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CRWT 2301.001
Fledging the Blackbird: An Introduction
to Creative Writing

W 12:30-3:15 JO 4.708 Fall 2008


Professor Contact Information:
Solana DeLamant
e-mail:worddancer@msn.com phone: 972.883.2250
Office: JO 4.904 Office hours: Mon.
3:30-4:30 p.m
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Thirteen Ways of Looking At A Blackbird


by Wallace Stevens

I
Among twenty snowy mountains,
The only moving thing
Was the eye of the blackbird
2
I was of three minds,
Like a tree
In which there are three blackbirds.
3
The blackbird whirled in the autumn winds.
It was a small part of the pantomime.
4
A man and a woman
Are one.
A man and a woman and a blackbird
Are one.
5
I do not know which to prefer,
The beauty of inflections
Or the beauty of innuendoes,
The blackbird whistling
Or just after.
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6
Icicles filled the long window
With barbaric glass.
The shadow of the blackbird
Crossed it, to and fro.
The mood
Traced in the shadow
An indecipherable cause.
7
O thin men of Haddam,
Why do you imagine golden birds?
Do you not see how the blackbird
Walks around the feet of the women about you?
8
I know noble accents
And lucid, inescapable rhythms;
But I know, too,
That the blackbird is involved
In what I know.
9
When the blackbird flew out of sight,
It marked the edge
Of one of many circles.
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10
At the sight of blackbirds
Flying in a green light,
Even the bawds of euphony
Would cry out sharply.
11
He rode over Connecticut
In a glass coach.
Once, a fear pierced him,
In that he mistook
The shadow of his equipage
For blackbirds.
12
The river is moving.
The blackbird must be flying.
13
It was evening all afternoon.
It was snowing
And it was going to snow.
The blackbird sat
In the cedar-limbs.
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Course Syllabus and Policy Statement


Course Description:
How do we define elements of good writing in poems, flash fiction, creative non-fiction
and short stories? How do we apply the identified elements to our own writing?
Introduction to Creative Writing will investigate the creative processes used in writing
various types of works. Our examination will include traditional and experimental forms.
The student will exhibit an understanding of appropriate workshop etiquette and critique
processes. Student demonstration of an understanding and application of the creative
process will include analysis and discussions of published works in each genre, creation
of new student works, critique of student works, select and arrange a chapbook of work,
and present a translation of a single student work into another art media.

Student Learning Objectives/Outcomes:


The Learner will recognize and discuss the essential elements of each writing genre.
(Knowledge and Comprehension-Thinking Skills Levels 1 and 2)
The Learner will employ in their original writing after examining the writing strategies of
published writers. (Application and Analysis, Thinking Skills Levels 3 and 4).
The Learner will choose and compose a manuscript of his/her own work and identify
several journals appropriate to their work for submission. (Synthesis-Thinking Skills
Level 5)
The Learner will produce and present a translation of one original work into another
artistic media. (Synthesis-Thinking Skills Level 5)
The Learner will evaluate the basic creative writing techniques of established and
experimental works in each genre. (Evaluation-Thinking Skills Level 6)

Required Text Books and Materials:


Kenneth Koch, Making Your Own Days
Janet Burroway, Writing Fiction
Wallace Stevens, The Necessary Angel: Essays on Reality and The Imagination
Ramazani, Ellman, and O'Clair, The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary
Poetry, Third Edition
Nguyen and Shreve, The Contemporary American Short Story
Recommended: John Drury, The Poetry Dictionary, Natalie Goldburg, Writing Down the
Bones.
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Additional Requirements:
Access to a computer and a printer, an e-mail account, access to WebCT at UTDallas, a
writing journal, preferable bound with archival quality paper.
All Hand-Outs, messages, and other assignments will by given out in class or posted
on WebCT.
Semester Assignments:
Students will write a personal aesthetic statement. (Pre Test)
Students will participate in a weekly poem created by “CUT UP” technique based on the
students choice of one line from the weekly assigned reading material and one original
line.
Students will write one paper analyzing the essential elements of one writer chosen from
the semester reading list. (term paper)
Students will memorize and recite one selection of at least ten lines (poem) or one
paragraph (prose).
Student will write one finished poem, flash fiction, essay, or short story, translate it into
another art media, and present both works, explaining the techniques and aesthetics
employed in the process.
Students will revise their aesthetic statements. (Post Test)
Academic Calendar:
Class 1- Wed., August 27, 2008
Focus: The Exquisite Corpse
Discuss: Introductions and Nuts and Bolts.
Instructional Input: Course syllabus, course goals, assignments, and policies. Explain
workshop rules and the “Encourage, Empower, and Challenge” critique structure.
Describe creating a poem using: Cut Up” technique. Explanation of Blackbird class
structure. Lecture and PowerPoint on Wallace Stevens and “Thirteen Ways to Look at a
Blackbird.”
Journal Break: Anne Waldman exercise
Journal Sharing: The student will share journal writing on assigned exercise.
Assignment for Wk 2: Read and be ready to discuss Koch, Part 1: Ch. 1 and 2. Stevens:
Ch. I: The Noble Rider and the Sound of Words. Bring to class one favorite line and one
original line for “Cut Up.” Norton: Vol. 1, p.235: Wallace Stevens. Norton: Vol 2, p. 261:
Kenneth Koch.
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Class 2-Wed., September 3, 2008


