I/O modules. The setup of both FSCs will
be discussed in this chapter.

FLC OVERVIEW
The Flexible Lighting Controller (FLC) is a microprocessor based controller that works in conjunction with
other FLCs, FSCs, and all Application Specific Controllers (ASCs) in the NexSys family product line. The FLC
uses the same CPU and programming as the FSC, but has a specific expansion module designed for lighting
control. The Lighting Control Module (LCM), formerly known as the 8 Triac/4 Digital Input expansion module,
is designed for use with 4 G.E. RR7 or RR9 lighting relays. The other expansion modules (8 UI, 4 DO/4 AO, and
8 DO) can be used in conjunction with the lighting expansion module for additional HVAC and lighting control
sequences. The FLC provides complete flexibility and is user defined. The FLC supports lighting control
applications such as:
Time of day scheduling
Remote tenant override
Wink notification before lighting turn-off
Zoning of lighting relays
Use of motion detectors or photocells
The FLC is setup through the FSC Editor which allows you to add 17 point types to the FLC and then program
the FLC for your needs. The programing is done through CPL (Control Programing Language) and gives you the
flexibility to program the FLC to perform the tasks which are specific to your system.

ADDING AN FSC OR FLC TO THE PHYSICAL TREE


Adding an FSC/FLC to the Physical Tree requires three steps to be carried out in order. These three steps are
Defining, Commissioning, and Configuring.
Defining - The Add Node Menu is used to install the FSC/FLC on the tree, define the FSC/FLCs name and
Program ID. The FSC/FLC being defined can be either off-line or on-line and does not have to be physically
attached to the network until the commissioning stage. You can define multiple devices and then commission
them all at once.
Commissioning - The Node Setup Menu is used to commission the defined FSC/FLC. Commissioning writes
the network image, Neuron ID, and Program ID to a database. The defined FSC/FLC must be on-line and
physically attached to the network for the commissioning process to work.
Configuring - The FSC/FLC Wizard is the editor used to configure a commissioned FSC/FLC. The wizard
works at the panel level to assign basic configuration settings and customize the FSC/FLC to your requirements.

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Advanced editing at the point level is described in the Advanced Point Editing section of this manual.

DEFINING AN FSC/FLC
To add an FSC/FLC to the Physical Tree:
1.

Right click on the Global Node or Router where the FSC/FLC will be located. The Node pop-up
menu (Figure 1) appears. Click Add to display the secondary menu, then choose Node, then either
Before or After to set the FSC/FLCs placement on the tree. The Add Node menu (Figure 2) appears.

Figure 1. Node Menu.

2.

Figure 2. Add Node Menu.

Click on the FSC/FLC in the list of devices and then enter a name for the FSC/FLC in the New
Node Name: area. This should be as descriptive as possible and indicate the purpose and/or location
of the FSC/FLC. For example, this could be FSC 02 West Wing.

NOTE: This field can have a total of 31 characters.


3.

Click

. The uncommissioned FSC/FLC has been added to the physical tree (Figure 3).

Figure 3. Physical Tree with Newly Added Uncommissioned FSC

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COMMISSIONING THE FSC/FLC


The next step is to commission the FSC/FLC. Any FSC/FLC that has not yet been commissioned will have
(Never Commissioned) after the FSC/FLCs name on the tree.
1.

Right click on the uncommissioned FSC/FLC to bring up the Node Menu (Figure 4). Select Setup
Node to bring up the Node Setup Menu (Figure 5).

Figure 4. Node Setup Menu

Figure 5. Node Setup Menu

2.

If you know the exact Neuron ID for the FSC/FLC, type it in the Neuron ID field. The Neuron ID is
specific to the FSC/FLC controller you are setting up and is given to the NexSys Workstation when
the service pin is pressed on the controller. If you do not know the exact Neuron ID number, do not
type anything in this field. Go to Step 3.

3.

If you dont know the Neuron ID then click the Service Pin button on the Node Setup menu. Next
press the Service Pin on the FSC/FLC you are commissioning. This registers the Neuron ID, Program
ID and associated device specific information. Once you press the service pin on the FSC/FLC the
Setup Node Menu displays the FSC/FLCs Neuron ID and Program ID information (Figure 6).

Figure 6. Node Setup Menu after pressing the Service Pin on the FSC/FLC

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4.

Setting Up an FSC/FLC

Click
to advance to the next Node Setup pages (Figures 7 & 8). Select any options you want to
configure.

Figure 7. Node Setup Page 2

Figure 8. Node Setup Page 3

CHECK BOX EXPLANATIONS


The node setup pages contain a number of checkboxes that are used in the configuration process. Their settings
determine the information sent and whether it is sent from the LNS database to the device, or vice-versa.
Choose carefully how you use these commands. If used incorrectly, it is possible to overwrite default values that
are not recoverable.
NOTE: SEND moves data from the LNS database to the device.
GET moves data from the device to the LNS database.
Send Network Image - Sends the devices network address and bindings to the LNS database.
Send Config. Data - Sends the devices configuration parameters (CPs) from the LNS database to the device.
F o rce Defaults - Sends the default CPs from the LNS database to the device.
Send Trend - Sends Trend setup data from the LNS database to the device.
Get Config. Data - Gets the devices CPs from the device and sends them to the LNS database. This is used
as a backup in the event the device requires reconfiguration.
Use as defaults - Checking this box gets the devices current configuration settings and makes them the
default CP settings for all similar devices. These settings are stored in the LNS database.
Note: Use this command when you have a number of devices that will be configured the same.
Configure the first device the way you want the rest to resemble. Then
Get unknown only - Gets any unknown CP data, from the device currently being setup, and sends it to
the LNS database. Typically, unknown CP information is associated with 3rd party devices.
Get Trend - Gets Trend setup data from the device and sends it to the LNS database.
Close window when configuring node done - Closes the configuration window and displays the tree as soon
as the configuration process is done.

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5.

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Click

Rev 2.0

to save your changes to the Node Setup Menu, close the wizard and display the

tree. This will complete the commissioning process and remove the Never Commissioned label from
the FSC/FLC on the tree. Click

to abandon your changes to the Node Setup Menu. If

you cancel you will be prompted to confirm your cancellation. Confirming the cancellation closes the
wizard and returns to the tree display. Abandoning the cancellation returns you to the wizard.

FSC/FLC CONFIGURATION WIZARD


The FSC/FLC Configuration Wizard is used to configure a newly commissioned FSC/FLC. It steps you through
a series of editor pages and allows you to accept the default settings or enter your own settings. As you move
through the Configuration Wizard the editor pages presented will vary, based on your proceeding choices. For
example, if you select Thermistor instead of Intelligent/TSO, you will automatically skip past the pages for
thermostat configuration, since the thermistor requires no configuration. The FSC/FLC flowchart (Figure 9)
shows each of the pages in the Wizard. The Wizard pages have been numbered to simplify following the
configuration process.
Note: Configuration Wizards for other devices have different point types and configuration pages.

Open The
FSC Wizard

Page 1
Configure
FSC/FLC
Time Values

Page 2
Enable
Daylight Savings
Time?

Yes

Page 3
Configure Daylight
Savings Time

No

Page 4
Select
FSC
Modules

Finish

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Figure 9. FSC/FLC Flow Chart

FSC/FLC WIZARD PAGE 1 - CONFIGURE FSC TIME VALUES


The first page to display in the FSC/FLC Wizard is the Configure FSC Time Values page. On this page you set
three time parameters. The first is Status Send Interval which is the time the FSC/FLC will send Status updates. .
The Configure FSC Time Values page is displayed below (Figure 10).

Figure 10. Configure FSC Time Values Page

1.

Set the Status Send Interval by typing in a new value, or using the spin boxes. This is the maximum
amount of time that elapses before the FSC or FLC sends a point status to the NexSys Workstation.
This is done by walking through the list of points and sending one point each time, regardless of the
maximum and minimum send times or the send on delta. This keeps the NexSys Workstation aware
that the FSC is communicating.

Default: 30 seconds Range: 0 to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 seconds


NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 seconds and click

, the time de-

faults to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 seconds.


2.

Set the Time Broadcast Interval by typing in a new value, or using the spin boxes. This is only
used if this FSC or FLC is the time provider. This interval is the length of time that elapses before the
FSC or FLC synchronizes other controllers to the time.

Default: 15 minutes Range: 0 to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 seconds


NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 seconds and click

, the time de-

faults to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 seconds.


3.

Set the Time Zone Offset From GMT by typing in a new value, or using the spin boxes. This field
represents the number of hours to add to the local standard time to obtain Greenwich Mean Time.
EST add 5 hours, CST add 6 hours, MST add 7 hours, PST add 8 hours.

Default: 5 Range: Hours=0-23 Minutes=0-59 Seconds=0-59


2.

Press

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to move to Page 2 - Enable Daylight Savings Time.

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FSC/FLC WIZARD PAGE 2 - ENABLE DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME


This page sets whether Daylight Savings Time will be enabled or disabled. The Enable Daylight Savings Time is
displayed below (Figure 11).

Figure 11. Enable Daylight Savings Time Page

1.

Accept the default Yes radio button to Enable Daylight Savings Time or click the No radio button to
Disable Daylight Savings Time.

Default: Yes

Option: No

Selecting No skips you to Page 4 - Select FSC Modules.


Selecting Yes moves you to Page 3 - Configure Daylight Savings Time.
2.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

FSC/FLC WIZARD PAGE 3 - CONFIGURE DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME


On this page you configure the Daylight Savings Time parameters by setting the Month, Week, Day, and Time
for the Start and End of Daylight Savings Time. The Configure Daylight Savings Time page is displayed below
(Figure 12).

Figure 12. Configure Daylight Savings Time Page

1.

Select the Start and Stop Month for Daylight Savings Time from the drop-down list boxes in the
Month field. This is the month range that Daylight Savings Time will be in effect.

Default: Start=April
2.

End=October

Select the Start and Stop Week for Daylight Savings Time from the drop-down list boxes in the
Week field. These are the weeks of the selected months that Daylight Savings Time begins and
ends.

Default: Start=First End=Last


3.

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Select the Start and Stop Day for Daylight Savings Time from the drop-down list boxes in the Day
field. These are the days of the selected weeks that Daylight Savings Time begins and ends.
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Default: Start=Sunday End=Sunday


4.

Select the Start and Stop Time for daylight savings time in the Time field. These are the times of
the selected days that daylight savings times will be in effect.

Default: 2 hours
5.

Range: Hours=0-23 Minutes=0-59 Seconds=0-59

Click

to advance to Page 4 - Select FSC Modules.

FSC/FLC WIZARD PAGE 4 - SELECT FSC MODULES


On the Modules page of the FSC Editor you define I/O modules on the FSC or FLC (Figure 13). If you are
editing an FSC-02, only modules 1 to 4 will display. Modules 5 to 8 will not be available with the FSC-02. The
Select FSC Modules page is displayed below (Figure 13).

Figure 13. Select FSC Modules Page

EXPANSION A

MODULE 1

MODULE 2

MODULE 3

MODULE 4

EXPANSION B

386 CPU

The 8 Universal Input (UI), 4 DO/4 AO (4 Digital Output/4 Analog Output), 8 DO (Digital Output), and LCM (8
Triac/4 Digital Input) modules are the I/O modules that can be connected with the FSC or FLC, but the LCM (8
Triac/4 Digital Input) module should only be used for lighting control. A total of 8 I/O modules can be used on
the FSC or FLC, with 4 modules connected to EXPANSION A and 4 modules connected to EXPANSION B of
the 386 CPU. The information on this page must match the hardware in the field. The first module connected to
the 386 CPU on EXPANSION A is Module 1 and the first board connected to EXPANSION B is Module 5
(Figure 14).

MODULE 5

MODULE 6

MODULE 7

MODULE 8

Figure 14. Numbers for I/O Modules.

To complete the Modules page for the FSC Wizard:


1.

Use the drop-down list to select the I/O module type for each Module connected to the FSC or FLC
(Figure 10).

Default: None

Options: None, 8 Univ. Input, 4 AO/4 DO, 8 DO, LCM (8 Triac/4 Dig. Input)

NOTE: The information on this page must match the placement of the I/O modules in the field.
For example, if you have 3 I/O modules and they are all connected to EXPANSION A, then
you must enter the module type for Modules 1, 2, and 3. The other modules should be
None. Likewise, if you have a total of 4 I/O modules and you have 2 modules connected to
EXPANSION A and 2 modules connected to EXPANSION B, then you must enter the
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module type for Modules 1, 2, 5, and 6. The other modules should be None.
Note: This is the last page in the FSC/FLC Configuration Wizard.
2.

Press

if you need to make any changes in any of the previous pages.

Click

to save your changes and exit the FSC/FLC Wizard.

Click

to abandon your changes and exit the FSC/FLC Wizard. You will be prompted to

confirm your desire to cancel.

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Chapter Four

Setting Up a VAV

This chapter contains information on:


l Setting Up A VAV
l Defining A VAV
l Commissioning A VAV
l Configuring A VAV

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Rev 2.0

SETTING UP A VAV
The NXA-VAV-01 and NXA-VAV-02 are Application Specific Controllers (ASC) in the NexSys product line.
Their primary purpose is pressure independent Variable Air Volume (VAV) control. These ASCs communicate
on the same LONWORKS network with all of the other NexSys controllers. The VAV-01 is designed for stand-off
or snap track installation on projects which require an external damper actuator. The NXA-VAV-02 is designed
with an integrated actuator for most standard VAV applications.

ADDING A VAV TO THE PHYSICAL TREE


Adding a VAV to the Physical Tree requires three steps to be carried out in order. These three steps are Defining,
Commissioning, and Configuring.
Defining - The Add Node Menu is used to install the VAV on the tree, define the VAVs name and Program ID.
The VAV being defined can be either off-line or on-line and does not have to be physically attached to the
network until the commissioning stage. You can define multiple devices and then commission them all at once.
Commissioning - The Node Setup Menu is used to commission the defined router. Commissioning writes the
network image, Neuron ID, and Program ID to a database. The defined VAV must be on-line and physically
attached to the network for the commissioning process to work.
Configuring - The VAV Wizard is the editor used to configure a commissioned VAV. The wizard works at the
panel level to assign basic configuration settings and customize the VAV to your requirements.
Advanced editing at the point level is described in the Advanced Point Editing section of this manual.

DEFINING A VAV
The first step to adding a VAV is the defining process.
To add a VAV to the Physical Tree:
1.

Right click on the Global Node or Router where the VAV will be located. The Node pop-up menu
(Figure 1) appears. Click Add to display the secondary menu, then choose Node, then either Before
or After to set the VAVs placement on the tree. The Add Node menu (Figure 2) appears.

Figure 1. Node Menu.

2.

Figure 2. Add Node Menu.

Click on the VAV in the list of devices and then enter a name for the VAV in the New Node Name:
area. This should be as descriptive as possible and indicate the purpose and/or location of the VAV.
For example, this could be VAV 2nd Floor West Wing.

NOTE: This field can have a total of 31 characters.


3.

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Click

. The uncommissioned VAV has been added to the physical tree (Figure 3).

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Figure 3. Physical Tree with Newly Added Uncommissioned VAV

COMMISSIONING THE VAV


The second step is to commission the VAV. Any VAV that has not yet been commissioned will have (Never
Commissioned) after the VAVs name on the tree.
1.

Right click on the uncommissioned VAV to bring up the Node Menu (Figure 4). Select Setup Node
to bring up the Node Setup Menu (Figure 5).

Figure 4. Node Menu

Figure 5. Node Setup Menu

2.

If you know the exact Neuron ID for the VAV, type it in the Neuron ID field. The Neuron ID is
specific to the VAV controller you are setting up and is given to the NexSys Workstation when the
service pin is pressed on the controller. If you do not know the exact Neuron ID number, do not type
anything in this field. Go to Step 3.

3.

If you dont know the Neuron ID then click the Service Pin button on the Node Setup menu. Next
press the Service Pin on the VAV you are commissioning. This registers the Neuron ID, Program ID
and associated device specific information. Once you press the service pin on the VAV the Setup
Node Menu displays the VAVs Neuron ID and Program ID information (Figure 6).

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Figure 6. Node Setup Menu after pressing the Service Pin on the VAV

4.

Click
to advance to the next Node Setup pages (Figures 7 & 8). Select any options you want to
configure.

Figure 7. Node Setup Page 2

Figure 8. Node Setup Page 3

CHECK BOX EXPLANATIONS


The node setup pages contain a number of checkboxes that are used in the configuration process. Their settings
determine the information sent and whether it is sent from the LNS database to the device, or vice-versa.
Choose carefully how you use these commands. If used incorrectly, it is possible to overwrite default values that
are not recoverable.
NOTE: SEND moves data from the LNS database to the device.
GET moves data from the device to the LNS database.
Send Network Image - Sends the devices network address and bindings to the LNS database.
Send Config. Data - Sends the devices configuration parameters (CPs) from the LNS database to the device.
Force Defaults - Sends the default CPs from the LNS database to the device.

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Send Trend - Sends Trend setup data from the LNS database to the device.
Get Config. Data - Gets the devices CPs from the device and sends them to the LNS database. This is used as a
backup in the event the device requires reconfiguration.
Use as defaults - Checking this box gets the devices current configuration settings and makes them the
default CP settings for all similar devices. These settings are stored in the LNS database.
Note: Use this command when you have a number of devices that will be configured the same.
Configure the first device the way you want the rest to resemble. Then
Get unknown only - Gets any unknown CP data, from the device currently being setup, and sends it to
the LNS database. Typically, unknown CP information is associated with 3rd party devices.
Get Trend - Gets Trend setup data from the device and sends it to the LNS database.
Close window when configuring node done - Closes the configuration window and displays the tree as soon as
the configuration process is done.

5.

Click

to save your changes to the Node Setup Menu, close the wizard and display the

tree. This will complete the commissioning process and remove the Never Commissioned label from
the VAV on the tree. Click

to abandon your changes to the Node Setup Menu. If you

cancel you will be prompted to confirm your cancellation. Confirming the cancellation closes the
wizard and returns to the tree display. Abandoning the cancellation returns you to the wizard.

VAV CONFIGURATION WIZARD


The VAV Wizard is used to configure a newly commissioned VAV. It steps you through a series of editor pages
and allows you to accept the default settings or enter your own settings. As you move through the VAV Wizard
the editor pages presented will vary, based on your preceding choices. For example, if you select Thermistor
instead of Intelligent/TSO, you will automatically skip past the pages for thermostat configuration, since the
thermistor requires no configuration. The VAV flowchart on the next page (Figure 9) shows each of the pages in
the Wizard. The Wizard pages have been numbered to simplify following the configuration process.
Note: Configuration Wizards for other devices have different point types and configuration pages.

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Open The
VAV Wizard
Page 1
Intelligent/
TSO?

Rev 2.0

Yes

Page 2
Obtain:
Balance Password
Stat Password
Stat Units
Time Display
Override Time

Page 12
Set
Floating Reheat
Parameters

Floating
Page 11
Select
Reheat Type,
Morning Warmup

Electric

No

Page 13
Set
Electric Reheat
Parameters

PWM
Page 3
Accept Default
Setpoints and Thermal
Load Parameters?

No

Page 4
Obtain
Setpoints

Page 5
Obtain
Thermal Load
PID
Parameters

Yes

None

Page 14
Set
PWM Reheat
Parameters

Page 15
Broadcast Damper
Inc Output?

Page 16
Broadcast Damper
Dec Output?

Page 6
Set Box K-Factor

Page 7
Set
Flow Parameters

Page 17
Broadcast Fan
Output?

Page 18
Broadcast Reheat
Inc/St 1?

Page 8
Accept Default Air Flow
PID Parameters?

No

Yes

Page 9
Flow PID
Parameters,
Scan Time,
Drive Time,
Direction

Page 19
Broadcast Reheat
Dec/St 2?

Finish

Page 10
Fan Type

Figure 9. VAV Wizard Flowchart

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Setting Up a VAV

To enter the VAV Wizard:


1.

Right click on the commissioned VAV to be configured (Figure 10) to bring up the Node Menu
(Figure 11).

Figure 10. Highlighted Commissioned VAV

2.

Figure 11. Node Menu

Select Configuration Wizard to bring up the VAV Wizards first editor page, Room Sensor Type
(Figure 12).

VAV WIZARD PAGE 1 - ROOM SENSOR TYPE


The first page to display in the VAV Wizard is the Room Sensor Type page. On this page you choose whether
the VAV will use either an Intelligent/TSO STAT or a thermistor to determine space temperature. If you are using
an Intelligent/TSO STAT, you have the option to use an auxiliary space temperature. If you are using a thermistor, you do not have the option of an auxiliary space temperature. The Room Sensor Type page (Figure 12) is
shown below.
NOTE: You must select Thermistor if you are binding space temperature from another controller.

Figure 12. Room Sensor Type

1.

Click on the appropriate radio button to select either an Intelligent/TSO STAT or a thermistor.

Default: Intelligent Option: Thermistor


Selecting Intelligent/TSO moves you to Page 2 - Thermostat Configuration.
Selecting Thermistor will skip you to Page 4 - Setpoint Configuration.
2.

2000 Johnson

Press

Controls, Inc.

to advance to the selected page.

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VAV WIZARD PAGE 2 - THERMOSTAT CONFIGURATION


On the Thermostat Configuration page you set the Balance Mode password and Stat password, configure
Engineering Units, Time Display and Override Time. The Thermostat Configuration page (Figure 13) for the
Intelligent/TSO STAT is displayed below.

Figure 13. Thermostat Configuration Page

1.

Accept the default or enter a new configuration password in the Stat Password field. This is the
password that is used to enter the Configuration Mode using an Intelligent STAT.

Default: 5001
2.

Accept the default or enter a new configuration password in the Balance Password field. This is the
password that is used to enter the Balance Mode using an Intelligent STAT.

Default: 4999
3.

Range: 0-9999

Range: 0-9999

Select whether the Intelligent STAT displays Engineering Units in English or Metric. This applies
to all units that are displayed on the Intelligent STAT.

Default: English

Option: Metric

NOTE: This applies even if you are using a thermistor because you can still use the Intelligent STAT as a
configuration tool through the STAT port.
4.

Select whether the Intelligent STAT displays the Time Display in AM/PM or Military. This applies
to all time mode parameters that are displayed on the Intelligent STAT.

Default: AM/PM

Option: Military

NOTE: This applies even if you are using a thermistor because you can still use the Intelligent STAT as a
configuration tool through the STAT port.
5.

Select the Override Time for the parameters in User Mode on the Intelligent STAT. Override is used
to cause the system to control to the occupied setpoints when the building is not normally occupied.
Override places the controller back into occupied mode for a specified time (set in the Override Time
field). When this time expires, the previous control (setpoints) resumes.

Default: 50 minutes
6.

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Click

to advance to Page 3 - Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters.

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Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Setting Up a VAV

VAV WIZARD PAGE 3 - DEFAULT SETPOINTS AND THERMAL LOAD PARAMETERS


On this page you choose whether to accept the Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters. The Default
Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters page (Figure 14) for the Intelligent/TSO STAT is displayed below.

Figure 14. Accept Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters Page

1.

Click on the Yes radio button to accept the Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters.
Click on the No radio button to set your own Setpoint and Thermal Load Parameters.

Default: Yes

Option: No

Selecting Yes skips you to Page 6 - Local Emergency Shutdown.


Selecting No moves you to Page 4 - Setpoint Configuration, then Page 5 -Thermal Load Parameters.
2.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

VAV WIZARD PAGE 4 - SETPOINT CONFIGURATION


This page sets the Intelligent/TSO STATs Heating and Cooling setpoints for the Occupied, Economy, and
Unoccupied modes. The Setpoint Configuration page (Figure 15) for the Intelligent/TSO STAT and Thermistor
is displayed below.

Figure 15. Setpoint Configuration Page

1.

Enter the Occupied Heating and Occupied Cooling Setpoints. These are the setpoints the controller controls to in occupied mode.

Default: Heating=72.00F (22.2C) Cooling=73.99F (23.3C)


2.

Enter the Economy Heating and Economy Cooling Setpoints. These are the setpoints the controller
controls to in economy mode.

Default: Heating=68.00F (20.0C) Cooling=78.01F (25.6C)

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3.

Rev 2.0

Enter the Unoccupied Heating and Unoccupied Cooling Setpoints. These are the setpoints the
controller controls to in unoccupied mode.

Default: Heating=55.00F (12.8C) Cooling=95.00F (35.0C)


4.

Enter the User Offset. This is the maximum number of degrees, above and below the user setpoint,
the user is allowed to set the Setpoint on the Intelligent or TSO STAT.

Example: If the setpoint is 70F and the User Offset is 2F, the maximum setpoint would be 72F and the
minimum setpoint would be 68F.
Default: 2.00F (1.11C).
NOTE 1: The offset is never applied to the unoccupied setpoints.
NOTE 2: The values entered on this screen set up a basic relationship between the setpoints.
Even though an offset is determined and added to the setpoints, the numbers entered on
this screen do not change. For more information, see the VAV Engineering Guide.
5.

Click

to advance to Page 5 -Thermal Load Parameters.

VAV WIZARD PAGE 5 - THERMAL LOAD PARAMETERS


This pages settings are used to calculate thermal load for the controller. The actual space temperature from the
Space Temp Controller and the desired space temperature from the Setpoint Controller and outputs a thermal
load value. This values is then fed to the Economizer Controller, the Fan Controller, and the Heating/Cooling
Controller. The output of the Emergency Command Controller and the output of the Application Mode Controller are also used at in the determination of thermal load. The PID Parameters for Thermal Load page is displayed below (Figure 16).

Figure 16. Set Flow Details Page

1.

Enter the Heating and Cooling PID Prop. Integ. Derv. gains. A PID loop always requires two
values (actual and desired) that have the same engineering units, such as two F temperatures, two
CFM air flow readings, etc., and generates a command to correct the error between them. Typically,
this command is then used with some other point for a final action. In this case, the point takes the
actual space temperature and the desired space temperature and outputs a thermal load value that is
fed to the Economizer, Fan Controller, and the Heating/Cooling Controller.
The Proportional (Prop.) gain is how much error between the two values you want for 100% control.
Proportional gain is always in the engineering units of the input variables, in this case F. Decreasing
the proportional gain increases the control.

Default: 4 F
The Integral (Integ.) gain is how much time elapses before 100% of the error is added back into the
control. Integral gain is always in seconds. Decreasing the integral gain increases the control.
Default: 2000 Seconds

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Setting Up a VAV

The Derivative (Deriv.) gain controls based on how fast the temperature is changing, and attempts to
sense rapid changes. The derivative gain is always in seconds. Increasing the derivative gain, decreases
control.
Default: 0
NOTE 1: It is recommended that the Derivative gain always be 0.
NOTE 2: If your control is too sensitive and your system is oscillating, you need to increase the
Proportional and/or Integral gains. If your control is too insensitive and it is taking too long
to reach the Active Setpoint, then you need to decrease the Proportional and/or Integral
gains.
2.

Enter the Heating and Cooling Scan Rates. This is how often the Heating and Cooling Temperature PID loops are recalculated.

Default:

Cooling = 6 Seconds
Heating = 7 Seconds

NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click
to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.
3.

, the time defaults

Enter the Default Output. This is a thermal load that is forced to the system in the event of a
controller failure or an invalid space temperature, such as a short or open connection to a sensor or
thermostat.

Default: 50%
4.

Click

to advance to Page 6 - K-Factor.

VAV WIZARD PAGE 6 - K-FACTOR


On the K- Factor page you set the K-Factor, k_Cal and K-Offset. The K-Factor page is displayed below (Figure
17).

Figure 17. K-Factor Page

1.

Enter the K Factor. K Factor is the actual CFM at a measured Velocity pressure of 1 inch water
column. K Factor = CFM / SqRt of Inches of water column. There are 3 different methods to
determine K Factor:
From the Dual Duct VAV box manufacturers field calibration chart, find the curve for the box
size in your system and whatever CFM value exists at exactly 1 w.c. is the K Factor. For
example, on a particular box manufacturers field calibration chart, a 10 box supplies 1450
CFM at 1 w.c. Therefore, you would enter 1450 for the K Factor.

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From the Dual Duct VAV box manufacturers field calibration chart, find a point where the
inches of water column and a curve intersect with a CFM vertical line. Then to determine K
Factor use the following equation: K Factor = CFM / SqRt of Inches of water column. For
example, on a particular box manufacturers field calibration chart, a 10 box supplies 250
CFM at .03 w.c. Using the above equation, K Factor = 250 / .03. You would enter 1443 for
the K Factor.
Obtain an exact CFM reading at 1 w.c. from the box manufacturer.
Default: 300
2.

Enter the K Factor Calibration. K Factor Calibration is calibration, or verification, of K Factor to


actual field conditions. To determine K Factor Calibration:
1. Set the VAV box to Maximum CFM position and measure all diffusers for CFM (Measured
CFM).
2. Record the actual CFM reading at the Intelligent Stat or NexSys Workstation at the
maximum position (Read CFM).
3. Calculate the difference in CFM (Measured CFM - Read CFM).
4. Use the following equation to calculate K Factor Calibration:
K Factor Calibration = ( Measured CFM - Read CFM) / SqRt of Inches of water column
For example, on a particular box manufacturers field calibration chart, a 6 box supplies 500
CFM at 1 w.c. When you command the box to maximum, you get a reading of 490 CFM on
the Intelligent Stat. The Balance Commissioner gets a reading of 505 CFM. Using a manometer, you determine .98 w.c. at 640 CFM.
Now plugging in the numbers to determine K Factor Calibration:
K Factor Calibration = ( Measured CFM - Read CFM) / SqRt of Inches of water column
K Factor Calibration = (505-490)/.98
K Factor Calibration = (15)/.9899494
K Factor Calibration = 15.15
Default: 0

NOTE: For more information regarding K Factor and K Factor Calibration, see the VAV Engineering Guide.
3.

Enter the Flow Offset. Flow Offset is a true offset used to make small adjustments at low CFM
reading. The Flow Offset is limited to no more than 5% of the maximum CFM value. This offset can
be used for inadequate laminar air flow entering the VAV box, installation variances, etc.

Default: 0
4.

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to advance to Page 7 - Flow Parameters.

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Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Setting Up a VAV

VAV WIZARD PAGE 7 - FLOW PARAMETERS


The Flow Parameters page sets the desired flow for the controller. The Flow Parameters page is displayed below
(Figure 18).

Figure 18. Flow Parameters Page

1.

Enter the Mode type. This is the pressure mode for the controller

Default: PRESSURE_INDEPENDENT
2.

Enter the Minimum and Maximum Air Flow. These are the minimum and maximum amounts of
air flow the system is allowed to provide in pressure independent mode.

Default:
3.

0 CFM (0 LPS)

Enter the MWU Max. Flow. Morning warmup maximum flow is the maximum flow that the system
is allowed to provide during the morning warmup application mode.

Default:
6.

199 CFM (94 LPS)

Enter the MWU Min. Flow. Morning warmup minimum flow is the minimum flow that the system is
allowed to provide during the morning warmup application mode.

Default:
5.

Minimum=199 CFM (94 LPS) Maximum=1000 CFM (472 LPS)

Enter the Min. Reheat Flow. Minimum reheat flow is the minimum air flow that the system is
allowed to provide while the controller is in reheat.

Default:
4.

Option: PRESSURE_DEPENDENT

Click

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

1000 CFM (472 LPS)


to advance to Page 8 - Accept Air Flow PID Parameters.

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VAV WIZARD PAGE 8 - ACCEPT AIR FLOW PID PARAMETERS?


On the Accept Air Flow PID Parameters page you choose to Accept or Decline the Air Flow PID Parameters.
The Accept Air Flow PID Parameters page is displayed below (Figure 19).

Figure 19. Flow Parameters Page

1.

Click on the Yes radio button to accept the Air Flow PID parameters.
Click on the NO radio button to set your own Air Flow PID parameters.

Selecting Yes skips you to Page 10 - Fan Type.


Selecting No moves you to Page 9 - Flow PID Parameters.
2.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

VAV WIZARD PAGE 9 - FLOW PID PARAMETERS


This point is the desired position of the damper. This point takes the actual air flow from the Flow Sensor and
the desired air flow from the Air Flow Reset Controller and outputs a value to either the Damper Actuator Inc. or
Damper Actuator Dec. This point also looks at the output of the Emergency Command Controller before
determining the output to the damper. The Flow PID Parameters Page is displayed below (Figure 20).

Figure 20. Flow PID Parameters

1.

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System Setup

Enter the Air Flow Prop. Integ. Derv. gains. A PID loop always requires two values (actual and
desired) that have the same engineering units, such as two F temperatures, two CFM air flow
readings, etc. and generates a command to correct the error between them. Typically, this command is
then used as with some other point for a final action. In this case, the point takes the actual air flow
and the desired air flow and outputs a value to the Damper Actuator Incr. or Damper Actuator Decr.

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Setting Up a VAV

The Proportional (Prop.) gain is how much error between the two values you want for 100% control.
Proportional gain is always in the engineering units of the input variables, in this case CFM. Decreasing
the proportional gain increases the control.
Default: 500 CFM
The Integral (Integ.) gain is how much time elapses before 100% of the error is added back into the
control. Integral gain is always in seconds. Decreasing the integral gain increases the control.
Default: 120
The Derivative (Deriv.) gain controls based on how fast the temperature is changing, and attempts to
sense rapid changes. The derivative gain is always in seconds. Increasing the derivative gain, decreases
control.
Default: 0
NOTE: It is recommended that the derivative gain always be 0.
NOTE: If your control is too sensitive and your system is oscillating, you need to increase the
proportional and/or integral gains. If your control is too insensitive and it is taking too long
to reach the active setpoint, then you need to decrease the proportional and/or integral
gains.
2.

Enter the Scan Time. This is how often the Air Flow PID loop is recalculated.

Default: 5 Seconds
NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click
to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.
3.

, the time defaults

Enter the Actuator Drive Time. This is the amount of time it takes for the damper to go from full
open to full closed.

Default: 3 minutes
NOTE 1: The drive time for the ESUSA VAV-02 is 3 minutes. Always consult the manufacturers
specifications if you are unsure of your damper actuators drive time.
4.

Select whether the damper Direction is Clockwise or Counter-Clockwise. This sets the damper to
move in a Clockwise or Counter-Clockwise direction. This is useful if the damper has been wired
wrong in the field.
Default: Clockwise

NOTE: Due to the integrated actuator, a VAV-02 controller should always be Direct. Proportional
gain is always in the engineering units of the input variables, in this case F. Decreasing
the proportional gain increases the control.
5.

Enter the Default Position. This is a thermal load that is forced to the system in the event of a
controller failure or an invalid space temperature, such as a short or open connection to a sensor or
thermostat.
Default: Closed

6.

Click

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VAV WIZARD PAGE 10 - FAN TYPE


This page sets the fan type, if any, the controller should use. The Fan Type page (Figure 21) is shown below:

Figure 21. Fan Type

1.

Select whether the fan type for the VAV system is None, Serial, or Parallel.

Default: PARALLEL
2.

Click

Options: NONE, SERIAL


to advance to Page 11 - Reheat Parameters.

VAV WIZARD PAGE 11 - REHEAT PARAMETERS


The Reheat Parameters page determines what reheat type (if any) should be used. It looks at the output of the
Temp PID Controller and determines if reheat should be ON or OFF. The output of this point is sent to the
Reheat Increment/Stage 1 and the Reheat Decrement/Stage 2, which are the control points for reheat. The
Reheat Parameters page is displayed below (Figure 22).

Figure 22. Reheat Parameters

1. Enter the Reheat Type.


Options:

REHEAT_NONE
REHEAT_FLOATING
REHEAT_2_STAGE_ELEC
REHEAT_3_STAGE_ELEC
REHEAT_PWM

2. Enter the Morning Warmup default status setting.


Options:

MWU_REHEAT_ENABLE
MWU_REHEAT_DISABLE

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Selecting REHEAT_NONE skips you to Page 15 - Broadcast Damper DEC Output.


Selecting REHEAT_FLOATING moves you to Page 12 - Floating Reheat Parameters.
Selecting REHEAT_2_STAGE_ELEC or REHEAT_3_STAGE_ELEC skips you to Page 13 - Electric
Reheat Parameters.
Selecting REHEAT_PWM skips you to Page 14 - PWM Reheat Parameters.
3.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

VAV WIZARD PAGE 12 - FLOATING REHEAT


On the Floating Reheat page you set the controllers Drive Time, Direction, and Default Position. The Floating
Reheat page is displayed below (Figure 23).

Figure 23. Floating Reheat Page

1.

Enter the Drive Time. This is the amount of time it takes to drive the motor controlling the reheat
valve from full open to full closed.

Default: 1 Minute and 30 Seconds


NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click
, the time defaults
to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.
2.

Enter the Direction. This is the direction the damper moves.

Default: Clockwise Option: Counter-Clockwise


3.

Enter the Default Position for the damper.


This determines if the motor is moving in the Normal direction or if it is moving in the Reverse
direction. Points 20 and 21 are the increment and decrement controls for the reheat. If Point #20
increases the heat and Point #21 decreases the heat, then select Normal. If Point #20 decreases the heat
and Point #21 increases the heat, select Reverse. This is helpful if the reheat device has been wired
backwards.

Default: Close
4.

Click

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Option: Open
to skip to Page 15 - Broadcast Damper DEC Output.

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Rev 2.0

VAV WIZARD PAGE 13 - ELECTRIC REHEAT


On the Electric Reheat page you set the Interstage Delay. This is a minimum amount of time that must elapse
after a stage of reheat has turned ON. The Electric Reheat page is displayed below (Figure 24).

Figure 24. Electric Reheat Page

1.

Enter the Interstage Delay.

NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click
, the time defaults
to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.
2.

Click

to skip to Page 15 - Broadcast Damper DEC Output

VAV WIZARD PAGE 14 - PWM REHEAT


On the PMW (Pulse Width Modulation) Reheat page you set the Minimum On Time, Pulse Width, and
Minimum Off Time for the controller. When pulse width modulation is used, an electrical pulse of variable
length correlates directly with the value under regulation. For example, a pulse width might be 5 seconds and
the output value may range from 0-100%. If the pulse sent were 2.5 seconds, the controller would regulate the
device to 50%. A 2.5 second signal would be sent by the controller each time the modulator cycles. The PWM
Reheat page (Figure 25) is displayed below.

Figure 25. PWM Reheat Page

1.

Enter the Minimum On Time.


The Minimum On Time is the length of each pulse if the output value is determined by the controller to
be 0%. This initializing pulse, like a heartbeat, indicates that the controller is active and a pulse will
follow. This value may be set to zero.

Default: 0

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2.

Setting Up a VAV

Enter the Pulse Width.


The Pulse Width is the maximum length of a pulse. If a maximum pulse is sent, the output value will
be 100%. If the pulse sent minus the minimum on time is zero seconds, then the output value will be
0%. When the Minimum On Time, Pulse Width, and Minimum Off Time are added together, you
find the length of the pulse modulation cycle. If you wish to have a cycle length of 60 seconds, the
minimum on time is set to 0, and a maximum pulse length is set to 5 seconds, then the minimum off
time would be set to 55 seconds. See Figure 31. Refer to the note under step 6.
Default: 1 Minute and 30 Seconds

Min.
On
Time

Min.
Off
Time

Pulse Width for 50% Output

Min.
Off
Time

Min.
On
Time

Min.
Off
Time

Min.
On
Time

Min.
Off
Time

Min.
On
Time

One Cycle Length

Min.
On
Time

Min.
Off
Time

Pulse Width for 0% Output

One Cycle Length

Min.
Off
Time

Min.
On
Time

Pulse Width for 100% Output

One Cycle Length

Figure 31. A Pulse Width Modulation Cycle.

3.

Enter the Minimum Off Time.


The Minimum Off Time is used to set an off time after a pulse cycle. This value may be set to zero.
This value is used to space out the actuator updates by requiring an off period where nothing occurs.

Default: 0
4.

Click

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

to advance to Page 15 - Broadcast Damper DEC Output

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VAV WIZARD PAGE 15 - BROADCAST DAMPER INC OUTPUT?


On the Broadcast Damper Increment Output page you select whether to broadcast the damper increment output.
The Broadcast Damper INC Output page is displayed below (Figure 26).

Figure 26. Broadcast Damper INC Output? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: It is suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the output of Point #12 - Damper
Position and that point is always broadcast to the network. If Point #17 is used for its
default purpose, it is redundant to broadcast both points. If the binding was broken between
Point #12 - Air Flow PID Controller and Point #17 - Damper Actuator Incr., and Point #17
was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this point.
2.

Click

to advance to Page 16 - Broadcast Damper DEC Output.

VAV WIZARD PAGE 16 - BROADCAST DAMPER DEC OUTPUT?


On the Broadcast Damper Decrement Output page you select whether to broadcast the damper decrement
output. The Broadcast Damper DEC Output page is displayed below (Figure 27).

Figure 27. Broadcast Damper DEC Output? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: It is suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the output of Point #12 - Damper
Position and that point is always broadcast to the network. If Point #18 is used for its
default purpose, it is redundant to broadcast both points. If the binding was broken between
Point #12 - Air Flow PID Controller and Point #18 - Damper Actuator Decr., and Point #18
was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this point.
2.
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to advance to Page 17 - Broadcast Fan Output.


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NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Setting Up a VAV

VAV WIZARD PAGE 17 - BROADCAST FAN OUTPUT?


On the Broadcast Fan Output page you select whether to broadcast the fan output. The Broadcast Fan Output
page is displayed below (Figure 28).

Figure 28. Broadcast Fan Output? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: It is suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the output of Point #15 - Fan and
that point is always broadcast to the network. If Point #19 is used for its default purpose, it
is redundant to broadcast both points. If the binding was broken between Point #15 - Fan
Controller and Point #19 - Fan Output, and Point #19 was bound to a point on an FSC, then
you might want to broadcast this point.
2.

Click

to advance to Page 18 - Broadcast Reheat INC/ST 1 Output.

VAV WIZARD PAGE 18 - BROADCAST REHEAT INC/ST 1 OUTPUT?


On the Broadcast Reheat INC/ST 1 Output page you select whether to broadcast the Reheat Increment/Stage 1
Output. The Broadcast Reheat INC/ST 1 Output page is displayed below (Figure 29).

Figure 29. Broadcast Reheat INC/ST 1 Output? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network. It is suggested that this be set to
No. This point receives the output of Point #16 - Reheat and that point is always broadcast
to the network. If Point #20 is used for its default purpose, it is redundant to broadcast both
points. If the binding was broken between Point #16 - Reheat Controller and Point #20 Reheat Act. Incr. or Stage 1, and Point #20 was bound to a point on an FSC, then you
might want to broadcast this point.t.
2.