Focus: The Exquisite Corpse
Discuss: Apply Steven’s poem line to topic of discussion. The student will discuss
reading assignment. Apply Steven’s poem line to topic of discussion.
Haiku-like section> discuss form and history of Haiku and Renga
I
Among twenty snowy mountains,
The only moving thing
Was the eye of the blackbird excerpt, Wallace Stevens
Journal break: Exercise assignment: Rick Jackson’s 5 Easy Pieces.
Journal sharing: The student will share journal writing assignment based on assigned
exercise.
Instructional Input: Koch reading assignment: Line, Meter, Rhythm, Syntax, received
forms (WOW Writing Poetic forms) Charles Baudelaire: “Paris Spleen, The Flowers of
Evil” abstract image of Baudelaire>Whitman (against the short line and structure of the
British Romantics)>Lecture on W.S. Merwin (musicality).
WebCT: Rhythm and Repetition: Michael Ryan: “Poem at Thirty,” Marvin Bell: “The
Dead Man poems,” Gwendolyn Brooks: "We Real Cool" W.H. Auden: “Time Can Say
Nothing” (Villanelle).
Assignment for Wk 3: Read Koch Part I, Ch. 3 and 4. Stevens: Ch. III. Three Academic
Pieces. Re-work journal entry. Bring to class a favorite line from readings. Norton: (Vol.
1) p.1. Walt Whitman; (VOL 2.), p. 408. W.S. Merwin. Vol. 2, p. 140: Gwendolyn
Brooks. Write: P of P. p.42.

Class 3-Wed., September 10, 2008


Student Aesthetic Statements are due at the beginning of class.
Focus: The Exquisite Corpse
Discuss: Apply Steven’s poem line to topic of discussion. The student will discuss
reading assignment. Discussion on Imagism
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2
I was of three minds,
Like a tree
In which there are three blackbirds. excerpt, Wallace Stevens
Journal Break: McKean exercise
Journal Sharing: The student will share journal writing based on exercise assignment.
Instructional Input: Discuss reading assignments, The Image Narrative, and the poetics
of WS. Merwin
WebCT: Pattiann Rogers (scientific language used to discuss other issues), John
Ashberry: “What is Poetry?” David St. John: “For George Trakl,” Mark Strand: “Eating
Poetry,”
Assignment for Wk 4: Read Koch Part II, Chapter 1,2,and 3. Stevens: Ch II. The
Figure of the Youth as Virile Poets. The student will revise journal writing and bring to
next class a favorite line from readings. Norton: Vol 2, p. 1053 Charles Olsen,
"Projective Verse." p. 620: Mark Strand . P of P, P.135

Class 4- Wed., September 17, 2008


Focus: The Exquisite Corpse
Discuss: Apply Steven’s poem line to topic of discussion. assigned readings.
Discussion on Cubism.
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The blackbird whirled in the autumn winds.
It was a small part of the pantomime. excerpt, Wallace Stevens
Journal Break: exercise provided
Journal Sharing: The student will share journal writing based on exercise assignment.
WebCT: Olson’s Projective Verse. Hugo: “Writing Off the Subject.”
Assignment for Wk 5: Stevens: Ch. V. Effects of Analogy. Norton: Vol. 2, p.256
Richard Hugo. Norton: Vol. 1,p.1000: W.H. Auden, "Writing." P of P, P. 54-55: Writing
Off the Spectrum.
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Class 5-Wed., September 24, 2008