Click

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to advance to Page 19 - Broadcast Reheat DEC/ST 2 Output.


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VAV WIZARD PAGE 19 - BROADCAST REHEAT DEC/ST 2 OUTPUT?


On the Broadcast Reheat INC/ST 1 Output page you select whether to broadcast the Reheat Decrement/Stage 2
Output. The Broadcast Reheat DEC/ST 2 Output page is displayed below (Figure 30).

Figure 30. Broadcast Reheat DEC/ST 2 Output? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: It is suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the output of Point #16 - Reheat
and that point is always broadcast to the network. If Point #21 is used for its default purpose, it is redundant to broadcast both points. If the binding was broken between Point #16
- Reheat Controller and Point #21 - Reheat Act. Decr. or Stage 2, and Point #21 was bound
to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this point.
Note: This is the last page in the VAV Wizard.
2.

Press

if you need to make any changes in any of the previous pages.

Click

to save your changes and exit the Configuration Wizard.

Click

to abandon your changes and exit the Configuration Wizard. You will be

prompted to confirm your desire to cancel.

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ADVANCED POINT EDITING


The VAV Configuration Wizard takes care of configuring most VAVs. However, there will be instances where
you need to directly access a point to verify status or to command the point. All 21 points on the VAV controller
are editable, and you can edit the points to tune your VAV system. Each point has a predefined number and point
type that are uneditable.

Figure 30. VAV-01 Point Listing


To edit an a VAV point:
1. Double-click the VAV you want to edit. The Points and LMOs subtree appears.
2. Double-click on the Points heading. The VAV Points page appears.
3. Double-click on the point you want to edit. The Status Command page appears.
4. Enter a new value into the command field.
5. Press Set to issue the command. Press

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Chapter Five

Setting Up a Heat Pump

This chapter contains information on:


l Setting Up A Heat Pump
l Defining A Heat Pump
l Commissioning A Heat Pump
l Configuring A Heat Pump

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Setting Up a Heat Pump

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Rev 2.0

SETTING UP A HEAT PUMP


The NXA-HPU-01 is an Application Specific Controller (ASC) in the NexSys product line. Its primary purpose
is to provide control for one individual heat pump; either a stand alone unit or one of the units in a closed loop
system. This ASC communicates on the same LONWORKS network with all of the other NexSys controllers. The
NXA-HPU-01 is designed for standoff or snap-track installation.

ADDING A HEAT PUMP TO THE PHYSICAL TREE


Adding a Heat Pump to the Physical Tree requires three steps to be carried out in order. These three steps are
Defining, Commissioning, and Configuring.
Defining - The Add Node Menu is used to install the Heat Pump on the tree, define the Heat Pumps name and
Program ID. The Heat Pump being defined can be either off-line or on-line and does not have to be physically
attached to the network until the commissioning stage. You can define multiple devices and then commission
them all at once.
Commissioning - The Node Setup Menu is used to commission the defined Heat Pump. Commissioning writes
the network image, Neuron ID, and Program ID to a database. The defined Heat Pump must be on-line and
physically attached to the network for the commissioning process to work.
Configuring - The Heat Pump Wizard is the editor used to configure a commissioned Heat Pump. The wizard
works at the panel level to assign basic configuration settings and customize the Heat Pump to your requirements.
Advanced editing at the point level is described in the Advanced Point Editing section of this manual.

DEFINING A HEAT PUMP


To add a Heat Pump to the Physical Tree:
1.

Right click on the Global Node or Router where the Heat Pump will be located. The Node pop-up
menu (Figure 1) appears. Click Add to display the secondary menu, then choose Node, then either
Before or After to set the Heat Pumps placement on the tree. The Add Node menu (Figure 2)
appears.

Figure 1. Node Menu.

2.

Figure 2. Add Node Menu.

Click on the Heat Pump in the list of devices and then enter a name for the Heat Pump in the New
Node Name: area. This should be as descriptive as possible and indicate the purpose and/or location
of the Heat Pump. For example, this could be Heat Pump 2nd Floor West Wing.

NOTE: This field can have a total of 31 characters.


3.

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Click

. The uncommissioned Heat Pump has been added to the physical tree (Figure 3).

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Setting Up a Heat Pump

Figure 3. Physical Tree with Newly Added Uncommissioned Heat Pump

COMMISSIONING THE HEAT PUMP


The next step is to commission the Heat Pump. Any Heat Pump that has not yet been commissioned will have
(Never Commissioned) after the Heat Pumps name on the tree.
1.

Right click on the uncommissioned Heat Pump to bring up the Node Menu (Figure 4). Select Setup
Node to bring up the Node Setup Menu (Figure 5).

Figure 4. Node Setup Menu

Figure 5. Node Setup Menu

2.

If you know the exact Neuron ID for the Heat Pump, type it in the Neuron ID field. The Neuron ID
is specific to the Heat Pump controller you are setting up and is given to the NexSys Workstation
when the service pin is pressed on the controller. If you do not know the exact Neuron ID number, do
not type anything in this field. Go to Step 3.

3.

If you dont know the Neuron ID then click the Service Pin button on the Node Setup menu. Next
press the Service Pin on the Heat Pump you are commissioning. This registers the Neuron ID,
Program ID and associated device specific information. Once you press the service pin on the Heat
Pump the Setup Node Menu displays the Heat Pumps Neuron ID and Program ID information
(Figure 6).

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Figure 6. Node Setup Menu after pressing the Service Pin on the Heat Pump

4.

Click
to advance to the next Node Setup pages (Figures 7 & 8). Select any options you want to
configure.

Figure 7. Node Setup Page 2

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Figure 8. Node Setup Page 3

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Setting Up a Heat Pump

CHECK BOX EXPLANATIONS


The node setup pages contain a number of checkboxes that are used in the configuration process. Their settings
determine the information sent and whether it is sent from the LNS database to the device, or vice-versa.
Choose carefully how you use these commands. If used incorrectly, it is possible to overwrite default values that
are not recoverable.
NOTE: SEND moves data from the LNS database to the device.
GET moves data from the device to the LNS database.
Send Network Image - Sends the devices network address and bindings to the LNS database.
Send Config. Data - Sends the devices configuration parameters (CPs) from the LNS database to the device.
F o rce Defaults - Sends the default CPs from the LNS database to the device.
Send Trend - Sends Trend setup data from the LNS database to the device.
Get Config. Data - Gets the devices CPs from the device and sends them to the LNS database. This is used
as a backup in the event the device requires reconfiguration.
Use as defaults - Checking this box gets the devices current configuration settings and makes them the
default CP settings for all similar devices. These settings are stored in the LNS database.
Note: Use this command when you have a number of devices that will be configured the same.
Configure the first device the way you want the rest to resemble. Then
Get unknown only - Gets any unknown CP data, from the device currently being setup, and sends it to
the LNS database. Typically, unknown CP information is associated with 3rd party devices.
Get Trend - Gets Trend setup data from the device and sends it to the LNS database.
Close window when configuring node done - Closes the configuration window and displays the tree as soon
as the configuration process is done.

5.

Click

to save your changes to the Node Setup Menu, close the wizard and display the

tree. This will complete the commissioning process and remove the Never Commissioned label from
the Heat Pump on the tree. Click

to abandon your changes to the Node Setup Menu. If

you cancel you will be prompted to confirm your cancellation. Confirming the cancellation closes the
wizard and returns to the tree display. Abandoning the cancellation returns you to the wizard.

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HEAT PUMP CONFIGURATION WIZARD


The Heat Pump Configuration Wizard is used to configure a newly commissioned Heat Pump. It steps you
through a series of editor pages and allows you to accept the default settings or enter your own settings. As you
move through the Configuration Wizard the editor pages presented will vary, based on your preceding choices.
For example, if you select Thermistor instead of Intelligent/TSO, you will automatically skip past the pages for
thermostat configuration, since the thermistor requires no configuration. The Heat Pump flowchart (Figure 9)
shows each of the pages in the Wizard. The Wizard pages have been numbered to simplify following the
configuration process.
Note: Configuration Wizards for other devices have different point types and configuration pages.
Open The
Heat Pump Wizard

A
Page 1
Intelligent/
TSO?

Page 2
Obtain:
Balance Password
Stat Password
Stat Units
Time Display

Yes

Page 12
Fan Controller
Parameters

No

Page 3
Accept Default
Setpoints and Thermal
Load Parameters?

Page 13
Compressor
Stages
(1, 2, 3)

Page 4
Obtain
Setpoints

No

Page 14
Compressor Controller
Emerg. Heat, Holdoff,
Min On, Min Off
Interstage Delay

Page 5
Obtain
Thermal Load
Parameters

Yes

Page 15
Reverse Valve
Parameters

Page 6
Local Emergency Shutdown:
Enable/Disable

Page 16
Loop Enable
(Water/Air)

Page 7
Economizer
Type?

Page 17
Broadcast
Damper Output?

None or 2-Position

Floating

Page 9
Local Economizer
Parameters

Local

Page 8
Economizer
Enable?

Network

Page 10
Mixed Air
Parameters

End

Finish

Page 18
Broadcast Fan
Output?

No

Low Limit?

Yes

Page 11
Low Limit
Shutdown
Parameters

Page 22
Broadcast
Compressor 3/EH?

Page 21
Broadcast
Compressor 2?

Page 19
Broadcast
Reverse Valve?

Page 20
Broadcast
Compressor 1?

Figure 9. Heat Pump Flow Chart

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HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 1 - ROOM SENSOR TYPE


The first page to display in the Heat Pump Wizard is the Room Sensor Type page. On this page you choose
whether the Heat Pump will use either an Intelligent/TSO STAT or a thermistor to determine space temperature.
If you are using an Intelligent/TSO STAT, you have the option to use an auxiliary space temperature. If you are
using a thermistor, you do not have the option of an auxiliary space temperature. The Room Sensor Type page is
displayed below (Figure 10).
NOTE: You must select Thermistor if you are binding space temperature from another controller.

Figure 10. Room Sensor Type

1.

Click on the appropriate radio button to select either an Intelligent/TSO STAT or a thermistor.

Default: Intelligent Option: Thermistor


Selecting Intelligent/TSO moves you to Page 2.
Selecting Thermistor will skip you to Page 4.
2.

Press

to move to the selected page.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 2 - THERMOSTAT CONFIGURATION


On the Thermostat Configuration page you set the Balance Mode password and Stat password, configure
Engineering Units, Time Display and Override Time. The Thermostat Configuration page for the Intelligent/
TSO STAT is displayed below (Figure 11).

Figure 11. Thermostat Configuration Page

1.

Accept the default or enter a new configuration password in the Balance Password field. This is the
password that is used to enter the Balance Mode using an Intelligent STAT.

Default: 4999

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2.

Rev 2.0

Accept the default or enter a new configuration password in the Stat Password field. This is the
password that is used to enter the Configuration Mode using an Intelligent STAT.

Default: 5001
3.

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Range: 0-9999

Select whether the Intelligent STAT displays Engineering Units in English or Metric. This applies
to all units that are displayed on the Intelligent STAT.

Default: English

Option: Metric

NOTE: This applies even if you are using a thermistor because you can still use the Intelligent
STAT as a configuration tool through the STAT port.
4.

Select whether the Intelligent STAT displays the Time Display in AM/PM or Military. This applies
to all time mode parameters that are displayed on the Intelligent STAT.

Default: AM/PM

Option: Military

NOTE: This applies even if you are using a thermistor because you can still use the Intelligent
STAT as a configuration tool through the STAT port.
5.

Select the Override Time for the parameters in User Mode on the Intelligent STAT. Override is used
to cause the system to control to the occupied setpoints when the building is not normally occupied.
Override places the controller back into occupied mode for a specified time (set in the Override Time
field). When this time expires, the previous control (setpoints) resumes.

Default: 50 minutes
6.

Click

to advance to Page 3 - Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 3 - DEFAULT SETPOINTS & THERMAL LOAD PARAMETERS
On this page you choose whether to accept the Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters. The Default
Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters page for the Intelligent/TSO STAT is displayed below (Figure 12).

Figure 12. Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters Page

2.

Accept the Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters by clicking on the appropriate radio
button. The Default Parameters are found on Page 4 and the Default Thermal Load Parameters
are found on Page 5.

Default: Yes

Option: No

Selecting Yes skips you to Page 6 - Emergency Shutdown.


Selecting No moves you to Page 4 - Setpoint Configuration.
3.

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Click

to advance to the selected page.

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Setting Up a Heat Pump

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 4 - SETPOINT CONFIGURATION


This page sets the Heating and Cooling setpoints for the Occupied, Economy, and Unoccupied modes, and also
sets a User Offset. All of these settings are for the Intelligent/TSO STAT. The Setpoint Configuration page is
displayed below (Figure 13).

Figure 13. Setpoint Configuration Page

1.

Enter the Occupied Heating and Occupied Cooling Setpoints. These are the setpoints the controller controls to in occupied mode.

Default: Heating=72.00F (22.2C) Cooling=73.99F (23.3C)


2.

Enter the Economy Heating and Economy Cooling Setpoints. These are the setpoints the controller
controls to in economy mode.

3.

Enter the Unoccupied Heating and Unoccupied Cooling Setpoints. These are the setpoints the
controller controls to in unoccupied mode.

Default: Heating=68.00F (20.0C) Cooling=78.01F (25.6C)


4.

Enter the Unoccupied Heating and Unoccupied Cooling Setpoints. These are the setpoints the
controller controls to in unoccupied mode.

Default: Heating=55.00F (12.8C) Cooling=95.00F (35.0C)


5.

Enter the User Offset. This is the maximum number of degrees, above and below the user setpoint,
the user is allowed to set the Setpoint on the Intelligent or TSO STAT.

Example: If the setpoint is 70F and the User Offset is 2F, the maximum setpoint would be 72F and the
minimum setpoint would be 68F.
Default: 2.00F (1.11C).
NOTE 1: The offset is never applied to the unoccupied setpoints.
NOTE 2: The values entered on this screen set up a basic relationship between the setpoints.
Even though an offset is determined and added to the setpoints, the numbers entered on
this screen do not change. For more information, see the Heat Pump Engineering Guide.
6.

Click

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to advance to Page 5 - PID Parameters For Thermal Load.

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HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 5 - PID PARAMETERS FOR THERMAL LOAD


This pages settings are used to calculate thermal load for the controller. The actual space temperature from the
Space Temp Controller and the desired space temperature from the Setpoint Controller and outputs a thermal
load value. This values is then fed to the Economizer Controller, the Fan Controller, and the Heating/Cooling
Controller. The output of the Emergency Command Controller and the output of the Application Mode Controller are also used at in the determination of thermal load. The PID Parameters for Thermal Load page is displayed below (Figure 14).

Figure 14. PID Parameters for Thermal Load Page

1.

Enter the Heating and Cooling PID Prop. Integ. Derv. gains. A PID loop always requires two
values (actual and desired) that have the same engineering units, such as two F temperatures, two
CFM air flow readings, etc., and generates a command to correct the error between them. Typically,
this command is then used with some other point for a final action. In this case, the point takes the
actual space temperature and the desired space temperature and outputs a thermal load value that is
fed to the Economizer, Fan Controller, and the Heating/Cooling Controller.
The Proportional (Prop.) gain is how much error between the two values you want for 100% control.
Proportional gain is always in the engineering units of the input variables, in this case F. Decreasing
the proportional gain increases the control.

Default: 4 F
The Integral (Integ.) gain is how much time elapses before 100% of the error is added back into the
control. Integral gain is always in seconds. Decreasing the integral gain increases the control.
Default: 2000 Seconds
The Derivative (Deriv.) gain controls based on how fast the temperature is changing, and attempts to
sense rapid changes. The derivative gain is always in seconds. Increasing the derivative gain, decreases
control.
Default: 0
NOTE 1: It is recommended that the Derivative gain always be 0.
NOTE 2: If your control is too sensitive and your system is oscillating, you need to increase the
Proportional and/or Integral gains. If your control is too insensitive and it is taking too long
to reach the Active Setpoint, then you need to decrease the Proportional and/or Integral
gains.
2.

Enter the Heating and Cooling Scan Rates. This is how often the Heating and Cooling Temperature PID loops are recalculated.

Default:

Cooling = 6 Seconds
Heating = 7 Seconds

3.

Enter the Default Output. This is a thermal load that is forced to the system in the event of a
controller failure or an invalid space temperature, such as a short or open connection to a sensor or
stat.

Default: 50%
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4.

Click

Setting Up a Heat Pump

to advance to Page 6 - Local Emergency Shutdown.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 6 - LOCAL EMERGENCY SHUTDOWN


This page enables or disables a digital input, wired to an external sensor, used to trigger a Local Emergency
Shutdown. When this page is enabled, and certain conditions have been met, an Emergency Shutdown for the
local controller is performed. Emergency operation mode begins and only effects the local unit. The Local
Emergency Shutdown page is displayed below (Figure 15).

Figure 15. Local Emergency Shutdown Page

1.

Select whether to Enable or Disable Local Emergency Shutdown function.

Default: Disable
2.

Click

Option: Enable
to advance to Page 7 - Economizer Type.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 7 - ECONOMIZER TYPE


This page determines the economizer type. The Economizer Type page is displayed below (Figure 16).

Figure 16. Economizer Type Page

1. Click on the appropriate radio button to select the Economizer Type.


Selecting None disables the Economizer sequence.
Selecting Floating enables modulated damper control.
Selecting 2-Position enables 2-position damper control.
Default: None

Options: Floating, 2-Position

Selecting None or 2-Position skips you to Page 12 - Fan Controller.

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Selecting Floating moves you to Page 8 - Economizer Enable.


2.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 8 - ECONOMIZER ENABLE


This page is used to select whether the Economizer sequence is determined locally (by the Heat Pump controller) or through the network (by an FSC). The Economizer Enable page is displayed below (Figure 17).

Figure 17. Economizer Enable Page

1.

Click on the appropriate radio button to select either Local or Network Economizer.
Selecting Local enables the Local Economizer.
Selecting Network enables the LON Economizer.

Default: Local

Option: Network

Selecting Local moves you to Page 9 - Local Economizer.


Selecting Network skips you to Page 10 - Mixed Air Parameters.
2.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 9 - LOCAL ECONOMIZER


This page is used to set the Setpoint and Deadband for the Local Economizer. The Local Economizer page is
displayed below (Figure 18).

Figure 18. Local Economizer Page

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1.

Setting Up a Heat Pump

Enter the Setpoint. This is the outside air temperature(OAT) and is dependent on your geographical
location. This is the temperature at which the economizer sequence is enabled.

Default: 55.00F
2.

Enter the OAT Deadband. This is the range the OAT must pass in order to enable or disable the
economizer sequence. For example, if the OAT deadband was set at 2F and the OAT setpoint was
set at 55, then the economizer sequence would not ENABLED until 53F and would not be DISABLED until the OAT setpoint had reached 57F.

Default: 2.50F
3.

Click

to advance to Page 10 - Mixed Air Parameters.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 10 - MIXED AIR PARAMETERS


This pages settings are used to calculate a Mixed Air PID damper position in percent. Mixed Air Parameters
takes the Setpoint of either the Mixed Air Temperature or the Discharge Air Temperature and outputs a Mixed
Air PID damper position in percent. This is not the absolute damper position because this position is based only
on the Discharge Air Temp and the Mixed Air Setpoint. This output is then fed to the Economizer Controller and
the exact damper position is determined. The Mixed Air Parameters page is displayed below (Figure 19).

Figure 19. Mixed Air Parameters Page

1.

Enter the Minimum Damper Percent. This is the minimum percent the damper will close to.

Default: 10%
2.

Accept the Temperature Source default or choose a different one from the drop-down list box. The
Temperature Source determines if the Setpoint for the Mixed Air PID is from the Mixed Air Temperature or the Discharge Air Temperature.

Default: Mixed_Air_Temp
3.

Options: Discharge_Air_Temp

Enter the Setpoint, for the Temperature Source selected above, in the Setpoint field. This setpoint
serves as the desired value in the PID loop.

Default: 12.79
4.

Enter the Air PID Values: Prop. Integ. Derv. A PID loop always requires two values (actual and
desired) that have the same engineering units, such as two F temperatures, two CFM air flow
readings, etc., and generates a command to correct the error between them. Typically, this command
is then used with some other point for a final action. In this case, the point takes either the actual
Mixed Air Temp or the actual Discharge Air Temp, and the desired Setpoint and outputs a value to
the Economizer.
The Proportional (Prop.) gain is how much error between the two values you want for 100% control.
Proportional gain is always in the engineering units of the input variables, in this case C. Decreasing
the proportional gain increases the control.

Default: 2.2 C
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The Integral (Integ.) gain is how much time elapses before 100% of the error is added back into the
control. Integral gain is always in seconds. Decreasing the integral gain increases the control.
Default: 300 Seconds
The Derivative (Deriv.) controls based on how fast the temperature is changing, and attempts to sense
rapid changes. The derivative gain is always in seconds. Increasing the derivative gain, decreases
control.
Default: 0 Seconds
NOTE 1: It is recommended that the derivative gain always be 0.
NOTE 2: If your control is too sensitive and your system is oscillating, you need to increase the
proportional and/or integral gains. If your control is too insensitive and it is taking too long
to reach the active setpoint, then you need to decrease the proportional and/or integral
gains.
5.

Enter the Scan Time. This is how often the Mixed Air PID loop is recalculated.

Default: 10 Seconds
NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click
to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.
6.

, the time defaults

Click on the appropriate radio button to select either Enable or Disable the Low Limit Shutdown.

Default: Enable

Options: Disable

Selecting Enable moves you to Page 11 - Low Limit Shutdown Parameters.


Selecting Disable skips you to Page 12 - Fan Controller Parameters.
7.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 11 - LOW LIMIT SHUTDOWN PARAMETERS


This point determines if conditions are met to perform a low limit shutdown. This is determined by comparing
either the Mixed Air Temp or the Discharge Air Temp to the Low Limit Setpoint. If the Mixed Air Temp/
Discharge Air Temp is below the Low Limit Setpoint, then a low limit shutdown is performed and the unit
undergoes an Emergency Shutdown. Low Limit Shutdown is used for equipment protection, mainly to prevent
coil freeze-up. The Low Limit Shutdown Parameters page is displayed below (Figure 20).

Figure 20. Low Limit Shutdown Parameters Page

1.

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Accept the Temperature Source default or choose a different one from the drop-down list box. The
Temperature Source determines if the Setpoint for the Low Limit Shutdown is from the Mixed Air
Temperature or the Discharge Air Temperature.

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Default: Mixed_Air_Temp
2.

Setting Up a Heat Pump

Options: Discharge_Air_Temp

Enter the Setpoint. This is the Low Limit Setpoint and is used in comparison to the Mixed Air
Temp/Discharge Air Temp to determine if there is a Low Limit Shutdown condition.

Default: 39.99F
3.

Enter the Deadband. This is the range the Mixed Air Temp must pass in order to enable or disable a
Low Limit Shutdown. For example, if the deadband was set at 2F and the Low Limit Setpoint was
40F, then the Low Limit Shutdown would activate and shutdown the controller at 38F. At 42F the
Low Limit Shutdown would be off and the delay time (Step 7) would be started.

Default: 2.00F
4.

Enter the Delay Time. This is the amount of time that must elapse before the systems attempts a
Reset. For example, using the conditions in Step 6, a delay time of 2 minutes is entered. Therefore,
once the temperature reaches 42F, the system delays 2 minutes before it attempts a reset.

Default: 0 Minutes
NOTE: At 0 the timer will not run and therefore the system will not reset itself. A manual reset
must be performed.
8.

Click

to advance to Page 12 - Fan Controller Parameters.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 12 - FAN CONTROLLER PARAMETERS


This page sets the Fan Type(if any), Minimum Run Time, Fan Status Enable/Disable, and the Fan Status Delay.
The output is sent to the Fan Output which is the control point for the fan.
NOTE: This point is only the state of the fan as the sequence of operation determines it to be.
Fan Status can be used as a feedback to determine the actual status of the fan.
The Fan Controller Parameters page is displayed below (Figure 21).

Figure 21. Fan Controller Parameters Page

1.

Accept the default or enter a new Fan Type. Fan type choices for the Heat Pump system are either
Automatic or Continuous . An automatic fan turns ON with compressor stage 1. A continuous fan is
ON continuously during occupied mode.

Default: Fan_Automatic
2.

Options: Fan_Continuous

Accept the default or use the spin boxes to set the Minimum Run Time for the fan. This is the
minimum amount of time the fan runs before compressor stage 1 turns ON. This is also the minimum
amount of time the fan runs after the compressor stage turns OFF.

Default: 1 minute 30 seconds

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NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click

, the time de-

faults to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.


3.

The Fan Status Enable box enables feedback to determine the status of the fan. This requires
hardware in the field to verify the status of the fan. Fan Status Enable choices for the Heat Pump
system are either Fan_No_Feedback or Fan_Status_Feedback. Fan_No_Feedback or
Fan_Status_Feedback. An automatic fan turns ON with compressor stage 1. A continuous fan is ON
continuously during occupied mode.

Default: Fan_No_Feedback Options: Fan_Status_Feedback


4.

Accept the default or use the spin boxes to set the Fan Status Delay time. The Fan Status Delay is
the minimum amount of time that must elapse after there is a change in the Fan Status. This delay
allows for no false readings on the Fan Status.

Default: 15 seconds
5.

Click

to advance to Page 13 - Number of Stages For Compressor.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 13 - NUMBER OF STAGES FOR COMPRESSOR?


This page sets whether the Heat Pump compressor is a 1, 2, or 3 stage compressor.
The Number of Stages For Compressor page is displayed below (Figure 22).

Figure 22. Number of Compressor Stages

1.

Click a radio button to set the Number of Stages for the compressor.

Default: 2

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2.

Click

Setting Up a Heat Pump

to advance to Page 14 - Compressor Controller.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 14 - COMPRESSOR CONTROLLER


This page sets if emergency heat is needed for the control sequence. This point looks at the output of the Mixed
Air PID Controller (Point #19), the output of the Emergency Command Controller (Point #20), the output of the
Loop Enable Controller (Point #27), and the Fan Status (Point #5) and determines if Compressor Stage 1, 2, 3 or
Emergency Heat is needed. The output is sent to the appropriate stage for the control output. The Compressor
Controller page is displayed below (Figure 23).

Figure 23. Compressor Controller Page

1.

Select whether or not there is Emergency Heat. This determines if the Heat Pump system uses
Emergency Heat.

Default: NO_EMERGENCY_HEAT Options: EMERGENCY_HEAT_ENAB


2.

Enter the Holdoff. The Emergency Heat Holdoff is an additional deadband that allows the system to
hold off before initiating Emergency Heat. Once all calculations are completed to determine if
Emergency Heat is needed, this parameter is checked to see if the current temperature is within this
deadband. If it is in the deadband, Emergency Heat is not initiated. For example, if the Holdoff is 2
and the Heating Setpoint is 68F, after all calculations for Emergency Heat have been made the
current temperature is looked at and determined to be 67F. Because the Holdoff is 2, Emergency
Heat would not be initiated because the temperature is still in the 2 deadband. If the current temperature was 65F, then Emergency Heat would be initiated.

Default: 1.01F
3.

Use the spin boxes or enter a value to set the Min. On Time and the Min. Off Time. The Min. On
Time is the minimum amount of time that the compressor must remain ON before it turns OFF. This
prevents short cycling. The Min. Off Time is the minimum amount of time that the compressor must
remain OFF before it turns ON. This is used for equipment protection.

Min On Time Default: 1 minute

Min OffTime Default: 4 minutes

NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click
to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.
4.

Click

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

, the time defaults

to advance to Page 15 - Reverse Valve Setup.

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HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 15 - REVERSE VALVE SETUP


This page sets the reverse valve for either cooling or heating. Polarities on valves vary so determine your
specific valves operation.. The HPU-01 controller is set up for Cooling to be NORMAL and Heating to be
INVERT. The Reverse Valve Setup page is displayed below (Figure 24).

Figure 24. Reverse Valve Setup

1.

Select whether the Direction of the reversing valve is Reverse_Valve_Normal or


Reverse_Valve_Invert. This determines if the reversing valve is set for cooling or heating. If you
want Cooling to be ON and Heating to be OFF, select Reverse_Valve_Normal. If you want Heating
to be ON and Cooling to be OFF, select Reverse_Valve_Invert.

Default: REVERSE_VALVE_NORMAL
2.

Option: REVERSE_VALVE_INV

Enter a value to set the Delay Time. This is the minimum amount of time after the reversing valve
changes state before it can change state again. For example, if the Delay Time is 5 minutes, and the
reversing valve changes state and is currently set for cooling mode, there will be a delay of 5 minutes
before the reversing valve can change to heating mode.
Default: 5 minutes

NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a

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time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click

, the time

defaults to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.


3.

Click

to advance to Page 16 - Loop Enable.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 16 - LOOP ENABLE


This page sets whether the Heat Pump System uses an Air or Water source heat pump.
The Loop Enable page is displayed below (Figure 25).

Figure 25. Loop Enable Page

1.

Click a radio button to set if the Heat Pump System uses an Air or Water source.

Default: Water
2.

Click

Option: Air
to advance to Page 17 - Broadcast Output For Damper.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 17 - BROADCAST OUTPUT FOR DAMPER?


This is the hardware analog output of the Economizer Controller and is already broadcast to the network. The
Broadcast Output For Damper page is displayed below (Figure 26).

Figure 26. Broadcast Output For Damper Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: It is highly suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the Economizer Controller
output and is always broadcast to the network.
If the binding was broken between the Economizer Controller and the Analog Output, and the

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Analog Output was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this
point.
2.

Click

to advance to Page 18 - Broadcast Output For Fan Output.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 18 - BROADCAST OUTPUT FOR FAN OUTPUT?


This is the hardware output of the Fan Controller and is already broadcast to the network. The Broadcast Output
For Fan Output page is displayed below (Figure 27).

Figure 28. Broadcast Output For Fan Output? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No
Note: It is highly suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the Fan Controller output
and is always broadcast to the network.
If the binding was broken between the Fan Controller and the Digital Output, and the Digital
Output was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this point.
2.

Click

to advance to Page 19 - Broadcast Output For Reverse Valve.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 19 - BROADCAST OUTPUT FOR REVERSE VALVE?


This is the output of the Reverse Valve and is already broadcast to the network. The Broadcast Output For
Reverse Valve page is displayed below (Figure 29).

Figure 29. Broadcast Output For Reverse Valve? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No
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Option: Yes

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Note: It is highly suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the Reverse Valve output
and is always broadcast to the network.
If the binding was broken between the Reverse Valve and the Digital Output, and the Digital
Output was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this point.
2.

Click

to advance to Page 20 - Broadcast Output For Compressor 1.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 20 - BROADCAST OUTPUT FOR COMPRESSOR 1?


This is the output of the Compressor Controller and is already broadcast to the network. The Broadcast Output
For Compressor 1 page is displayed below (Figure 30).

Figure 30. Broadcast Output For Compressor 1? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: It is highly suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the Compressor Controller
output and is always broadcast to the network.
If the binding was broken between the Compressor Controller and the Digital Output, and the
Digital Output was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this point.
2.

Click

to advance to Page 21 - Broadcast Output For Compressor 2.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 21 - BROADCAST OUTPUT FOR COMPRESSOR 2?


This is the output of the Compressor Controller and is already broadcast to the network. The Broadcast Output
For Compressor 2 page is displayed below (Figure 31).

Figure 31. Broadcast Output For Compressor 2? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No
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Option: Yes
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Note: It is highly suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the Compressor Controller
output and is always broadcast to the network.
If the binding was broken between the Compressor Controller and the Digital Output, and the
Digital Output was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this point.
2.

Click

to advance to Page 22 - Broadcast Output For Compressor 3/EH.

HEAT PUMP WIZARD PAGE 22 - BROADCAST OUTPUT FOR COMPRESSOR 3/EH?


This is the output of the Compressor Controller and is already broadcast to the network. The Broadcast Output
For Compressor 3/EH page is displayed below (Figure 32).

Figure 32. Broadcast Output For Compressor 3/EH? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: It is highly suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the Compressor Controller
output and is always broadcast to the network.
If the binding was broken between the Compressor Controller and the Digital Output, and the
Digital Output was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this point.
Note: This is the last page in the Heat Pump Configuration Wizard.
2.

Press

if you need to make any changes in any of the previous pages.

Click

to save your changes and exit the Heat Pump Wizard.

Click

to abandon your changes and exit the Heat Pump Wizard. You will be prompted

to confirm your desire to cancel.

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Chapter Six

Setting Up a PEC

This chapter contains information on:


l Setting Up A PEC
l Defining A PEC
l Commissioning A PEC
l Configuring A PEC

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Setting Up a PEC

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

SETTING UP A PEC
The NXA-PEC-01 is an Application Specific Controller (ASC) in the NexSys product line. The Packaged
Equipment Controller (PEC) is designed to support four types of packaged equipment systems: Fan Coil Units
(FCUs) and Roof Top Units (RTUs), Unit Ventilators (UVs), and Air Handling Units (AHUs). This ASC
communicates on the same LONWORKS network with all of the other NexSys controllers. The NXA-PEC-01 is
designed for standoff or snap-track installation.

ADDING A PEC TO THE PHYSICAL TREE


Adding a PEC to the Physical Tree requires three steps to be carried out in order. These three steps are Defining,
Commissioning, and Configuring.
Defining - The Add Node Menu is used to install the PEC on the tree, define the PECs name and Program ID.
The PEC being defined can be either off-line or on-line and does not have to be physically attached to the
network until the commissioning stage. You can define multiple devices and then commission them all at once.
Commissioning - The Node Setup Menu is used to commission the defined router. Commissioning writes the
network image, Neuron ID, and Program ID to a database. The defined PEC must be on-line and physically
attached to the network for the commissioning process to work.
Configuring - The PEC Configuration Wizard is the editor used to configure a commissioned PEC. The PEC
Wizard works at the panel level to assign basic configuration settings and customize the PEC to your requirements.

DEFINING A PEC
The first step to adding a PEC is the defining process.
To add a PEC to the Physical Tree:
1.

Right click on the Node or Router where the PEC will be located. The Node pop-up menu (Figure 1)
appears. Click Add to display the secondary menu, then choose Node, then either Before or After to
set the PECs placement on the tree. The Add Node menu (Figure 2) appears.

Figure 1. Node Menu.

2.

Figure 2. Add Node Menu.

Click on the PEC in the list of devices and then enter a name for the PEC in the New Node Name:
area. This should be as descriptive as possible and indicate the purpose and/or location of the PEC.
For example, this could be PEC 2nd Floor West Wing.

NOTE: This field can have a total of 31 characters.


3.

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Click

. The uncommissioned PEC has been added to the physical tree (Figure 3).

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Setting Up a PEC

Figure 3. Physical Tree with Newly Added Uncommissioned PEC

COMMISSIONING THE PEC


The second step is to commission the PEC. Any PEC that has not yet been commissioned will have (Never
Commissioned) after the PECs name on the tree.
1.

Right click on the uncommissioned PEC to bring up the Node Menu (Figure 4). Select Setup Node
to bring up the Node Setup Menu (Figure 5).

Figure 4. Node Menu

Figure 5. Node Setup Menu

2.

If you know the exact Neuron ID for the PEC, type it in the Neuron ID field. The Neuron ID is
specific to the PEC controller you are setting up and is given to the NexSys Workstation when the
service pin is pressed on the controller. If you do not know the exact Neuron ID number, do not type
anything in this field. Go to Step 3.

3.

If you dont know the Neuron ID then click the Service Pin button on the Node Setup menu. Next
press the Service Pin on the PEC you are commissioning. This registers the Neuron ID, Program ID
and associated device specific information. Once you press the service pin on the PEC the Setup
Node Menu displays the PECs Neuron ID and Program ID information (Figure 6).

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Figure 6. Node Setup Menu after pressing the Service Pin on the PEC

4.

Click
to advance to the next Node Setup pages (Figures 7 & 8). Select any options you want to
configure.

Figure 7. Node Setup Page 2

Figure 8. Node Setup Page 3

The checkboxes on Figures 6, 7, and 8 are described on the next page.

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CHECK BOX EXPLANATIONS


The node setup pages contain a number of checkboxes that are used in the configuration process. Their settings
determine the information sent and whether it is sent from the LNS database to the device, or vice-versa.
Choose carefully how you use these commands. If used incorrectly, it is possible to overwrite default values
that are not recoverable.
NOTE:

SEND moves data from the LNS database to the device.


GET moves data from the device to the LNS database.

Send Network Image - Sends the devices network address and bindings to the LNS database.
Send Config. Data - Sends the devices configuration parameters (CPs) from the LNS database to the device.
Force Defaults - Sends the default CPs from the LNS database to the device.
Send Trend - Sends Trend setup data from the LNS database to the device.
Get Config. Data - Gets the devices CPs from the device and sends them to the LNS database. This is used as
a backup in the event the device requires reconfiguration.
Use as defaults - Checking this box gets the devices current configuration settings and makes them the
default CP settings for all similar devices. These settings are stored in the LNS database.
Note: Use this command when you have a number of devices that will be configured the same.
Configure the first device the way you want the rest to resemble. Then
Get unknown only - Gets any unknown CP data, from the device currently being setup, and sends it to
the LNS database. Typically, unknown CP information is associated with 3rd party devices.
Get Trend - Gets Trend setup data from the device and sends it to the LNS database.
Close window when configuring node done - Closes the configuration window and displays the tree as soon
as the configuration process is done.

5.

Click

to save your changes to the Node Setup Menu, close the wizard and display

the tree. This will complete the commissioning process and remove the Never Commissioned label
from the PEC on the tree. Click

to abandon your changes to the Node Setup Menu.

If you cancel you will be prompted to confirm your cancellation. Confirming the cancellation
closes the wizard and returns to the tree display. Abandoning the cancellation returns you to the
wizard.

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CONFIGURATION WIZARD (PEC)


The PEC Configuration Wizard is used to configure a newly commissioned PEC. It steps you through a series
of editor pages and allows you to accept the default settings or enter your own settings. As you move through the
Configuration Wizard the editor pages presented will vary, based on your preceding choices. For example, if you
select Thermistor instead of Intelligent/TSO, you will automatically skip past the pages for thermostat configuration, since the thermistor requires no configuration. The PEC flowchart (Figure 9) shows each of the pages in the
Wizard. The Wizard pages have been numbered to simplify following the configuration process.
Note: Configuration Wizards for other devices have different point types and configuration pages.

Open The
PEC Wizard

Page 1
Intelligent/
TSO?

Page 12
Fan
Controller
Parameters

Page 2
Obtain:
Balance Password
Stat Password
Stat Units
Time Display

Yes

Page 13
Discharge Air
Reset from
Thermal Load?

No

Yes

Page 14
Temperature PID
Parameters

No
Page 3
Accept Default
Setpoints and Thermal
Load Parameters?

Page 4
Obtain
Setpoints

No

Page 15
Number Of
Valves?

One Valve (1)

Page 5
Obtain
Thermal Load
Parameters

Yes

Discrete

Page 17
Local
Winter/Summer
Setpoint and
Deadband

None
or
2-Position

Floating

Page 8
Economizer
Enable?

Page 10
Mixed Air
Parameters

Page 29
Broadcast Heating
Decrement?

Page 22
Floating Cooling
Parameters

LON

Discrete

Page18
Heating Type?

Floating

Page 19
Floating Heating
Parameters

Page 24
Broadcast Damper
Output?

No

Network

Finish

Page 20
Discrete Heating
Parameters

Page 21
Cooling Type?

Floating

Local SWT
or
Local OAT

Page 7
Economizer
Type?

Local

Page 23
Discrete Cooling
Parameters

Page 16
Winter/Summer
Controller

Page 6
Local Emergency Shutdown:
Enable/Disable

Page 9
Local Economizer
Parameters

Two Valve (2)

Low Limit?

Yes

Page 11
Low Limit
Parameters

Page 28
Broadcast Heating
Increment?

Page 27
Broadcast Cooling
Decrement?

Page 25
Broadcast Fan
Output?

Page 26
Broadcast Cooling
Increment?

Page 9. PEC Wizard Flowchart

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To enter the Configuration Wizard:


1.

Right click on the commissioned PEC to be configured (Figure 10) to bring up the Node Menu
(Figure 11).

Figure 10. Highlighted Commissioned PEC

2.

Figure 11. Node Menu

Select Configuration Wizard to bring up the Configuration Wizards first editor page, Room
Sensor Type (Figure 12).

PEC WIZARD PAGE 1 - ROOM SENSOR TYPE


The first page to display in the PEC Configuration Wizard is the Room Sensor Type page. On this page you
choose whether the PEC will use either an Intelligent/TSO STAT or a thermistor to determine space temperature.
If you are using an Intelligent/TSO STAT, you have the option to use an auxiliary space temperature. If you are
using a thermistor, you do not have the option of an auxiliary space temperature. The Room Sensor Type page is
shown below.
NOTE: You must select Thermistor if you are binding space temperature from another controller.

Figure 12. Room Sensor Type

1.

Click on the appropriate radio button to select either an Intelligent/TSO STAT or a thermistor.

Default: Intelligent Option: Thermistor


Selecting Intelligent/TSO moves you to Page 2 - Thermostat Configuration .
Selecting Thermistor will skip you to Page 4 - Setpoint Configuration.
2.

Press

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PEC WIZARD PAGE 2 - THERMOSTAT CONFIGURATION


On the Thermostat Configuration page you set the Balance Mode password and Stat password, configure
Engineering Units, Time Display and Override Time. The Thermostat Configuration page for the Intelligent/
TSO STAT is displayed below (Figure 13).

Figure 13. Thermostat Configuration Page

1.

Accept the default or enter a new configuration password in the Balance Password field. This is the
password that is used to enter the Balance Mode using an Intelligent STAT.

Default: 4999
2.

Default: 5001
3.

Range: 0-9999

Accept the default or enter a new configuration password in the Stat Password field. This is the
password that is used to enter the Configuration Mode using an Intelligent STAT.
Range: 0-9999

Select whether the Intelligent STAT displays Engineering Units in English or Metric. This applies
to all units that are displayed on the Intelligent STAT.

Default: English

Option: Metric

NOTE: This applies even if you are using a thermistor because you can still use the Intelligent
STAT as a configuration tool through the STAT port.
4.

Select whether the Intelligent STAT displays the Time Display in AM/PM or Military. This applies
to all time mode parameters that are displayed on the Intelligent STAT.

Default: AM/PM

Option: Military

NOTE: This applies even if you are using a thermistor because you can still use the Intelligent
STAT as a configuration tool through the STAT port.
5.

Select the Override Time for the parameters in User Mode on the Intelligent STAT. Override is used
to cause the system to control to the occupied setpoints when the building is not normally occupied.
Override places the controller back into occupied mode for a specified time (set in the Override Time
field). When this time expires, the previous control (setpoints) resumes.

Default: 50 minutes
6.

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Click

to advance to the next page.

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NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Setting Up a PEC

PEC WIZARD PAGE 3 - DEFAULT SETPOINTS AND THERMAL LOAD PARAMETERS


On this page you choose whether to accept the Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters. The Default
Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters page for the Intelligent/TSO STAT is displayed below (Figure 14).

Figure 14. Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters Page

1.

Click on the Yes radio button to accept the Default Setpoints and Thermal Load Parameters.
Click on the No radio button to set your own Setpoint and Thermal Load Parameters.

Default: Yes

Option: No

Selecting Yes skips you to Page 6 - Local Emergency Shutdown.


Selecting No moves you to Page 4 - Setpoint Configuration, then Page 5 -Thermal Load Parameters.
2.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 4 - SETPOINT CONFIGURATION


This page sets the Intelligent/TSO STATs Heating and Cooling setpoints for the Occupied, Economy, and
Unoccupied modes. The Setpoint Configuration page for the Intelligent/TSO STAT and Thermistor is displayed
below (Figure 15).

Figure 15. Setpoint Configuration Page

1.

Enter the Occupied Heating and Occupied Cooling Setpoints. These are the setpoints the controller controls to in occupied mode.

Default: Heating=72.00F (22.2C) Cooling=73.99F (23.3C)

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2.

Rev 2.0

Enter the Economy Heating and Economy Cooling Setpoints. These are the setpoints the controller
controls to in economy mode.

Default: Heating=68.00F (20.0C) Cooling=78.01F (25.6C)


3.

Enter the Unoccupied Heating and Unoccupied Cooling Setpoints. These are the setpoints the
controller controls to in unoccupied mode.

Default: Heating=55.00F (12.8C) Cooling=95.00F (35.0C)


4.

Enter the User Offset. This is the maximum number of degrees, above and below the user setpoint,
the user is allowed to set the Setpoint on the Intelligent or TSO STAT.

Example: If the setpoint is 70F and the User Offset is 2F, the maximum setpoint would be 72F and the
minimum setpoint would be 68F.
Default: 2.00F (1.11C).
NOTE 1: The offset is never applied to the unoccupied setpoints.
NOTE 2: The values entered on this screen set up a basic relationship between the setpoints.
Even though an offset is determined and added to the setpoints, the numbers entered on
this screen do not change. For more information, see the PEC Engineering Guide.
5.

Click

to advance to Page 5 -Thermal Load Parameters.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 5 - PID PARAMETERS FOR THERMAL LOAD


This pages settings are used to calculate thermal load for the controller. The actual space temperature from the
Space Temp Controller and the desired space temperature from the Setpoint Controller and outputs a thermal
load value. This values is then fed to the Economizer Controller, the Fan Controller, and the Heating/Cooling
Controller. The output of the Emergency Command Controller and the output of the Application Mode Controller are also used at in the determination of thermal load. The PID Parameters for Thermal Load page is displayed below (Figure 16).

Figure 16. PID Parameters for Thermal Load Page

1.

Enter the Heating and Cooling PID Prop. Integ. Derv. gains. A PID loop always requires two
values (actual and desired) that have the same engineering units, such as two F temperatures, two
CFM air flow readings, etc., and generates a command to correct the error between them. Typically,
this command is then used with some other point for a final action. In this case, the point takes the
actual space temperature and the desired space temperature and outputs a thermal load value that is
fed to the Economizer, Fan Controller, and the Heating/Cooling Controller.
The Proportional (Prop.) gain is how much error between the two values you want for 100% control.
Proportional gain is always in the engineering units of the input variables, in this case F. Decreasing
the proportional gain increases the control.

Default: 4 F

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The Integral (Integ.) gain is how much time elapses before 100% of the error is added back into the
control. Integral gain is always in seconds. Decreasing the integral gain increases the control.
Default: 2000 Seconds
The Derivative (Deriv.) gain controls based on how fast the temperature is changing, and attempts to
sense rapid changes. The derivative gain is always in seconds. Increasing the derivative gain, decreases
control.
Default: 0
NOTE 1: It is recommended that the Derivative gain always be 0.
NOTE 2: If your control is too sensitive and your system is oscillating, you need to increase the
Proportional and/or Integral gains. If your control is too insensitive and it is taking too long
to reach the Active Setpoint, then you need to decrease the Proportional and/or Integral
gains.
2.

Enter the Heating and Cooling Scan Rates. This is how often the Heating and Cooling Temperature PID loops are recalculated.

Default:

Cooling = 6 Seconds
Heating = 7 Seconds

NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click
to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.
3.

, the time defaults

Enter the Default Output. This is a thermal load that is forced to the system in the event of a
controller failure or an invalid space temperature, such as a short or open connection to a sensor or
thermostat.

Default: 50%
4.

Click

to advance to Page 6 - Local Emergency Shutdown.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 6 - LOCAL EMERGENCY SHUTDOWN


This page enables or disables a digital input, wired to an external sensor, used to trigger a Local Emergency
Shutdown. When this page is enabled, and certain conditions have been met, an Emergency Shutdown for the
local controller is performed. Emergency operation mode begins and only effects the local unit. The Local
Emergency Shutdown page is displayed below (Figure 17).

Figure 17. Local Emergency Shutdown Page

1.

Select whether to Enable or Disable Local Emergency Shutdown function.

Default: Disable

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2.

Click

Rev 2.0

to advance to Page 7 - Economizer Type.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 7 - ECONOMIZER TYPE


This page determines the economizer type. The Economizer Type page is displayed below (Figure 18).

Figure 18. Economizer Type Page

1. Click on the appropriate radio button to select the Economizer Type.


Selecting None disables the Economizer sequence.
Selecting Floating enables modulated damper control.
Selecting 2 Position enables 2 position damper control.
Default: None

Options: Floating, 2 Position

Selecting None or 2-Position skips you to Page 12 - Fan Control Parameters.


Selecting Floating moves you to Page 8 - Economizer Enable.
2.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 8 - ECONOMIZER ENABLE


This page is used to select whether the Economizer sequence is determined locally (by the PEC controller) or
through the network (by an FSC). The Economizer Enable page is displayed below (Figure 19).

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NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Setting Up a PEC

Figure 19. Economizer Enable Page

1.

Click on the appropriate radio button to select either Local or Network Economizer.
Selecting Local enables the Local Economizer.
Selecting Network enables the LON Economizer.

Default: Local

Option: Network

Selecting Local moves you to Page 9 - Local Economizer Parameters.


Selecting Network skips you to Page 10 - Mixed Air Parameters.
2.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 9 - LOCAL ECONOMIZER


This page is used to set the Setpoint and Deadband for the Local Economizer. The Local Economizer page is
displayed below (Figure 20).

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Figure 20. Local Economizer Page

1.

Enter the Setpoint. This is the outside air temperature(OAT) and is dependent on your geographical
location. This is the temperature at which the economizer sequence is enabled.

Default: 55.00F
2.

Enter the OAT Deadband. This is the range the OAT must pass in order to enable or disable the
economizer sequence. For example, if the OAT deadband was set at 2F and the OAT setpoint was
set at 55, then the economizer sequence would not ENABLED until 53F and would not be DISABLED until the OAT setpoint had reached 57F.

Default: 2.50F
3.

Click

to advance to Page 10 - Mixed Air Parameters.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 10 - MIXED AIR PARAMETERS


This pages settings are used to calculate a Mixed Air PID damper position. Mixed Air Parameters takes the
Setpoint of either the Mixed Air Temperature or the Discharge Air Temperature and outputs a Mixed Air PID
damper position in percent. This is not the absolute damper position because this position is based only on the
Discharge Air Temp and the Mixed Air Setpoint. This output is then fed to the Economizer Controller and the
exact damper position is determined. The Mixed Air Parameters page is displayed below (Figure 21).

Figure 21. Mixed Air Parameters Page

1.

Enter the Minimum Damper Percent. This is the minimum percent the damper will close to.

Default: 10%
2.

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Accept the Temperature Source default or choose a different one from the drop-down list box. The

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Setting Up a PEC

Temperature Source determines if the Setpoint for the Mixed Air PID is from the Mixed Air Temperature or the Discharge Air Temperature.
Default: Mixed_Air_Temp
3.

Options: Discharge_Air_Temp

Enter the Setpoint, for the Temperature Source selected above, in the Setpoint field. This setpoint
serves as the desired value in the PID loop.

Default: 12.79 C (55F)


4.

Enter the Air PID Values: Prop. Integ. Derv. A PID loop always requires two values (actual and
desired) that have the same engineering units, such as two F temperatures, two CFM air flow
readings, etc., and generates a command to correct the error between them. Typically, this command
is then used with some other point for a final action. In this case, the point takes either the actual
Mixed Air Temp or the actual Discharge Air Temp, and the desired Setpoint and outputs a value to
the Economizer.
The Proportional (Prop.) gain is how much error between the two values you want for 100% control.
Proportional gain is always in the engineering units of the input variables, in this case C. Decreasing
the proportional gain increases the control.

Default: 2.2 C (4F)


The Integral (Integ.) gain is how much time elapses before 100% of the error is added back into the
control. Integral gain is always in seconds. Decreasing the integral gain increases the control.
Default: 300 Seconds
The Derivative (Deriv.) controls based on how fast the temperature is changing, and attempts to sense
rapid changes. The derivative gain is always in seconds. Increasing the derivative gain, decreases
control.
Default: 0 Seconds
NOTE 1: It is recommended that the derivative gain always be 0.
NOTE 2: If your control is too sensitive and your system is oscillating, you need to increase the
proportional and/or integral gains. If your control is too insensitive and it is taking too long
to reach the active setpoint, then you need to decrease the proportional and/or integral
gains.
5.

Enter the Scan Time. This is how often the Mixed Air PID loop is recalculated.

Default: 10 Seconds
NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click
faults to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.
6.

Click on the appropriate radio button to select either Enable or Disable the Low Limit Shutdown.

Default: Enable
7.

, the time de-

Options: Disable

Select the Temperature Source. This sets whether the controller uses Mixed_Air_Temp or
Discharge_Air_Temp in its PID calculations.

Default: Mixed_Air_Temp

Option: Discharge_Air_Temp

Selecting Enable in Step 6 above moves you to Page 11 - Low Limit Shutdown Parameters.
Selecting Disable in Step 6 above skips you to Page 12 - Fan Control Parameters.
8.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 11 - LOW LIMIT SHUTDOWN PARAMETERS


This page determine if conditions are met to perform a low limit shutdown. This is determined by comparing
either the Mixed Air Temp or the Discharge Air Temp to the Low Limit Setpoint. If the Mixed Air Temp/

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Discharge Air Temp is below the Low Limit Setpoint, then a low limit shutdown is performed and the unit
undergoes an Emergency Shutdown. Low Limit Shutdown is used for equipment protection, mainly to prevent
coil freeze-up. The Low Limit Shutdown Parameters page is displayed below (Figure 22).

Figure 22. Low Limit Shutdown Parameters Page

1.

Enter the Setpoint. This is the Low Limit Setpoint and is used in comparison to the Mixed Air
Temp/Discharge Air Temp to determine if there is a Low Limit Shutdown condition.

Default: 39.99F
2.

Enter the Deadband. This is the range the Mixed Air Temp must pass in order to enable or disable a
Low Limit Shutdown. For example, if the deadband was set at 2F and the Low Limit Setpoint was
40F, then the Low Limit Shutdown would activate and shutdown the controller at 38F. At 42F the
Low Limit Shutdown would be off and the delay time (Step 7) would be started.

Default: 2.00F
3.

Enter the Delay Before Restart time. This is the amount of time that must elapse before the system
attempts a Restart. For example, if a delay time of 2 minutes is entered and the system has executed
an Emergency Shutdown, once the temperature reaches setpoint, the system delays 2 minutes before
it attempts a reset.

Default: 0 Minutes
NOTE: At 0 the timer will not run and therefore the system will not reset itself. A manual reset
must be performed.
4.

Select the Temperature Source. This sets whether the controller uses Mixed_Air_Temp or
Discharge_Air_Temp in its calculations.

Default: Mixed_Air_Temp
5.

Click

Option: Discharge_Air_Temp

to advance to Page 12 - Fan Controller Parameters.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 12 - FAN CONTROLLER PARAMETERS


This pages settings determine when the fan should be ON or OFF. The settings look at the output of the Manual
Occupancy Controller and the output of the Emergency Command Controller to determine if the fan should be
ON or OFF. The output of this point is sent to the Fan Output which is the control point for the fan.
NOTE: This point is only the state of the fan as the sequence of operation determines it to be.
Fan Status can be used as a feedback to determine the actual status of the fan.
The Fan Controller Parameters page is displayed below (Figure 23).

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Figure 23. Fan Controller Parameters Page

1.

Accept the default or enter a new Fan Type. Fan type choices for the PEC system are either Automatic or Continuous . An automatic fan turns ON with compressor stage 1. A continuous fan is ON
continuously during occupied mode.

Default: Fan_Automatic
2.

Options: Fan_Continuous

Accept the default or use the spin boxes to set the Minimum Run Time for the fan. This is the
minimum amount of time the fan runs before compressor stage 1 turns ON. This is also the minimum
amount of time the fan runs after the compressor stage turns OFF.

Default: 1 minute 30 seconds


NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click

, the time de-

faults to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.


3.

The Fan Status Enable box enables feedback to determine the status of the fan. This requires
hardware in the field to verify the status of the fan.

Default: Fan_No_Feedback Options: Fan_Status_Feedback


4.

Accept the default or use the spin boxes to set the Fan Status Delay time. The Fan Status Delay is
the minimum amount of time that must elapse after there is a change in the Fan Status. This delay
allows for no false readings on the Fan Status.

Default: 15 seconds
NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click
faults to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.
5.

Click

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

, the time de-

to advance to Page 13 - Discharge Air Reset From Thermal Load.

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Rev 2.0

PEC WIZARD PAGE 13 - DISCHARGE AIR RESET FROM THERMAL LOAD


This pages settings determine if the Discharge Air Reset sequence is activated based on Space Temperature or
Thermal Load. The Discharge Air Reset From Thermal Load page is displayed below (Figure 24).

Figure 24. Discharge Air Reset From Thermal Load Page

1.

Click on the appropriate radio button to select either NO (Space Temperature Control) or Yes
(Thermal Load).

Default: No

Options: Yes

Selecting No skips you to Page 15 - Number of Valves.


Selecting Yes moves you to Page 14 - Temperature PID Parameters.
2.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 14 - DISCHARGE AIR RESET


The Discharge Air Reset page uses Space Temp control to initiate a The Discharge Air Reset page is displayed
below (Figure 25).

Figure 25. Page 14 - Discharge Air Reset

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NexSys Workstation Users Guide

1.

Setting Up a PEC

Enter the Minimum Reset Temperature. This is the minimum temperature .

Default: 12.77 C
2.

Enter the Maximum Reset Temperature. This is the maximum temperature .

Default: 35 C
3.

Enter the Air PID Values: Prop. Integ. Derv. A PID loop always requires two values (actual and
desired) that have the same engineering units, such as two F temperatures, two CFM air flow
readings, etc., and generates a command to correct the error between them. Typically, this command
is then used with some other point for a final action. In this case, the point takes either the actual
Mixed Air Temp or the actual Discharge Air Temp, and the desired Setpoint and outputs a value to
the Economizer.
The Proportional (Prop.) gain is how much error between the two values you want for 100% control.
Proportional gain is always in the engineering units of the input variables, in this case C. Decreasing
the proportional gain increases the control.

Default: 2.2 C
The Integral (Integ.) gain is how much time elapses before 100% of the error is added back into the
control. Integral gain is always in seconds. Decreasing the integral gain increases the control.
Default: 1000 Seconds
The Derivative (Deriv.) controls based on how fast the temperature is changing, and attempts to sense
rapid changes. The derivative gain is always in seconds. Increasing the derivative gain, decreases
control.
Default: 0 Seconds
NOTE 1: It is recommended that the derivative gain always be 0.
NOTE 2: If your control is too sensitive and your system is oscillating, you need to increase the
proportional and/or integral gains. If your control is too insensitive and it is taking too long
to reach the active setpoint, then you need to decrease the proportional and/or integral
gains.
4.

Click

to advance to Page 15 - Number of Valves.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 15 - NUMBER OF VALVES


This page is used to select whether the system is a 1 Valve (two-pipe) or 2 Valve (four-pipe) system. A 1 Valve
(two-pipe) has only one supply pipe and only one return pipe. This system supplies hot water or chiller water
and it has to be one or the other, never both. A 2 Valve (four-pipe) system has both hot and chilled water at the
same time (supply and return chilled water and supply and return hot water). In order for the PEC-01 to provide
proper control, the controller needs to be configured to match the mechanical system you are setting up. The
Number of Valves page is displayed below (Figure 26).

Figure 26. Number of Valves Page

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1.

Rev 2.0

Click on the appropriate radio button to select whether the system is a 1 Valve (two-pipe) or 2 Valve
(four-pipe) system.

Default: 2 (4 pipe) Option: 1 (2 pipe)


Selecting 1 Valve(2 pipe) moves you to Page 16 - Winter/Summer Controller.
Selecting 2 Valve(4 pipe) skips you to Page 21 - Cooling Type.
2.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 16 - WINTER/SUMMER CONTROLLER


This determines the Winter or Summer mode for a two-pipe system. This mode is determined by looking at the
Supply Water Temp/Outside Air Temp. The output of the Winter/Summer Controller is fed to the Heating/
Cooling Controller. The Winter/Summer Controller page is displayed below (Figure 27).

Figure 27. Winter/Summer Controller Page

1.

Click on the appropriate radio button to select whether the Winter/Summer mode is determined by
either the Local SWT (Supply Water Temperature), the Local OAT (Outside Air Temperature) or the
LON. Local means you want to determine the season using the Outside Air/Supply Water Temp on
the PEC-01 controller. If you are getting this temperature from an FSC and binding it to this PEC-01,
then you would choose LON.

Default: Local SWT Options: Local OAT, LON


Selecting either Local SWT or Local OAT moves you to Page 17 - Local Winter/Summer Controller.
Selecting LON skips you to Page 21 - Cooling Type.
2.

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Click

to advance to the selected page.

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Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Setting Up a PEC

PEC WIZARD PAGE 17 - LOCAL WINTER/SUMMER CONTROLLER


This page determines the Setpoint and Deadband for the Local Winter/Summer Controller. The Local Winter/
Summer Controller page is displayed below (Figure 28).

Figure 28. Local Winter/Summer Controller Page

1.

Enter the Setpoint for the Local Winter/Summer Controller. This is the setpoint that determines when
the system is in Winter or Summer mode.

Default: 32.00F
2.

Enter the Deadband for the Local Winter/Summer Controller. This is the range the setpoint must
pass in order to enable or disable the summer or winter mode. For example, if the deadband was set
at 2F and the Setpoint was 55F, then the summer mode would not be ENABLED until 57F and
would not be DISABLED until 53F. Likewise, winter mode would not be ENABLED until 53F and
would not be DISABLED until 57F.

Default: 0.00F
3.

Click

to advance to Page 18 - Heating Type.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 18 - HEATING TYPE


This page determines if the heating type for the system uses a modulated device (Floating) or a discrete device
(Discrete). The Heating Type page is displayed below (Figure 29).

Figure 29. Heating Type Page

1.

Select the Heating Type by clicking on the appropriate radio button.

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Default: Floating

Rev 2.0

Option: Discrete

Selecting Floating moves you to Page 19 - Floating Heating Parameters.


Selecting Discrete skips you to Page 20 - Discrete Heating Parameters.
2.

Click

to advance to the selected page.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 19 - FLOATING HEATING PARAMETERS


This page sets the Drive Time, Direction, and Emergency Default The Floating Heating Parameters page is
displayed below (Figure 30).

Figure 30. Floating Heating Parameters Page

1.

Use the spin boxes or enter a value to set the heating Drive Time. This is the amount of time it takes
for the modulating device for heating to go from full open to full closed.

Default: 1 minute and 30 seconds.

NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click

, the time

defaults to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.


2.

Use the drop-down list box to select the damper Direction. This determines if the damper is moving
in its direct direction or the reverse direction. This is useful if the device has been wired wrong in the
field.

Default: Clockwise Option: Counter clockwise


3.

Select the Emergency Default. This is the default setting that the floating actuator will go to when
any Emergency mode other than Normal occurs.

Default: Close
4.

Click

to advance to Page 24 - Broadcast Output For Damper.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 20 - DISCRETE HEATING PARAMETERS

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This page sets the Interstage Delay, Minimum On Time and Minimum Off Time. The Discrete Heating Parameters page is displayed below (Figure 31).

Figure 31. Discrete Heating Parameters Page

1.

Enter a value to set the Heating Interstage Delay. This is the minimum amount of time that must
elapse between successive stages of compressor activation.

Default: 1 minute and 30 seconds


NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click
, the time defaults
to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.
2.

Enter a value to set the Heating Min. On Time. This is the minimum amount of time that the
compressor must remain ON before it turns OFF. This prevents short cycling.

Default: 1 minute
3.

Enter a value to set the Heating Min. Off Time. This is the minimum amount of time that the
compressor must remain OFF before it turns ON. This is used for equipment protection.

Default: 1 minute
4.

Click

to advance to Page 24 - Broadcast Output For Damper.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 21 - COOLING TYPE


This page determines if the cooling type for the system uses a modulated device (Floating) or a discrete device
(Discrete). The Cooling Type page is displayed below (Figure 32).

Figure 32. Cooling Type Page

1.

Select the Cooling Type by clicking on the appropriate radio button.

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Default: Floating

Rev 2.0

Option: Discrete

Selecting Floating moves you to Page 22 - Floating Cooling Parameters.


Selecting Discrete skips you to Page 23 - Discrete Cooling Parameters.
2. Click

to advance to the selected page.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 22 - FLOATING COOLING PARAMETERS


The Floating Cooling Parameters page is displayed below (Figure 33).

Figure 33. Floating Cooling Parameters Page

1.

Enter a value to set the cooling Drive Time. This is the amount of time it takes for the modulating
device for cooling to go from full open to full closed.

Default: 1 minute and 30 seconds


NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click

, the time

defaults to 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.


2.

Use the drop-down list box to set drive Direction. This determines if the cooling device is moving in
its direct direction or the reverse direction. This is useful if the device has been wired wrong in the
field.

Default: Clockwise Option: Counter clockwise


3.

Select the Emergency Default. This is the default setting that the floating actuator will go to when
any Emergency mode other than Normal occurs.

Default: Close
4.

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System Setup

Click

Option: Open
to skip to Page 18 - Heating Type.

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Setting Up a PEC

PEC WIZARD PAGE 23 - DISCRETE COOLING


This page sets the Interstage Delay, Minimum On Time, and Minimum Off Time for Discrete Cooling. The
Discrete Cooling page is displayed below (Figure 34).

Figure 34. Discrete Cooling Page

1.

Enter a value to set the Discrete Cooling Interstage Delay. This is the minimum amount of time that
must elapse between successive stages of compressor activation.

Default: 1 minute 30 seconds


NOTE: The Maximum time you can enter is 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds. If you enter a
time greater than 1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds and click
1 Hour 49 Minutes and 13 Seconds.
2.

Enter a value to set the Min. On Time and the Min. Off Time. The Min. On Time is the minimum
amount of time that the compressor must remain ON before it turns OFF. This prevents short cycling.
The Min. Off Time is the minimum amount of time that the compressor must remain OFF before it
turns ON. This is used for equipment protection.

Default - Min. On Time: 1 minute


3.

, the time defaults to

Click

Default - Min. Off Time: 5 minutes

to skip to Page 18 - Heating Type.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 24 - BROADCAST OUTPUT FOR DAMPER?


This is the hardware output of the Economizer Controller and is already broadcast. It receives the economizer
damper position as a percent (0% to 100%) from the Economizer Controller and supplies an output signal of 0 to
10 VDC to control the economizer damper actuator. The Broadcast Output For Damper? page is displayed
below (Figure 35).

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Figure 35. Broadcast Output For Damper Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: It is highly suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the Economizer Controller
output and is always broadcast to the network.
If the binding was broken between the Economizer Controller and the Analog Output, and the
Analog Output was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this
point.
2.

Click

to advance to Page 25 - Broadcast Output For Fan Output.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 25 - BROADCAST OUTPUT FOR FAN OUTPUT?


This is the hardware output of the Fan Controller and controls the state of the Fan (On or Off). The Broadcast
Output For Fan Output? page is displayed below (Figure 36).

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Figure 36. Broadcast Output For Fan Output? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: It is highly suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the Fan Controller output
and is always broadcast to the network.
If the binding was broken between the Fan Controller and the Digital Output, and the Digital
Output was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this point.
2.

Click

to advance to Page 26 - Broadcast Output For Cooling Increment.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 26 - BROADCAST OUTPUT FOR COOLING INCREMENT?


This is the hardware output of the Heating/Cooling Controller and is already broadcast. If the system uses
floating cooling control, this controls the cooling increment. If the system uses discrete cooling control, this
controls Stage 1 of cooling. The Broadcast Output For Cooling Increment page is displayed below (Figure 37).

Figure 37. Broadcast Output For Cooling Increment? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: It is highly suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the Economizer Controller
output and is always broadcast to the network.
If the binding was broken between the Economizer Controller and the Digital Output, and the
Digital Output was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this point.

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2.

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Click

Rev 2.0

to advance to Page 27 - Broadcast Output For Cooling Decrement.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 27 - BROADCAST OUTPUT FOR COOLING DECREMENT?


This is the hardware output of the Heating/Cooling Controller and is already broadcast. If the system uses
floating cooling control, it controls the cooling decrement. If the system uses discrete cooling control, it controls
Stage 2 of cooling. The Broadcast Output For Cooling Decrement page is displayed below (Figure 38).

Figure 38. Broadcast Output For Cooling Decrement? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: It is highly suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the Economizer Controller
output and is always broadcast to the network.
If the binding was broken between the Economizer Controller and the Digital Output, and the
Digital Output was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this point.
2.

Click

to advance to Page 28 - Broadcast Output For Heating Increment.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 28 - BROADCAST OUTPUT FOR HEATING INCREMENT?


This is the hardware output of the Heating/Cooling Controller and is already broadcast. If the system uses
floating cooling control, this controls the heating increment. If the system uses discrete cooling control, this
controls Stage 1 of heating. The Broadcast Output For Heating Increment page is displayed below (Figure 39).

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Figure 39. Broadcast Output For Heating Increment? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: It is highly suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the Economizer Controller
output and is always broadcast to the network.
If the binding was broken between the Economizer Controller and the Digital Output, and the
Digital Output was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this point.
2.

Click

to advance to Page 29 - Broadcast Output For Heating Decrement.

PEC WIZARD PAGE 29 - BROADCAST OUTPUT FOR HEATING DECREMENT?


This is the hardware output of the Heating/Cooling Controller and is already broadcast. If the system uses
floating cooling control, it controls the heating decrement. If the system uses discrete cooling control, it controls
Stage 2 of heating. The Broadcast Output For Heating Decrement page is displayed below (Figure 40).

Figure 40. Broadcast Output For Heating Decrement? Page

1.

Select whether this point is Broadcast to the network.

Default: No

Option: Yes

Note: It is highly suggested that this be set to No. This point receives the Economizer Controller
output and is always broadcast to the network.
If the binding was broken between the Economizer Controller and the Digital Output, and the
Digital Output was bound to a point on an FSC, then you might want to broadcast this point.
Note: This is the last page in the PEC Configuration Wizard.
2.

Press

if you need to make any changes in any of the previous pages.

Click

to save your changes and exit the PEC Wizard.

Click

to abandon your changes and exit the PEC Wizard. You will be prompted to

confirm your desire to cancel.

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ADVANCED PEC EDITING


EDITING POINTS
All 31 points on the PEC controller are editable and you edit the points to tune your PEC system. Each point has
a predefined point number and point type which are not editable. To edit a point on the PEC controller:
1.

Click on the PEC you want to edit, then click on the Points (Figure 7).

Figure 7. PEC Points Page with Point #11 - User Setpoint Highlighted.

2.

Double click on the point you want to edit. The Point Editor for the selected point displays.

3.

Edit the point, as necessary. Specific procedures for editing points are discussed on the following
pages:

EDITING POINT #1 - DISCHARGE AIR TEMP (ANALOG INPUT)


Point #1 measures the temperature of the discharge air from a thermistor input. This point is used by the Mixed
Air PID (Point #19) in determining the desired damper position.

EDITING POINT #2 - MIXED AIR TEMP (ANALOG INPUT)


Point #2 measures the temperature of the mixed air from a thermistor input. This point is used by the Mixed Air
PID (Point #19) in determining the desired damper position.

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EDITING POINT #3 - SPACE TEMP (ANALOG INPUT)


Point #3 is a temperature input. Depending on the exact configuration, this could be either Space Temperature or
an auxiliary temperature, Return Air Temperature. If you are using an ESUSA sensor, this point is Space
Temperature and measures the temperature of the zone under control. If you are using an ESUSA thermostat,
then this point can be used as return air temperature.

EDITING POINT #4 - OUTSIDE AIR/SUPPLY WATER TEMP (ANALOG INPUT)


Point #4 measures the temperature of the outside air or the supply water from a thermistor input. Depending on
the system configuration, this point could be used by the Winter/Summer Controller (Point 21) in determining
the summer or winter mode of control for a two pipe system. If this point measures outside air temperature, this
point provides the OAT for display on the Intelligent STAT.

EDITING POINT #5 - FAN STATUS INPUT (DIGITAL INPUT)


Point #5 is a discrete input and is used for fan status feedback. The main purpose of this point is to add safety to
the system by allowing verification of the state of the fan for equipment protection.

EDITING POINT #6 - EMERGENCY SHUTDOWN (DIGITAL INPUT)


Point #6 is for the Emergency Shutdown. This input is wired to an external sensor in an area that should be able
to cause an Emergency Shutdown for the local controller.

EDITING POINT #7 - SPACE TEMP CONTROLLER


This point holds the Space Temperature and generates alarms. If you selected Intelligent on the Thermostat Page
for the PEC, then this value comes from an ESUSA STAT. If Thermistor was selected, then this value comes
from the Space Temp (Point #3) or an external LON device.

EDITING POINT #8 - INDOOR AIR QUALITY CONTROLLER


Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is the quality of the air expressed in a percentage with 0% being the best and 100%
being the worst. This point is used to tell the controller to increase the Minimum Flow Setpoint to compensate
for poor IAQ. The intention is to increase air flow to provide additional fresh air to displace air currently in the
controlled space.

EDITING POINT #9 - OUTSIDE AIR TEMP


This point receives the outside air temperature from another point or another controller. This point is used by the
Analog Output (Point 26) in determining the desired damper position. This point differs from the Outside Air/
Supply Water Temp (Point #4) because Point #4 is an actual hardware point, while Point #9 is a software point.
Point #9 allows you to bind an Outside Air Temperature from another controller.

EDITING POINT #10 - MANUAL OCCUPANCY CONTROLLER


This point determines the state of occupancy for the controller (Occupied, Unoccupied, Economy). The state of
occupancy determines which setpoints are currently in use by the controller. The possible states of occupancy
the controller can be placed in are shown on the Point Command window (Figure 13). Although the list contains
4 states, the PEC controller only responds to 3 different states. The states are:
OCCUPIED - Uses the Occupied Heating and Cooling Setpoints.
UNOCCUPIED - Uses the Unoccupied Heating and Cooling Setpoints.
BYPASS - Not used in the PEC controller.
STANDBY - Uses the Economy Heating and Cooling Setpoints.

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Setting Up a PEC

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Rev 2.0

EDITING POINT #11 - USER SETPOINT CONTROLLER


This is the user desired setpoint. This point is given to the controller by the user through the Intelligent or TSO
STAT. This point is used in conjunction with the Setpoint Controller (Point # 18) to determine an offset (by
comparing the Occupied Cooling Setpoint to the User Setpoint) and then apply that offset to the current setpoints to determine the Active Setpoint.

EDITING POINT #12 - OVERRIDE CONTROLLER


This point provides the override function and timing for the controller. Override is used to cause the system to
control to the occupied setpoints when the building is not normally occupied. Override places the controller back
into occupied mode for a specified time (set in the Override Time field). When this time expires, the previous
control (setpoints) resumes.

EDITING POINT #13 - APPLICATION MODE CONTROLLER


This point sets the overall operation mode of the PEC controller. The possible modes the controller can be
placed in are listed below. Although the list contains ten modes, the PEC controller only responds to six different
modes.
The modes are:
AUTO - This is the normal mode for the PEC. The controller cools and heats over the whole range of possible
setpoints. Control is provided between -100% to 100% thermal load.
HEAT - The controller is in heat mode only. Control is provided between -100% and 0% thermal load.
MORNING WARMUP - The economizer damper is fully closed, and then the controller functions as usual.
See the PEC Engineering Guide for more information.
COOL - The controller is in cool mode only. Control is provided between 0% and 100% thermal load.
NIGHT PURGE - The economizer damper is driven to maximum.
PRECOOL - Not used in the PEC controller.
OFF - The controller is not providing control and is fixed at 0% thermal load.
TEST - Not used in the PEC controller.
EMERGENCY HEAT - Not used in the PEC controller.
FAN ONLY - Not used in the PEC controller.

EDITING POINT #14 - MANUAL RESET


This point allows the network to send a manual reset command to the Low Limit Shutdown controller in order to
facilitate a reset.

EDITING POINT #15 - LOW LIMIT SHUTDOWN


This point determines if conditions are met to perform a low limit shutdown. This is determined by comparing
the Mixed Air Temp (Point #2) and the Low Limit Setpoint. If the Mixed Air Temp is below the Low Limit
Setpoint, then a low limit shutdown is performed and the unit undergoes an Emergency Shutdown. Low Limit
Shutdown is used for equipment protection mainly to prevent coil freeze-up.

EDITING POINT #16 - LOCAL EMERGENCY SHUTDOWN


This point determines if conditions are met to perform a local emergency shutdown. This is determined by the
Emergency Shutdown (Point #6) and is used to tell the controller when to assume emergency operation mode
operations and only effects the local unit.

EDITING POINT #17 - LON EMERGENCY SHUTDOWN

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Setting Up a PEC

This point determines if conditions are met to perform a LON emergency shutdown. This is determined by a
point that is bound from another controller to the PEC-01 controller and is used to tell the controller when to
assume emergency operation mode operations. This point is used for smoke control. The possible states of
emergency the controller can be placed in are shown below:
NORMAL - No emergency operations - the controller is controlling to application mode.
PRESSURIZE - The controller drives the economizer damper to maximum, the fan is turned ON, and the
thermal load is forced to 0%.
DEPRESSURIZE - The controller drives the economizer damper to full closed, the fan is turned OFF, and
the thermal load is forced to 0%.
PURGE - The controller drives the economizer damper to maximum, the fan is turned ON, and the thermal
load is forced to 0%.
SHUTDOWN - The controller drives the economizer damper to full closed, the fan is turned OFF, and the
thermal load is forced to 0%.

EDITING POINT #18 - SETPOINT CONTROLLER


This point determines the setpoint the controller is currently using. This point takes the User Setpoint Controller
(Point #11), compares it to the occupied cooling setpoint entered on this point editor, and determines an offset.
This offset is then added to the occupied heating and cooling and economy heating and cooling setpoints and the
active setpoint is determined. The output of the Manual Occupancy Controller (Point #10), the output of the
Override Controller (Point #12), and the output of the Space Temp Controller (Point #7) are also looked at in the
determination of setpoint.
NOTE 1: The offset is never applied to the unoccupied setpoints.
NOTE 2: The values entered on this screen set up a basic relationship between the setpoints.
Even though an offset is determined and added to the setpoints, the numbers entered on
this screen do not change. For more information, see the PEC Engineering Guide.

EDITING POINT #19 - MIXED AIR PID CONTROLLER


This point is used to determine the mixed air PID damper position. This point takes the Discharge Air Temp
(Point #1) and the Mixed Air Setpoint (entered in this editor) and outputs a Mixed Air PID damper position in
percent. This is not the absolute damper position because this position is based only on the Discharge Air Temp
and the Mixed Air Setpoint. This output is then fed to the Economizer Controller (Point #23) and the exact
damper position is determined.

NOTE 1: It is recommended that the derivative gain always be 0.


NOTE 2: If your control is too sensitive and your system is oscillating, you need to increase the
proportional and/or integral gains. If your control is too insensitive and it is taking too long
to reach the active setpoint, then you need to decrease the proportional and/or integral
gains.

EDITING POINT #20 - EMERGENCY COMMAND CONTROLLER


This point is used to tell the controller when to assume emergency operation mode operations. This point looks
at the Low Limit Shutdown (Point #15), the Local Emergency Shutdown (Point #16), and the LON Emergency
(Point #17) and determines the emergency mode of operations. The possible states of emergency the controller
can be placed in are shown on the Point Command window (Figure 26). The emergency states are:
NORMAL - No emergency operations - the controller is controlling to application mode.
PRESSURIZE - The controller drives the economizer damper to maximum, the fan is turned ON, and the
thermal load is forced to 0%.

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Rev 2.0

DEPRESSURIZE - The controller drives the economizer damper to full closed, the fan is turned OFF, and the
thermal load is forced to 0%.
PURGE - The controller drives the economizer damper to maximum, the fan is turned ON, and the thermal load
is forced to 0%.
SHUTDOWN - The controller drives the economizer damper to full closed, the fan is turned OFF, and the
thermal load is forced to 0%.

EDITING POINT #21 - WINTER/SUMMER CONTROLLER


This point determines the summer or winter mode for a two-pipe system. This mode is determined by looking at
the Outside Air/Supply Water Temp (Point #4). The output of the Winter/Summer Controller (Point #21) is fed
to the Heating/Cooling Controller (Point #25).

EDITING POINT #22 - TEMP PID CONTROLLER


This point calculates thermal load for the controller. It takes the actual space temperature from the Space Temp
Controller (Point #7) and the desired space temperature from the Setpoint Controller (Point #18) and outputs a
thermal load value that is fed to the Economizer Controller (Point #23), the Fan Controller (Point #24), and the
Heating/Cooling Controller (Point #25). The output of the Emergency Command Controller (Point #20) and the
output of the Application Mode Controller (Point #13) are also used at in the determination of thermal load.

EDITING POINT #23 - ECONOMIZER CONTROLLER


This point determines the economizer damper position. The damper position is determined by looking at the
Indoor Air Quality Controller (Point #8), the Outside Air/Supply Water Temp (Point #4), the Mixed Air PID
Controller (Point #19), the Manual Occupancy Controller (Point #10), the Emergency Command Controller
(Point #20), and the Temp PID Controller (Point #22).

EDITING POINT #24 - FAN CONTROLLER


This point determines when the fan should be ON or OFF. This point looks at the output the Manual Occupancy
Controller (Point #10) and the output of the Emergency Command Controller (Point #20) to determine if the fan
should be ON or OFF. The output of this point is sent to the Fan Output (Point #27) which is the control point
for the fan.
NOTE: This point is only the state of the fan as the sequence of operation determines it to be.
Fan Status (Point #5) can be used as a feedback to determine the actual status of the fan.

EDITING POINT #25 - HEATING/COOLING CONTROLLER


This point determines whether the system is heating or cooling. Many factors are looked at in this determination.
Depending on what is entered in this point editor, this can determine heating or cooling, discrete or floating
control, 2 or 4 pipe system, etc.
NOTE: The fields on this screen change depending on the Cooling Type and Heating Type
selected.

EDITING POINT #26 - ANALOG OUTPUT


NOTE:

This point is used to control the Economizer Damper.

This point is the hardware output of the Economizer Controller (Point #23). This point receives the economizer
damper position as a percent (0 to 100) from the Economizer Controller and supplies an output signal of 0 to 10
VDC to control the economizer damper actuator.

EDITING POINT #27 - DIGITAL OUTPUT #1 FAN ACTUATOR OUTPUT


218

Point #27 controls the state of the fan (ON or OFF). This point is the hardware output of the Fan Controller
(Point #24) and applies the control.
System Setup
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Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

System Setup Index

System Setup Index


A
Active Setpoint 153
Adding a PEC 186
Adding a Router to the Physical Tree 121
Commissioning 121
Defining 121
Adding Nodes To A Router 124
Advanced PEC Editing 214
Air Flow 152
Application Mode Controller 148,172
Application Specific Controller 164
ASC 130,140
B
Broadcast 158,159,160,181,182,183,184
C
Coactive Routers 121
Commissioning a Defined Router 123
Commissioning the PEC 187
Config Data Set 107
Config Password 146,147,169,170
Configuration Mode 146,169
Connection Description Template (CDT)
Adding A Connection Description Template
(CDT) 115
Addressing 116
Deleting An Existing CDT 117
Entering Values
Other 116
Service Types 116
Timing Parameters 116
Modifying An Existing CDT 117
Cooling Scan Rate 149,172
CPL 130
CTI Routers 121
D
Damper 152
Deadband 177
Default Output 149,153,172

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Defining a PEC 186


Delay Time 177,180
Derivative Gain 149,153,172,176
Direct Action 153
Display Order 146,170
Drive Time 153
E
Echelon Routers 121
Economizer
Controller 148,172,175
Economy
Cooling Setpoint 147,148,171
Heating Setpoint 147,148,171
Edit/View Binding 106
Emergency
Command 179
Command Controller 148,172
Heat 179
Heat Holdoff 179
Shutdown 215
English Units 146,170
F
Fan
Controller 148,172
Output 177
Status 178,179
Status Delay 178
Far-Side Transceiver Types 121
Fiber Optic/Twisted Pair Router 121
FLC 130
Flow Offset 150
FSC 183
FSC/FLC 130
Add 130
FTR 121
G
Global Node 102,131,140,164
H
Heating
Scan Rate 149,172

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System Setup Index

Heating/Cooling Controller 148,172


Holdoff 179

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I/O Module 137


Integral Gain 148,153,172,176
Intelligent STAT 145,169
Interstage Delay 156

Move 101
Rename 110
Node Commands 96
Offline 97
Reset 98
Test 98
Wink 96
Node Menu 96

K Factor 149,150,152
K Factor Calibration 150

OAT Deadband 175


Occupied Cooling Setpoint 147,171
Occupied Heating Setpoint 147,171
Occupied Mode 146,170
Offset 148,171

L
Load Firmware 110
Local 174
Local Economizer 174
LON Economizer 174
Loop Enable 179
Low Limit
Setpoint 176
M
Maximum Air Flow 151
Metric Units 146,170
Min. Off Time 179
Min. On Time 179
Min. Reheat Flow 151
Minimum Air Flow 151
Minimum Run Time 177
Mixed Air PID 176,179
Mixed Air Temperature 176
Morning Warmup
Maximum Flow 151
Minimum Flow 151
MultiNode Operations 113
MWU Max. Flow 151
MWU Min. Flow 151
N
Network 174
Neuron ID 103,132,141,165
No Reverse 180
Node
Add 102
Configuration Wizard 118
Delete 107

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P
Parallel Fan 154
Password 146,169,170
PEC 131,140,164
Editors 132,141,165
Global Information 134,143,168,190
Physical Tree 131,140,164
NexSys Network Interface Node
Connection Description Template (CDT) 114
PID 154
PID Loop 152
Plug-Ins 99
Registering A Plug-In 99
Running A Plug-In 100
Polarity 180
Proportional Gain 148,153,172,175
R
Reheat Decrement 154
Reheat Increment 154
Replace Node 105
Reverse 180
Reverse Action 153
Router
Bridge Router 120
Configured Router 120
Learning Router 120
Permanent Bridge Router 120
Permanent Repeater Router 120
Repeater Router 120
Router Classification Types 120

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Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

System Setup Index

S
Scan Rate 149,153,172
Scan Time 176
Serial Fan 154
Service Pin 103,132,141,165
Set Time/Day On Node 109
Setpoint 177
Setpoint Controller 148,172
Setup Node 103
Space Temperature 135,145,169
Stages 178
Standby State 215
Status Send Interval 135
T
Thermal Load 148,172
Thermistor 145,169
Time Broadcast Interval 135
Time Mode 146,170
Time Zone Offset 135
U
Units 146,170
Unoccupied Cooling Setpoint 148,171
Unoccupied Heating Setpoint 148,171
User Mode 146,170

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System Setup Index

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Rev 2.0

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

SECTION FOUR

PROGRAMMING

Chapters
1. Binding Network Variables
2. Using CPL
3. CPL Blocks
4. Schedules

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Programming Introduction

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

Electronic Systems USA, a wholly owned subsidiary of Johnson Controls, Inc., reserves the right to update
specifications when Appropriate. Information contained in this document is based on specifications believed to
be correct at the time of publication.