Focus: The Exquisite Corpse
Discuss: Apply Steven’s poem line to topic of discussion. The student will discuss
readings. discussion on Nominalism
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A man and a woman
Are one.
A man and a woman and a blackbird
Are one. excerpt, Wallace Stevens
Journal Break: translation into another genre: The Peasant Wedding by Brueghel
(painting).
Journal Sharing: The student will share journal writing exercise assignment.
Instructional Input: “no ideas but in things.” “It‘s All Middle.” Ralph Angel. Gertrude
Stein: “Tender Buttons.” Lecture on Anne Carson, components of Language poetry
(Graham) and fusing genres (Carson)
Handout: Assignment for Wk 6: Jorie Graham: “Le Manteau du Pascal,” I was Taught
Three,” and other poems. Anne Carson: “The Glass Essay.”
Assignment for Wk 6: Stevens: Ch. VII: The Relations between Poetry and Painting.
Norton: Vol. 1, p. 176, Gertrude Stein, Vol. 1, p. 545, p. 986. ee.cummings, Vol. 2, p.
909, Charles Bernstein., Norton: Vol. 2, p. 919: Jorie Graham, Norton: Vol 2.,p.933:
Anne Carson.

Class 6- Wed., October 1, 2008


DUE: next week Student Paper # 1.
Focus: The Exquisite Corpse
Discuss: Apply Steven’s poem line to topic of discussion. Discussion on Perspectivism
The student will discuss the components of Language poetry (Graham) and fusing genres
(Carson) and the processes of translating genres.
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I do not know which to prefer,
The beauty of inflections
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Or the beauty of innuendoes,


The blackbird whistling
Or just after. excerpt, Wallace Stevens
Journal Break: exercise: Homophonic Translation.
Journal Sharing: The student will share journal writing based on exercise assignment
Instructional Input: , Norton, Vol. 1, p.291: William Carlos Williams: “Spring and All,”
"Pictures from Bruegel." Vol. 2, p. 384, John Ashbery, "The Instruction Manual."
Handout: Russell Edson’s poems, Sentence issues.
Assignment for Wk 7: Stevens: Ch.VI. Imagination as Value. Norton: Vol. 2, p. 384,
John Ashbery.

Class 7- Wed. October 8, 2008


DUE: Student paper # 1. Analysis of a poem by one of the poets studied during the
semester.
Focus: The Exquisite Corpse
Discuss: Apply Steven’ line to topic of discussion. The student will discuss reading
assignment. Discussion of Sensationalism (The Use of the Senses)
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Icicles filled the long window
With barbaric glass.
The shadow of the blackbird
Crossed it, to and fro.
The mood
Traced in the shadow
An indecipherable cause. excerpt Wallace Stevens

Journal Break: exercise: The Short Narrative Poem


Journal Sharing: The student will share journal writing on assigned exercise.
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Instructional Input: Lecture on The Craft of Copy-Writing: guest lecturer: Barrie


Neller.
Assignment for Wk 8: Using an original self-produced poem or prose work, the student
will extract the essential idea of the piece into one sentence.

Class 8- Wed., October 15, 2008


Focus: The Exquisite Corpse
Discuss: Apply Steven’s poem line to topic of discussion and discuss reading
assignments.
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O thin men of Haddam,
Why do you imagine golden birds?
Do you not see how the blackbird
Walks around the feet of the women about you? excerpt Wallace Stevens
Journal Break: TLW choose a memory write its essence as a haiku. Haiku by Kerouac,
Basho (“Learn from the Pine”),
Journal Sharing: The student will share journal writing on assigned exercise.
Instructional Input: Guest lecturer: Ann Howells, Prose poetry and the 55s
Assignment for Wk 9: TLW write a prose piece using the flash fiction requirements and
either the 200 word or the 54 word form.

Class 9-Wed., October 22, 2008


Focus: The Exquisite Corpse paragraph
Discuss: Apply Steven’s poem line to topic of discussion and readings assignments. Link
to Thomas Albert music link: http://www.thomasalbert.net/ and link to
http://www.eighthblackbird.com/....click to thirteen ways album for music excerpts

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I know noble accents
And lucid, inescapable rhythms;
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But I know, too,


That the blackbird is involved
In what I know. excerpt Wallace Stevens
Journal Break: Create a world; give it shape in 750 words.
Journal Sharing: The student will share journal writing on assigned exercise.
Instructional input: Lecture by rjs: The Bridge Between Poetry and Fiction
Handout: Francois Camoin: “Things I Did to Make it Possible.” John Cheever: “Why I
Write Stories.”
Assignment for Wk 9: Write a list story. Borroway: Ch. 1: Whatever Works. Ch. 2. The
Tower and the Net, Ch.3, Showing and Telling.