Echelon , Coactive, Windows NT, and General Electric are registered trademarks and service marks of
companies other than Electronic Systems USA. FSC, CPL and NEXSYS are trademarks of Electronic
Systems USA.

Copyright 2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

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All Rights Reserved

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Programming Introduction

Programming Table of Contents


Chapter One - Binding Network Variables

251
Overview .......................................................................................................................... 252
Editing and Viewing Bindings ................................................................................ 252
Refresh ....................................................................................................... 253
Adding A Bind ............................................................................................. 254
Deleting a Bind ........................................................................................... 255
Chapter Two - Using CPL
257
Overview .......................................................................................................................... 258
CPL Pages Subtree ............................................................................................... 258
Working With Individual Pages ................................................................... 259
CPL Page Menu Commands ...................................................................... 259
CPL Blocks ....................................................................................................................... 261
Block Types ................................................................................................ 262
Arithmetic Blocks ............................................................................. 262
Comparison Blocks .......................................................................... 262
Constant Blocks ............................................................................... 262
Function Blocks ................................................................................ 262
Global Variable Blocks ..................................................................... 263
Logical Blocks .................................................................................. 263
Point Blocks ..................................................................................... 263
Time Blocks ...................................................................................... 263
Block Colors................................................................................................ 263
CPL Editor ........................................................................................................................ 263
CPL Editor Toolbar................................................................................................. 264
Selection Mode ........................................................................................... 264
Zoom Modes ............................................................................................... 264
Best Fit........................................................................................................ 264
Show Grid ................................................................................................... 265
Monitor Mode .............................................................................................. 265
Zoom Control Box.................................................................................................. 266
CPL Block Menu .................................................................................................... 267
Creating And Editing CPL Pages ..................................................................................... 267
To Add A New CPL Page: ...................................................................................... 267
Adding CPL Blocks ..................................................................................... 268
Editing CPL Blocks ................................................................................................ 269
Editing Multiple Blocks ................................................................................ 269
Direct/Reverse Acting ...................................................................... 270
Deleting A Block .......................................................................................... 270
Deleting Multiple Blocks .............................................................................. 271
Moving A Block ........................................................................................... 271
Moving Multiple Blocks ............................................................................... 272
Block Connections ........................................................................................................... 272
Connecting Blocks ................................................................................................. 272
Multiple Inputs............................................................................................. 273
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Deleting A Block Connection ....................................................................... 273


CPL User Library .............................................................................................................. 274
CPL Library Window .............................................................................................. 274
Accessing the CPL Library from NWS ........................................................ 275
Closing The CPL Library ............................................................................. 275
Library Pages Window ........................................................................................... 275
Library Pages Toolbar ................................................................................. 276
CPL Library Block Editor Window .......................................................................... 276
Creating A New CPL Library Page .............................................................. 277
Importing A CPL Library Page ..................................................................... 277
Exporting A CPL library page ...................................................................... 277
Summary Of Blocks ............................................................................................... 278
Chapter Three - CPL Blocks
281
CPL Blocks ....................................................................................................................... 282
CPL Block Settings ................................................................................................ 282
Ignore Error Check Box .............................................................................. 283
Entering Block Information - Constants ................................................................. 283
Analog Constant ......................................................................................... 284
Settings ............................................................................................ 284
Digital Constant .......................................................................................... 284
Settings ............................................................................................ 284
Entering Block Information - Functions .................................................................. 285
2-Position .................................................................................................... 286
Settings ............................................................................................ 286
Accumulator ................................................................................................ 287
Settings ............................................................................................ 287
Calculation .................................................................................................. 287
Settings ............................................................................................ 288
Counter ....................................................................................................... 289
Settings ............................................................................................ 289
Dial Provider ............................................................................................... 289
Settings ............................................................................................ 289
Enthalpy ...................................................................................................... 290
Settings ............................................................................................ 290
Error - Analog (A-error) ............................................................................... 290
Settings ............................................................................................ 290
Error - Digital (D-Error)................................................................................ 291
Settings ............................................................................................ 291
Hi/Lo/Average ............................................................................................. 291
Settings ............................................................................................ 291
Lead/Lag ..................................................................................................... 292
Settings ........................................................................................... 292
Min/Max ...................................................................................................... 293
Settings ............................................................................................ 293
Minimum On/Off .......................................................................................... 294
Settings ............................................................................................ 294
One Shot..................................................................................................... 294
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Settings ............................................................................................ 295


PID Loop ..................................................................................................... 296
Settings ............................................................................................ 296
Timing .............................................................................................. 296
Psychro ....................................................................................................... 297
Settings ............................................................................................ 297
Ramp .......................................................................................................... 297
Settings ............................................................................................ 298
Timing .............................................................................................. 298
Relay - Analog ........................................................................................... 298
Settings ............................................................................................ 298
Relay - digital ............................................................................................. 298
Settings ............................................................................................ 299
Reset .......................................................................................................... 299
Settings ............................................................................................ 300
Rolling Average ........................................................................................... 300
Settings ............................................................................................ 300
Timing .............................................................................................. 300
Runtime ...................................................................................................... 301
Settings ............................................................................................ 301
Schedule ..................................................................................................... 302
Settings ............................................................................................ 302
Timing .............................................................................................. 303
Sequencer .................................................................................................. 303
Settings ............................................................................................ 303
Descriptor ......................................................................................... 303
Startup ........................................................................................................ 304
Settings ............................................................................................ 304
Start/Stop .................................................................................................... 304
Settings ............................................................................................ 304
Time Event .................................................................................................. 304
Settings ............................................................................................ 305
Entering Block Information - Global Variables ....................................................... 305
Settings ............................................................................................ 306
Global Analog Input .................................................................................... 306
Global Digital Input ..................................................................................... 306
Global Analog Output.................................................................................. 306
Global Digital Output................................................................................... 306
Entering Block Information - Logical ...................................................................... 307
AND ............................................................................................................ 307
Settings ............................................................................................ 307
OR .............................................................................................................. 308
Settings ............................................................................................ 308
NOT ............................................................................................................ 308
Settings ............................................................................................ 308
XOR ............................................................................................................ 308
Settings ............................................................................................ 309

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Entering Block Information - Comparison .............................................................. 309


A-Equal ....................................................................................................... 310
Settings ............................................................................................ 310
A-Not Equal ............................................................................................... 310
Settings ............................................................................................ 310
D-Equal ....................................................................................................... 310
Settings ............................................................................................ 310
D-Not Equal .................................................................................................311
Settings .............................................................................................311
Greater Equal .............................................................................................. 311
Settings .............................................................................................311
Greater Than ............................................................................................... 311
Settings .............................................................................................311
Less Equal .................................................................................................. 312
Setting .............................................................................................. 312
Less Than ................................................................................................... 312
Settings ............................................................................................ 312
Entering Block Information - Arithmetic ................................................................. 312
Add ............................................................................................................. 313
Settings ............................................................................................ 313
Divide .......................................................................................................... 313
Settings ............................................................................................ 313
Modulus ...................................................................................................... 314
Settings ............................................................................................ 314
Multiply ........................................................................................................ 314
Settings ............................................................................................ 314
Negate ........................................................................................................ 314
Settings ............................................................................................ 314
Sq. Root (Square Root) .............................................................................. 315
Settings ............................................................................................ 315
Subtract ...................................................................................................... 315
Settings ............................................................................................ 315
Entering Block Information - Points ....................................................................... 315
AI (Analog Input) ......................................................................................... 316
Settings ............................................................................................ 316
DI (Digital Input) .......................................................................................... 316
Settings ............................................................................................ 316
AO (Analog Output) .................................................................................... 316
Settings ............................................................................................ 317
D0 (Digital Output) ...................................................................................... 317
Settings ............................................................................................ 317
MAI (Multiple Analog Input) ......................................................................... 317
Settings ............................................................................................ 318
MDI (Multiple Digital Input) ......................................................................... 318
Settings ............................................................................................ 318
Point State .................................................................................................. 319
Settings ............................................................................................ 319

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Entering Block Information - Time ......................................................................... 319


Constant Time............................................................................................. 320
Settings ............................................................................................ 320
Convert Time .............................................................................................. 320
Settings ............................................................................................ 320
Current Time ............................................................................................... 321
Settings ............................................................................................ 321
Chapter Four - Schedules
323
SCHEDULING .................................................................................................................. 324
The Schedule Subtree ........................................................................................... 324
Viewing Individual Schedules ..................................................................... 324
Creating A New Schedule ...................................................................................... 325
Adding A New Schedule: ............................................................................ 325
Entering Values For A New Schedule: ........................................................ 326
Editing An Existing Schedule ................................................................................. 328
Renaming A Schedule ........................................................................................... 328
Deleting A Schedule .............................................................................................. 328
Copying Schedules To Another FSC ..................................................................... 329
Refresh Schedules ................................................................................................ 329
Programming Index ........................................................................ 331

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Programming

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2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Chapter One

Binding Network Variables

This chapter contains information on:

l
l
l

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Editing and Viewing Bindings


Adding a Bind
Deleting a Bind

Binding

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

OVERVIEW
Binding is the process that defines connections between LONWORKS Devices . These connections define the data
that devices on the network share with one another. To share this data, NexSys connects (or binds) a point on a
device to another point that needs that same data. This point can either be on the same device or it can be a
different device on the network.
NOTE: The words bind and connection can be used interchangeably.
Binding is accomplished by connecting Network Variables (NVs). NWS uses the Bind Editor to bind Network
Variable Outputs (NVOs) to Network Variable Inputs (NVIs). As stated above, Network Variables can be bound
from one node to another node, or bound internally on the same node. For more information on Points and
Network Variables, please see Section Five, Operations - Chapter One.
Binding gives the User the ability to use Network Variables over the LON instead of physical wiring between the
FSC and the VAV. In Figure 1, a temperature NVO on one node (a VAV controller) is bound to a temperature
NVI on another node (in this example an FSC). When the temperature from the VAV is broadcast on the LON, it
is received by the FSC. Thus, the VAV controller shares the temperature reading from its temperature sensor with
the FSC without the need for any physical connection between the two devices.
VAV Controller

Flexible System Controller

Temp Sensor
Temp NVO
55

95
75
55

Temp NVI

Binding

55

Figure 1. Binding Between Nodes.

EDITING AND VIEWING BINDINGS


All Bindings for a node are accessed through the Binding Editor (Figure 2). The Binding Editor Window
consists of three smaller windows:

NV - The NV window (Figure 3) displays a scrollable list of all NVs available on the node.

Connects To - When an NV is selected from the NV Window, the Connects To Window (Figure 4)
displays the NV it is connected to, if the connection (binding) exists.

Binding Summary - The Binding Summary Window (Figure 5) displays a scrollable list of all the
bindings for the selected node.

Figure 2. Binding Editor Window

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Figure 3. NV Window

Binding

Figure 4. Connects To Window

Figure 5. Binding Summary Window

REFRESH
Click

to receive the most current binding information from the network. You can also use this

feature to update changes you have made if NexSys fails to update the Binding Editor automatically.

To access the Binding Editor:


1.

Right click on the selected node. Select Edit/View Binding from the node pop-up menu (Figure 6).

2.

The Binding Editor Window opens.

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Binding

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Figure 6. Node Pop-Up Menu

ADDING A BIND
To add a new bind, there must be matching NVs available to connect to. The steps for adding a bind are:
1.

Right click on the selected node. Select Edit/View Binding from the node pop-up menu.

2.

The Binding Editor Window opens.

3.

Select the NV you wish to bind from, and click

NOTE: Only NVOs can be bound from, and only NVIs can be bound to.
4.
5.

The Bind To Editor Window (Figure 7) opens. The top of the window displays the name of the
NVO you are binding from (Figure 8).
The bottom window shows the matching NVs available (Figure 9). Select the NVI you wish to bind
to and click

to return to the Binding Editor Window. The new bind be displayed in the

appropriate windows
NOTE: When binding NVs, you must bind matching SNVTs. If no matching NVs exist, the task
bar at the bottom of the window gives an error message (Figure 10).
6.

Click

Figure 7. Bind To Editor

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to close the Binding Editor Window.

Figure 8. Point Bound From

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Figure 9. Available NVIs

Binding

Figure 10. Error Message Task Bar

DELETING A BIND
To delete an existing bind:
1.

Right click on the selected node. Select Edit/View Binding from the node pop-up menu.

2.

The Binding Editor Window opens. You can view the bindings listed in the Binding Summary
window to determine which NVs you will need to select.

3.

Select the NVO you wish to delete the bind from.

4.

The corresponding NVI will be displayed in the Bind To Window, and the

button will

be visible. Select the corresponding NVI (Figure 11).


NOTE: Not all binds can be deleted. If the

button is grayed out, then that bind can

not be deleted.
5.

Click

to delete the binding.

6.

You will be returned to the Binding Editor. The bind will no longer be displayed

7.

Click

to close the Binding Editor Window.

Figure 11. NVO And NVI Selected And Delete Button Visible

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Chapter Two

Using CPL

This chapter contains information on:


l Creating CPL Blocks
l Creating CPL Pages
l Using the CPL Library

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OVERVIEW
NexSys CPL (Control Programming Language) provides the User with the means to create and edit
graphical programs. CPL programming allows the User to build a picture of their desired control
strategy. These programs, called CPL Pages, can then be stored on the FSC (Flexible System Controller)
or in the CPL Library. The CPL Library is available for storing common programs for exporting or
importing.
Using the NexSys CPL Editor, the User builds a picture of their control strategy using graphical objects
called CPL Blocks. The User places these objects on a CPL Page, and then enters specific values and
settings for that block. The User defines the proper control flow by using lines to represent connections. The resulting picture becomes a working program. A sample control block (Figure 1) is shown
below in Edit mode. In the Monitor mode, the program is enabled, and values would be display at the
inputs/outputs of each block.

Hot Deck Temperature Control Sample Program

Figure 1. Sample CPL Program

CPL PAGES SUBTREE


The CPL Pages subtree (Figure 2) is located within the FSC controller node. All CPL functions (except
CPL Library functions) are accessed through this subtree. When you select CPL Pages from the Physical Tree, the CPL Page List panel opens to the right.
The CPL Page List panel (Figure 3) shows the status and index numbers of all CPL Pages residing on
the node. The Status indicates whether the page is enabled (currently running) or disabled. The Index
number is the internal number assigned to the page by NWS.

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Figure 2. CPL Pages Subtree

Figure 3. CPL Page List

The CPL Pages subtree popup menu (Figure 4) has three commands:

Add Allows the User to add new CPL pages. See Creating and Editing CPL Pages in this
chapter for more detail.

Refresh Updates the CPL Pages subtree to agree with data on the LNS database.

Create Page From Library Allows the User to add a CPL Page from the CPL Library to the
CPL Pages residing on the controller node.

Figure 4. CPL Pages Popup Menu

WORKING WITH INDIVIDUAL PAGES


To access the CPL Pages:
1.

From the Physical Tree, click

to open the desired FSC Controller node.

2.

To view the individual CPL Pages, click

on the CPL Pages subtree.

CPL PAGE MENU COMMANDS


Each CPL Page has a popup menu (Figure 5) with the following commands:

Enable/Disable Tells the FSC to begin running (Enable) or stop running (Disable) the page.

Note: If the CPL Page is already enabled, the popup menu will show Disable instead of Enable
for the command (Figure 6)

Rename Opens the Rename Page (Figure 7). Enter the new name for your page in the text field,
and click
to apply.

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Copy to Library Opens the Copy Page to Library window (Figure 8). Select the file path for the
CPL Library you wish to save to, and enter a name for the new Library Page. Click
.

Copy to FSC - Allows you to copy the page to another FSC on the network. When you select this
command, the Copy Page to FSC window opens (Figure 9). Select the FSC to copy to, and click

Delete Allows you to delete the selected CPL Page. When you select this command, a Warning
window (Figure 10a) will prompt you. Click

to delete the page.

Figure 5. CPL Page Popup Menu

Figure 6. Popup Menu For Enabled Point

Figure 7. Rename Page Window

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Figure 8. Copy Page To Library Window

Figure 9. Copy Page To FSC Window

Figure 10a. Delete Page Warning Box

CPL BLOCKS
CPL Blocks are graphical representations of points and functions within a control system. The User can
specify values, settings, and connections for that block to implement the desired control strategy. Each
CPL Block has a pop-up menu (Figure 10b) that is used to set or change parameters (Edit command)

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or delete the block from the page (Delete command).


CPL Blocks make available a variety of functions to the User. They are also color-coded by block type
for ease of use (Figure 10c).

Figure 10b. Block Pop-up

10c. Block Type Color Codes

BLOCK TYPES
There are eight basic block types, each listed below, with all possible selections for each category.
Refer to Table 1 at the end of this chapter for an overview of the blocks and their functions.
ARITHMETIC BLOCKS
Arithmetic blocks are used for mathematical operations.
Add(+)

Multiply(*)

Divide(/)

Negate

Modulus

Subtract(-)

Square Root

COMPARISON BLOCKS
Comparison blocks are used to compare values and select an output state in logical control sequences.
Equal - Analog

Less Equal

Equal - Digital

Less Than

Greater Equal

Not Equal - Analog

Greater Than

Not Equal - Digital

CONSTANT BLOCKS
Constant blocks are used where a constant value is needed.
Analog

Digital

FUNCTION BLOCKS
Function blocks are used to perform higher level calculations.
2-Position

Min/Max

Rolling Average

Accumulator

Min. On/Off

Runtime

Counter

One Shot

Schedule

Calculation

PID Loop

Select Hi/Lo/Avg

Dial Provider

Psychro

Sequencer

Enthalpy
Error - Analog

Ramp

Startup

Relay - Analog

Start/Stop

Error - Digital

Relay - Digital

Time Event

Lead/Lag

Reset

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GLOBAL VARIABLE BLOCKS


Global variable are actual field input or output values that may be used on multiple CPL pages.
Analog Input

Digital Input

Analog Output

Digital Output

LOGICAL BLOCKS
Logical blocks are used for creating logic control sequences.
AND
OR
NOT
XOR

POINT BLOCKS
Point blocks are actual field input or output values.
Input Analog

Multiple Digital Input

Input Digital

Output Analog

Multiple Analog Input

Output Digital

Point State

TIME BLOCKS
Time blocks are time related blocks.
Constant Time

Convert Time

Current Time

BLOCK COLORS
Block colors are used to differentiate block types (see Figure 10c on the previous page). The following list
shows what each block color will be:
Math Blocks - Orange
Comparison Blocks - Pink
Constant Blocks -Yellow
Function Blocks -Green
Global Variable Blocks - White
Logical Blocks - Turquoise
Point Blocks - Grey
Time Blocks - Blue

CPL EDITOR
The CPL Editor (Figure 11) window is used to create and edit CPL Pages. The CPL Editor window
consists of the CPL Toolbar, the Zoom Control Box, the Block Menu, and the CPL Page. The
and

buttons are located below the CPL Page. The CPL editor opens each

time a new or existing CPL Page is selected.


All CPL Page creating and editing is done in the Selection Mode. You can also use the CPL Editor in
Monitor mode to view current activity on the node. See the CPL Editor section in this chapter for more
information on Modes.
NOTE: You can not add blocks while the CPL Editor is in Monitor Mode.

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Figure 11. CPL Editor Window

Rev 2.0

Figure 12. CPL Editor Toolbar

CPL EDITOR TOOLBAR


The CPL Editor Toolbar (Figure 12) features six buttons: Selection Mode, Zoom Mode (In), Zoom
Mode (Out), Best Fit, Show Grid, and Monitor Mode.

To activate a Toolbar button, place the mouse pointer on it and click.

To deactivate a Toolbar button, place the mouse pointer over it, and click.

SELECTION MODE
You must be in Selection Mode to add or delete blocks, and to make or delete connections.

To activate Selection Mode, click

from the Toolbar. The mouse pointer will be the

arrow shape.
Note: You will remain in Selection Mode when using all other toolbar buttons EXCEPT Monitor
Mode.

ZOOM MODES
When a CPL page becomes large and filled with many blocks, viewing the page becomes increasingly
difficult. Use the Zoom Mode Toolbar buttons to zoom in and out on the page as needed. (You also
have the option of using the Zoom Control Box on the right side of the window. See the Zoom Control
Box section in this chapter for details.)

Click

to increase magnification, and

change

to decrease it. The mouse pointer will

into the zoom magnifying glass icon.

Each time you click the mouse, the amount of magnification (Zoom In or Zoom Out)
doubles.

To return to the mouse pointer, click the


Zoom

button located on the Toolbar next to the

Mode buttons.

BEST FIT
When you select the Best Fit mode, NexSys automatically resizes your CPL Page to optimal viewing
size.

244 PROGRAMMING

Click

to activate.

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SHOW GRID
The Show Grid Toolbar button places a grid on your CPL Page. This grid helps you to place blocks on
the CPL Page in an orderly, easy-to-understand manner.

Click

to activate.

MONITOR MODE
Monitor Mode displays the current values of the block outputs of an enabled CPL Page. You can edit a
CPL Block while in Monitor Mode, but you cannot add or delete block, or change inputs. When the
Monitor mode is activated, a green Monitor light displays on the Toolbar (Figure 13).
1.

To activate Monitor Mode, click

. The green Monitor light displays on the Toolbar, and

begins to flash.
2.

The CPL Editor will display a Status Task Bar directly below the CPL Page (Figure 14). Verify
that the FSC is loaded, and that the page is loaded and enabled.

3.

The block outputs will initially display question marks (Figure 15) as NexSys polls the FSC. When all
the data has been received by NexSys, the current values will display (Figure 16).

4.

If there is an error on your CPL Page or the Page is disabled, an Error message will display (Figure 17).
Click

to deactivate it. NexSys automatically places you in Selection Mode so you can troubleshoot

your Page.
5.

Use the block popup menu Edit command (Figure 18) to make changes to the blocks settings.
(See Editing CPL Blocks in this chapter for more information). Click

to save the

changes. An Abort button will display below the Status Bar. If the Page becomes locked up,
you can click
6.

to escape.

To deactivate Monitor Mode, you must click

again. You will be returned to Selection

Mode.

Figure 13. Green Monitor Mode Light

Copyright 2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Figure 14. CPL Editor Status Task Bar

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Figure 15. Question Marks During Polling

Figure 17. Error Messages Displayed

Rev 2.0

Figure 16. Output Values Displayed

Figure 18. Block Popup Menu Edit Command

ZOOM CONTROL BOX


In addition to the Zoom Mode Toolbar buttons, you can also use the Zoom Control Box (Figure 19)
located on the right side of the CPL Editor Window to adjust your view of a CPL Page.

Use your mouse pointer to drag the diamond-shaped drag handles towards (to zoom in) or
away from (to zoom out) the center of the control. The percent of the picture you are
viewing is displayed at the top of the Zoom Control Box.

Figure 19. Zoom Control Box

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Figure 20. CPL Block Menu

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Figure 21. Drop-Down Menu

CPL BLOCK MENU


The CPL Block Menu (Figure 20) is located on the right side of the CPL Editor Window, directly
beneath the Zoom Control Box:
The CPL Block Menu has eight command bars, each corresponding to the eight CPL Block types (see
CPL Blocks at the beginning of this chapter). Each command bar is color-coded according to the block
type it represents.
Click on the command bar of the block type you wish to use. A scrollable drop-down menu (Figure
21) opens, listing symbols for each of the available functions. Each of these symbols can be dragged to
the open CPL Page.

CREATING AND EDITING CPL PAGES


NOTE: You must be in Selection Mode to add or delete blocks, or make connections. It is best
not to enable your CPL Page until you have completely finished making changes.

TO ADD A NEW CPL PAGE:


1.

Click

to open the FSC node you wish to control with.

2.

Click

to open the CPL Pages subtree.

3.

Right click on the CPL Pages subtree, and select Add.

4.

The Add CPL Page window (Figure 22) opens. Enter the name of your new CPL Page in the
text field,

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5.

The CPL Editor opens on the right, displaying that page.

6.

Use the CPL Editor to make needed changes, using methods described below in this section.

7.

To save your changes, click


of your CPL Page, click

. If you wish to return to the previous saved version


.

Figure 22. Add CPL Page Window

To open and edit an existing CPL Page:


1.

Click

to open the FSC node you wish to control with.

2.

Click

to open the CPL Pages subtree.

3.

Select the page from the list under CPL Pages subtree. The CPL Editor opens on the right,
displaying
that page.

4.

Use the CPL Editor to make needed changes, using methods described below in this
section.

5.

To save your changes, click


version of your CPL Page, click

. If you wish to return to the previous saved


.

ADDING CPL BLOCKS


To add CPL blocks to your page:
1.

Click on the command bar of the block type you want to open the scroll-down list.

2.

Click on the desired block, and move the cursor to the CPL Page.

3.

The point will turn into crosshairs. Click where you want the block to appear. The pointer
will remain as crosshairs, allowing you to enter as many of the same block as needed.

4.

To stop adding blocks, right click the pointer. It will return to the arrow shape.

6.

To save your changes, click


version of your CPL Page, click

248 PROGRAMMING

. If you wish to return to the previous saved


.

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EDITING CPL BLOCKS


Each CPL Block has an Edit window available from the popup menu Edit command. The NexSys CPL
Editor also allows the User to edit, delete, and move multiple blocks at the same time.
Through the CPL Block Edit window (Figure 23), the User can select settings and values for each block
on the page. Different blocks will have different settings required. Some blocks may not require any
information (Figure 24).
There are two ways to access the Edit Window:
1.

Double click on the block you wish to edit


OR:

1.

Right click on the block you wish to edit.

2.

Select Edit from the popup menu. The Edit Window will open.

3.

Enter values and settings from available options.

4.

Click

to accept.

5.

Click

to save changes.

Figure 23. CPL Block Edit Window

Figure 24. CPL Block Edit Window With No Options

EDITING MULTIPLE BLOCKS


To edit multiple blocks at the same time:
1.

Hold down the left mouse button, and use the mouse pointer to draw a box around the
blocks you wish to include .

NOTE: The sides of the box must not be touching any of the blocks.
2.

When you release the mouse button, a blue dashed line appears around the grouped blocks (Figure 25).

3.

Right click inside the group, and select Edit from the pop-up menu (Figure 26).

4.

The Edit windows for all the selected blocks open simultaneously.

5.

After you have made all changes and closed all the Edit windows, click

to

save your work.


To remove the grouping from a selected group of CPL blocks:
1.

Click the left mouse button anywhere in the Edit window.

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Figure 25. Grouped CPL Blocks

Rev 2.0

Figure 26. Edit Menu Command

DIRECT/REVERSE ACTING
Direct acting blocks produce the output value directly as calculated, whereas reverse acting blocks
produce the exact opposite (the reverse) of the calculated value. For example, if a direct acting block
outputs a true, then the same block, set to reverse acting, would output false.

All blocks having the direct or reverse acting capabilities default to direct acting.

A check box is provided on the Settings page for reverse acting operation (Figure 27).

Figure 27. Reverse Acting Option Selected

Figure 28. Delete Option On CPL Block Popup Menu

DELETING A BLOCK
There are two ways to delete a block from your CPL Page:
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Select the block and press Delete on your keyboard


OR:

1.

Right click inside the block you wish to delete.

2.

Select Delete from the pull-down menu (Figure 28). The block will disappear.

3.

To save your changes, click

. If you decide to keep the block after all, click

to return to the previous saved version of your CPL Page.

DELETING MULTIPLE BLOCKS


To delete multiple blocks at the same time:
1.

Hold down the left mouse button, and use the mouse pointer to draw a box around the
blocks you wish to include .

NOTE: The sides of the box must not be touching any of the blocks.
2.

When you release the mouse button, a blue dashed line appears around the grouped blocks
(Figure 29).

3.

Right click inside the group, and select Delete from the pop-up menu (Figure 30).

4.

All the grouped blocks are deleted. Click

to save your work.

To remove the grouping from a selected group of CPL blocks:


1.

Click the left mouse button anywhere in the Edit window.

Figure 29. Grouped Blocks

Figure 30. Delete Command

MOVING A BLOCK
To move a CPL Block on the page:
1.

In Selection Mode, click on the block you want to move. A dotted blue line will appear
around the block (Figure 31) to indicate selection.

2.

Press and hold the left mouse button. Drag the block to the desired location. To deselect
the block, click your mouse again or select another block. The dotted blue lines will
disappear.

3.

To save your changes, click

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Figure 31. Selected CPL Block

Figure 32. Analog Connection

Rev 2.0

Figure 33. Digital Connection

MOVING MULTIPLE BLOCKS


To move multiple blocks at the same time:
1.

Hold down the left mouse button, and use the mouse pointer to draw a box around the
blocks you wish to include .

NOTE: The sides of the box must not be touching any of the blocks.
2.

When you release the mouse button, a blue dashed line appears around the grouped blocks
(Figure 29, previous page).

3.

Hold down the left mouse button on the grouped blocks, and drag them to the new location
on the page.

4.

Release the mouse button, and click

to save your work.

To remove the grouping from a selected group of CPL blocks:


1.

Click the left mouse button anywhere in the Edit window.

BLOCK CONNECTIONS
Block connection line types are selected for you automatically and are used as a simple method of
displaying analog or digital connections. There are two line types used to connect blocks. All analog
connections are made using a solid line (Figure 32), and all digital connections are made using a
dashed line (Figure 33).

CONNECTING BLOCKS
To connect a CPL block to another block:
1.

Right-click the mouse pointer on the output tab of the first block.

2.

Select New Connection from the pop-up menu (Figure 34). A connection line appears from
the output tab to the mouse pointer

3.

Move the mouse pointer to the input tab of the block you are connecting to and click to
complete the connection. If the connection you are attempting to make is not allowed by
NexSys, you will be unable
to complete the connection and the Prohibited symbol
appears (Figure 35).

4.

Click

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to save your changes.

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Figure 34. New Connection

Using CPL

Figure 35. Prohibited Symbol

MULTIPLE INPUTS
Some of the CPL Blocks allow up to 15 inputs. An Add block (Figure 36) with 12 inputs is shown
below:

When you first select a multiple input block, it will display with only two input tabs. As
you complete a block connection for each input, one additional input tab is automatically
added to the block.

This will repeat until the maximum number of inputs for the block are used.

Figure 36. Add Block With A Total of 12 Inputs

DELETING A BLOCK CONNECTION


If you want to delete a block connection:
1.

You can disconnect a block connection using the popup menu from either the output of the
block you are connecting from (Figure 37) or the input of the block you are connecting to
(Figure 38).

2.

Select Delete Connection from the pop-up menu.

3.

Click

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Figure 37. Delete Connection From Output

Rev 2.0

Figure 38. Delete Connection From Input.

CPL USER LIBRARY


The CPL Library is a repository for your CPL pages. This library allows you to:

Store CPL programs for use with multiple nodes. The user need only edit specific block
values for each node.

Import CPL programs from other NexSys applications into the CPL Library.

Create and store new CPL programs.

Edit CPL programs stored in the CPL Library.

The NexSys installation includes pre-programmed CPL Library pages for the User convenience. The
pages cover a variety of standard control system functions, and can be used as is, or modified as
needed. The pages are stored in a default directory on the same drive as NexSys (Figure 39).
The default file path is: (Drive):\NexSys2\CPL\EsusaLib\...

Figure 39. Directory Of Stored CPL Library Pages

CPL LIBRARY WINDOW


The CPL Library Window (Figure 40) consists of two sub-windows: the Library Pages Window on the
left, and the CPL Block Editor on the right. You can create or edit CPL Library Pages in the CPL Block
Editor in the same manner as when using the CPL Editor in the CPL Pages subtree, except that there is
no Monitor Mode available for the CPL Library. See the CPL Editor in this chapter for information.

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Figure 40. CPL Library Window

ACCESSING THE CPL LIBRARY FROM NWS


To access the CPL Library from the NWS Main Window:
1.

From the Menu Bar, click NWS > CPL Library (Figure 41) OR:

2.

Click the Open The Local CPL Library button

on the Toolbar.

CLOSING THE CPL LIBRARY


To close the CPL Library:
1.

Right click on the Title Bar and select Close (Figure 42) OR:

2.

Click the

button on the Title Bar (Figure 43).

Figure 41. Open From Menu Bar

Figure 42. Closing the CPL Library With Title Bar Menu

Figure 43. Title Bar Close Button

LIBRARY PAGES WINDOW


The Library Pages Window (Figure 44) is a scrollable listing of all your CPL Library pages. You can export
these pages to the FSC node, or save them to disk.
To select a page from the Library Pages list:

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1.

Rev 2.0

Use the mouse pointer to select the desired page. Use the scroll bar on the right side as needed to
view the entire list.
To view the complete page name, resize the window horizontally, using the mouse pointer to enlarge
as needed.

2.
3.

Click on the desired page. The page will open in the CPL Block Editor window.

Figure 44. Library Pages Window

Figure 45. CPL Library Toolbar

LIBRARY PAGES TOOLBAR


Three buttons are available on the Library Pages Toolbar (Figure 45):
Create New Library Page - Creates a new page (see Importing a CPL Library Page below).
Import Existing Library Page Opens up the Open window (Figure ), allowing you to select
a page from another node or database and save it in the CPL Library.
Remove Library Page Deletes the selected Library Page from the Library Pages
window.
NOTE: If you delete a CPL page, and then wish to place it back in the Library Pages window,
click

and re-import the page.

CPL LIBRARY BLOCK EDITOR WINDOW


Use the CPL Block Editor to create or change the page youve selected from the Library Pages window.
You can create or edit CPL Library Pages in the CPL Block Editor in the same manner as when using

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the CPL Editor in the CPL Pages subtree, except that there is no Monitor Mode available for the CPL
Library.
For complete instruction on creating and editing CPL Pages, see the section CPL Editor in this chapter.

CREATING A NEW CPL LIBRARY PAGE


To create a new CPL page:
1.

Click the

located on the Tool Bar.

2.

An Open dialog box (Figure 46) prompts you for the filename and directory you want it
saved in. Click

3.

to save the new page.

The page is added to the Library Pages listing. Click on the filename in the Library Pages
window. The new page will open in the CPL Block Editor window. You can now add
blocks and create your page.

Figure 46. Creating A New CPL Library Page

Figure 47. Importing An Existing CPL Page

IMPORTING A CPL LIBRARY PAGE


You can import existing CPL pages from other directories, from a floppy disk, or CD-ROM:
1.

Click on the

button located on the Tool Bar.

2.

An Open dialog box (Figure 47) prompts you for the filename and directory you want to
select. Select the file you wish to import and click

3.

The page is added to the Library Pages listing. Click on the filename in the Library Pages
window. The page will open in the CPL Block Editor window. You can now edit your page
as needed.

EXPORTING A CPL LIBRARY PAGE


CPL Library pages can only be exported to other locations by using the Windows NT Explorer program.
To export CPL Library Pages:
1.

Open Windows NT Explorer from your

2.

Use the Move and Copy menu commands as you normally would in Windows NT Explorer.

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SUMMARY OF BLOCKS
The following tables give a brief overview of all the CPL Blocks with descriptions.

NexSys CPL Blocks


Block Type

Color

Block Title
Description
Title

Description

Arithmetic

Yellow

Add (+)
Divide (/)
Multiply (*)
Modulus
Negate
Square Root
Subtract (-)

Add
Divide
Multiply
Modulus
Negate
Sq. Root
Subtract

Comparison

Pink

Equal - Analog
Equal - Digital
Greater Equal
Greater Than
Less Equal
Less Than
Not Equal Analog
Not Equal Digital
Analog Constant
Digital Constant
2-Position

A-Equal
D-Equal
Greater Equal
Greater Than
Less Equal
Less Than
A-Not Equal

Adds the values of up to 15 inputs


Divides the dividend by the divisor
Multiplies the values of up to 15 inputs
Divides the dividend by the divisor and outputs the remainder
Multiplies the input by (-1)
Outputs the square root of the input value
Subtracts the second input (the subtrahend) from the first input value and
outputs the difference
Outputs a True if the two analog inputs are equal
Outputs a True if the two digital inputs are equal
Outputs a True if the first input is greater than or equal to the second input
Outputs a True if the first input is greater than the second input
Outputs a True if the first input is less than or equal to the second input
Outputs a True if the first input is less than the second input
Outputs a True only if the two analog inputs are not equal

D-Not Equal

Outputs a True only if the two digital inputs are not equal

A-Constant
D-Constant
2 Pos.

Outputs a constant analog value that you enter after placing the block
Outputs a constant digital value that you enter after placing the block
Uses two inputs: an input value and a setpoint. Outputs a True if the input
value is greater than the setpoint
Samples the input at a user-defined interval and adds it to the previous
sample for the output
Multi-function block for complex mathematical or logical formulas
Counts the number of times the input goes high
When the input is high, the controller may dial out; when the input is low,
dial out capability is inhibited
Calculates enthalpy using dry bulb as Input 1 and either relative humidity,
dew point, or wet bulb as Input 2
Selects a second, alternate analog input if the first analog input is in error
Selects a second, alternate digital input if the first digital input is in error
Controls staged heating or cooling based on the runtime of the HVAC units
Monitors the input for either a minimum or maximum value to output
Maintains a minimum On and/or Off time for the output

Constants

Yellow

Functions

Green

Accumulator

Accum.

Calculation
Counter
Dial Provider

Calculation
Counter
Dial Provider

Enthalpy

Enthalpy

Error - Analog
Error - Digital
Lead/Lag
Min/Max
Minimum On/Off

A-Error
D-Error
Lead/Lag
Min/Max
Min. On/Off

One Shot

1 Shot

PID Loop

PID

Psychro

Psychro.

Ramp
Relay - Analog
Relay - Digital
Reset
Rolling Average
Runtime

Ramp
A-Relay
D-Relay
Reset
Roll Avg.
Runtime

Outputs a pulse of a user-defined duration following a trigger. You select


whether the output follows a Make or Break trigger, and define the retrigger
action (Useful for lag time delays)
Performs Proportional-Integral-Derivative control based upon the Input,
Setpoint, and Enable inputs and control values entered by the user
Calculates relative humidity, dew point, wet bulb, or enthalpy based upon
the wet bulb temperature input and either the relative humidity, dew point,
or wet bulb
Limits the amount an input can increase or decrease in a given time period
Uses a digital input to select between two analog inputs
Uses a digital input to select between two digital inputs
Produces a scaled and offset output based on the selected input
Averages a user-defined number of samples from the input
Monitors the input for a high signal and outputs the total time the input is
high

Table 1. CPL Block Information (continued on next page).

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Chapter Three

CPL Blocks

This chapter contain information on:


l Constant Blocks
l Function Blocks
l Global Variable Blocks
l Logical Blocks
l Math Blocks
l Point Blocks
l Time Blocks

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CPL BLOCKS
All CPL Blocks are accessed from the CPL Block Menu located on the right side of the CPL Editor (Figure ).
The CPL Block Menu has eight types of block types (Figure ), each with its own scrollable drop-down list. The
User clicks and drags blocks from the CPL Block Menu to the CPL Page. For information on using the CPL
Editor, see Section Four, Programming - Chapter Two.
Connections made to the inputs and outputs of the selected block can be made before or after settings are
defined. For information on connecting CPL Blocks, see Section Four, Programming - Chapter Two.

Figure . The CPL Editor

Figure . The Eight CPL Block Types

NOTE: Both inputs and outputs are referred to as High and Low.
A High input can also be referred to as: Logical 1 or True.
A Low input can also be referred to as: Logical 0 or False.

CPL BLOCK SETTINGS


Each CPL Block has a Setting Window that is used to enter values specific to that block. Figure 3 shows the
Settings window for the Analog Relay block.
To enter settings for a selected block:
1.

Right click on the selected block. Select Edit from the pop-up menu (Figure 4).

2.

Enter any values required into the appropriate text fields. Click

to save settings.

NOTE: Not all CPL Blocks require settings information. If no settings information is required,
the edit window will contain only the message No Setting Info (Figure 5).

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Figure 3. Analog Relay Setting Window

CPL Blocks

Figure 4. Edit Command On Block Pop-up Menu

Figure 5. No Setting Info. Setting Window

Figure 6. Ignore Error Checkbox

IGNORE ERROR CHECK BOX


When the Ignore Error box is checked (Figure 6), the CPL Block will continue to operate as long as there is
one valid input. If the output is required to be an Average, the block will output the average of the valid inputs,
and ignore the inputs in error. If the Ignore Error option is not selected, the block will cease operating when it
receives an error message from any of its inputs.

ENTERING BLOCK INFORMATION - CONSTANTS


The Constants drop-down menu (Figure 7) allows the User to choose Analog and Digital Constant blocks.

Figure 7. Constants Drop Down Menu

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ANALOG CONSTANT
The Analog Constant block (Figure 8) outputs a constant analog value that you enter after placing the block.
There are no inputs required for this block.

A-Constant
0.000

User selected value

Figure 8. Analog Constant Block.

Figure 9. Analog Constant Settings Page

SETTINGS
On the Settings page (Figure 9), enter the value for the Analog Constant.

DIGITAL CONSTANT
The Digital Constant block (Figure 10) outputs a constant digital value that you enter after placing the block.
There are no inputs required for this block.
D-Constant
0

User selected value

Figure 10. Digital Constant Block

SETTINGS
On the Settings page (Figure 11), enter data:
1.

Choose a SNVT type from the drop-down list.

2.

If necessary, select an engineering unit.

3.

Select the desired state from the Value field.

NOTE: Refer to Table 1 in Section Six, Appendices - Appendix A for a complete listing of
available SNVT types.
NOTE: If the Snvt Type selected is No Snvt,select a value between 0 and 255 for the Value field
(Figure 12).

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Figure 11. Digital Constant Settings Page

CPL Blocks

Figure 12. No Snvt Type Selected

ENTERING BLOCK INFORMATION - FUNCTIONS


The Functions drop-down menu (Figure 13) is shown as it will appear on the CPL Block Menu. Use the arrows
at the top and bottom of the menu to view all available functions. A Function is a predefined mathematical
operation used to perform higher level calculations for control systems.
Many of the Function blocks use identical settings windows. Two of the most commonly used windows are the
Timing Window (Figure 14) and the Descriptor Window (Figure 15).
The Timing Window prompts for two values:
1.

The desired interval in hours, minutes, and seconds.

2.

The desired offset of the interval in hours, minutes, and seconds.

Note: All CPL Function Blocks are referenced to 2400 hours 00 seconds of the current day.
The Descriptor Window requires a descriptive name for the block that allows the User to easily
identify it. A maximum of 32 characters is allowed. This descriptor will display above the block, and
also moves with it around the CPL Page.
Click on tab of the settings page desired to bring it to the foreground.

Figure 13. Functions Menu

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Figure 14. Timing Window

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Figure 15. Descriptor Window

2-POSITION
The 2-Position block (Figure 16) uses two inputs, with Input 1 being a connected input and Input 2 being the
setpoint value. A True will be outputted if Input 1 is greater than the setpoint value.

2 Pos. (DA)

Input
Setpoint

Figure 16. 2-Position Block

Figure 17. 2-Position Settings Window

SETTINGS
On the Settings page (Figure 17) you must enter the deadband value. The default setting for a 2-Position block
is direct acting.
The settings consist of:

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1.

Enter the Deadband value.

2.

To set the output as Reverse Acting, click the Reverse Acting box.

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ACCUMULATOR
The Accumulator block (Figure 18) samples the input for the designated interval and outputs the value of that
sampling. Each time the interval is repeated, the value of the current sample is added to the previous values for
an accumulative output (Output = Previous sample +current sample).
The optional Reset input resets the output to zero, and the accumulation process begins again at the next
interval.

Accum.

Input
Reset
Figure 18. Accumulator Block

SETTINGS
The settings consist of
1.

Enter the sampling Interval and Offset values in the standard Timing Window.

CALCULATION
The Calculation block (Figure 19) allows the User to define and carry out complex mathematical or logical
operations in a single block, reducing the size of the CPL Page. Up to 15 universal inputs are allowed as
variables, and the output may be selected as analog or digital.
Note:

Once the output is chosen and the block is connected, however, the type of output
may NOT be changed unless the connection is first broken.

The Calculation Block has two settings windows, the CPLCalcBlockEditor (Figure 20) is used to create
formulas, and the Descriptor Window is used to name the block.

Calculation

Input 1
Input 2

Figure 19. Calculation Block

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Figure 20. CPLCalcBlockEditor Window

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SETTINGS
The CPLCalcBlockEditor Window consists of four text fields. The large field at the top of the page is used to
enter the desired formulas for the block. The three fields at the bottom are Variables, Constants, and Operations:

Variables - Variables include V1-V15, and Output. V1-V15 correspond to inputs 1-15.

Values are used in comparison equations. Values include Year, Month, Day, Hour, Minute, True,
False, and other common control system considerations.

Operations are the mathematical and logical to be made on the variables and constants. Operations
include a comprehensive list of Boolean (AND, OR, NOT, etc.), comparative (Greater Than, Less
Than, Equal, etc.), and mathematical operations (Addition, Subtraction, Square Root, etc.).

To enter values in the CPLCalcBlockEditor:


1.

Use the Output radio button (Figure 21) located above the text fields to select the output type.

2.

The text field in the upper portion of the page is used for entering the equation information. Three
ways are available to enter the equation:
1. Place the cursor in the text field and type the formula in. This way is not recommended due to
the possibility of typing errors.
2. Double click on items in the text fields at the bottom of the window to select and enter the
information.
3. Select the value with your mouse pointer, and press Enter on your keyboard.

Note: If your equation has an error, an error message is generated in the center of the page
(Figure 22). Click

to pinpoint the problem. The error will be high-

lighted in the text field.


4. Click

to save the information. If an error exists in the formula, the program dis-

plays a Invalid Data message (Figure 23). You will not be allowed to close the window until
the error is corrected.
3.

Click on the Descriptor Window tab to bring it to the foreground. Enter a descriptive name for the
block, and click

Figure 21. Error Message Displayed With Error Highlighted

Figure 22. Error Message Displayed With Error Highlighted

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Figure 23. Invalid Data Message For Calculation Block

COUNTER
The Counter block (Figure 24) counts the number of times the Input goes high, and outputs that number. If the
Reset input goes high, the count is reset to zero, and begins again. The reset input must be connected to a digital
source.
SETTINGS
No setting information is required.
Counter

Input
Reset
Figure 24. Counter Block

DIAL PROVIDER
The Dial Provider block (Figure 25) allows networks using CTI Dial-Up NCBs (Network Combiner Modules) to
communicate with remote NCBs. When the Enable input goes high, the associated NCB dials the preconfigured
telephone number of the target NCB.
SETTINGS
No setting information is required.

Dial Provider
Enable

Figure 25. Dial Provider Block

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ENTHALPY
This block (Figure 26) will calculate Enthalpy. The Dry Bulb Temperature is a required input. You can select
from one of the following for the second input: RH, Dew Point or Wet Bulb as Input 2.

Enthalpy
Dry Bulb Temp.
Input

Figure 26. Enthalpy Block

Figure 27. Enthalpy Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Settings page (Figure 27) :
1.

2.

Select one of the following Input Types:

Relative Humidity

Dew Point

Wet Bulb.

Select the Mode for the output as either

English

Metric

ERROR - ANALOG (A-ERROR)


The Analog Error block (Figure 28) will select the Alternate Input if the first analog Input is in error. This
allows the current operation to shift inputs and continue running, rather than shutting down due to problems with
the first input.

A-Error
Input
Alternate Input
Figure 28. Analog Error Block

SETTINGS
No setting information is required.

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ERROR - DIGITAL (D-ERROR)


The Digital Error block (Figure 26) will select the Alternate Input if the first digital Input is in error. This
allows the current operation to shift inputs and continue running, rather than shutting down due to problems with
the first input.

D-Error
Input
Alternate Input
Figure 29. Digital Error Block

SETTINGS
No setting information is required.

HI/LO/AVERAGE
The Hi/Lo/Average Block (Figure 30) will output the highest, lowest, or average value of up to 15 inputs,
depending on the function selected from the Setting Window. The current selected function is displayed in
parentheses next to the title of the block.

Hi/Lo/Avg. (L)
Input 1
Input 2

Figure 30. Hi/Lo/Avg. Block

Figure 31. Hi/Lo/Avg. Block Setting Window

SETTINGS
1.
The Settings page (Figure 31) allows you to select between one three functions that determines the
value of the output:
Low - Outputs the lowest value of all the inputs.
High - Outputs the highest value of all the inputs.
Average - Calculates and then outputs the average value of all the outputs.
2.

Select the Ignore Error checkbox to have the block ignore any input errors.

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LEAD/LAG
The Lead/Lag Block (Figure 32) uses runtimes of similar HVAC equipment to equalize runtimes on each
machine. This prevents excessive wear and tear on any one machine. It also allows you to set an Interstage
Delay time to prevent multiple pieces of equipment from powering up at the same time and causing excessive
power drain.
The Lead/Lag Blocks supports up to 12 outputs. It accepts up to 12 Runtime inputs. The Lead/Lag block
requires 3 inputs in additional to the Runtime inputs of the equipment. These are:
Control - This value is compared to the setpoints of the Control Points, and activates the outputs
according to the Setpoint and Deadband values selected on the Setting Window.
Enable - When high, allows the Block to begin operating.
Set Sequence - This input is used to lock in the current control time for a specified interval. The
control sequence remains locked in while the Set Sequence input remains high, and then
resets.

Lead/Lag
Control
Enable
Set Seq.
Runtime 1
Runtime 2
Figure 32. Lead/Lag Block

Figure 33. Lead/Lag Setting Window

SETTINGS
The Lead/Lag Block contains both the Settings Window (Figure 33) and the Descriptor Window. On the Settings
Window text fields, you can type in the values requested, or use the spin boxes to select a value.
1.

Enter a number in the Number of Control Points field. This value determines the number of
setpoints the block recognizes, and also the number of outputs available.

2.

Enter a Deadband value. If the value of the control signal reaches the setpoint + or - the half the
deadband, the associated output point will change state. The state of the output depends on:

If the block has been defined as direct (default value) or reverse acting (see Step 4 below)

Whether the control signal value is rising or falling.

The output state does not change while the value of the control signal remains in the deadband zone.

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3.

The Interstage Delay interval is the time after a output is initialized that the Block waits before
initializing the next output, preventing excessive power drainage.

4.

The Reverse Acting option causes the output points to energize as the control signal decreases
below the setpoint value. The outputs will deactivate as the control signal rises about the setpoint
value. This is the opposite action of the Direct Acting default setting.

5.

The Control Lowest First option causes the output with the lowest runtime to run first. The default
value is that the output with the highest runtime starts first.

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6.

The Ignore Runtime Errors option allows the block to use the last valid runtime inputs if a runtime
input is in error, preventing the entire operation from being halted because of one input error.

7.

The Off Condition menu allows you to select the criteria for how the equipment will be turned off
once the control point value crosses the setpoint:
Runtime - The output with the longest runtime will turn off first.
First On/First Off - The first output to be turned on will be the first output to be turned off.
Last On/First Off - The last output to be turned on will be the first output to be turned off.

8.

Enter the Setpoint value for each output. The Setpoint number corresponds to both the Runtime input
and the output numbers. The number of Setpoints is equal to the number of Control Points.

9.

Click on the tab for the Descriptor Window and enter a easily identifiable descriptive name for your
block. Click

MIN/MAX
The Min/Max block (Figure 34) will output either the Minimum or Maximum value of the input, depending on
which output is selected on the Setting Window. The default output is Minimum. The blocks displays in parentheses next to its title which option is currently selected.
The block outputs the minimum/maximum value until the input drops below/exceeds its current output. It then
outputs the new value. The second input is used to Reset the output value to the current input value.

Min/Max (Min)

Input
Reset

Figure 34. Min/Max Block

Figure 35. Min/Max Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Settings page (Figure 35), select Minimum or Maximum. Click

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MINIMUM ON/OFF
The Minimum On/Off Block (Figure 36) output matches the input, but with a timing delay. It will hold the output
high (On) or low (Off) for a specified interval before changing to reflect input changes. The values (On/Off)
and the interval times are selected in the Setting Window (Figure 37). You can select both the Minimum On and
the Minimum Off functions.
The timing chart below (Figure 38) show a Minimum On input where the minimum On time has been set to 4
seconds. The output forces a minimum 4 second On time value before resetting. This repeats each time the input
triggers On.

Min. On/Off
Input

Figure 36. Minimum On/Off Block

Figure 37. Minimum On/Off Block Setting Window

0utput
Input
Time
Min. ON Time

Figure 38. Minimum On Timing Chart

SETTINGS
On the Settings page (Figure 37), select the following:
1.

For Minimum On, select the Minimum On checkbox and enter the interval values.

2.

For Minimum Off, select the Minimum Off checkbox and enter the interval values.

ONE SHOT
The One Shot block (Figure 39) forces the length (duration) of the output pulse to be a specified value. You
have the option of starting the pulse on either the Make (rising edge) or the Break (falling edge) of the input
pulse. . The chart below (Figure 40) shows a typical input pulse and the resulting output pulse with a 2 second
pulse length specified.
Break
Make
Input

1 Shot (B)

Trigger
Figure 39. One Shot Block

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Time
One
Shot
2 sec.
w/o reset duration on trigger

Figure 40. One Shot Chart Without Reset Duration On Trigger

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You can additionally select a Retrigger Action of the input pulse. The Retrigger function will allow the output
to ignore, reset to, or cancel the output in response to changes in the input occurring during the length of the
output pulse. The second chart (Figure 41) shows a typical input pulse and the resulting output pulse with a 5
second pulse length specified, and a Retrigger Action of Reset Duration. The circled areas show where a reset
occurs due to a make/break in the input pulse before the 5 second one shot interval has expired:
1.

On Make - The Reset Duration On Make Trigger restarts the 5 second timer as the input signal goes
high again. Since the second high occurred with only 4 out of 5 seconds completed, the output pulse
resets for another 5 seconds interval. The total output pulse length is 9 seconds.

2.

On Break - The Reset Duration On Break Trigger restarts the 5 second timer as the input signal
goes low again. Since the break occurred with only 3 out of 5 seconds completed, the output pulse
resets for another 5 seconds interval. The total output pulse length is 8 seconds (not shown).

Break
Make
Input
Time
One Shot
5 sec.
w/ reset duration on trigger

reset occurs here

Figure 41. One Shot Chart With Reset Duration

Figure 42. One Shot Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Settings page (Figure 42) you select:
1.

One Shot On triggering on either Make (rising edge) or Break (falling edge) of the input pulse.

2.

The Retrigger Action has three options:


Ignore - Ignores changes in the input pulse and there is no retrigger action taken.
Reset Duration - Resets the output pulse on the trigger edge of the input pulse and begins the
duration interval over again.
Cancel Output - Cancels the output pulse on the trigger edge of the input pulse.

3.

Enter the desired Duration of the output pulse.

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PID LOOP
The PID (Proportional Integral Derivative) Loop Block (Figure 43) will calculate and output a PID Loop value
based on the three inputs and the parameters selected for calculation purposes. The inputs required are:
Input -

This first input is used a control value, against which the Setpoint is compared and PID Loop
calculations are made.

Setpoint -

This input is used as the Setpoint value for PID Loop calculations.

Enable -

This input allows the PID Loop function to begin operating.

PID (DA)
Input
Setpoint
Enable

Figure 43. PID Loop Block

Figure 44. PID Loop Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 44), enter the following values:
1.
Enter the values for Proportional (Prop), Integral (Integ), and Derivative (Deriv).
2.
Enter the Disabled Output Value. This is the output of the PID when the Enable input goes to
False.
3.
Enter the Minimum Output and the Maximum Output values for the connected device. These are
the range limits for the output.
4.
Enter the Output Offset value that is added to the calculated output of the PID.
5.
Click the check box if the output is to be Reverse Acting.
TIMING
Click on the tab of the Timing Window to bring it to the foreground. In this window you enter the Interval and
Offset values.

Intervals are based on a repeating 12 hour period and say when the PID Loop will execute.

The Offset is the time after midnight (2400 hours) or noon (1200 hours) that the Interval will start.
1. Enter the Interval and Offset values and click

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PSYCHRO
The Psychro block (Figure 48) is used for calculating the relative humidity, dew point, wet bulb, or enthalpy of
the controlled area. This block has the following features:

The Dry Bulb Temperature is the first input. The User selects the second input type (Relative
Humidity, Dew Point, or Wet Bulb).

The User also selects the output type (Relative Humidity, Dew Point, Wet Bulb, Enthalpy).

The User selects the Mode of measurement (English, Metric).

Psychro.

Dry Bulb Temp.


Input

Figure 45. Psychro Block

Figure 46. Setting Window for Psychro Block

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 46), the User:
1.

Selects an Input Type.

2.

Selects an Output Type.

3.

Selects the Mode of Measurement (Engineering Units).

RAMP
The Ramp block (Figure 47) puts a limit on the amount of change in an output. This block acts as a filter,
smoothing out rapid increases and decreases in output levels, thereby preventing damage to field equipment.
The User selects the ramp speeds, the sampling Interval rate, and any offset required. The User can select values
for both increases and decreases in output if desired.

Ramp

Input

Figure 47. Ramp Block

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Figure 48. Setting Window

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SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 48), the User enters values for the desired ramps. On the Timing Window, enter
values for the sampling Interval rate and an Offset value, if needed.
1.

For Ramping Up, click the Ramp Up check box and enter the increment rate in minutes.

2.

For Ramping Down, click the Ramp Down check box and enter the decrement rate in minutes.

NOTE: You can enter values for both ramps if desired.


TIMING
The Interval value indicates how often the blocks out is updated. The Offset will stagger the Interval start time.
1.

Enter the Interval sampling rate desired.

2.

Enter the Offset value desired.

RELAY - ANALOG
The Analog Relay block (Figure 55) acts as a relay switch for analog inputs. The state of the Select input
determines whether the output is a 0 (Input - False) or a 1 (Input - True). The User can select a delay in how
fast the output reflects changes in the input.

A-Relay
Input - False
Select
Input - True

Figure 55. Analog Relay Block

Figure . Analog Relay Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Settings page (Figure 56):
1.

Select a delay type and enter the value of the delay:

The Delay on Make will cause a delay in the output when the input is True.

The Delay on Break will cause a delay in the output when the input is False.

RELAY - DIGITAL
The Digital Relay block (Figure 55) acts as a relay switch for digital inputs. The state of the Select input
determines whether the output is a 0 (Input - False) or a 1 (Input - True). The User can select a delay in how
fast the output reflects changes in the input.

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D-Relay
Input - False
Select
Input - True

Figure 58. Digital Relay Block

Figure 59. Digital Relay Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Settings page (Figure 56):
1.

Select a delay type and enter the value of the delay:

The Delay on Make will cause a delay in the output when the input is True.

The Delay on Break will cause a delay in the output when the input is False.

RESET
The Reset Block (Figure 61) re-scales the input voltage to a proscribed output range defined by the User:

The User defines an input range using Low and High values. An output range is defined the same
way.

The Reset block calculates a linear interpolation of the input value:output value.

The value for both ranges are display under the block title:
X/X:Y/Y = Input Low / Input High : Output Low / Output High

Input

Reset
0/0:0/0

Figure 61. Reset Block

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Figure . Reset Setting Window

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SETTINGS
On the Setting Window:
1.

Enter the High and Low Input values into the text fields.

2.

Enter the High and Low Output values into the text fields.

ROLLING AVERAGE
The Rolling Average Block (Figure 64) continually samples the input at a selected interval and outputs the
average of those samples.

The Number of Samples X is defined by the User.

The block is continuously calculating and then outputting the average of the most recent X samples,
resulting in a rolling output that drops the oldest sample value each time a new sample value is
taken.

The number of samples averaged is always X.

The User also defines the Interval values and any Offset values required.

The Rolling Average Block requires three inputs:


Input -

The control input from which the samples are taken.

Enable -

The input that tells the block to begin operating.

Clear -

This input resets the output to zero

Roll Avg.
Input
Enable
Clear

Figure 64. Rolling Average Block

Figure . Rolling Average Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 65):
1.
TIMING
1.
2.

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Enter the value of the Number of Samples required.

Enter the Interval values required.


Enter the Offset values, if needed.

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RUNTIME
The Runtime block (Figure 68) outputs the amount of time piece of equipment has been running. The Input
remains high while the machine is running, and the block outputs the total time in minutes the input remains
high. The User has three options to select from for the Reset input configuration (Figure ).
The User selects how the Reset input (when high) will clear the output (Clear Output):
Never -

The output begins counting on the rising edge of the input pulse, and never resets to zero.
Instead, it retains the last value counted during the reset period, and when the input pulse goes
high again it continues with the interrupted count.

On Make - The output begins counting on the rising edge of the input pulse, and when reset retains the
last value counted. When the input pulse goes high again, it begins the count over again
beginning with the number 1
On Break - The output begins counting on the rising edge of the input pulse, and resets to zero on the
falling edge of the reset pulse.
NOTE: The default output value of the block when the page is started is zero.
Never 0 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 7 8 8 8 8
Break 0 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 0
Make 0 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 1 2 3 3 3 3
Time

Runtime

Input
Reset

Runtime Output is the total count while the Input is High.


A Reset Input signal resets the count to 0.

Figure 68. Runtime Block

Figure 69. Runtime Output Chart

Figure . Runtime Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 70):
1.

Select a setting from Clear Output:

Never

On Make

On Break.

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SCHEDULE
The Schedule Block (Figure 72) allows the User to select and implement schedules stored on the FSC (for more
information on Scheduling, see Section Four, Programming - Chapter Four). The Schedule block settings
provide additional customizing of the selected schedule, specific to the device being controlled.
The Schedule Block has two inputs that are used as control inputs, and three outputs designed to control the
device and to provide the User with event information.
The two inputs are:
Monitor Temp -

The temperature point used as a control value.

OAT -

The Outside Air Temperature point also used as a control value.

The three outputs are:


Digital Schedule Output (T/F) -

Outputs to the controlled device per the schedule calculations.

Minutes Until Start -

Outputs the value in minutes remaining before the schedule begins.

Minutes Until Stop -

Outputs the value in minutes remaining until the schedule ends.

Schedule
MonitorTemp.

Digital Schedule Output (T/F)

OAT

Minutes until Start


Minutes until Stop

Figure 72. Schedule Block

Figure . Schedule Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 73) is used to enter scheduling information:
1.

Select a schedule from the Schedule Index drop-down list.

2.

Click inside the check boxes to select an option:


Optimum Start - Allows you to set a limit on when the schedule can begin, regardless of the
input values.
Optimum Stop - Allows you to set a limit on when the schedule ends, regardless of the input
values.
Heat Mode - Tells the controlled device to operate in Heat mode.
Cool Mode - Tells the controlled device to operate in Cool mode.
Ignore Error - Tells the block to ignore any input errors and continue operating.

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3.

If you selected Optimum Start, enter a value in the Opt. Start Window.

4.

If you selected Optimum Stop, enter a value in the Opt. Stop Window.

5.

Enter the Heat SPT (Heating Setpoint) - The temperature at which heating is turned on.

6.

Enter the Cool SPT (Cooling Setpoint) - The temperature at which cooling is turned on.

7.

Enter the Heat Design Temp - The building design temperature value compiled by ASHRAE.

8.

Enter the Cool Design Temp - The building design temperature value compiled by ASHRAE.

9.

Enter the Opt. Stop Drift Temp (Optimum Stop Drift Temperature) - The maximum allowable
temperature variance, from heating or cooling comfort temperature, used for calculating Optimum
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TIMING
On the Timing Window:
1.

Enter the Interval time.

2.

Enter the Offset time, if needed.

SEQUENCER
The Sequencer Block (Figure ) is a staging block used for staged heating or cooling. It will control up to 15
outputs. These outputs are activated (or deactivated) by the control input rising above (or falling below) the
corresponding setpoint. The sequence of the commands is fixed and can not be changed. This block does not
use runtime or feedback information to modify its control, and the controlled outputs do not have to be equal.
The Sequencer Block has two inputs:

The Control input is compared against the selected settings of each setpoint to calculate the
value of the corresponding output.

The Enable input tells the Sequencer Block to begin operating.

Sequencer
Control
Enable

Figure 76. Sequencer Block

Figure 77. Sequencer Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure ) you define the number of control setpoints, the deadband, the interstage delay,
and the direct/reverse acting nature of the block:
1.

Enter a value for the Number of Control Points. This value will determine how many setpoints the
block will recognize, and the total number of outputs.

2.

Enter a Deadband value. If the value of the control signal reaches the setpoint plus or minus half the
deadband, the associated output point will change state in accordance with the selected settings. The
output status will not change while the value of the control signal remains inside the deadband zone.

3.

Enter an interval value for the Interstage Delay. This value is the amount of time after a stage is
activated that the next stage in sequence must wait before also activating. No delay is imposed on the
stages as the control signal value decreases and the output points are deactivated.

4.

The Reverse Acting option causes the corresponding output points to initialize as the control signal
decreases below the selected setpoint values. When the control signal rises above the setpoint value
of a stage, the output will deactivate.

5.

Enter the Setpoint values. The number of control points selected determines the number of setpoints
available.

DESCRIPTOR
Click on the tab of the Descriptor Window to bring it to the foreground.
1.

Enter a uniquely descriptive name for the block that will make it easy to locate on the CPL Page. The
descriptor name can be up to 32 characters in length, and is displayed above the block.

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STARTUP
When a CPL Page is first enabled, all the outputs will be in error. The Startup Block (Figure 83) is used to
kickstart the page, outputting a True for the first cycle of the page.

Start

Figure 83. Startup Block

SETTINGS
No setting information available.

START/STOP
The Start/Stop Block (Figure 84) is a simple scheduling control block with one Start/Stop Time available. You
can set the block to control for one or more days of the week. No inputs are required for this block.

Start/Stop

Figure 84. Start/Stop Block

Figure 85. Start/Stop Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 85), select the days and times you would like for the schedule to run.
1.

Select the days you want the Start/Stop schedule to run.

2.

Enter a value for the Start Time.

3.

Enter a value for the Stop Time.

TIME EVENT
Upon detecting a time event, the Time Event block (Figure 86) will output a True digital state for one cycle of
the CPL page. The time event is defined as a new minute, hour, day, week, month, or year. On the Settings page
for this block, you may select which time event will trigger the output. An application for this block could be to
determine a new day so that all of the runtime blocks could be reset. Additional information provided in the
setup is an offset time which is a delay before the output will change. For instance, if the event is new hour, the
offset could be 10 minutes so that things can occur in a staggered state. There is no Inputs page for this block.

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Time Event

Figure 86. Time Event Block

Figure 87. Time Event Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 87), select the event and any offset time required.
1.

Select the desired Event.

2.

Enter a value for the Offset Time, if needed.

ENTERING BLOCK INFORMATION - GLOBAL VARIABLES


A Global Variable is a CPL block value from a single control panel that will be accessed frequently on the CPL
Pages for that panel. Global Variables reduce the number of software points needed, and serve as a timesaving
device for creating CPL Pages. They allow the User to save the specified value to a global variable block, and
the global variable block is used thenceforth to represent that value. The value could be data from a single
control point, the result of complex CPL calculations, or any other situation where using a global variable is
faster and easier than using the original CPL block programming.
The Global Variables drop-down menu (Figure 88) has four CPL blocks available to the User:

GAI (Global Analog Input)


GAO (Global Analog Output)

GDI (Global Digital Input)

GDO (Global Digital Output)

NexSys allows 100 analog variables and 100 digital variables. As you create each variable, you will assign it an
Index number (1-100). This index number is displayed on each block below the title for easy reference. This
way, a GAO in one location can become a GAI at other locations, provided both analog variables are assigned
the same index number.

Figure 88. Global Variable Menu

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Figure . Global Variable Setting Window

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SETTINGS
All global variable blocks use the same Setting Window (Figure ). An Index number is the only setting required:

1.

Enter an Index value.

GLOBAL ANALOG INPUT


The GAI (Global Analog Input) block (Figure 89) is assigned an index number on the Setting Window. No
input is required.

GAI
VAR #1
Figure 89. Global Analog Input

GLOBAL DIGITAL INPUT


The GDI (Global Digital Input) block (Figure 91) is assigned an index number on the Setting Window. No input
is required.

GDI
VAR #1
Figure 91. Global Digital Input

GLOBAL ANALOG OUTPUT


The GAO (Global Analog Output) block (Figure 93) is assigned an index number on the Setting Window.
GAO
VAR #1

Figure 93. Global Analog Output

GLOBAL DIGITAL OUTPUT


The GDO (Global Digital Output) block (Figure 96) is assigned an index number on the Setting Window.
GDO
VAR #1
Figure 96. Global Digital Output

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ENTERING BLOCK INFORMATION - LOGICAL


Logical Blocks use standard logical operators to define relationships between elements. Logical Blocks are used
to perform logic control sequences. The Logical drop-down menu (Figure ) has four logical blocks available:

AND

NOT

OR

XOR

Figure 99. Logical Menu

AND
The AND Block (Figure 100) accepts up to 15 digital inputs. It beginns with two inputs, adding an additional
input (up to 15) each time a connection is made. It uses the following logic:
If all inputs equal True, then Output equals True.
Else Output equals False.

And
Input 1
Input 2
Input 3
Figure 100. AND Block

Figure 101. AND Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 101):
1.

Click the Ignore Error check box if you want the block to ignore any input errors.

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OR
The OR Block (Figure 100) accepts up to 15 digital inputs. It uses the following logic:
If any Input equal True, then Output equals True.
Else Output equals False.

Or
Input 1
Input 2
Input 3

Figure 100. OR Block

Figure 101. OR Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 101):
1.

Click the Ignore Error check box if you want the block to ignore any input errors.

NOT
The NOT Block (Figure 100) acts as an inverter. It accepts a digital input, and outputs its logical opposite. It
uses the following logic:
If Input1 equal True, then Output equals False.
If Input1 equal False, then Output equal True.
Not

Input 1
Figure 100. NOT Block

SETTINGS
No setting information is required.

XOR
The XOR Block (Figure 100) accepts up to 15 digital inputs. It uses the following logic:
If Input x or Input y equal True, then Output equals True.
If Input x and Input y equal True, then Output equals False.
More simply stated, an odd number of inputs must be True for the XOR output to be True.

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XOr
Input 1
Input 2
Input 3

Figure 100. XOr Block

Figure 101. XOr Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 82):
1.

Check the Ignore Error box if this function is desired.

ENTERING BLOCK INFORMATION - COMPARISON


CPL Comparison Blocks use Boolean logical operators to compare two inputs and output either a True or False,
depending on the logic applied. All Comparison Blocks have a digital (True/False) output. The Comparisons
drop-down menu (Figure ) offers eight blocks:

A-Equal

A-Not Equal

D-Equal

D-Not Equal
Greater Equal

Greater Than

Less Equal

Less Than

NOTE: The CPL Comparison blocks treat a digital input as a logical 1 or 0. All digital outputs
greater than 1 will be treated as a 1.

Figure 83. Comparison Drop-Down Menu

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A-EQUAL
The A-Equal (Analog Equal) Block (Figure 84) applies the following logic:
If Input 1 equals Input 2, then Output equal True
Else, Output equal False
This block accepts only analog inputs.

A-Equal
Input 1
Input 2
Figure 84. A-Equal Block

SETTINGS
No setting information is required.

A-NOT EQUAL
The A-Not Equal (Analog Not Equal) Block (Figure 85) applies the following logic:
If Input 1 is not equal to Input 2, then Output equal True
Else, Output equal False
This block accepts only analog inputs.
A-Not Equ.
Input 1
Input 2
Figure 85. A-Not Equal Block

SETTINGS
No setting information is required.

D-EQUAL
The D-Equal (Digital Equal) Block (Figure 86) applies the following logic:
If Input 1 equals Input 2, then Output equal True
Else, Output equal False
This block accepts only digital inputs.

D-Equal
Input 1
Input 2
Figure 86. D-Equal Block

SETTINGS
No setting information is required.

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D-NOT EQUAL
The D-Not Equal (Digital Not Equal) Block (Figure 87) applies the following logic:
If Input 1 not equal to Input 2, then Output equal True
Else, Output equal False
This block accepts only digital inputs.

D-Not Equ.
Input 1
Input 2
Figure 87. D-Not Equal Block

SETTINGS
No setting information is required.

GREATER EQUAL
The Greater Equal Block (Figure 88) applies the following logic:
If Input 1 is greater than or equal to Input 2, then Output equal True
Else, Output equal False
This block accepts only analog inputs.
Greater Equal
Input 1
Input 2
Figure 88. Greater Equal Block

SETTINGS
No setting information is required.

GREATER THAN
The Greater Than Block (Figure 89) applies the following logic:
If Input 1 is greater than Input 2, then Output equal True
Else, Output equal False
This block accepts only analog inputs.
A-Equal
Input 1
Input 2
Figure 89. Greater Than Block

SETTINGS
No setting information is required.

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LESS EQUAL
The Less Equal Block (Figure 90) applies the following logic:
If Input 1 is less than or equal to Input 2, then Output equal True
Else, Output equal False
This block accepts only analog inputs.
Less Equal
Input 1
Input 2
Figure 90. Less Equal Block

SETTING
No setting information is required.

LESS THAN
The Less Than block (Figure 91) applies the following logic:
If Input 1 is less than Input 2, then Output equal True
Else, Output equal False
This block accepts only analog inputs.

Less Than
Input 1
Input 2
Figure 91. Less Than Block

SETTINGS
No setting information is required.

ENTERING BLOCK INFORMATION - ARITHMETIC


The Arithmetic CPL Blocks are used to perform basic arithmetic operations on elements. The Arithmetic dropdown menu (Figure 92) offers seven blocks:

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Add

Divide

Modulus

Multiply

Negate

Square Root

Subtract

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The Arithmetic Blocks accept analog inputs only. No settings information is required.

Figure 92. Arithmetic Menu

ADD
The Add Block (Figure 93) adds together the values of the inputs and outputs the sum. The Add Block will
accept up to fifteen analog inputs.

Add
Addend 1
Addend 2
Addend 3
Figure 93. Add Block

SETTINGS
No setting information required.

DIVIDE
The Divide Block (Figure 94) divides the first input (the Dividend) by the second input (the Divisor) and
outputs the quotient. The block accepts two analog inputs.

Divide
Dividend
Divisor
Figure 94. D ivide Block

SETTINGS
No setting information required.

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MODULUS
The Modulus Block (Figure 95) performs a similar operation as the Divide Block, but outputs the remainder of
the quotient instead:
The Modulus Block divides the first input (the Dividend) by the second input (the Divisor),
and the remainder becomes the output value.
The block accepts two analog inputs.

Modulus

Dividend
Divisor
Figure 95. Modulus Block

SETTINGS
No setting information required.

MULTIPLY
The Multiply Block (Figure 96) multiplies the values of up to 15 analog inputs, and outputs the product of the
selected values.
Multiply

Multiplier 1
Multiplier 2
Multiplier 3
Figure 96. Multiply Block

SETTINGS
No setting information required.

NEGATE
The Negate Block (Figure 97) multiplies the input by -1, thereby outputting the negative value of that input. The
block accepts an analog input.

Negate
Input
Figure 97. Negate Block

SETTINGS
No setting information required.

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SQ. ROOT (SQUARE ROOT)


The Sq. Root (Square Root) Block (Figure 98) outputs the square root of the input value. The blocks accepts an
analog input.

Sq. Root

Input
Figure 98. Sq. Root Block

SETTINGS
No setting information required.

SUBTRACT
The Subtract Block (Figure 99) subtracts the second input value (Subtrahend) from the first input value
(Input), and outputs the difference between the two input values. The Subtract block accepts two analog inputs.

Subtract

Input
Subtrahend
Figure 99. Subtract Block

SETTINGS
No setting information required.

ENTERING BLOCK INFORMATION - POINTS


A Point is a single piece of data on a controller. A point can be hardware or software, analog or digital, and an
input or output. A CPL Point Block is a graphical representation on the CPL Page of a hardware/software input
or output value. The Point Block drop-down menu (Figure 100) has seven blocks available:
AI -

Analog Input

DI -

Digital Input

AO -

Analog Output

DO -

Digital Output

MAI -

Multiple Analog Input

MDI -

Multiple Digital Input

Pt. State -

Point State

After the Point Block is placed on the CPL Page, the User selects the data source and other values from the
Setting Window (Figure 101).
NOTE: The MAI, MDI, and Pt. State blocks have a Setting Window specific to their function.

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Figure 100. Points Menu

Rev 2.0

Figure 101. Point Setting Window

AI (ANALOG INPUT)
The AI (Analog Input) Block (Figure 102) represents a analog point, and outputs its value. The data source that
you select for the point will be displayed below the blocks title.
AI
Undefined
Figure 102. Analog Input Block

SETTINGS
1.
Select a point data source from the Point drop-down listing.

DI (DIGITAL INPUT)
The DI (Digital Input) Block (Figure 103) represents a digital point, and outputs its value. The data source that
you select for the point will be displayed below the blocks title.
DI
Undefined
Figure 103. Digital Input Block

SETTINGS
1.
Select a point data source from the Point drop-down listing.

AO (ANALOG OUTPUT)
The AO (Analog Output) Block (Figure 104) represents an analog point, and inputs its value. The data source
that you select for the point will be displayed below the blocks title.
AO
Undefined
Figure 104. Analog Output Block

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SETTINGS
1.
Select a point data source from the Point drop-down listing.

D0 (DIGITAL OUTPUT)
The DO (Digital Output) Block (Figure 105) represents a digital point, and inputs its value. The data source that
you select for the point will be displayed below the blocks title.
DO
Undefined

Figure 105. Digital Output Block

SETTINGS
1.
Select a point data source from the Point drop-down listing.

MAI (MULTIPLE ANALOG INPUT)


The MAI (Multiple Analog Input) Block (Figure 106) allows the User to compare multiple inputs against each
other simultaneously, and output the results of that comparison. The MAI is an FSC point type that allows for the
multiple analog points from the panel to be bound to this one point for evaluation. The status of this point can
only be viewed on the CPL page.
The output of the MAI is determined by the output function selected. The MAI block allows the User a choice of
six Output Functions:

Low -

Lowest of all inputs

High -

Highest of all inputs

Average -

Average of all inputs

Number Above* -

Number of inputs above a specified value

Number Below* -

Number of inputs below a specified value

Percent Above* -

Percentage of inputs above a specified value

Number Above* -

Percentage of inputs below a specified value

NOTE: Output Functions with an asterisk (*) require a value enter in the Setting Window.
The selected output function is displayed on the block next to the block title.

MAI (Low)
Undefined

Figure 106. MAI Block

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Figure 108. MAI Setting Window

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SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 107), you must select a point, choose an output function, and enter a value, if
needed.
1.

Select a Point from the drop-down list.

2.

Select an Output Function.

3.

Enter a control *Value for your output function, if required.

4.

Select the check box for Ignore Error, if necessary.

MDI (MULTIPLE DIGITAL INPUT)


The MDI (Multiple Digital Input) Block (Figure 108) allows the User to compare multiple inputs against each
other simultaneously, and output the results of that comparison. The MDI is an FSC point type that allows for the
multiple analog points from the panel to be bound to this one point for evaluation. The status of this point can
only be viewed on the CPL page.
The output of the MDI is determined by the State and Output Function selected. The MDI block allows the
User a choice of two Output Functions:

Number In State* -

Number of inputs above a specified value

Percent In State* -

Number of inputs below a specified value

The selected Output Function is displayed on the block next to the block title.

MDI (Number in State)


Undefined

Figure 108. MDI Block

Figure 109. MDI Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 109), you must select a point, choose an output function, and enter a value, if
needed.

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1.

Select a Point from the drop-down list.

2.

Select an Output Function.

3.

Enter the desired State.

4.

Select the check box for Ignore Error, if necessary.

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POINT STATE
The Pt. State (Point State) Block (Figure 110) examines the state of a selected point. If the state of the point
matches the values defined by the User, the block outputs a True. For any other condition, the block outputs
False. There are two Output options:

Alarm Condition

Mode

When the User selects an Output from the Setting Window (Figure 11), the list of states available for that option
are listed in the scrollable text box. The state selected is the criteria for the block output. The selected state is
displayed on the block next to the block title.

Pt. State (Alarm)


Undefined

Figure 110. Pt. State Block

Figure 111. Point State Setting Window

SETTINGS
In the Setting Window (Figure 111):
1.

Select a Point from the drop-down list.

2.

Select an Output.

3.

Select the desired state from the scrollable list displayed in the text box.

ENTERING BLOCK INFORMATION - TIME


Time Blocks provide time values for CPL Programming. The Time Blocks drop-down menu (Figure 112) has
three blocks available:
Constant Time -

Outputs a constant time value.

Convert Time -

Converts a time value input into a different time mode (unit) for output.

Current Time -

Outputs the current time.

Figure 112. Time Menu

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CONSTANT TIME
The Constant Time block (Figure 113) outputs a constant (unchanging) time value selected by the User. The
value is displayed below the block title.

Constant Time
00:00:00

Figure 1113. Constant Time Block

Figure 114. Constant Time Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 114):
1.

Enter the Time value desired.

CONVERT TIME
The Convert Time block (Figure 115) converts an (analog) time value input to an output in the selected time
Mode. The selected mode is displayed on the block below the block title. Four modes are available:

Seconds

Minutes

Hours

Days

Convert Time
Minutes

Figure 115. Convert Time Block

Figure 115. Convert Time Setting Window

SETTINGS
On the Setting Window (Figure 116):
1.
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Select the Mode desired.

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CURRENT TIME
The Current Time Block (Figure 117) outputs the current number of minutes that have transpired since midnight of the current day.

Current Time

Figure 117. Current Time Block

SETTINGS
No setting information is required.

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Chapter Four

Schedules

This chapter contains information on:


l Adding a New Schedule
l Editing Existing Schedules
l Deleting Schedules

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SCHEDULING
NexSys provides the User with the capability to create, edit, and reuse energy management schedules. All
scheduling is handled through the FSC (Flexible System Controller) node. Scheduling can also be implemented
using a LonWorks compatible third-party scheduling node. All schedules reside on the node where they were
created. NexSys allows the User to copy schedules from one FSC controller node to another.
Although the completed schedules are stored on the FSC, they must be incorporated into a CPL Page in order to
begin operating. NexSys uses the Schedule CPL Block to implement the schedules. For more information on the
Schedule CPL Block, please see Section Four, Programming - Chapter Three.

THE SCHEDULE SUBTREE


Scheduling allows you to design and implement a customized on/off control program, designed for use on
specific days, seasons, or other criteria. There are two types of data concerning the Schedule information:

The Summary Schedule List contains the listing of all the individual schedules on a given panel.
The Schedule list provides a systematic control over the schedules. From the list of schedules, new
schedules can be added and old schedules deleted.

The second source of data is the actual schedule(s). The individual schedules have day/time entries.
There are NWS data sources defined to handle this information.

VIEWING INDIVIDUAL SCHEDULES


Schedules are found on the Physical Tree beneath the FSC controller node on which they reside (Figure 1). To
view the available schedules on the Schedules subtree:
1.

Click

to expand the FSC controller node you are working with.

2.

Click

to expand the Schedules subtree. All schedules residing on the FSC node will be listed.

When you expand the Schedules subtree, the Summary Schedule List panel (Figure 2) opens on the right. The
schedules listed in the Summary Schedule List panel matches the schedules listed under the Schedules subtree.

Figure 1. Schedules Subtree

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Figure 2. Summary Schedule List

SCHEDULES POP-UP MENU


The Schedules Pop-up menu (Figure 3) has two commands:

Add Allows you to create new CPL schedules.

Refresh Updates the Summary Schedule List to reflect all changes.

Figure 3. Schedules Pop-up Menu

CREATING A NEW SCHEDULE


Creating a new schedule is accomplished in two main steps Adding A New Schedule, and Entering Values.

ADDING A NEW SCHEDULE:


1.

Click

to expand the scheduling node.

2.

Right click on Schedules and select Add.

3.

The Add CPL Schedule window (Figure 4) opens. Enter the name of your new schedule and click
(okay).

4.

Right click on Schedules and select Refresh. The name of your new schedule should appear under
this node.

Figure 4. Add CPL Schedule Window

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ENTERING VALUES FOR A NEW SCHEDULE:


1.

Verify that your new schedule is still selected from the Schedules subtree. The FSC Schedules panel
(Figure 5) will be open on the right.

2.

Enter the Start Time, Stop Time, and Days of the week in the appropriate text fields (Figure 6).

3.

Click

. The schedule updates and displays with the new values. The window at the top of

the panel will show the current values highlighted (Figure 7).
4.

To enter another value, arrow down to the next blank line in the FSC Schedule Window (Figure 8)
and repeat steps two and three.

Figure 5. FSC Schedules Panel

Figure 6. Start/Stop Times and Days Of The Week

Figure 7. Current Schedule Values Highlighted

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Schedules

Figure 8. Enter New Schedule Values Text Field

5.

Repeat steps two, three, and four as often as needed. If you wish to delete a value, highlight it in the
FSC Schedules Window, and click

6.

Click

. To delete all the parameters, click

. This saves the schedule to the scheduling node.

NOTE: If you do not click

before exiting the FSC Schedules panel, a Unsaved

Changes warning box appears (Figure 9). Click

to save your changes to the

scheduling node.

Figure 9. Unsaved Changes Warning Box

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Figure 10. Editing An Existing Schedule

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EDITING AN EXISTING SCHEDULE


1.

Select the schedule you wish to edit from the Schedules subtree. The FSC Schedules panel will open
on the right.

2.

Select the values text field you wish to edit from the top window and enter the new values for the
Start Time, Stop Time, and Days of the week (Figure 10).

3.

Click

4.

If you wish to delete a value, highlight it in the Schedules window, and click

. The schedule updates and displays with the new parameters.

all the parameters, click


5.

Click

. To delete

. This saves the schedule to the scheduling node.

RENAMING A SCHEDULE
1.

Right click on the schedule you wish to rename, and select Rename from the popup menu (Figure
11).

2.

The Rename CPL Schedule dialog box opens. Enter the new name for your schedule (Figure 12)
and click

. The new schedule name appears in the subtree.

Figure 11. Rename Command

Figure 12. Rename CPL Schedule Window

DELETING A SCHEDULE

308

1.

Right click on the schedule you wish to delete, and select Delete from the popup menu (Figure 13).

2.

The Warning window appears. Click

Programming

to delete the schedule.

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Schedules

Figure 13. Delete Schedule Command

Figure 14. Copy To FSC Schedule Command

COPYING SCHEDULES TO ANOTHER FSC


Copy to FSC - Copies the selected schedule to another FSC node on the network (Figure 14). When selected:
1.

The Copy Schedule To FSC window (Figure 15) opens.

2.

Selected the desired FSC to copy to and click

Figure 15. Copy To FSC Window

REFRESH SCHEDULES
The Refresh command requests the LNServer database for the most current CPL and/or Schedule information.
You should Refresh each time you use the Enable, Disable, and Copy to FSC commands.
1.

Click

2.

Right click on Schedules and select Refresh (Figure 16).

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Programming Index

Programming Index
A
Accumulator Block 267
Add Block 293
Analog Constant Block 264
Analog Equal Block 290
Analog Input Block 296
Analog Not Equal Block 290
AND Block 287
Arithmetic 292
B
Binding 232
Binding Editor 232
Refresh Button 233
Block Connections 252
Connecting Blocks 252
Deleting A Block Connection 253
Multiple Inputs 253
Prohibited 232
C
Calculation Block 267
Constant, Analog Block 264
Constant, Digital Block 264
Constant Time Block 300
Convert Time Block 300
Counter Block 269
CPL Block 262
2-Position 266
Accumulator 267
Add 293
Analog Constant 264
Analog Input 296
Analog Output 296
AND 287
Calculation 267
Constant Time 300
Convert Time 300
Counter 269
Current Time 301
Dial Provider 269
Digital Constant 264
Digital Input 296
Digital Output 297
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Divide 293
Enthalpy 270
Equal - Analog 290
Equal - Digital 290
Error - Analog 348
Error - Digital 271
Greater Equal 291
Greater Than 291
Input - Analog 296
Lead/Lag 272
Less Equal 292
Less Than 292
Min/Max 273
Minimum On/Off 274
Modulus 294
Multiple Analog Input 297
Multiple Digital Input 298
Multiply 294
Negate 294
NOT 288
Not Equal - Analog 290
One Shot 274
OR 288
Output - Digital 297
PID Loop 276
Psychro 277
Ramp 277
Relay - Analog 278
Reset 279
Rolling Average 280
Runtime 281
Schedule 282
Select Hi/Lo/Average 271
Sequencer 283
Square Root 295
Start/Stop 284
Startup 284
Subtract 295
Time Event 284
XOR 288

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CPL Blocks
Adding CPL Blocks 248
Arithmetic Blocks 242
Block Colors 243
Block Types 242
Constant Blocks 242
Constants 263
CPL Block Settings 263
Ignore Error Check Box 263
Settings Window 262
Deleting A Block 250
Direct/Reverse Acting Blocks 250
Function Blocks 242
Global Variables Blocks 243
Logical Blocks 243
Moving A Block 251
Multiple Input Block 253
Point Blocks 243
Summary Of Blocks 258
Time Blocks 243
CPL Editor 243
Best Fit 244
CPL Block Menu 247
CPL Editor Toolbar 244
Deleting Multiple Blocks 251
Editing Multiple Blocks 249
Monitor Mode 245
Activate 245
Deactivate 245
Moving Multiple Blocks 252
Show Grid 245
Zoom Control Box 246
Zoom Modes 244
CPL Pages
Adding A New CPL Page 247
CPL Page Menu Commands 239
Copy To FSC 240
Copy To Library 240
Enable/Disable 239
CPL Pages Subtree 238
Popup Menu 239
Creating CPL Pages 247
Editing CPL Pages 247
Individual Pages 239
CPL User Library 254
Accessing 255
Closing 255

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CPL Library Block Editor Window 256


Creating A New CPL Library Page 257
Exporting A CPL Library Page 257
Importing A CPL Library Page 257
Library Pages Toolbar 256
Library Pages Window 254
Pre-programmed Pages 254
Current Time Block 301
D
Dial Provider Block 269
Digital Constant Block 264
Digital Equal Block 290
Digital Output Block 297
Divide Block 293
E
Editing and Viewing Bindings 232
Editing and Viewing Binds 234
Enthalpy Block 270
Error - Analog Block 270
Error - Digital Block 271
F
FSC Schedules Panel 306
Refresh 309
Function Blocks 265
Functions
Descriptor Window 265
Timing Window 265
G
Global Analog Input Block 286
Global Analog Output Block 286
Global Digital Input Block 286
Global Digital Output Block 286
Global Variables Blocks 285
Greater Equal Block 291
Greater Than Block 291
L
Lead/Lag Block 272
Less Equal Block 292
Less Than Block 292
Logical Blocks 287

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M
Min/Max Block 273
Minimum On/Off Block 274
Modulus Block 294
Multiple Analog Input Block 297
Multiple Digital Input Block 298
Multiply Block 294
N
Negate Block 294
Network Variable Inputs 232
Network Variable Outputs 232
Network Variables 232
NOT Block 288
O
One Shot Block 274
OR Block 288

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Programming Index

Scheduling 304
Schedule CPL Block 304
Schedule Subtree 304
Summary Schedule List 304
Select Hi/Lo/Average Block 271
Sequencer Block 283
Square Root Block 295
Start/Stop Block 284
Startup Block 284
Subtract Block 295
T
Time Blocks 299
Time Event Block 284
Two Position Block 264
X
XOR Block 288

P
PID Loop Block 276
Point Blocks 295
Point State Block 299
Psychro Block 277
R
Ramp Block 277
Refresh Schedules 309
Relay - Analog Block 278
Reset Block 279
Reverse Acting Block 276
Rolling Average Block 280
Runtime Block 281
S
Schedule
Add 305
Create 305
Entering Values 306
Delete 308
Edit 308
Pop-up Menu 305
Rename 308
Viewing 304
Schedule Block 282

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SECTION FIVE

OPERATIONS

Chapters
1. Workstation Basics

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Electronic Systems USA, a wholly owned subsidiary of Johnson Controls, Inc., reserves the right to update
specifications when appropriate. Information contained in this document is based on specifications believed to
be correct at the time of publication.

Echelon , Coactive, Windows NT, and General Electric are registered trademarks and service marks of
companies other than Electronic Systems USA. FSC, CPL and NEXSYS are trademarks of Electronic
Systems USA.

Copyright 2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

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Operations Introduction

Operations Table of Contents


Chapter One - Workstation Basics

313
NexSys Work Station (NWS) Window Overview ......................................................OPS-314
Menu Bar ............................................................................................................... 315
Tool Bar ................................................................................................................. 317
Physical Tree .................................................................................................................... 318
NexSys Network Interface ..................................................................................... 318
Editing The NexSys Network Interface ....................................................... 319
To Access The NexSys Network Interface Editor: ............................ 319
NexSys Network Interface Editor Options: ....................................... 319
Connection Description Template (CDT) .................................................... 320
Adding A Connection Description Template (CDT) .......................... 321
Modifying Connection Description Templates (CDT)........................ 323
Deleting Connection Description Templates (CDT) .......................... 323
Multi-Node Operations ................................................................................ 324
Selecting the node(s): ...................................................................... 324
Selecting the options ........................................................................ 325
Confirming your selections ............................................................... 325
Routers .................................................................................................................. 325
Controller Nodes.................................................................................................... 326
Node Pop-up Menu Commands ............................................................................ 326
Points .................................................................................................................... 334
Adding FSC/FLC points .............................................................................. 334
Editing FSC/FLC Points .............................................................................. 335
Deleting FSC/FLC Points ............................................................................ 335
LMOs (LonMark Objects) ...................................................................................... 336
Network Variables .................................................................................................. 336
Binding: Connecting NVOs To NVIs .......................................................... 337
Configuration Properties ........................................................................................ 337
Point, LMO, NV, and CP Working Panels .............................................................. 338
Additional FSC Subtrees ....................................................................................... 340
CPL Pages .................................................................................................. 340
Schedules ................................................................................................... 342
Node Working Panels....................................................................................................... 344
Detail Panel ........................................................................................................... 345
Query Options............................................................................................. 346
Trend Setup Panel ................................................................................................. 346
Trend During Occupancy ................................................................. 347
Sampling ..................................................................................................... 348
Trend Setup For ASCs ..................................................................... 348
Trend Setup For FSCs .................................................................... 349
Trend Harvest Panel .............................................................................................. 349
Trend Channels Window ............................................................................ 350
Trend Samples Window ............................................................................ 350
Trend Harvest Graph window ..................................................................... 351

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The Harvest Button ..................................................................................... 353


To View Trending Data: ............................................................................... 353
ASG (Application Specific Graphics) Panel ........................................................... 353
Occupancy Modes ...................................................................................... 354
Occupied .......................................................................................... 354
Unoccupied ...................................................................................... 354
Economy .......................................................................................... 354
Controller Status Data ................................................................................ 355
Line Graph .................................................................................................. 355
Operations Index ............................................................................ 359

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Chapter One

Workstation Basics

This chapter contains information on:


l NWS Main Window Overview
l Menu and Tool Bars
l Physical Tree
l Node Working Panels

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NEXSYS WORK STATION (NWS) WINDOW OVERVIEW


This chapter provides you with an overview of the NWS window environment. The NWS window consists of
two sub-windows: the Physical Tree window, and the Node Working Panels window. First is introduced the
NWS Main Menu and Task Bars. Then the Physical Tree, its subtrees, and associated menu commands and
capabilities are covered. The final section introduces the NWS Working Panels, covering each panel in detail.
NOTE: For operating instructions, please see Section Two, Installation and Startup, Chapter
Three.
For Binding, Scheduling, and CPL Programming instructions, please see Section Four, Programming.
For a detailed explanation of NexSys Architecture, please see Section Six, Appendices Appendix C.

All the functionalities of NWS are accessed from this main window (Figure 1) using the Menu Bar, the Tool Bar,
the Physical Tree, and the Node Working Panels. Within the main window the left window displays the expandable Physical Tree representing your control system. The right window displays the working panels for the
currently selected node on the Physical Tree. The left-hand corner of the bottom task bar displays the status of
the server.

Figure 1. NWS Main Window

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MENU BAR
The Menu Bar (Figure 2) has three options: NWS, View, and Help. To access the pull-down menus for each of
these options, click on the name.

Figure 2. Menu Bar

Figure 3. NWS Menu Commands

The NWS pull-down menu (Figure 3) has five commands:


Physical Tree This command opens up a new Physical Tree window showing the Physical Tree and
Working Panels (Figure 4). Click on the tree node you wish to expand or collapse, or use the
Expand All and

Collapse All Tool Bar buttons for viewing the tree.

CPL Library This command opens up a window showing the CPL Library (Figure 5). You can select an
existing program to edit, or create a new Library Page. For more information, please see Section
Four, Programming - Chapter Two.
Alarm - This command opens the Alarm View window (Figure 6), which displays a record of previous
alarms, up to 300. The User can select:
Always on top - The Alarm View window remains open and on top of all other open windows,
so the User can constantly monitor alarm activity.
Visible on New Alarm - The Alarm View window opens automatically each time a new alarm
is generated.
Beep on new alarm - NexSys will beep to alert the User each time a new alarm is generated.
Exit Select this command to exit NexSys.

Figure 4. Physical Tree Window

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Figure 5. CPL Library Window

Figure 6. Alarm View Window

The View menu (Figure 7) has one command:


Toolbar Click on the check box to view the Toolbar, or, if it is already checked, click on the check box to
hide the Toolbar.

Figure 7. View Menu Commands

The Help menu (Figure 8) has two commands:


About This command opens a window (Figure 9) that shows the name, version number, and copyright of
your NexSys software.
NexSys Help This command opens the On-line Help dialog box. You can find help topics through the
Help Table of Contents (Figure 10), the Help Index (Figure 11), or through a search engine using the
Find Setup Wizard (Figure 12).
NOTE: You can access context-sensitive Help at anytime using the F1 key. Pressing the F1
function key at the top of your keyboard will open the context-sensitive Help screen for the
currently selected object.

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Figure 8. Help Menu

Figure 10. Table of Contents

Workstation Basics

Figure 9. NexSys About... Screen

Figure 11. Help Index

Figure 12. Help Find Setup Wizard

TOOL BAR
The NexSys Tool Bar (Figure 13) features shortcut buttons for the commands available in the Menu Bar NWS
pull-down menu.

Figure 13. NexSys Tool Bar

Listed below are the buttons available on the Tool Bar:


Exit NexSys Workstation
Open The List Of Physical Trees
Open The Local CPL Library
Open Alarm Window

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PHYSICAL TREE
The Physical Tree is a representation of the nodes connected on the LON (LONWORKS control networking
technology). Each node contains all the points for the designated hardware device (if available), and also the
LMOs (LONMARK Objects) if the device is LONMARK-compliant. The entire Physical Tree can be collapsed into
the NexSys Network Interface Node, or expanded from this same point.

To expand the tree, click

at the node you wish to view. To collapse, click

at the node

you wish to close.


The Physical Tree consists of the system node represented as NexSys Network Interface (Figure 14), controller
nodes, and routers. Figure 15 shows the VAV-01 node on the Physical Tree expanded to display its points, and
corresponding NVs (Network Variables) and CPs (Configuration Parameters) for, in this example, the Node
Object point on the node.

Figure 14. NexSys Network Interface Node

Figure 15. Expanded VAV-01 Node

NEXSYS NETWORK INTERFACE


The NexSys Network Interface node (Figure 14) is the system, or root node for your control system. It represents
the physical interface card to the LONWORKS network (the PCLTA 10/20 or PCC-10 interface card installed on
your PC or laptop). It will always be the first node on the Physical Tree, and is also known as the Global Node.

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EDITING THE NEXSYS NETWORK INTERFACE


The NexSys Network Interface uses the Editing: NexSys Network Interface dialog box (Figure 16) to
configure operating properties for your control system. The dialog box displays general information on your
system, as well as text fields for with default values that define interval rates.

Figure 16. Editing NexSys Network Interface Dialog Box

Figure 17. NexSys Network Interface Pop-up Menu

TO ACCESS THE NEXSYS NETWORK INTERFACE EDITOR:


1.
Right click on the NexSys Network Interface node, and select Edit from the pop-up menu (Figure
17).
NEXSYS NETWORK INTERFACE EDITOR OPTIONS:
NSI Timeout (sec) - Indicates how long the system waits for remote LNS clients to respond to a ping.
Discovery Interval (sec) - Contains the new device discovery interval (in seconds) in which LCA Object
Server scans the network for newly attached, unconfigured devices. An interval value of 0 (the
default value) turns off the background discovery process. A value of 65535 means Do Not
Change. All other values indicate the minimum interval between discoveries.
Update Interval (sec) - Indicates the interval (in seconds) in which NSS retries updating (in the background) any changes made to devices in the field. A value of 0 indicates that the background process
is turned off. Setting this property to 0 will turn off the background process.
Transmit Timer (sec) - The interval (in seconds) that the LON retries to send Request and Acknowledged
messages.
Register Nodes on Receipt of Service Pin - Tells NexSys to register the node in the database when it
receives a service pin.
Ignore Pending Update - Tells NexSys to ignore any pending updates when receiving the remote client

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request to go OnNet, avoiding potential delays due to a large backlog of updates.


OnNet - When this box is checked, you are in OnNet Mode, and are now communicating with the LNS
database and the devices in the field. OnNet Mode is a management mode in which the NSS updates
both its on-board database and the configuration of devices in the network. When the NSS is first
placed in the OnNet mode it also updates any changes made while it was in the OffNet management
mode.
Licensing - Displays the licensing information for your system:
If you have purchased a Standard LNS License
The amount of Credits In License equals the amount of devices that can be installed on the
system.
The Licensed Credits Used is the amount of devices installed in the system.
Deficit Credits are devices installed that exceed the legal number of credits allowed.
The Maximum Deficit Credits is the maximum number of devices that you can install during
the Deficit Days Remaining grace period.
Deficit Days Remaining is the amount of time given by LNS to resolve your licensing deficits
before LNS shuts down completely. LNS will notify you by message screens when you are in
deficit condition.
Channel Delay (Backbone) - The average number of milliseconds required for a packet to get onto the
channel once it has been queued.

CONNECTION DESCRIPTION TEMPLATE (CDT)


The Connection Description Template (CDT) is the template used to define the parameters of a binding. The
CDT determines the type of addressing and message service to be used, timing parameters, use of authentication
and priority slots, etc. The User can create a new template, or modify existing templates.
The CDT uses five different types of Addressing:
Broadcast - Addresses all the nodes in a subnet or domain.
Neuron ID - Refers to a single node by its unique 48-bit ID
Group -

Refers to numbered group of nodes in the system.

Subnet/Node - Refers to a single node by its domain, subnet, or node (DSN) address (assigned when the
network image is sent to the node for the first time).
Turnaround - Used for connections that take place only within a node.
The CDTs created on the NexSys Network Interface node are displayed in the Connection Description Template
List (Figure ). They will also appear in a scrollable Connection Template list in the Bind To Editor for the User
to select when adding a new bind (please see Section XXX for more information on Binding).
To access the CDTs:

328

1.

Right click on the NexSys Network Interface node. The pop-up menu will open.

2.

Select the Connection Template command (Figure 18).

3.

The Connection Description Template List (Figure 19) opens.

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Figure 18. Connection Template Command

Workstation Basics

Figure 19. Connection Description Template List

ADDING A CONNECTION DESCRIPTION TEMPLATE (CDT)


To add a new CDT:
1.

Open the Connection Description Template List (described above.)

2.

Click

to open the Add Connection Description Template Setting Window (Figure

20).
3.

Enter the Name and a Descriptor (if desired) for the CDT in the appropriate text fields (Figure 21).
This information will be displayed in the CDT List (Figure 22). You must enter a Name.

Figure 20. Add CDT Setting Window

Figure 21. Name and Descriptor Text Fields

Figure 22. Name and Descriptor as displayed in the CDT List

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4.

Rev 2.0

Enter values for the following parameters:

Addressing:
Force Unicast - Forces LNS to use DSN (domain/subnet/node) or NID (Neuron ID) addressing
where it would normally use group (or broadcast) addressing.
No broadcast - Tells LNS to fail if there is no other way to address the message besides broadcast.
Fail group to broadcast - Tells LNS to use broadcast addressing if it has trouble using group
addressing.
Always broadcast - Tells LNS to always use broadcast addressing.
Service Types
Service Type Override - Tells LNS that you will choose the service type explicitly rather than
allowing LNS to determine it.
Acknowledged - The message is sent out and acknowledged by the receiver (not to be used for large
group bindings causing failure to received Acknowledge messages.
Unacknowledged repeated - The message is sent out many times to ensure the probability of it
reaching its destination.
Unacknowledged - The message is sent out once.
Request Response - Used only for out-and-back messages (e.g.,. NV polls), not used for binds.
Timing Parameters
Repeat Count Override - Enter a value for the number of times LNS should repeat an unacknowledged-repeated message.
Retry Count Override - Enter a value for the number of times LNS should retry an acknowledged
message if it does not receive an acknowledgment in time.
Transmit Timer Override - Enter a value for the interval rate LNS waits between retries of
acknowledged and request/response messages.
Receive Timer Override - Select a value that tells LNS the time period within which receiving
devices will treat messages from the same source with the same reference ID as
duplicate messages. Repeats of messages using the above service types all use the
same reference ID as the original to identify them as duplicates.
Repeat Timer Override - Select a value for the interval LNS waits between repeats for unacknowledged-repeated messages.
Other
Authentication Override - Manually overrides control of the LNS message Authentification option.
Use Authentication - Turns the message Authentication option on, telling NexSys to begin sending
and receiving
authentification packets for messages on the network.
Priority Override - Manually overrides control of the LNS message Priority Override option.
Use Priority - Tells LNS that the binding should use a reserved time slot on the network,
helping the message to arrive more quickly to its destination.

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Suppress Source Address - Tells LNS to suppress the source address.


MODIFYING CONNECTION DESCRIPTION TEMPLATES (CDT)
To modify an existing CDT:
1.

Open the Connection Description Template List.

2.

Click

to open the Modify Connection Description Template Setting Window

(Figure 23). The Name of the selected CDT appears in the title bar, and both the Name and Descriptor appear in the associated text fields (Figure 24) of the window.
3.

Make changes to settings as desired.

Figure 23. Modify CDT Setting Window

Figure 24. Selected CDT Name and Descriptor

DELETING CONNECTION DESCRIPTION TEMPLATES (CDT)


To delete an existing CDT:
1.

Open the Connection Description Template List.

2.

Select the CDT you wish to delete, and click

3.

A Warning box (Figure 25) appears, asking you to confirm the deletion. Click

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Figure 25. Delete CDT Warning Box

MULTI-NODE OPERATIONS
The Multi-Node Operations window (Figure 26) allows you to perform operations on more than one node
simultaneously. The Multi-Node function is available for the NexSys Network Interface node only. Three steps
are involved in this process: Selecting the Nodes, Selecting the Options, and Confirming Your Selections.
SELECTING THE NODE(S):
a.

to add it to the Selected

Select a node from the Available Nodes window and Click


Nodes window (Figure 27).

b.

Click

to move all available nodes to the Selected Nodes window.

c.

Click

to remove a node from the Selected Nodes window.

d.

Click

e.

If you wish to add all nodes of a particular device type (Figure 28), select one of the

to remove all nodes from the Selected Nodes window.

nodes from the Available Nodes window and click

Figure 26. Multi-Node Operations Window

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Figure 28. Adding All This Type

Workstation Basics

Figure 29. Select Options Window

SELECTING THE OPTIONS


a.

Click the

to open the Select Options window (Figure 29). Select the desired options

and click

to continue, or click

to return to the previous screen

CONFIRMING YOUR SELECTIONS


a.
NexSys displays the Confirm Selections window (Figure 30). If all the information shown in the
table is correct, click
b.

The Multi-Node Status window (Figure 31) will open, displaying the process and then providing
a

c.

message when the operation is successfully completed.

Should you wish to make changes, click the

Figure 30. Confirm Selections Window

to return to the previous screens.

Figure 31. Multi-Node Status Window

ROUTERS

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A router (Figure 32) is a device that forwards information from one network/subnetwork to another using an
established protocol. Routers do not normally store messages that they are routing. Routers receive a message
and make a decision as to whether the message needs to be forwarded, and if so, to whom. You can also use
routers for network traffic control and for partitioning sections of the network traffic from traffic in other
sections, increasing the efficiency of your network.
A router may be one of four general types: bridge; repeater; configured; and a learning router.

A bridge router filters by domain ID only.

A repeater router forwards all messages, without any filter at all. It makes no decisions at all, it
simply receives a signal at one end, and broadcasts it out the other. It has limited capability to restore
weak signals to their former power level.

A configured router filters messages by domain, subnet, node, or group using configured tables
supplied by the network management tool.

A learning router also filters by domain subnet, node or group. The router starts out initially as a
bridge router, and increases the level of filtering as it learns the topology. Learning routers can fail if
configured devices are incorrectly moved within the network.

CONTROLLER NODES
Controller nodes (Figure 32) are hardware devices that actually perform a control or support function. These
devices are intelligent devices that can communicate with other devices on the LONWORKS network, using
LonTalk protocol over one or more communication channels (the path between devices). Each device has a
microprocessor that provides the intelligence, and implements the protocol. The device publishes information
specific to its application, and the protocol defines the format of the messages being sent and received. The
device uses a transceiver installed in the circuitry to electrically interface to the communication channel. All
devices connected to a specific channel must have compatible transceivers with compatible configuration.
Each controller node is configured with a Configuration Data Set (CDS). A CDS is a set of configuration
parameter values associated a particular device template. Third-party devices require a manufacturer plug-in
providing the CDS for the device. Each node pop-up menu has two different commands available for selecting
the CDS:

The user can select the default CDS or use any other CDSs that are available for that device with the
Setup Node command.

The Config. Data Set command allows the user to add a new CDS, or to apply an existing one.

Figure 32. Router Nodes

Figure 33. Controller Nodes

NODE POP-UP MENU COMMANDS


Right clicking on a node will bring up its pop-up menu. Different commands will be available depending on the
device specified for each node.
A brief explanation for available commands follows. For more detailed information, please see Section Three,
System Setup - Chapter Two.

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Add Gives you the option of adding of adding a node or router to your Physical Tree. You will also
select where you want the new node placed (Figure 34).

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NOTE: An additional Add command is available only for routers. The command At End (Figure
35) places a device on the output of the router.

Figure 34. Add Pop-up Menu

Figure 35. Router Add Pop-up Menu With At End Command

Config. Data Set Allows you to Add a configuration data set (CDS) that was loaded with the
device template, or select and Apply a configuration data set (CDS) to the selected node (Figure 36).
To Add a CDS, click Config. Data Set > Add. The Add CDS window opens (Figure 37),
displaying a list of device templates with their corresponding CDS. Click the appropriate item,
and click
.
To Apply a CDS, click Config. Data Set > Apply. The Apply CDS window opens (Figure 38),
displaying a list of CDSs applicable to the selected node. Click the appropriate item, and click
. A prompt appears, warning you that the existing configuration parameters on the node
will be overwritten. Click

Figure 36. Config. Data Set Pop-up Menu

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Figure 37. Add CDS Window

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Figure 38. Apply CDS Window

Configuration Wizard Available only for controller nodes, this command opens the devicespecific Configuration Dialog box (Figure 39). Use the
available options for the device. Click

and

when done, or click

to select from
to exit without

making any changes.


NOTE: For further information on using the Node Configuration Wizards, please see the appropriate chapter in Section Three, System Setup.

Figure 39. Configuration Dialog Box

Figure 40. Connection Description Template List Window

Connection Template Available only from the NexSys Network Interface node, this command
opens the Connection Description Template (CDT) List window (Figure 40), allowing you to Add,
Modify, or Delete items from this list.

NOTE: For more information, please see the section on NexSys Network Interface - Connection Description Templates in this chapter, and Section Four, Programming - Chapter
One.

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Delete Allows you to delete the selected node.

Device Template - Available only from the NexSys Network Interface node, this command opens the
Device Templates window (Figure 41), allowing you to Add, Modify, or Delete items from this list.

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Figure 41. NNI Device Template Window

Edit - Available from the NexSys Network Interface and Router nodes, this command opens the
Editing: NexSys Network Interface window (Figure 42) or the Editing Router window (Figure 43),
allowing you to make changes to the device parameters.

Figure 42. Editing: NexSys Network Interface Window

Figure 43. Editing Router Window

Edit/View Binding Opens the Binding Editor (Figure 44) for that node, allowing you to view, Add,
or Delete bindings. For more information on binding network variables, Please see Section Four,

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Programming - Chapter One.

Figure 44. Binding Editor

Load Firmware Opens the Load Firmware dialog box (Figure 45), allowing you to select and load
additional firmware for the node device.

Move Available for controller and router nodes, this command allows you to change the nodes
position on the physical tree (Figure 46).

Figure 45. Load Firmware Dialog Box

Figure 46. Move Menu Command

Node Commands Commands the node to Wink, Offline/On-line, Reset, or Test. (Figure 47).
The Wink command allows you to identify a node in the field by lighting the Wink led. This
command is available for ASCs only.
The Offline command causes the node to go offline, stopping it from executing its application.

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If the node is already offline, the command will be On-line, causing the node to go on-line and
execute its application.
The Reset command causes the node to reset, returning to its original starting parameters.
The Test command opens the Node Command Window (Figure 48), and verifies the Neuron
ID, Program ID, and node address of the selected node.

Figure 47. Node Commands Menu

Figure 48. Node Command Test Window

Plug-In The Plug-In menu command has two options: Run and Register (available only on
NexSys Network Interface node).
Select Plug-In > Run (Figure 49). The Run Plug-In window (Figure 50) opens, showing all
available plug-ins for the node. Select the plug-in you wish to run, and click

Figure 49. Plug-In Run Menu Command

Figure 50. Run Plug-In Window

The Register command is available on the NexSys Network Interface (Global) node only.
Select Plug-In > Register (Figure 51). The Plug-In Register window (Figure 52) opens,
showing all available plug-ins for the node, and their status. Select the plug-in you wish to
register, and click

NOTE: You can also use this window to Unregister a plug-in by selecting the plug-in and clicking
.

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Figure 51. Plug-In Register Command

Replace Node - Allows you to directly replace one node on the Physical Tree with another. When
selected, the Replace Node window (Figure ) opens, allowing you to select another device by
Neuron ID and commission it.

Figure 53. Rename A Panel Window

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Figure 52. Plug-In Register Window

Rename - Opens the Rename a Panel window (Figure 53). Enter the new name for the panel, and
click

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Figure 54. Replace Node Window

Set Time/Date on Node This menu command opens the Set Time/Date window (Figure 55) for the
selected node. Not available for router nodes, and not applicable to the NexSys Network Interface.

Set Time Provider This command, available only on FSC nodes, opens the Set System Time
Provider window (Figure 56), allowing you to change the system Time Provider from one FSC to
another.

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Figure 55. Set Time/Date On Node Window

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Figure 56. Set System Time Provider Window

Setup Node Used to commission nodes or routers added using the Add command, or to change
configuration parameters on commissioned nodes:
1. Click on this command to open the Node Setup window (Figure 57).
2. Use the

to select the configuration options you prefer (Figure 58).

3. You can click


(Figure 59), and click
the node.

Figure . Node Setup Window

at this point, or click

again to the next window

from there to send the configuration parameters to

Figure . Window to Select Node Options

Figure . Complete Node Actions Window

Time Provider Available only on the NexSys Network Interface node, this command opens the

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Current System Time Provider window (Figure 60) allowing you to view or remove the current
time provider.

Figure 60. Current System Time Provider Window

POINTS
A node is a controller in the field, and the Physical Tree displays an element representing that device. Each
controller node on the Physical Tree, when expanded, displays a list of its points and LMOs (Figure 61).
A Point is a single element of data in the system. Points can be:

Hardware (a physical point with an actual value)

Software (data bound in by software, often by a CPL program).

Analog or digital

Inputs (network variable inputs, or NVIs) or outputs (network variable outputs, or NVOs).

Points can be predefined on the device, as for ASCs, or can be set up by the User, as with FSCs and
FLCs.

Figure 61. Controller Node Points and LMOs

ADDING FSC/FLC POINTS


The User must define the points for an FSC (Flexible System Controller) or FLC (Flexible Lighting Controller).
The procedure is identical for both devices. To add points to an FSC:

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1.

Right click on the FSC Points subtree, and select Add (Figure 62).

2.

The Add FSC Point dialog box opens (Figure 63). Enter a name for the point, and use the drop down
lists to select values for the text fields.

3.

Click

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Figure 62. Add FSC Point

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Figure 63. Add FSC Point Window

EDITING FSC/FLC POINTS


1.

Click on the point you wish to edit.

2.

Select the Edit FSC Point working panel (Figure 64).

3.

Enter the new values for the point, and click

Figure 64. Edit FSC Point Working Panel

DELETING FSC/FLC POINTS


1. Right click on the point you wish to delete (Figure 65).
2. The Delete FSC Point confirmation dialog box opens (Figure 66). Click

Figure 65. Delete FSC Point Menu Command

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Figure 66. Delete FSC Point Confirmation Box

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LMOS (LONMARK OBJECTS)


LMOs ( LONMARK Objects) are a collection of network variables, configuration properties, and associated
behaviors defined by Echelons LONMARK functional profiles. These functional profiles, as well as the interface
to application programs, are implemented as LONMARK objects on individual devices (Figure 67).
LONMARK objects define standard formats and semantics for how information is exchanged between devices on a
network. Object definitions contain both mandatory and optional network variables and configuration properties,
and may also contain manufacturer-specific network variables and configuration properties.

Figure 67. Expanded LMOs Subtree

Figure 68. NVs List of NVOs And NVIs

NETWORK VARIABLES
Points consist of network variables (NVs). A network variable (NV) is a data item that a device uses to communicate with other devices on the network. Network variables are used in networked control systems because they
eliminate all of the low-level and tedious work of building and sending downlink messages, and receiving and
responding to uplink messages.

An NVI (network variable input) is a data item (NV) that the device expects to get from other
devices on the network.

An NVO (network variable output) is a data item (NV) that the device expects to provide to other
devices on the network. Use to communicate with one another.

The application specific to that device determines the types, functions, and number of network variables in each
node. Expand the NV to view its NVOs and NVIs (Figure 68)

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Figure 69. Binding Editor

BINDING: CONNECTING NVOs TO NVIs


Binding is a process that configures the device firmware to know the logical address of the other devices that it
will be sending NVO data to and receiving NVI data from. A bind, also referred to as a connection, creates
logical connections between the NVO of the selected device to the NVI of the other device(s) on the network it
is communicating with. Binding is handled through the Binding Editor (Figure 69). For more information on
Binding, please see Section Four, Programming - Chapter One.
NexSys uses the Connection Description Template (CDT) to define the parameters of a bind. The CDT will
include information on what sort of addressing and message service type it should use, timing parameters, use of
authentication and priority slots, etc. Please see NexSys Network Interface - Connection Description Templates in this chapter for more information on CDTs.

CONFIGURATION PROPERTIES
When a network variable (NV) is expanded (Figure 70), it displays the list of its configuration properties (CPs).
Configuration properties are data values used to modify the operation of a device or LONMARK object. They
may belong to a device, a LONMARK object, or an NV (Network Variable). Configuration properties may be
implemented using configuration network variables, a configuration file, or in a direct memory access data
block.
There are two types of configuration property types: Standard Configuration Property Types (SCPTs, called
skip-its), and User-defined Configured Property Types (UCPTs, called you-keep-its). UCPTs are generally
given a descriptive name by the User.

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Figure 70. NV List of Configuration Properties

POINT, LMO, NV, AND CP WORKING PANELS


The Detail and Status/Command working panels are used for displaying information and commanding values
on Points, LMOs, NVs, and CPs. To view, select the Points/LMO subtree of the desired controller node. The
Detail panel displays a listing of all the items in the subtree (Figure 71). , and the appropriate panels will open in
the left window of NWS.

Figure 71. Points Detail Panel

Figure 72. Panel Tabs

To view and/or command a single point:


1.

Click on the point you wish to access.

2.

The Detail and Status/Command panels display. Click on the tab of the window you wish to open
(Figure 72):
Detail Working Panel - Gives information about the selected item. If you select one of the
main subtree headings (Points, LMOs, NVs, CPs), the If you select a single item under one of
these subtrees, the panel displays information particular to that item (Figure 73).

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Figure 73. Detail Working Panel

Status/Command Working Panel This panel (Figure 74) is available only for single items
selected under the four main subtrees: Points, LMOs, NVs, and CPs.
To request the current Status of a CP, click

located on the bottom of the

window.
To Command a CP, enter the values in the appropriate text field, and click
located at the bottom of the window.

Figure 74. Status/Command Working Panel

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An additional working panel is available for FSC Points only:

Edit FSC Point - Allows you to change values for a Point on the FSC Node. Please see Editing
FSC/FLC Points previously covered in this chapter.

ADDITIONAL FSC SUBTREES


An FSC node contains two additional subtrees in addition to the Points and LMOs subtrees; CPL Pages and
Schedules (Figure 75):

The CPL Pages subtree allows you to add CPL pages and create new pages from the CPL Library.

The Schedules subtree allows you to create new schedules, or modify an existing one.

Figure 75. CPL Pages And Schedules Nodes

CPL PAGES
When you select the CPL Pages node, the CPL Page List (Figure 76) working panel opens to the right of the
Physical Tree. The panel lists all existing CPL Pages that you can select from. You can also click

on the

node, and the same pages will be listed below the main subtree.
NOTE: For more information on CPL (Control Programming Language), please see Section
Four, Programming.

Figure 76. CPL Page List

Figure 77. CPL Pages Pop-up Menu

Right click on the CPL Pages node to open the pop-up menu (Figure 77). NexSys gives you three commands:

Add This command adds a new CPL page. When selected, the Add CPL Page window opens
(Figure 78). Type in the name of your new page, and click
node and CPL Page List.

. The page will be added to the

Refresh - Select Refresh to update the node of any changes that may have occurred since the last
Refresh.

Create Page From Library - This command adds a page from the CPL Library to your CPL Page
List. To add a CPL Library Page:
1. Select the Create Page from Library command from the pop-up menu.
2. The Create Page from Library Window opens (Figure 79). Select the page you would like

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to add, and click

Figure 78. Add CPL Page Window

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. The page will be added to the node and CPL Page List.

Figure 79. Create Page From Library Window

When you select one of the pages listed under the CPL Pages node, the CPL Editor panel (Figure 80) opens to
the right of the Physical Tree, replacing the CPL Page List . Using the CPL Editor, you can create, edit, and
monitor CPL programs. Please see Section Four, Programming - Chapter Two for further information.

Figure 80. CPL Editor Panel

The individual CPL Pages also have a pop-up menu (Figure 81), with five commands:

Enable/Disable The Enable command allows the page to begin operating. The page must be
enabled to be viewed in Monitor Mode. The Disable command replaces Enable as a menu command
when the page is currently enabled.

Rename This command allows you to rename your CPL Page. When selected:
1. The Rename Page window opens (Figure 82).
2. Enter your new page name in the text field, and click

Copy to Library This command copies the selected CPL Page from the FSC to your CPL Library.
When this command is selected:
1.

The Copy Page To Library window (Figure 83) opens.

2.

Select the desired file path, and enter a name for your page in the Page Name text field. Click

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Copy to FSC - Copies the selected page to another FSC node. When selected:
1. The Copy Page To FSC window (Figure 84) opens.
2. Selected the desired FSC to copy to and click

Delete This command will delete the selected CPL Page. When selected:
1. A Warning dialog box appears (Figure 85) asking you to confirm your action.

Figure 81. CPL Pages Pop-Up Menu

Figure 82. CPL Rename Page Window

Figure 83. CPL Copy Page to Library Window

Figure 84. CPL Copy Page to FSC Window

Figure 85. Warning Dialog Box

SCHEDULES
Scheduling allows you to design and implement a customized on/off control program, designed for use on
specific days, seasons, or other criteria.

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NOTE: For more information on Scheduling, please see Section Four, Programming - Chapter
Four.
There are two types of data concerning the Schedule information:

The Summary Schedule List (Figure 86) contains the listing of all the individual schedules on a
given panel. The Schedule list provides a systematic control over the schedules. From the list of
schedules, new schedules can be added and old schedules deleted.

The second source of data is the actual schedule(s). The individual schedules have day/time entries.
There are NWS data sources defined to handle this information.

The Schedules pop-up menu (Figure 87) has two commands: Add and Refresh.

Add Allows you to create new CPL schedules. When this command is selected:
1. The Add CPL Schedule window (Figure 88) opens. Enter the name of your new schedule in
the Name text field, and click

2. Select Refresh from the pop-menu to update the Summary Schedule List.
To enter the values for your new schedule:
1. Select the schedule. The FSC Schedule window (Figure 89) opens on the right.
2. Enter the desired values and click

and then

Refresh Requests the LNServer database for the most current CPL and/or Schedule information.
You should Refresh each time you use the Enable, Disable, and Copy to FSC commands.

Figure 86. Summary Schedule List

Figure 88. Add CPL Schedule Window

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Figure 87. Schedules Pop-up Menu

Figure 89. FSC Schedules Window

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The individual schedules also have a pop-up menu (Figure 90), with three commands:

Rename This command allows you to rename your schedule. When selected:
1. The Rename CPL Schedule window opens (Figure 91).
2. Enter your new schedule name in the text field, and click

Delete This command will delete the selected schedule. When selected:
1. A Warning dialog box appears (Figure 92) asking you to confirm your action.

Copy to FSC - Copies the selected schedule to another FSC node on the network. When selected:
1. The Copy Schedule To FSC window (Figure 93) opens.
2. Selected the desired FSC to copy to and click

Figure 90. Schedule Pop-Up Menu

Figure 92. Warning Dialog Box

Figure 91. Rename CPL Schedule Window

Figure 93. Copy Schedule to FSC Window

NODE WORKING PANELS


The NexSys Node Working Panels (Figure 94) allow the User to view data on a node selected on the Physical

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Tree. Each device type (VAV, FSC, PEC, etc.) has a specific set of working panels available to the User. The
Working Panels provide information on the selected node, enter values for the node, set up and monitor trending
schedules, command points, view data graphically, etc.
To view the working panels for each device on your network:
1.

Select the device from the Physical Tree on the left.

2.

The available working panels for that device appear on the right of the screen. Click on the tab of the
panel you wish to view.

NOTE: Use the scroll bars at the bottom and right side of the panel to view all the information. Be
sure that the panel window is large enough to display any data on the bottom part of the
window.

Figure 94. NWS Working Panels

Figure 95. Tabs Of Available Working Panels

Figure 96 . Detail Panel

DETAIL PANEL
The Detail Panel (Figure 96) allows you to query NexSys for detailed information on the node. To query
NexSys:

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1.

Select the node you wish to query from the Physical Tree.

2.

On the Detail Panel, use the mouse pointer to check the boxes of the queries (Figure 97) you would
like to make, and then click
3.

The taskbar at the bottom on the screen briefly displays the query progress. When NexSys is
finished accessing the information, it is displayed in the right window.

Figure 97. Query Info. Options

Figure 98. FSC Query Info. Options

QUERY OPTIONS
The Query Options available (Figure 97) are:

Query Status: This query gives you information on node activity. This includes the amount of xmit
(transmit) errors, lost and missed messages, the error log, model and version number, etc.

Reset Status: This query resets the node to the original parameters. The reset status is also noted in
the right window.

Program ID/Neuron ID: This query will list the program and neuron IDs.

Hardware/Software Revision: This query gives you the names of the hardware and software
revisions currently installed on the node.

NOTE: Different device types may not have all Query options available
An FSC node will have three additional queries available (Figure 98):

I/O Module: The query lists the I/O Modules that are defined, and the type that are responding.

CPU Statistics: This query is used to display up-to-date statistics on the CPU itself, including the
amounts of available RAM, NVS RAM, and Flash memory.

CPL: This query lists all the CPL Pages residing on the node, and their current state (enabled or
disabled).

TREND SETUP PANEL


The Trend Setup Panel (Figure 99) is used to declare trending. The panel is actually a configuration screen, and

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allows you to set up your trend to perform a variety of functions. When a trend has been configured, NexSys
initiates the trending function as soon as the selected controller begins running. The results of the Trend Setup
are displayed in the Trend Harvest Panel section immediately following.
NOTE: Trending data for ASCs is stored in their internal volatile memory, and is not preserved
across a power loss or other conditions. If the data is critical, then it should be transferred
to the FSC or other means of permanent storage.

Figure 99. Trend Setup Panel

You can select from three types of trending: Interval, Delta, or a Hybrid of these two.
Interval Trending: Interval Trending has its primary emphasis in logging data on a time interval basis, and is
very useful for determining system timing. NWS logs the data you have requested at the configured time interval
whether or not the data has changed, and results in a very equally spaced graph of data points (see Trend Harvest
Panel).
Delta Trending: Delta Trending has its emphasis in the change of an analog point. Use Delta Trending when
you wish to trend a temperature for an extended period of time, but are interested only in a certain increment of
change. Stable data can be stored for long periods of time. Delta Trending is often used for tracking space
temperature changes during both occupied and unoccupied modes. It results in a Trend Harvest Panel graph of
unequally spaced data, with little detail of what happened between changes (see Trend Harvest Panel following
this section ).
Hybrid Trending: You can use a mix of both Interval and Delta Trending in any way desired. A trend can be
declared that gathers data at a specified interval, and at a specified delta. Hybrid Trending provides a middle
ground between the two strategies, and is used when you want periodic data gathered, but also want to note
changes.
TREND DURING OCCUPANCY
This mechanism is based on the status of a digital point. The Trend During Occupancy option (Figure 100)
allows the controller to disable trending when activity is not of interest to the controller.

The ASCs will allow Occupancy to be the only digital value for trending enable/disable. When this
option is selected, the ASC will trend when the controller is Occupied, and not trend when the
controller is Unoccupied.

The FSC will allow trending to occur on any digital point value that exists locally on the controller
(Figure 101). The status of this digital point can be determined on a different controller, but that point
must be mapped to the FSC selected and bound between the controllers. The FSC will trend when the
selected state is True. If Trend during occupancy is selected, the controller trends only when the
selected State is true and the mode is Occupied.

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Figure 100. Trend During Occupancy OptionFigure 101. FSC Trend Enable/Disable Options

SAMPLING
A sample is the data gathered on a point at the specified interval/delta. A finite amount of samples is available in
the buffer for each node. Each point to be sampled is assigned a trend channel. The number of trend channel
available is device dependent. You can designate how many samples you want allocated to each trend channel if
you are sampling multiple points. If you are only sampling one point per node, the entire sample amount will
default to that point. The memory allocation is as follows:
ASCs

Number of Trend Channels = 6

Total Number of Samples = 880

FSCs

Number of Trend Channels = 100

Total Number of Samples = 5000

TREND SETUP FOR ASCS


To configure an Interval trend:
1.

Select the Point you wish to trend from the drop-down list (Figure 102).

2.

Left click on the Interval check box (Figure 103). A check will appear, and the Hours and Minutes
fields will become active.

3.

Enter the time in hours and minutes of the interval you wish to use.

4.

If you have selected more than one point for trending, enter the amount of samples you are allocating
to this point in the Samples field. The remaining amount of samples available for allocation is shown
underneath the field (Figure 104)

5.

Select

Figure 102. Point Drop-Down List

Figure 104. Remaining Samples

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Figure 103. Interval Check Box

Figure 105. Delta Trend Check Box

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To configure a Delta trend:


6.

Select the Point you wish to trend from the drop-down list (Figure 102).

7.

Left click on the Delta check box (Figure 105). A check will appear, and the field to the right will
become active.

8.

Enter in the field to the right the amount of Delta you wish to trend on.

9.

If you choose to enable the point, left click on the Enable Point check box.

TREND SETUP FOR FSCS


NexSys provides several features for trending on FSCs that are not available on ASCs:

The FSC will allow trending to occur on any digital point value that exists locally on the controller.
The status of this digital point can be determined on a different controller, but that point must be
mapped to the FSC selected and bound between the controllers (see Enable on Digital, above).

A start and stop time interval can be provided in the configuration data for the trend channel. This
time interval determines when the trending is enabled (greater than or equal to the first time) and
disabled (greater than or equal to the second time). The time can wrap around midnight (for example,
it can be enabled at 7:00 PM and disabled at 7:30 am).

The Trend Setup Panel for the FSC is configured in the manner as for ASCs, with the addition of the Time Based
Start and Stop fields, and Enable Point State field.
To configure a Time Based trend:
1.

Left click on the Time Based check box (Figure 106). A check will appear, and the Start and Stop
fields will become active.

2.

Enter the time in hours and minutes that you would like the trending to Start.

3.

Enter the time in hours and minutes that you would like the trending to Stop.

Figure 106. Time Based Check Box

Figure 107. Enable Point Check Box

To configure a digital Enable Point value and State trend:


1.

Left click on the Enable Point check box (Figure 107). A check will appear, and the Enable Point and
State drop-down lists will become active.

2.

Use the arrow to select the point that you wish the trending to occur on from the Enable Point dropdown list.

3.

Use the arrow to select the point that you wish the trending to occur on from the State drop-down list.

TREND HARVEST PANEL


The Trend Harvest Panel (Figure 108) displays a live graphical representation of the Trending set up by the
Trend Setup Panel. The Trend Harvest Panel consists of three windows: the Trend Point List Window, the
Trend Samples Window, and the Trend Harvest Graph Window. Each window provides the User with
information on a selected point. The Trend Harvest Panel uses the Harvest button to gather data.

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Figure 108. Trend Harvest Panel

Rev 2.0

Figure 109. Trend Point List Window

TREND CHANNELS WINDOW


The Trend Point List window (Figure 109), located in the upper left corner of the panel, displays the channel
number, point number, and the name of the points that have been set up in the Trend Setup panel. The trending
can be viewed in Controller Time or PC Time (Figure 110). These radio button are located at the bottom of the
Trend Channels window.
NOTE: The Controller Time will be the time entered using the node drop-down menu Set Time/
Date on Node command.

Figure 110. Clock Selection

Figure 111. Trend Samples Window

TREND SAMPLES WINDOW


The Trend Samples window (Figure 111), located in the lower half of the panel, displays the raw data of the
samples being taken for the trend. The User can view the channel number, the name of the point, the value of the
point and the engineering unit (Eng. Unit) used, and the date and time of the sample.

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Figure 112. Trend Harvest Graph Window

TREND HARVEST GRAPH WINDOW


The Trend Harvest Graph window (Figure 112), located on the upper right side of the panel, is a graphical
version of the data displayed in the Trend Sample window:

The X axis of the graph (Figure 113) shows the time and date of the samples being taken.

The Y axis of the graph (Figure 114) indicates the value of each point on the line, and the Engineering Unit that the value is calculated in.

Figure 113. Graph X Axis

Figure 114. Graph Y Axis

The User can select any of nine different modes (Figure 115) for viewing the graphed data. The name of the
selected point is displayed directly below the Modes listings.

Figure 115. Trend Harvest Graph Viewing Modes

Figure 116. Graphed Trend Data Line

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Figure 117. Plot Mode

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To select a viewing mode, click on the mode, and then click and hold the mouse pointer on the graphed trend
data line (Figure 116) to move the axes as indicated by the mode function:

Plot Mode (Figure 117) activates the graph to begin displaying the data. This is the default mode for
the graph. Select this mode to exit from the other modes, and return to the original display.

NOTE: This mode can only be selected and un-selected. Moving the graphed trend data with the
mouse pointer has no effect.

The Scroll X, Scroll Y, and Scroll XY modes (Figure 118 ) allow the user to move along the axis/
axes as needed.

The Zoom X, Zoom Y, and Zoom XY modes (Figure 119) allow the user to zoom in on graphed
data using the axis/axes as needed.

1. Move the trend data is the direction desired. The selected axis will scroll in the same direction.

1. Move the trend data is the direction desired. The selected axis will scroll in the same direction

The Cursor option displays data for a single point on the selected graph data line:
1. Select the Cursor option. A vertical cursor the length of the Y axis is displayed on the graph
(Figure 120).
2. Click and drag the cursor along the graph line. The Cursor Mode at the top of the graph
displays the X:Y values for the point on the graph where the cursor rests (Figure 121).

NOTE: If, after using the Zoom mode you cannot drag the cursor to a desired point, you may
need to return to the default graph (by selecting Plot mode) and resize with less Zoom.
Figure 118. Scroll Modes

Figure 119. Zoom Modes

Figure 120. Vertical Cursor

Figure 121. Cursor Point Data Readout

Clicking the Zoom Box option (Figure 122) allows you to use the mouse cursor to draw a box
around the part of the display (Figure 123) you would like to see more closely:
1. Click the Zoom Box option at the top of the graph.
2. Hold down the left mouse key as you draw a box around the part of the graph desired.
3. Release the left mouse key and the graph automatically resizes to the defined area.

Figure 122. Zoom Box

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Figure 123. Zoom Box Drawn On Graph

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THE HARVEST BUTTON


The Harvest button (Figure 124) gathers and displays the trend information currently selected in the Trend
Setup Panel. When the Harvest button is selected, it clears the panel of previous data, and then updates each
subwindow with the selected trend data.

Figure 124. Harvest Button

Figure 125. Trend Data Status Message

Figure 126. Harvest Completed Message

TO VIEW TRENDING DATA:


1.

Click

. The panel taskbar displays a status message (Figure 125). When all harvesting

has been completed the panel taskbar displays a Done message (Figure 126).
2.

Use the mouse pointer to select the channel you wish to view. The sampling interval selected begins
at this moment.

3.

The Trend Sample displays the value of each sample as it is taken. It will continue until all the
samples have been taken.

NOTE: A complete interval must pass before a trend sample can be displayed in either the Trend
Sample Window or the Trend Harvest Graph.
4.

As the interval is completed, the Trend Harvest Graph begins graphing the trend data.

ASG (APPLICATION SPECIFIC GRAPHICS) PANEL


The ASG Panel (Figure 127) displays specific controller status information for the selected node. Each controller device type has a specific ASG Panel.
NOTE: The ASG panel is available only for ASCs (Application Specific Controllers).
The ASG panel consists of Occupancy Mode in the upper left section of the window, a Line Graph (s) on the
right, and Controller Response Data in the lower half of the window.. Each device type has a specific set of
points that are displayed. The User can also adjust the Occupied User Setpoint from this panel.

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Figure 127. ASG Panel

OCCUPANCY MODES
The Occupancy section of the ASG Panel displays data for each of the Occupancy Modes: Occupied, Unoccupied, and Economy.
OCCUPIED
The Occupied mode (Figure 128) displays a slidebar for adjusting the User setpoint (Figure 129), and live
values for the Cooling (Cooling SPT) , Heating (Heating SPT), and User (User SPT) setpoints. The User SPT
value is the value set using the slidebar.

Figure 128. Occupied Mode

Figure 129. User Setpoint Slidebar

To change the User SPT (Setpoint) from this panel:


1.

Use the mouse pointer to drag the indicator arrow of the User SPT Slidebar (Figure 129) to the
desired temperature.

2.

Verify the exact temperature setting from the User SPT text box to the right of the gauge.

UNOCCUPIED
The Unoccupied Mode displays the Heating (HTG) and Cooling (CLG) Setpoints for this mode (Figure 130).
ECONOMY
The Unoccupied Mode displays the Heating (HTG) and Cooling (CLG) Setpoints for this mode (Figure 131).

Figure 130. Unoccupied Mode

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Figure 131. Economy Mode

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CONTROLLER STATUS DATA


The Controller Status Data section (Figure 132) displays device-specific status information. Included can be
configuration data, occupancy mode, reheat stages, the status of fans, dampers, thermal load, heating and cooling
outputs, etc.
The Controller Status Data is automatically updated each time the node and/or ASG Panel is selected (Figure
133).

Figure 132. Controller Status Data

Figure 133. Controller Status Data Updating

LINE GRAPH
The ASG Line Graph (Figure 134) is a graphical representation of data displayed on the ASG Panel. The Line
Graph may have several graphs available, depending on the device (Figure 135).
To select a graph:
1.

Click on the name of the graph displayed on the window tab in the upper left corner of the graph. The
graph will be brought to the foreground.

Figure 134. ASG Line Graph

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Figure 135. ASG Graphs Available

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The X axis of the graph (Figure 136) represents the number of samples being taken.

The Y axis of the graph (Figure 137) indicates the value of each point on the line, and the Engineering Unit that the value is calculated in.

Figure 136. ASG Graph X Axis

Figure 137. ASG Graph Y Axis

The ASG graph uses a color coded legend (Figure 138) to differentiate between graph data lines. By matching
the color of the data lines to the legend, the User can view multiple readings at one time (Figure 139).

Figure 138. ASG Graph Legend

Figure 139. ASG Graph Data Lines With Legend

The User can select any of nine different modes (Figure 140) for viewing the graphed data. To select a viewing
mode, click on the mode desired:

Plot Mode (Figure 141) activates the graph to begin displaying the data. This is the default mode for
the graph. Select this mode to exit from the other modes, and return to the default display.

NOTE: This mode can only be selected and un-selected.

Figure 140. ASG Graph Viewing Modes

Figure 141. Plot Mode

The Scroll X, Scroll Y, and Scroll XY modes (Figure 142) allow the user to move along the graph
axis/axes as needed.
1. Move the data is the direction desired. The selected axis will scroll in the same direction.

The Zoom X, Zoom Y, and Zoom XY modes (Figure 143) allow the user to zoom in on graphed
data using the axis/axes as needed.
1. Move the data is the direction desired. The selected axis will scroll in the same direction.

Figure 142. Scroll Modes

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Figure 143. Zoom Modes

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The Cursor option displays data for a single point on the selected graph data line:
1. Select the Cursor option. A vertical cursor the length of the Y axis is displayed on the graph
(Figure 144).
2. Select the data line you wish to examine from the graph legend. The selected line will appear
highlighted (Figure 145).
3. Click and drag the cursor along the graph line. The Cursor Mode at the top of the graph
displays the X:Y values for the point on the graph where the cursor rests (Figure 146).

NOTE: If, after using the Zoom mode you cannot drag the cursor to a desired point, you may
need to return to the default graph (by selecting Plot mode) and resize with less Zoom.

Figure 144. Vertical Cursor

Figure 145. Highlighted Selection

Figure 146. Cursor Point Data Readout

Clicking the Zoom Box option (Figure 147) allows you to use the mouse cursor to draw a box
around the part of the display (Figure 148) you would like to see more closely:
1. Click the Zoom Box option at the top of the graph.
2. Hold down the left mouse key as you draw a box around the part of the graph desired.
3. Release the left mouse key and the graph automatically resizes to the defined area.

Figure 147. Zoom Box

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Figure 148. Zoom Box Drawn On Graph

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Operations Index

Operations Index
C

Configuration Data Set 335


Connection Description Template (CDT) 325
Adding A Connection Description Template
(CDT) 329
Adding A New CDT 329
Addressing
Types 328
Deleting 331
Entering Values 330
Addressing 330
Other 330
Service Types 330
Timing Parameters 330
Connection Description Templates (CDT)
Deleting An Existing CDT 331
Modifying An Existing CDT 331
Controller Nodes 334
Configuration Wizard 336
Pop-up Menu Commands 334
CPL Pages 348
Add 348
CPL Library
Create Page From Library 348
Menu Commands 349
Refresh 348

Multi-Node Operations
Selecting The Node 332
Selecting The Options 333

F
FSC
CPL Pages 348
Detail Panel
Query Options 354
FSC Subtrees 348
Schedules 350
FSC/FLC
Adding FSC/FLC Points 342
Deleting FSC/FLC Points 343
Editing FSC/FLC Points 343

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N
Network Variables
Binding NVs 345
NexSys
Licensing 328
NexSys Network Interface 326
Editing 327
Editor Options 327
NexSys Network Interface Node
Accessing the CDT 328
CDT Addressing 328
Connection Description Template (CDT) 328
Editing Options 327
Editing the Nexsys Network Interface 327
Multi-Node Operations 332
Node Working Panels 352
Detail Panel 353
Query Options 354
NWS Main Window
Menu Bar 323
Help Menu 324
NWS Menu 323
View Menu 324
Node Working Panels 352
Overview 322
Tool Bar 325
Buttons 325
P
Physical Tree 326
Configuration Properties 345
Controller Nodes 334
Setup Node 341
LMOs 344

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Lon Mark Object (LMO) 344


Network Variables 344
NexSys Network Interface Node 326
Points 342
Routers 333
Points
Adding FSC/FLC Points 342
Deleting FSC/FLC Points 343
Detail Panel 346
Editing FSC/FLC Points 343
Status/Command Panels 347
Working Panels 346
R
Routers 333
Add At End Command 335
Configuration Data Sets 334
Types of Routers 334
S
Schedules 350
Add 351
Copy To FSC 352
Delete 352
Rename 352
T
Trend Setup Panel 354
Trending 354
Types Of Trending 355

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SECTION SIX

APPENDICES

Appendices
A. Standard Network Variable Types (SNVTS)
B. Glossary
C. NexSys Architecture
D. LNServer

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Appendices Introduction

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

Electronic Systems USA, a wholly owned subsidiary of Johnson Controls, Inc., reserves the right to update
specifications when appropriate. Information contained in this document is based on specifications believed to
be correct at the time of publication.

Echelon , Coactive, Windows NT, and General Electric are registered trademarks and service marks of
companies other than Electronic Systems USA. FSC, CPL and NEXSYS are trademarks of Electronic
Systems USA.

Copyright 2000 Electronic Systems USA

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All Rights Reserved

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Appendices Introduction

Appendices Table of Contents


Appendix A - Standard Network Variable Types

419
SNVTs .............................................................................................................................. 420
Digital Points And SNVTs ...................................................................................... 420
Analog Points And SNVTs ..................................................................................... 424
Appendix B - Glossary
427
Glossary ........................................................................................................................... 428
Appendix C - NexSys Architecture
439
Overview Of NexSys And LNS Architecture ..................................................................... 440
NexSys Software ................................................................................................... 440
NexSys Workstation (NWS) ........................................................................ 440
LNServer ..................................................................................................... 441
LNS 3.0 Architecture.............................................................................................. 441
LCA Object Server ActiveX Control ............................................................ 441
Network Services Server (NSS).................................................................. 441
Network Services Interface (NSI)................................................................ 441
Example Of NexSys Software Interaction ............................................................. 441
Appendix D - LNServer
445
Overview Of LNServer ..................................................................................................... 446
Starting LNServer .................................................................................................. 446
Title Bar ...................................................................................................... 446
Menu Bar .................................................................................................... 447
User Connection Window ........................................................................... 447
LNServer Messages Window ..................................................................... 447
UI Activity Window ...................................................................................... 448
Tree Poll Thread Window ........................................................................... 448
System Status Window ............................................................................... 448
Exiting LNServer.................................................................................................... 449
Appendices Index........................................................................... 451

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Appendices Introduction

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Appendix A

Standard Network Variable Types

This chapter contains information on:


l Digital SNVTs and Points
l Analog SNVTS and Points

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SNVTs

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

SNVTS
Standard Network Variable Types (SNVTs) provide inter-operability between devices made by different
manufacturers by providing a well-defined interface for communication .
Standard Network Variable Types (SNVTs) allow these devices to inter-operate using networks variables (NVs)
by structuring the NV data so that all data is interpreted in the same way.

DIGITAL POINTS AND SNVTS


The User can select SNVT types (Figure 1) when adding a point to the FSC. The types of SNVTs available
depends on the type of digital point being added. When adding digital points:

Digital points are:


Input or output
hardware or software.
Output hardware points are:
Momentary
Maintained.

Hardware points must be assigned to an I/O module and point on the module.

The same SNVTs are available to all the digital points.

Figure 1. SNVT Types For Digital Point

Table 1 lists the SNVT # and Type, a brief description of the SNVT, and the range of the SNVT for digital
points.

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SNVTs

SNVTs for Digital Points


SNVT # and Type
011 Day of Week

022 Level Discrete

038 Phone State

Description
Used to represent days of the week

Range
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Null
Used to represent a 2, 3, or 4 state device 2 state: Off/ On
3 state: Off/ Low / Medium/ High
4 state: Off/ Low / High/ High/ High
Off/On: Off/ On/ Null

Used to represent the different phone


states

Not In Use
Off Hook
Dialing
Dial Completed
Ringback
Incoming
Ringing
Answered
Talking
Hanging Up
Hung Up (Remote)
Hold
Unhold
Released
Full Duplex
Blocked
Call Waiting
Destination Busy
Network Busy
Error
Null
069 Installation Source Configuration Source
Local/ External/ Null
095 Switch
Used to represent a 2, 3, or 4 state device 2 state: Off/ On
Closed/ Open
False/ True
Access/ Secure
3 stage: Off/ Stage 1/ Stage 2/ Stage 3
4 stage: Off/ Stage 1/ Stage 2/ Stage 3/
Stage 4
Normal/Alarm: Normal/ Alarm
Security:
Normal/ Alarm / Tamper/
Access
097 Override
Override State
Retain
Specified
Default
Null
103 HVAC Emergency Used to represent device states that are
Normal
used for Smoke Control
Pressurize
Depressurize
Purge
Shutdown

Table 1. SNVTs and Ranges for Digital Points (continued on following pages)

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SNVTs for Digital Points


SNVT # and Type
108 HVAC Mode

Description
Used by FSC to set application mode of
an ASC under its control

Range
Auto
Heat
Morning Warm-up
Cool
Night Purge
Precool
Off
Test
Emergency Heat
Fan Only
Free Cool
Ice
Null
109 Occupancy
Used to transmit the occupancy state of a Occupied
room or zone
Unoccupied
Bypass
Standby
Null
118 Evaporation State Used to represent the evaporation state
No Cooling
Cooling
Emergency Cooling
Null
119 Thermostat Mode Used to represent the thermostat mode
No Control
In/ Out
Modulating
Null
120 Defrost Mode
Used to represent the defrost mode
Ambient
Forced
Synchronized
Null
121 Defrost Termination Used to represent the Defrost termination Temperature
Time
First Occuring
Last Occuring
Null
122 Defrost State
Used to represent the defrost state
Standby
Pump Down
Defrost
Drain Down
Injection Delay
Null
Table 1. SNVTs and Ranges for Digital Points (continued on following page)

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SNVT # and Type


132 Fire Test / Fire
Initiator

SNVTs

SNVTs for Digital Points


Description
Range
Used to represent the Fire Test or the Fire Fire Test: Normal
Initiator Mode
Reset
Test
No Test
Null
Fire Initiator: Undefined
Thermal Fixed
Smoke-Ion
Multi-Ion-Thermal
Smoke-Photo
Multi-Photo-Thermal
Multi-Photo-Ion
Multi-Photo-Ion-Thermal
Thermal and ROR
Multi-Thermal and ROR
Manual Pull
Water Flow
Water Flow and Tamper
Status Only
Manual Call
Fireman Call
Universal

133 Fire Indicator

Used to represent the Fire Indicator

145 HVAC Unit Type

Used to represent the HVAC unit type

Undefined
Strobe Unsync
Strobe Sync
Horn
Chime
Bell
Sound
Speaker
Universal
Null
Generic
Fan Coil
VAV
Heat Pump
Rooftop Unit
Unit Ventilator
Chilled Ceiling
Radiator
Air Handling Unit
Self-Contained Unit
Null

Table 1. SNVTs and Ranges for Digital Points (end)

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ANALOG POINTS AND SNVTS


The User can select SNVT types (Figure 2) when adding a point to the FSC. There are many different SNVT
types available for analog points. The types of SNVTs available depends on the type of analog point being
added. When adding analog points:

Analog points are input or output, hardware or software.


Output hardware points are:
0-10VDC
Floaters.
Input hardware points are:
0-5VDC
0-10VDC thermistors
0-20mA
4-20mA
Totalizers.

Hardware points must be assigned to a I/O module and point on the module.

The same SNVTs are available to all the analog points.

Figure 2. SNVT Types For Analog Point

Table 2 lists the SNVT # and Type, a brief description of the SNVT, and the range of the SNVT for analog
points.

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SNVTs

SNVT Types for Analog Points


SNVT # and Type

Description

Units and Range

001 Ampere

Used to measure electrical current

Amps: -3276.8 - 3276.7

005 BTU (Kilo)

Used to measure heat energy

KBTU: 0 - 65535

006 BTU (Mega)

Used to measure heat energy

MBTU: 0 - 65535

008 Count

Accuracy
0.1

Used to keep a count of changes of Count(s): 0 - 65,535


state or other values
009 Count Increment Used to store an offset for a count Count(s): -32768 - 32768

013 Electrical Energy Used to measure electrical energy

kWH: 0 - 65,535

015 Flow

Used to measure the flow of volume CFM: 0 - 138,859


LPS: 0 - 65,534
024 Mass (Kilo)
Mass in kilograms
Lbs: 0 - 14,447.75
Kg: 0-6553.5
025 Mass (Mega)
Mass in metric tons
KLbs: 0 - 14,447.75
Mg: 0-6553.5
028 Electrical Pow er Used to measure electrical pow er
kW: 0 - 6,553.5
029 PPM

Used to measure Parts Per Million

030 Pressure

Used to measure pressure

PPM: 0 - 65535

PSI: -475.26 - 475.25


KPascals: -3276.80 - 3276.70
051 Count F
Used to keep a count of changes of Counts: 0 - 1E38
state or other values (float)
052 Count Inc F
Used to store an offset for a count Count: -1E38 - 1E38
(float)
053 Flow (Float)
Used to measure flow of volume
GPM: -1E38 -1E38
(float)
KGPM: -1E35 - 1E35
LPS: -1E38 - 1E38
054 Length (Float)
Used to measure length (float)
Ft: 0 - 1E38
m: 0 - 1E38
057 Electrical Pow er Used to measure electrical pow er
kW: -2,000,000 - 2,000,000
(Float)
068 Electrical Energy Used to measure electrical energy
kWH: 0 - 2,000,000
(Float)
076 Frequency (Hz) Used to measure frequency
Hz: 0 - 6553.5

2.119
1
0.22
0.1
0.22
0.1
1
1
2
1
1

3
3
0.1

079 LUX

Used to measure illumination

LUX: 0 - 65535

081 Percent

Used to measure a percentage

082 Multiplier

Used to scale other values

%: -163.84 - 163.83%
% Open: -163.84 - 163.83%
% Close: -163.84 - 163.83%
Multiply: 0 - 32.7675

0.005
0.005
0.005
0.0005

105 Temperature

Used to measure temperature

F: -459.71 - 621.79
C: -273.17 - 327.66
Seconds: 0 - 6,553.4

0.18 F
0.09 C
1

107 Time in Seconds Used to measure time in seconds


113 Water Column

Used to measure pressure in inches INWG: -131.714 - 131.710


of w ater column
Pascals: -32,768 - 32,766

3 w .c
0 Pa

Table 2. SNVTs and Ranges for Analog Points

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Appendix B

Glossary

This chapter contains information on:


l NexSys Terminology

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Glossary

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Rev 2.0

GLOSSARY

A
Acknowledged Messaging - Provides end-to-end acknowledgment, where a message is sent to each designated
receiver, and the sender expects to receive an acknowledgment message from each. If the send does not receive
an acknowledgment, it times out and retries the transaction at the end of the Transaction Timer interval.
Action: Reverse/Direct. - See Direction Reverse.
Active Alarm Window - Displays only the current or unacknowledged alarms in the NexSys system.
Active X Control - A 32-bit, language-independent programmable objects that can be used in a variety of
software development tools.
Address Table Entry - Used with point binding, the address table entry tells the NV sending the data the
address to send to, and sometimes also telling the receiver where the data is being sent.
AI - Analog Input.
AHU - Air Handling Unit.
Alarm History window - Gives the history of all alarms from all nodes as they are sent to the NWS.
Alarm Hysteresis - The range an item in alarm must pass in order to generate a return to normal.
Alarm Inhibit Time - The length of time - in hours, minutes, and seconds- that must elapse, after the controller
is activated, before an alarm is generated for a particular point. This prevents unwanted alarms on start-up or
when the controller is powered up.
Alarm Set Time - The length of time - in hours, minutes, and seconds- a point must be in alarm state before it is
broadcast.
Alarm Type - You may define an alarm for certain points. Only one alarm type may be defined for each point,
but that type may apply to as many of that points states as you wish. You also have the option of selecting one
of several Alarm Types to make the alarm more descriptive.
Alias - An alternative name for an object, such as a variable, file, or device. The alias increases binding flexibility by allowing an NV (Network Variable) to use more than one selector and/or address table entry.
Analog - Point data which has a numerical value. (e.g. 35F, 10 minutes, 1000 CFM)
AO - Analog Output.
ASC - Application Specific Controller.
Automatic Fan - An HVAC fan which cycles off and on, running only during compressor stage 1.

B
Bind - The act of connecting NVs on one node with NVs of another node. NVOs are bound to NVIs.
Broadcast Addressing - Addressing all nodes in a subnet or domain.
BTU - British Thermal Unit. Measurement of heat.

C
Calibration Offset - An increment of error set by the factory used to calibrate a particular hardware device, like
a thermistor.
Channel - The communications medium that is used to connect network devices.
Channel Delay - Indicates the average amount of time (in milliseconds), for a message packet to get on the
channel, once it has been queued. This delay allows expected traffic patterns to be input to the system, with timer
calculations being affected accordingly.
Command Fail Time - See Feedback Time.
Configure - (to configure a node) The transfer of all point setup information from the editors to the hardware
device, the transfer of binding information to the hardware device, and the assigning of a network address to the
hardware device.
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Glossary

Configuration Data Set (CDS) - A set of configuration parameter values associated with a particular device
template. The user can choose to use the default values, or use a different set of values available for the template.
CDSs allow a user to save a set of values for a particular setup of a type of device, and apply it to other similar
devices of the same type.
Configuration Properties (CPs) - Configuration properties are data values used to configure the operation of a
device or LONMARK object. Configuration properties may be implemented using configuration network variables, or they may be implemented as configuration parameters stored in a data block.
Connection Description Template (CDT) - Defines the parameters of a bind (also referred to as a connection).
The CDT will include information on what sort of addressing and message service type it should use, timing
parameters, use of authentication and priority slots, etc.
Continuous Fan - An HVAC fan which runs continually during Occupied Mode.
CPL - NexSyss Control Programming Language.

D
DA - Discharge Air.
DAT - Discharge Air Temperature.
Data Server - An engine for system monitoring and control, it interfaces with the LNS Server to automatically
monitor network data points. It also converts network data in binary data or formatted strings for direct display.
Deadband - Range an input variable may pass through without initiating any change in the output variable.
Default Gateway - A network card (router) at the end of a local trunk allowing access to a remote host.
Default Value - A value in SNVT units of the point used in such specific instances as Send Default on Error and
Override Behavior. This is also used as the initial value at start-up if the point is not fixed.
Delta Send - Increment by which an AI must change before sending its status to the LON.
DHCP - Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A method of assigning IP addresses to client PCs on a network
which doesnt use static IP addresses.
DI - Digital Input or Discrete Input.
Dial Provider - The FSC at a remote side, connected via NCB, which has the responsibility for monitoring that
site and dialing the main system if an alarm occurs.
Digital - Traditionally, point data which can have one of two states. (e.g. off/on, open/closed, true/false.) On
occasion, a digital point with a feedback will have three states. (e.g. on/off/auto). In the NWS, however, a
digital point can have several integer states. For example, the HVAC mode SNVT has eight modes or states.
Digital Lockout - Prevents unwanted alarms by locking out alarms from a point. Once you select a Digital
Lockout point, you must specify the lockout state and time (if desired). This is commonly done with temperature sensors in conditioned spaces so that they do not generate nuisance alarms when the conditioning equipment
is not active.
Digital Lockout Point - DO points whose status dictates whether alarms should be generated for a particular AI.
Digital Lockout State - States of DO Lockout Point for which AI alarms are to be locked out.
Digital Lockout Time - The time - in hours, minutes, and seconds- that must elapse after a DO switches from a
digital lockout state to a non-digital lockout state before alarms can be generated on a particular AI. This
prevents unwanted alarms from being generated on the AI the first few moments after a DO changes out of a
Digital Lockout State.
Direction Reverse - If you select YES, this parameter reverses increment/decrement points. (Note: On an I/O
Module page, the increment/decrement points are reversed when you select YES. Therefore, instead of using
this function to correct an error, you may want to switch the increment/decrement I/O Module point preferences.) For DO hardware points and discrete hardware points, this is called Action: Reverse/Direct.
Discovery Interval - Indicates the minimum interval rate (in seconds) at which the LCA Object Server scans
the network for newly attached, unconfigured devices.
DNS - Domain Name System. A method for resolving host names and IP addresses used in the Internet.

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DO - Digital Output.
DO Momentary - DO point used to control latching devices like motor starters and lighting relays.
Double click - Click twice with the left mouse button.
Download - The transfer of data from the NWS to the panel.
DP - Differential Pressure.
Drag - Click and hold the right mouse button, reposition the cursor and let go of the mouse button. This is used
when moving items on the computer screen.
Drive Time - The time - in hours, minutes, and seconds - for the actuator being controlled to move from
completely closed to completely open. This is only used on floating (three state) actuator motors.
DST - Daylight Savings Time.
Duct Size - Cross sectional area of a duct in square feet.

E
Enthalpy - Thermodynamic value for the total heat content (BTU/lb).

F
FCU - Fan Coil Unit.
Feedback - A DI point is often used to read the status of a device controlled by a DO point. If the DI does not
have the same state as the DO, there may be a problem. If so, an alarm is generated using the Feedback option.
Feedback takes precedence over state-based alarming via the alarm page.
Feedback Point - DO point which the DI point should match or else generate an alarm.
Feedback Time - Time - in hours, minutes, and seconds- the FSC will wait before generating an alarm when the
status of the DI does not match that of its DO feedback point. Feedback Time may also be called Command
Fail Time in the editors.
Field Minimum - Lowest temperature, pressure, GPM, or etc. the sensor can measure. This will typically
correspond to the lowest voltage or current value on the sensor. This is FSC specific.
Field Maximum - Highest temperature, pressure, GPM, or etc. the sensor can measure. This will typically
correspond to the highest voltage or current value on the sensor. This is FSC specific.
Floating Actuator - A device which moves a damper, valve, or other similar physical device which is controlled
by timed increase and decrease signals. Applying voltage to the increase input of the actuator will cause it to
move in the increase direction. The same is true for the decrease input. The actuator only moves while
voltage is applied to one of its inputs. These devices are generally slow with no position feedback.
Floating Control - Actuator/Valve control signal consisting of pulses from 0.1-10 seconds on increase and
decrease lines that cause the actuator to move the desired direction while the pulse is present. The actuator
will remain at that point until the next pulse.
Front End - Controlling software for the system; NWS.
FSC - Flexible System Controller.
FTP - File Transfer Protocol. A TCP/IP protocol allowing the transfer of files between computers.
FTT 10 - A twisted pair, free or bus topology, with a speed of 78K Baud. Basic length for bus topology is 8500
ft. For free topology, length is 1600 ft. This system is polarity insensitive.

G
Global Node - The primary node on the physical tree. This node defines common information for the LON, and
all other nodes attach to this one.
Group Addressing - Refers to a numbered group of nodes in the system.
GUI - Graphical User Interface.

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H
Hardware Address - A unique alphanumeric code found on the Network Interface Card, also call the MAC
address.
High Alarm Limit - A value set on an analog point. When the value of the point, as seen in the point status
window, rises above the limit, the point will generate an alarm.
Highlight - Used to select text. Place the cursor left of the first character, press and hold down the left mouse
button, and drag the mouse to the end of the text to be selected.
Host - An individual PC, server, router, etc. on a network.
Host Name - The network name of a particular host. In Windows NT, it can be found by opening the control
panel and double clicking on the Network icon.
Host Table - A file stored on a local PC which maps known IP addresses and network names.
HP - Heat Pump.
HTML - Hypertext Markup Language. Language used for creating WWW documents enabling hyperlinking to
other places in the document or different sites on the web.
Hysteresis - See Alarm Hysteresis.

I
IAQ - Indoor Air Quality. The quality of air expressed as a percentage.
Intelligent STAT - A microcontroller based thermostat which allows an occupant to adjust the setpoint, display
User Mode parameters, and put the controller in override. The LCD can display the room temperature, time,
outside air temperature, and setpoint.
Internet - A group of connected networks. The global Internet is referenced with a capital letter. A lower case
i indicates a group of connected networks.
IP - Internet Protocol. A network protocol which the Internet is based on.
IP Address - A 32 bit (4 byte) binary code used to identify individual hosts on a network.

K
K Factor - Factor of thermal conductivity. The rate that heat flows through a given area of a certain matter,
usually air or water.

L
LAN - Acronym for a Local Area Network.
LCA (LONWORKS Component Architecture) - The LNS application programming interface for Microsoft
Windows NT or Windows 95 operating systems.
LCA (LONWORKS Component Architecture) Object Server - An ActiveX control that converts LNS objects
(e.g., devices, routers, channels) managed by the NSS into standard OLE objects, and enables sharing of
information and objects between multiple tools and components.
LNS (LONWORKS Network Services) - Echelons network management and monitoring software, LNS allows
tools from multiple manufacturers to work together in a single control system by providing a single network
management tool.
LNS Server - A software engine consisting of a library and tools that performs network services.
LNServer - The software interface that allows NWS to communicate with LNS, and through LNS, devices in
the field.
Lockout - Amount of time which must elapse after a point goes active before alarms will no longer be locked
out.

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Logical Tree - Map of the NexSys system where all points are user defined and may be pulled from any physical
node in the system. For example, all space temps may be grouped in one logical node.
LON (Local Operating Network) - Echelons LONWORKS Local Operating System. The LON is designed to
move very brief sensor and control messages containing commands and status information, used to trigger
actions.
LonMark - An independent organization to establish a higher level of interoperability between nodes.
LonMark Object (LMO) - Functional groupings of network variables (NVs) and configuration parameters.
LonTalk - A communication protocol for an Echelon system.
Low Alarm Limit - A value set on an analog point. When the value of the point, as seen in the point status
window, falls below the limit, the point will generate an alarm.

M
MA - Mixed Air. The combined outside air and recirculated air.
MAC Address - Media Access Control Address. A unique alphanumeric code found on a Network Interface
Card, also known as the hardware address.
MAI - Multiple Analog Input. A point type allowing the user to get information from a number of analog points
in the system without using a large number of points on the FSC when the user is not concerned about which
specific controller the value comes from. MAI points have no point status. They are reported in CPL only.
MAIs may be used for such things as finding the average space temperature from a group of sensors, or finding
the minimum/maximum thermal load from a group of VAV controllers in order to control an AHUs output.
Maintenance Time - The time - in hours, minutes, and seconds- in which the actuator will be driven an extra
amount at its endpoints to ensure that it reaches the endpoint. Since a floating actuator has no feedback, this is
the primary way it can be automatically re-zeroed, whenever it is sent to one extreme or the other. This applies
to the FSC only. Normally, this will be set at 1.5 times the drive time.
Max Receive Time - See NV Update Time.
Max Send Time - The maximum time - in hours, minutes, and seconds- that will elapse between status broadcasts of a particular point, regardless of whether or not it has changed value. This ensures occasional updates in
case the change of state broadcast was missed. NV updates are broadcast to bound connections only, not to the
front end.
Max Value - Maximum value the points status can be. If the point is commanded above the Max Value, its
status will be equal to the Max Value. For hardware analog points, this is the value that matches the field max
value in engineering units.
MDI - Multiple Discrete Input. A point type allowing the user to get information from a number of discrete
points in the system without using a large number of discrete points on the FSC when the user is not concerned
about which specific controller the value comes from. MDI points have no point status. They are reported in
the CPL only. MDIs may be used for such things as monitoring the number of AHU requests from a set of VAV
controllers so that the FSC can decide whether to turn on.
Min Delta - The minimum change that must occur in a particular analog point for it to be broadcast. Used to
limit network traffic. The Min Delta must be valid for a broadcast to occur.
Minimum Move - The time - in hours, minutes, and seconds- that constitutes the minimum move that will be
imposed on the floating actuator. This prevents minor back-and-forth hunting or tiny moves which causes wear
and tear on an actuator without improving control.
Min Send Time - The minimum time - in hours, minutes, and seconds- that must elapse between status broadcasts of a particular point, regardless of how often its value changes. This is used to limit network traffic,
especially on a point that may change frequently. The send time must be valid for a broadcast to occur. Analog
points do not broadcast to the front end for any reason but alarms.
Min Value - The minimum value a points status can be. If a point is commanded below the minimum value, its
status will be equal to the Min Value. For hardware analog points, this is the values that matches the field Min
Value. The value is in the engineering units of the appropriate SNVT.
MIP - Microprocessor Interface Program.

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Momentary (Latching) Relay - A relay that mechanically latches into a desired state. These relays have two
coils, an on and an off. If voltage is applied to one of the coils, the relay moves to that position and remains
there until voltage is applied to the opposite coil. This is often Magnetic Relay.

N
NCB - Network ComBiner. A router manufactured by CTI Products, Inc. which allows the linking of LonWorks
networks over dial up or leased telephone lines. It is connected to the LON via modem. NCBs come in pairs,
the local and remote, on either end of the phone line.
NetBEUI - Network BIOS Extended User Interface. In Windows NT, its the fastest LAN transport protocol.
NetBIOS - An early (1980s) mechanism for client/server communication which can be used across platforms.
Network Manager - Allows communication to and from the field, and creates and maintains Echelon specific
databases.
Neuron ID - Unique, 48-bit, factory-assigned identification number associated with every neuron chip.
Neuron ID Addressing - The most basic form of addressing, refers to a node by its Neuron ID number.
NexSys Server - Server for NexSys. Handles communication between NWS and the Network Manager.
NIC - Network Interface Card. A hardware card which is installed in the PCs expansion bus slot and connects
the PC with the network.
Node - The NexSys Network Interface, a router, or a controller in the field, or the Physical Tree element
representing the item.
Node History Window - A NexSys window which displays information on the on-line/off-line nature of devices
in the NexSys system, modifications, configuration updates, and firmware updates.
NSI (Network Services Interface) - The component in the LNS architecture that provides the physical connection to the LONWORKS network. The NSI is the interface between NWS (through LNServer) and the field devices
network.
NSI Timeout - The value ( in seconds) that indicates how long the system will wait for remote LNS clients to
respond to a ping.
NSS (Network Services Server) - The LNS network management service that processes network services,
maintains the network database, and enables and coordinates multiple points of access.
Number of Inputs (MAI/MDI) - The number of connections to be made from other panels to this point. This
value cannot be 0. The value must be exactly the number of connection you are going to make to the point. If
too few are specified, all values will not be used. If too many are specified, the point will stay in error, since all
of its inputs do not have current information.
NV - Network Variable. Variable on one node that can be connected to network variables on one or more
additional nodes. This allows sharing of data in a distributed application.
NVI - Network Variable Input.
NVO - Network Variable Output.
NV Update Time - Maximum time the panel will wait for a status from a point on another panel such as Remote
I/O or VAV before the FSC considers it in error. You may want to set this time slightly higher than the Max Send
Time of the output point to which it is bound.
NWS (NexSys Workstation) - The graphical user interface (GUI) component of NexSys.

O
OA - Outside Air Temperature
OAT - Outside Air Temperature.
OEM - Original equipment manufacturer.
OffNet Mode - A management mode in which the NSS makes network configuration changes in its on-board
database but does not update the nodes in the field. The saved updates are queued for later processing when the
NSS is placed in the OnNet management mode.

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OnNet Mode - A management mode in which the NSS updates both its on-board database and the configuration
of devices in the field. When the NSS is first placed in the OnNet mode it also updates any changes that were
made while it was in the OffNet management mode.
Operator - Any individual who controls a system using the NWS.

P
PCLTA - Personal Computer LonTalk Adaptor. Hardware/PC interface board which converts data to/from the
field.
PEC - Package Equipment Controller.
Physical Tree - Map of the NexSys system as it is configured on the LON. All points are grouped according to
the hardware device where they reside.
PID Loop - Proportional, Integral, Derivative loop. Used to fine tune control of an HVAC system.
Ping - Packet Internet Groper. Echo method of determining if a host destination is reachable.
Plug-Ins - An ActiveX control for manipulating data within the LNS database. Most commonly used for OEM
node configuration.
Point - A single piece of data on a controller (software/hardware, input/output)
Points List - Detailed information on points in the system.
Program ID - The identification number from Echelon indicating the type of device, manufacturer, etc.
Properties - Attributes of the devices in the network that the user can view and modify.
Protocol - A defined set of messages between two software applications allowing each application to both
specify requests, and respond to the other applications requests.
Purge - Remove old data from the system. Data may be stored to disk. Alarm and trend data may be purged.

R
Resource Catalog Files - Resource files define how node information is displayed in LNServer. LNServer uses
this information to decode and extract information about network variables (NVs) and configuration parameters
(CPs).
Reheat - A system used to provide local space heating when required by turning on a hot water heat exchanger
or electric heater in a duct to warm the air flow.
Repeater - A simple router used to increase the network length or switch to a new channel.
Reset - (to reset a node) Resets the neuron on the CPU of the hardware device.
Restore - Place previously removed data back in the workstation database. Purged alarm and trend data which
has been stored to disk may be restored.
RH - Relative Humidity.
Right click - Click once with the right mouse button.
Router - Hardware device allowing communication between different media types, or the Physical Tree element
representing it. It will selectively filter information and can increase the network length.
RTU - Roof Top Unit.

S
Samples - The number of data points available. It can refer to the total amount of space in the buffer, or the
amount of space allocated to a single trend channel.
Schedules - A series of start and stop times used in conjunction with a group of days. Schedules are set up in
CPL and used for building control.

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Security File - Profile set up in NexSys limiting an operator to certain system command options.
Selector - Used during point binding, the selector is a 14-bit number that LNS assigns to the bind so that both
ends (NVs) what is being updated.
Send Default on Error - Determines whether or not to send the defined Default Value - instead of Error when the point is in error.
Send Time - Amount of time a point waits prior to broadcasting its data to the LON.
Sensor - A device used to measure a variable. Usually, a space temperature.
Service Pin - Physical input to an Echelon node which is used when configuring a node. Activating the service
pin broadcasts the neuron ID to the NWS.
Setpoint - The desired value of a control point.
SNVT (Standard Network Variable Type) - Format of a point using predefined ranges, allowing data to be
exchanged between controllers. A standardized engineering unit.
Space Temperature - Current temperature recorded in a zone by a thermistor or sensor.
SCPT (Standard Configuration Property Type) -A SCPT is a LONMARK-standardized definition type of
configuration property (CP) for devices.
Status Send Interval - The interval at which the controller broadcasts a status from one of its points to the
NexSys server. The NexSys server monitors the traffic to ensure that all controllers are on-line. The default is
30 seconds.
Subnet Mask - A four byte (32 bit) binary value which defines the network ID portion of an IP address and the
host ID portion.
Subnet /Node Addressing - Refers to a single node by its domain/subnet/node (DSN) address assigned when
the network image is sent to the node during its initial setup.
Subtree - The portion of the Physical Tree that is under a node. It can contain points, LONMARK objects, NVs
(Network Variables), and CPs (Configuration Parameters).
System Node - The Physical Tree element that represents the PC being used to access the LON. It is also used to
access database-global properties.
SWT - Supply Water Temperature.

T
TCP/IP - Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. A suite of protocols controlling Internet communications by allowing for host definition and information routing.
Terminal Unit - An end device on the DDC (Direct Digital Control) system. The VAV box is an example of a
terminal unit.
Thermal Load - Heating capacity of a system.
Thermistor - A thermoelectrical element used to measure temperature.
Third Party Node - Any device manufactured by a company other than Johnson Controls, Inc.
Time Broadcast Interval - The interval at which the time provider broadcasts the current time to all controllers.
This is necessary to coordinate all controllers, since most controllers do not have a real time clock and are thus
only accurate to within a few seconds per day. The default is 15 minutes.
Time Provider - The node in the system (designated by the user) which coordinates time for all nodes in the
system by broadcasting the time at an interval. Currently the time provider must be an FSC.
Totalizer (AI) - A point which registers a tally. For example, it could count the number of times a relay opens.
TP-1250 - A twisted pair wire with a speed of 1.25 M Baud. TP-1250 can only be used with bus topology, and
the length is limited to 1600 ft. It is polarity insensitive.
Transmit Timer - Indicates the interval in seconds that the LON retries to send Request and Acknowledged
messages.

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Trend - Set up on an individual point to monitor its status over time. It may be viewed, printed, and graphed.
Trend Channel - A collection of data that has been gathered on a single point.
Trend Configuration - The relatively small amount of data that configures the controller and determines the
point(s) for which data to be stored, the interval required, and/or the change (delta) that will be monitored.
Trend Data - The entire collection of data gathered on a single point.
Trend List - A list of all points in the NexSys system which are currently being trended.
Trend Sample - A single piece of data on a single point. The smallest unit of trend data.
Triac - Discrete electronic device for switching an AC signal. This cannot be used for DC since it will only turn
off when instantaneous current drops to zero.
TSO STAT - Temperature, setpoint, override microcontroller thermostat.
Turnaround Addressing - Addressing for connections that take place exclusively within the node.
Two-State - Simple On/Off or Open/Closed signal.

U
UCPT (User-defined Configuration Property Type) - Manufacturer defined configuration properties types.
UI - User Interface.
Update Firmware - To send a new software revision from the PC to the hardware device.
Update Interval - Indicates the interval in seconds that NSS retries to update (in the background) any changes
made on a device that NSS was not able to update during the original transaction.
Upload - The transfer of data from the panel to the front end.
URL - Universal Resource Locator. An alphanumeric name which resolves to the IP address of a site on the
Internet.
User Defined Graphic - The graphic of a node custom designed by the user to display point status data and
access other graphics, editors, or CPL pages.
UV - Unit Ventilator.

V
VAV 01 - Variable Air Volume controller requiring an external damper actuator.
VAV 02 - Variable Air Volume controller with an integrated damper actuator.

W
WAN - A network comprised of multiple locations, usually a group of interconnected LANs.
Wink - To cause the service LED of a hardware device to flash.
WINS - Windows Internet Name Service. A Microsoft service provided for Windows PCs containing Internet
numbers for specific NetBIOS names.
WWW - World Wide Web. A group of connected computers on the Internet running Hypertext Transfer Protocol.

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Appendix C

NexSys Architecture

This chapter contains information on:


l Overview of NexSys and LNS Architecture
l NexSys Workstation (NWS)
l LNServer
l LNS 3.0 Architecture
l Example of NexSys Software Interactions

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OVERVIEW OF NEXSYS AND LNS ARCHITECTURE


NexSys 2.0 contains two ESUSA software programs that interact directly with LNS. These are the NexSys
Workstation (NWS), and LNServer. LNS architecture consists of Network Services Server (NSS), Network
Services Interface (NSI), and LONWORKS Component Architecture (LCA) Object Server Active X Control.
NWS is the user interface, and LNServer processes information for the NWS. LNS relays field information to
and from LNServer, and stores information in the database. LNS can be configured as a server with both NSS
and NSI installed, or as a client, which has neither. The LCA Object Server Active X Control enables communication between NWS and LNS.
While NexSys 2.0 has all the functionality of previous NexSys versions, it is fundamentally different because it
uses LONWORKS Network Services (LNS) 3.0 Architecture as a network management tool. LNS allows software
tools from different vendors to work together on a network. Users see the NexSys Workstation (NWS) graphical
user interface, but LNS core services are transparent to the user. The LNS architecture exists as an underlying
framework, providing installation, configuration, and maintenance services, as well as node monitoring and
control. Figure 1 illustrates the relationship between NexSys and the LNS architecture on both main and remote
PCs.

Main NexSys PC
NexSys Software

NWS

NexSys Workstation

Remote NexSys PC

TCP/IP
Connection

LNServer

NexSys Software

LONWORKS Network Server

NWS

NexSys Workstation

LNServer

TCP/IP
Connection

Component Object Model Connection


LONWORKS Software/Hardware

LCA Object Server

LonWorks Network
Services Server

Component Object Model Connection

Database

LONWORKS Software

LCA Object Server

LNS
NSI

NSS

Network Services
Server

Network
Services
Interface

(LON card -i.e. PCLTA-10,


PCLTA-20, or
PCC-10)

LON

LON

NODE

NODE

NODE

NODE

NODE

NODE

Figure 1. Relationships Between NexSys 2.0 And LNS 3.0 Architecture

NEXSYS SOFTWARE
NexSys 2.0 contains two ESUSA software programs; the NexSys Workstation (NWS), and LNServer. NWS
provides the capability to configure, edit, and program your building control system. LNServer provides access
to the LNS architecture, and gives NexSys the ability to interact with Active X component-based software.

NEXSYS WORKSTATION (NWS)


NexSys Workstation (NWS) is the graphical component of NexSys. This is the NexSys User Interface (UI), and
allows the user to view and work with information regarding the nodes on the system, set up Control Programming Language (CPL) programs, use schedules, set up graphical representations of the building system, etc.

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LNSERVER
LNServer connects NWS to LNS. When a request is made, the LNServer communicates with the LONWORKS
Component Architecture (LCA) Object Server Active X Control, which in turn passes the request to LNS. The
LNServer runs concurrent with the NexSys Workstation.
The LNServer performs the functions of the Echsub and the Netman in previous versions of NexSys, and uses
LNS instead of LonManager API for DOS. Unlike previous versions of the EchSub and the NetMan, a copy
of LNServer must be installed on every PC; both main and remote.

LNS 3.0 ARCHITECTURE


LNS architecture has two main components: Network Services Server (NSS) and Network Services Interface
(NSI). NSS provides network management services. It communicates with the field via the LONWORKS interface
card (NSI). NSS and NSI operations are transparent to the user. The LONWORKS Component Architecture (LCA)
Object Server Active X Control provides a programming language-independent interface to LNS.
LNS uses a client/server model. With LNS, the user can setup, configure, or manage the network from any point,
using a variety of tools. LNS automatically performs many networking tasks, including detection of new nodes
and automatic notification of address changes. LNS continually updates all user interfaces that monitor and
control nodes.
All Echelon LNS software is automatically installed during the NexSys installation. The main system will have
the Network Services Server (NSS), the network databases, and the LonTalk interface card. Remote systems will
only an LNS client.

LCA OBJECT SERVER ACTIVEX CONTROL


The LONWORKS Component Architecture (LCA) Object Server is an ActiveX control that converts LNS objects
(e.g., devices, routers, channels) managed by the NSS for Windows engine into standard OLE objects. The
object server also provides a network tool kernel that enables sharing of information and objects between
multiple tools and components.
Echelons LONWORKS Component Architecture (LCA) Object Server is installed on each NexSys PC to communicate with the Network Services Server (NSS).

NETWORK SERVICES SERVER (NSS)


The Network Services Server (NSS) is the LNS network management service. It processes the data, maintains
the network database, and executes the services requested by the clients from the various points of system
access. Each NexSys system will have ONLY one NSS, and it will be located in the main NexSys PC. All IP
remote PCs and network tools communicate with the main PCs NSS via TCP/IP. Individual clients on the
network may monitor the network, but all changes must be made through the single NSS.
The NSS communicates with LNServer (and ultimately, NWS) through the LCA Object Server Active X
Control. NSS communicates with devices in the field through the NSI ( see below).

NETWORK SERVICES INTERFACE (NSI)


Information is passed to the field network from the NSS through the Network Services Interface (NSI) card. The
Network Services Interface (NSI) is the hardware interface card in the main NexSys PC. This interface card is
either the PCLTA-10, the PCLTA-20, or the PCC-10. The only NSI is located in the main NexSys PC. Remote
PCs communicate via TCP/IP with the NSS on the main NexSys PC.

EXAMPLE OF NEXSYS SOFTWARE INTERACTION


ESUSAs NexSys Workstation (NWS), ESUSAs LNServer, and the Echelon LNS components work together to
make up NexSys 2.0. The NWS allows the user to visually interface with their environmental control system.

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

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395

NexSys Architecture

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

They can view, enter, or update information on their nodes and points, CPL programs, schedules, and binding
information. LNServer and LNS manage services carried out by the user requests.
In this example, the user creates a new node. LNServer then communicates this request to LNS through the LCA
Object Server. The NSS creates or accesses the network database for the information entered in the NWS. The
NSS is also communicating with the device in the field through the NSI card.
When a VAV-01 node is added to the Physical Tree through the NWS, All the information regarding that VAV
must be downloaded to the actual controller in the field. The interactions listed below take place in the order as
defined. :
1.

User adds VAV-01 node to the Physical Tree in NWS.

2.

NWS requests service pin from LNServer. User send service pin from the device in the field,
bypassing the LNS database.

3.

NWS sends Neuron ID from LNServer, which passes the data to the LNS database.

4.

NWS commands that the Network Image and Configuration Data be downloaded to the VAV-01 in
the field. The data is routed through LNServer to LNS, and then downloaded to the device. A
Finished message is sent back from the device to NWS.

Figure 2 below illustrates the software interactions described above:

NWS

LNServer

LNS
Database

VAV-01 Node
(Sometimes)

ADD

Bypasses database

Get Service Pin


Set Neuron ID
Send Network
Image
Send Configuration
Data

Finished

Figure 2. NexSys Software Interactions

396

Appendices

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Rev 2.0

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

NexSys Architecture

Appendices

397

NexSys Architecture

398

Appendices

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Appendix D

LNServer

This chapter contains information on:


l LNServer

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

LNServer

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

OVERVIEW OF LNSERVER
LNServer connects NWS to LNS. When a request is made, the LNServer communicates with the LONWORKS
Component Architecture (LCA) Object Server Active X Control, which in turn passes the request to LNS. The
LNServer runs concurrent with the NexSys Workstation.
The LNServer performs the functions of the Echsub and the Netman in previous versions of NexSys, and uses
LNS instead of LonManager API for DOS. Unlike previous versions of the EchSub and the NetMan, a copy
of LNServer must be installed on every PC; both main and remote.

STARTING LNSERVER
1.

Double Click on

LNServer icon OR:

2.

Click

> Programs >NexSys 2.0 Main System > LNServer OR:

3.

Click

> Programs > NexSys2 Start. This option will open both LNServer and NWS.

The LNServer Main Window (Figure 1) consists of four windows; a large window on the left, and three smaller
windows on the right.

When LNServer first opens, only the LNServer Messages and the UI Activity windows appear.

When the Tree Poll Thread window opens, the LNServer is now operational, and you can now start
NWS. The User Connection Window will remain blank until NWS is running.

Title Bar
LNServer Messages
Menu Bar

User Connection
Window

UI Activity

Tree Poll Thread

System Status
Window
Figure 1. LNServer Main Window

TITLE BAR
The Title Bar (Figure 2) is the horizontal bar at the top of the window. It contains the title of the window, the
LNServer icon and the

(Maximize),

(Minimize), and

(Close) buttons.

Figure 2. LNServer Title Bar

400

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2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

LNServer

MENU BAR
The Menu Bar (Figure 3) displays the names of LNServer menus. It is located below the Title Bar. Each menu
item has a pull-down list of available menu commands (Figure 4).
To open the drop-down menu:
1.

Click the menu name.

Figure 3. LNServer Menu Bar

Figure 4. Example Of LNServer Pull-down Menu From Menu Bar.

USER CONNECTION WINDOW


The User Connection window (Figure 5) allows the user to view all activity as it is being executed in NWS. The
user can track node commands, bindings, queries, and NWS system responses.

Figure 5. User Connectivity window

LNSERVER MESSAGES WINDOW


The LNServer Messages window (Figure 6) displays the steps LNServer takes as it initializes. The user can
verify which database is being accessed, node activity, etc.

Figure 6. LNServer Messages Window

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Appendices

401

LNServer

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

UI ACTIVITY WINDOW
The UI (User Interface) Activity window (Figure 7) displays the activity being displayed on the users computer
monitor. It continually refreshes, or paints, as objects are moved, resized, etc., on the viewing screen.

Figure 7. LNServer UI Activity Window

TREE POLL THREAD WINDOW


The Tree Poll Thread window (Figure 8) monitors the communication between the two software applications:
LNServer and NWS.

Figure 8. LNServer Tree Poll Thread Window

SYSTEM STATUS WINDOW


The System Status window (Figure 9) displays the network being used, network connectivity status, the system
and subsystems being accessed, and application interaction.

Figure 9. System Status Window

402

Appendices

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

LNServer

EXITING LNSERVER
There are four ways to exit the NexSys:
1.

Click on File from the Menu Bar. Select Exit.

2.

Right click anywhere on the Title Bar. Select Close.

3.

Click the

4.

Click on the LNServer icon in the left corner of the Title Bar. Select Close.

(Close) button from Title Bar.

The LNServer button on the Task Bar at the bottom of the screen will appear as in Figure 7.

Figure 7. LNServer Shutting Down

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Appendices

403

LNServer

404

Appendices

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Appendices Index

Appendices Index
A

Analog Points 378


Input Hardware Points 378
Output Hardware Points 378
Analog SNVTS 379

SNVT 374, 378


Standard Network Variable Types 374
Starting LNServer 400
System Status Window 402

Digital Points 374


Output Hardware Points 374
Digital SNVTs 374

Title Bar 400


Tree Poll Thread Window 402

E
Exiting LNServer 403

U
UI (User Interface) Window 402
User Connection Window 401

G
Glossary 382
L
LNS 3.0
Architecture 395
LCA Object Server ActiveX Control 395
Network Services Interface (NSI) 395
Network Services Server (NSS) 395
LNServer 395
LNServer Messages Window 401
M
Menu Bar 401
N
Network Information 402
NexSys and LNS Architecture
Example of Software Interaction 395
Overview 394
NexSys Software 394
LNServer 395
NexSys Workstation (NWS) 394
NWS 394

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Appendices

405

Appendices Index

406

Appendices

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Software Overview Index

Master Index
A

Accumulator Block PRO-267


Active Setpoint SSU-153
Add Block PRO-293
Adding a PEC SSU-186
Adding a Router to the Physical Tree SSU-121
Commissioning SSU-121
Defining SSU-121
Adding Nodes To A Router SSU-124
Advanced PEC Editing SSU-214
Air Flow SSU-152, 158
Analog Constant Block PRO-264
Analog Equal Block PRO-290
Analog Input Block PRO-296, 297
Analog Not Equal Block PRO-290
Analog Points APP-378
Input Hardware Points APP-378
Output Hardware Points APP-378
Analog SNVTS APP-378
AND Block PRO-287
Application Mode Controller SSU-148, 172
Application Specific Controller SSU-164
Arithmetic PRO-292
ASC SSU-130

Calculation Block PRO-267


Catalog ISU-76
Checkboxes SWO-12
Click SWO-7
Coactive Routers SSU-121
Commissioning a Defined Router SSU-123
Commissioning the PEC SSU-187
Config Data Set SSU-107
Config Password SSU-146, 147, 169, 170
Configuration Data Set OPS-334
Configuration Mode SSU-146, 169
Connection Description Template (CDT) OPS328
Adding A Connection Description Template
(CDT) SSU-115, OPS-329
Addressing SSU-116
Adding A New CDT OPS-329
Addressing
Types OPS-328
Deleting OPS-331
Deleting An Existing CDT SSU-117
Entering Values OPS-330
Addressing OPS-330
Other SSU-116, OPS-330
Service Types SSU-116, OPS-330
Timing Parameters SSU-116, OPS-330
Modifying An Existing CDT SSU-117
Connection Description Templates (CDT)
Deleting An Existing CDT OPS-331
Modifying An Existing CDT OPS-331
Constant, Analog Block PRO-264
Constant, Digital Block PRO-264
Constant Time Block PRO-300
Controller Nodes OPS-334
Configuration Wizard OPS-336
Pop-up Menu Commands OPS-334
Convert Time Block PRO-300
Cooling Scan Rate SSU-149, 172
Counter Block PRO-269
CPL SSU-130
CPL Block PRO-262
2-Position PRO-266

B
Basic Menu Concepts SWO-10
Basic Mouse Actions SWO-7
Basic Window Concepts SWO-8, 9
Binding SSU-158, PRO-232
Binding Editor PRO-232
Refresh Button PRO-233
Block Connections PRO-252
Connecting Blocks PRO-252
Deleting A Block Connection PRO-253
Multiple Inputs PRO-253
Prohibited PRO-252
Broadcast SSU158, 159, 160, 181, 182, 183, 184
Buttons SWO-12

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Software Overview

Software Overview Index

Accumulator PRO-267
Add PRO-293
Analog Constant PRO-264
Analog Input PRO-286
Analog Output PRO-286
AND PRO-287
Calculation PRO-267
Constant Time PRO-300
Convert Time PRO-300
Counter PRO-269
Current Time PRO-301
Dial Provider PRO-269
Digital Constant PRO-264
Digital Input PRO-286
Digital Output PRO-286
Divide PRO-293
Enthalpy PRO-270
Equal - Analog PRO-290
Equal - Digital PRO-290
Error - Analog PRO-270
Error - Digital PRO-271
Greater Equal PRO-291
Greater Than PRO-291
Input - Analog PRO-296, 297
Lead/Lag PRO-272
Less Equal PRO-292
Less Than PRO-292
Min/Max PRO-273
Minimum On/Off PRO-274
Modulus PRO-294
Multiple Analog Input PRO-297
Multiple Digital Input PRO-298
Multiply PRO-294
Negate PRO-294
NOT PRO-288
Not Equal - Analog PRO-290
One Shot PRO-274
OR PRO-288
Output - Digital PRO-297
PID Loop PRO-276
Psychro PRO-277
Ramp PRO-277
Relay - Analog PRO-278
Reset PRO-279
Rolling Average PRO-280
Runtime PRO-281
Schedule PRO-282

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Software Overview

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

Select Hi/Lo/Average PRO-271


Sequencer PRO-283
Square Root PRO-295
Start/Stop PRO-284
Startup PRO-284
Subtract PRO-295
Time Event PRO-284
XOR PRO-288
CPL Blocks
Adding CPL Blocks PRO-248, 249
Arithmetic Blocks PRO-242
Block Colors PRO-243
Block Types PRO-241
Constant Blocks PRO-242
Constants PRO-263
CPL Block Settings PRO-262
Ignore Error Check Box PRO-263
Settings Window PRO-262
Deleting A Block PRO-250
Direct/Reverse Acting Blocks PRO-250
Function Blocks PRO-242
Global Variables Blocks PRO-243
Logical Blocks PRO-243
Moving A Block PRO-251
Multiple Input Block PRO-253
Point Blocks PRO-243
Summary Of Blocks PRO-258
Time Blocks PRO-243
CPL Editor PRO-243
Best Fit PRO-244
CPL Block Menu PRO-247
CPL Editor Toolbar PRO-244
Deleting Multiple Blocks PRO-251
Editing Multiple Blocks PRO-249
Monitor Mode PRO-245
Activate PRO-245
Deactivate PRO-245
Moving Multiple Blocks PRO-252
Show Editor PRO-245
Zoom Control Box PRO-246
Zoom Modes PRO-244
CPL Pages OPS-348
Add OPS-348
Adding A New CPL Page PRO-247
CPL Library
Create Page From Library OPS-348
CPL Page Menu Commands PRO-239

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Copy To FSC PRO-240


Copy To Library PRO-240
Enable/Disable PRO-239
CPL Pages Subtree PRO-238
Popup Menu PRO-239
Creating CPL Pages PRO-247
Editing CPL Pages PRO-247
Individual Pages PRO-239
Menu Commands OPS-349
Refresh OPS-348
CPL User Library PRO-254
Accessing PRO-255
Closing PRO-255
CPL Block Editor Window PRO-256
Creating A New CPL Library Page PRO-257
Exporting A CPL Library Page PRO-257
Importing A CPL Library Page PRO-257
Library Pages Toolbar PRO-256
Library Pages Window PRO-255
Pre-programmed Pages PRO-254
CTI Routers SSU-121
Current Time Block PRO-301
Cursor SWO-6
D
Damper SSU-152
Damper Actuator SSU-158
Damper Actuator Increment SSU-158
Damper Position SSU-158
Deadband SSU-177
Default Output SSU-149, 153, 172
Defining a PEC SSU-186
Delay Time SSU-177, 180
Derivative Gain SSU-149, 153, 172, 176
DHCP ISU-37
Dial Provider Block PRO-269
Dial Up Networking ISU-54, 58
Dial-Up Monitor ISU-59
Dialin Information, RAS ISU-53
Dialog Boxes SWO-12, 13
Digital Constant Block PRO-264
Digital Equal Block PRO-290
Digital Output Block PRO-297
Digital Points APP-374
Output Hardware Points APP-374
Digital SNVTs APP-374
Direct Action SSU-153

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Software Overview Index

Display Order SSU-146, 170


Divide Block PRO-293
Double Click SWO-7
Drag SWO-7
Drive Time SSU-153
Dropdown List Boxes SWO-12
E
Echelon Routers SSU-121
Economizer
Controller SSU-148, 172, 175
Economy
Cooling Setpoint SSU-147, 148, 171
Heating Setpoint SSU-147, 148, 171
Edit/View Binding SSU-106
Editing and Viewing Bindings PRO-232
Editing and Viewing Binds PRO-234, 235
Editing Points. See Heat Pump: Editing
Points; PEC: Editing Points; Remote I/O:
Editing Points; Variable Air Volume (VAV):
Editing Points
Emergency
Command SSU-179
Command Controller SSU-148, 172
Heat SSU-179
Heat Holdoff SSU-179
Shutdown SSU-215
Emergency Shut Down SWO-19
English Units SSU-146, 170
Enthalpy Block PRO-270
Error - Analog Block PRO-270
Error - Digital Block PRO-271
Escape Key SWO-6
ESUSA Resources ISU-76
Exiting LNServer APP-403
F
Fan
Controller SSU-148, 159, 172
Output SSU-159, 177
Status SSU-178, 179
Status Delay SSU-178
Far-Side Transceiver Types SSU-121
Fiber Optic/Twisted Pair Router SSU-121
FLC SSU-130
Flow Offset SSU-150
FSC SSU-158, 159, 160, 183

Software Overview

iii

Software Overview Index

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

CPL Pages OPS-348


Detail Panel
Query Options OPS-354
FSC Subtrees OPS-348
Schedules OPS-350
FSC Schedules Panel PRO-306, 307
Refresh PRO-309
FSC/FLC SSU-130
Add SSU-130
Adding FSC/FLC Points OPS-342
Deleting FSC/FLC Points OPS-343
Editing FSC/FLC Points OPS-343
FTR SSU-121
Function Blocks PRO-265
Function Keys SWO-6
Functions
Descriptor Window PRO-265
Timing Window PRO-265
G
Global Analog Input Block PRO-286
Global Analog Output Block PRO-286
Global Digital Input Block PRO-286
Global Digital Output Block PRO-286
Global Node SSU-102, 131, 140, 164
Global Variables Blocks PRO-285
Glossary APP-382
Greater Equal Block PRO-291
Greater Than Block PRO-291
H
Hardware Drivers ISU-66
Heating
Scan Rate SSU-149, 172
Heating/Cooling Controller SSU-148, 172
Highlight SWO-7
Holdoff SSU-179
I
I/O Module SSU-137
Installation Checklist ISU-33
Installing
PCC-10 ISU-73
PCLTA-10/20 Card ISU-73
Installing a Network Adapter ISU-34
Installing NexSys ISU-38
Integral Gain SSU-148, 153, 172, 176

iv

Software Overview

Rev 2.0

Intelligent STAT SSU-145, 169


Interrupt Request (IRQ)
Selecting ISU-72
Interstage Delay SSU-156
IP Address ISU-55
IPCONFIG ISU-53
K
K Factor SSU-149, 150, 152
K Factor Calibration SSU-150
Keyboard SWO-6
L
Lead/Lag Block PRO-272
Less Equal Block PRO-292
Less Than Block PRO-292
List Boxes SWO-12
LNS SWO-23
LNS 3.0
Architecture APP-395
LCA Object Server ActiveX Control APP395
Network Services Interface (NSI) APP-395
Network Services Server (NSS) APP-395
LNServer SWO-23, APP-395
Configuration Wizard ISU-39
Configure for Local Location ISU-40
Configure for Remote Location ISU-43
Configuring ISU-39
Exiting ISU-82
Starting LNServer ISU-78
Status Bar ISU-82
LNServer Messages Window APP-401
Load Firmware SSU-110
Local SSU-174
Local Economizer SSU-174
Logical Blocks PRO-287, 289
LON Economizer SSU-174
Loop Enable SSU-179
Low Limit
Setpoint SSU-176
M
M3 Workstation SWO-23
Maximum Air Flow SSU-151
Menu Bar APP-401
Menus SWO-10

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Metric Units SSU-146, 170


Min. Off Time SSU-179
Min. On Time SSU-179
Min. Reheat Flow SSU-151
Min/Max Block PRO-273
Minimum Air Flow SSU-151
Minimum Criteria ISU-34
Minimum On/Off Block PRO-274
Minimum Run Time SSU-177
Mixed Air PID SSU-176, 179
Mixed Air Temperature SSU-176
Modem ISU-56
Modulus Block PRO-294
Morning Warmup
Maximum Flow SSU-151
Minimum Flow SSU-151
Mouse SWO-6
MS Loopback Adapter ISU-35
Multi-Node Operations
Selecting The Node OPS-332
Selecting The Options OPS-333
Multi-tasking SWO-6
MultiNode Operations SSU-113
Multiple Analog Input Block PRO-297
Multiple Digital Input Block PRO-298
Multiply Block PRO-294
MWU Max. Flow SSU-151
MWU Min. Flow SSU-151
My Computer SWO-15
N
Negate Block PRO-294
NetBEUI ISU-36, 49
Network SSU-174
Network Adapter
Installing ISU-34
Network Information APP-402
Network Neighborhood SWO-15
Network Protocols ISU-36, 53
Network Variable Inputs PRO-232
Network Variable Outputs PRO-232
Network Variables PRO-232
Binding NVs OPS-345
Neuron ID SSU-103, 132, 141, 165
NexSys
Licensing OPS-328
NexSys and LNS Architecture

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Software Overview Index

Example of Software Interaction APP-395


Overview APP-394
NexSys Network Interface OPS-326
Editing OPS-327
Editor Options OPS-327
NexSys Network Interface Node
Accessing the CDT OPS-328
CDT Addressing OPS-328
Connection Description Template (CDT)
OPS-328
Editing Options OPS-327
Editing the Nexsys Network Interface OPS327
Multi-Node Operations OPS-332
NexSys Software APP-394
LNServer APP-395
NexSys Workstation (NWS) APP-394
NexSys Work Station (NWS)
Exiting NWS ISU-82
Starting NWS ISU-78
Nexsys Workstation (NWS) SWO-23
No Reverse SSU-180
Node
Add SSU-102
Configuration Wizard SSU-118
Delete SSU-107
Move SSU-101
Rename SSU-110
Node Commands SSU-96
Offline SSU-97
Reset SSU-98
Test SSU-98
Wink SSU-96
Node Menu SSU-96
Node Working Panels OPS-352
Detail Panel OPS-353
Query Options OPS-354
NOT Block PRO-288
NT Explorer SWO-17
NWS APP-394
NWS Main Window ISU-79
Menu Bar ISU-81, OPS-323
Help Menu OPS-324
NWS Menu OPS-323
View Menu OPS-324
Node Working Panels OPS-352
Overview OPS-322

Software Overview

Software Overview Index

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Physical Tree ISU-81


Resizing the NexSys Window ISU-80
Title ISU-80
Tool Bar OPS-325
Buttons OPS-325
Toolbar ISU-81
Version Number ISU-80
O
OAT Deadband SSU-175
Occupied Cooling Setpoint SSU-147, 171
Occupied Heating Setpoint SSU-147, 171
Occupied Mode SSU-146, 170
Offset SSU-148, SSU-171
One Shot Block PRO-274
OPC LonWorks Server SWO-23
OR Block PRO-288
Overview SWO-6
P
Parallel Fan SSU-154
Password SSU-146, 169, 170
PC Configurations ISU-32
PCC-10 ISU-66
PCLTA Card, Full Size
Disabling ISU-65
Removing ISU-65
PCLTA-10 ISU-66
PCLTA-20 ISU-66
PEC SSU-131, 140, 164
Editors SSU-132, 141, 165
Global Information SSU134, 143, 168, 190
Physical Tree SSU-131, 140, 164, OPS-326
Configuration Properties OPS-345
Controller Nodes OPS-334
Setup Node OPS-341
LMOs OPS-344
Lon Mark Object (LMO) OPS-344
Network Variables OPS-344
NexSys Network Interface Node OPS-326
Connection Description Template (CDT)
SSU-114
Points OPS-342
Routers OPS-333
PID SSU-154
PID Loop SSU-152

vi

Software Overview

Rev 2.0

PID Loop Block PRO-276


PING ISU-53
Plug-Ins SSU-99
Registering A Plug-In SSU-99
Running A Plug-In SSU-100
Point SWO-7
Point Blocks PRO-295 to PRO-299
Point State Block PRO-298
Points
Adding FSC/FLC Points OPS-342
Deleting FSC/FLC Points OPS-343
Detail Panel OPS-346
Editing FSC/FLC Points OPS-343
Status/Command Panels OPS-347
Working Panels OPS-346
Polarity SSU-180
Pop-Up Menus SWO-11
Shortcut Menus SWO-11
Printer Setup SWO-18
Proportional Gain SSU-148, 153, 172, 175
Psychro Block PRO-277
Pull-Down Menus SWO-10, 11
R
Radio Buttons SWO-12
Ramp Block PRO-277
RAS
Client ISU-53
Dial the Server ISU-58
Dialin Information ISU-53
Disconnect a Remote Site ISU-59
Installing ISU-46
Setting to Automatic Start ISU-50
User Login Privileges ISU-51
Refresh Schedules PRO-309
Reheat Decrement SSU-154
Reheat Increment SSU-154
Relay - Analog Block PRO-278
Replace Node SSU-105
Reset Block PRO-279
Resource Files ISU-76
Adding ESUSA Resources to Catalog ISU-76
Reverse SSU-180
Reverse Acting Block PRO-276
Reverse Action SSU-153
Right Click SWO-7
Rolling Average Block PRO-280

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Rev 2.0

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Router
Bridge Router SSU-120
Configured Router SSU-120
Learning Router SSU-120
Permanent Bridge Router SSU-120
Permanent Repeater Router SSU-120
Repeater Router SSU-120
Router Classification Types SSU-120
Routers OPS-333
Add At End Command OPS-335
Configuration Data Sets OPS-334
Types of Routers OPS-334
Runtime Block PRO-281
RX ISU-60
S
Scan Rate SSU-149, 153, 172
Scan Time SSU-176
Schedule
Add PRO-305
Create PRO-305
Entering Values PRO-306
Delete PRO-308
Edit PRO-308
Pop-up Menu PRO-305
Rename PRO-308
Viewing PRO-304
Schedule Block PRO-282
Schedules OPS-350
Add OPS-351
Copy To FSC OPS-352
Delete OPS-352
Rename OPS-352
Scheduling PRO-304
Schedule CPL Block PRO-304
Schedule Subtree PRO-304
Summary Schedule List PRO-304
Scroll Bars SWO-8
Scroll Box SWO-8
Select SWO-7
Select Hi/Lo/Average Block PRO-271
Sequencer Block PRO-283
Serial Fan SSU-154
Service Pin SSU-103, 132, 141, 165
Set Time/Day On Node SSU-109
Setpoint SSU-177
Setpoint Controller SSU-148, 172

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.

Software Overview Index

Setup Node SSU-103


Shortcut Menus SWO-16
SMX
1250 Transceiver Board ISU-65
78K Transceiver Board ISU-65
DFOM Transceiver Board ISU-65
SNVT APP-374, APP-378
Space Temperature SSU-135, 145, 169
Spin Boxes SWO-12
Square Root Block PRO-295
Stages SSU-178
Standard Network Variable Types APP-374
Standby State SSU-215
Start Menu SWO-17
Start-Up Procedure ISU-76
Exiting LNServer ISU-82
Exiting NWS ISU-82
Starting LNServer ISU-78
Starting LNServer And NWS Together ISU78
Starting NWS ISU-78
Start/Stop Block PRO-284
Starting LNServer APP-400
Starting NexSys ISU-78, 79
Startup Block PRO-284
Status Send Interval SSU-135
Subtract Block PRO-295
Swipe SWO-7
System Status Window APP-402
T
Task Bar SWO-16
TCP/IP ISU-36, 37, 49, 55
Thermal Load SSU-148, 172
Thermistor SSU-145, 169
Time Blocks PRO-299
Time Broadcast Interval SSU-135
Time Event Block PRO-284
Time Mode SSU-146, 170
Time Zone Offset SSU-135
Title Bar APP-400
Tree Poll Thread Window APP-402
Trend Setup Panel OPS-354
Trending OPS-354
Types Of Trending OPS-355
Two Position Block PRO-266
TX ISU-60

Software Overview

vii

Software Overview Index

NexSys Workstation Users Guide

Rev 2.0

U
UI (User Interface) Window APP-402
Units SSU-146, 170
Unoccupied Cooling Setpoint SSU-148, 171
Unoccupied Heating Setpoint SSU-148, 171
User Connection Window APP-401
User Mode SSU-146, 170
W
Window
Maximize SWO-9
Minimize SWO-9
Move SWO-9
Resize SWO-9
Restore SWO-9
Windows NT SWO-19
Accessing Information
Pull-Down Menus SWO-10
Copy an Object SWO-16
Create a Folder SWO-16
Delete a Folder SWO-16
Desktop SWO-14
Find an Object SWO-17
Hardware SWO-6
Move an Object SWO-16
MS DOS Window SWO-18
Overview SWO-14
Recycle Bin SWO-16
Rename an Object SWO-16
Screen Breakdown
Cursor SWO-7
Scroll Bars SWO-8
Windows SWO-9
Windows NT Help SWO-15
X
XOR Block PRO-288

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Software Overview

2000 Johnson Controls, Inc.