Class 10-Wed. October 29, 2008


Focus: The Exquisite Corpse Writing
Discuss: Students will discuss application of Stevens’ poem and reading assignments.
link to http:/ ethandraws.blogspot.com/search?q=blackbird
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When the blackbird flew out of sight,
It marked the edge
Of one of many circles. excerpt Wallace Stevens
Journal Break: Students will practice "beginning in the middle" by writing an exercise
with a given first line: "Where were you last night?"
Journal Sharing: Students will share their exercise assignment.
Discuss: Apply Steven’s poem line to topic of discussion and reading assignments.
Instructional Input: Character and Plot.
Assignment for Wk 11: Borroway: Chapter 4: Book People, Ch. 5: The Flesh Made
Word. Nguyen and Shreve: Plot: Flannery O'Conner: “A Good Man is Hard to Find,”
and Dorothy Allison: "River of Names. Character: Raymond Carver, "Cathedral," and
Junot Diaz: "Fiesta, 1980." Dialogue: Joyce Carol Oates: "Where Are You Going, Where
Have You Been?"
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Class 11- Wed. November 5, 2008


Focus: The Exquisite Corpse Writing
Discuss: Apply Steven’s poem line to topic of discussion and reading assignments.
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At the sight of blackbirds
Flying in a green light,
Even the bawds of euphony
Would cry out sharply. excerpt Wallace Stevens

Journal Break: Creating a Character's Background, Place, Setting, and Milieu, p. 66


Journal Sharing: The student will share journal writing on assigned exercise.
Instructional Input: Scene lecture
Assignment for Wk 12: Burroway: Ch. 6: Far, Far Away: Fictional Place. Nguyen and
Shreve: Leslie Marmon Silko: "Yellow Woman." Alice Walker: "Everyday Use." Sandra
Cisneros: "The Monkey Garden." (Symbol) Louise Erdrich: "The Red Convertible."
(Extra readings: Leslie Marmon Silko: Norton: Vol. 2.,p. 879. Louise Erdrich: Norton,
Vol. 2, p. 1004)

Class 12-Wed. November 12, 2008


DUE: nest week Paper # 2.
Focus: The Exquisite Corpse Writing
Discuss: Apply Steven’s poem line to topic of discussion and reading assignments.
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He rode over Connecticut
In a glass coach.
Once, a fear pierced him,
In that he mistook
The shadow of his equipage
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For blackbirds. excerpt Wallace Stevens


Journal Break: SDL provided exercise
Journal Sharing: The student will share journal writing on assigned exercise.
Instructional Input: Show Movie: Vantage Point (2 hrs, 40 min.)
Assignment for Wk 13: Burroway: Chapter 7: The Tower and the Net. Ch. 8: Assorted
Liars. Nguyen and Shreve: Donald Barthelme: "The School," and Pam Houston, "How to
Talk to a Hunter," (Structure) Margaret Atwood, "Happy Endings," John Cheever, "The
Swimmer."

Class 13-Wed. November 19, 2008


DUE: Student paper on the analysis of a short story by one of the writers studied
during the semester.
Focus: The Exquisite Corpse Writing
Discuss: Apply Steven’s poem line to topic of discussion and reading assignments. link
to http:/www.edwardpicot.com/thirteenways (computer generated movie)
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The river is moving.
The blackbird must be flying. excerpt Wallace Stevens
Journal Break: SDL provided exercise
Journal Sharing: The student will share journal writing on assigned exercise.
Instructional Input: Experimental Fiction
WebCT: Sojourn 19 author. T.C. Boyle: “If the River was Whisky,” “Caviar.”
Assignment for Wk 14: Write a short story or poem of any genre using tabloid headlines
(provided). Borroway: Ch. 9. Is And Is Not. Ch. 10: I Gotta Use Words When I Talk To
You. Nguyen and Shreve: Voice: Sherman Alexie: Because My Father Always Said He
Was the Only Indian Who Saw Jimi Hendrix Play "The Star Spangled Banner." Grace
Paley, "Wants." (Extra Reading: Norton, Vol 2, p. 1966: Sherman Alexie)

Class 14-Wed. November 26, 2008


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Revised Student Aesthetic Statements are due at the beginning of class.


Focus: The Exquisite Corpse
Discuss: Apply Steven’s poem line to topic of discussion and reading assignments. play
Blackbirds by Gregory Yountz For Flute and Bassoon. Narrator recites each of the
Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird and instruments interpret each poem.
EditionVIENTO Cat. no.: EV 223.
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It was evening all afternoon.
It was snowing
And it was going to snow.
The blackbird sat
In the cedar-limbs. excerpt Wallace Stevens
Journal Break: In two or three sentences, write down three unusual, startling, or
amusing things you did or that happened to you. One thing must be true; the other two
must be lies.
Journal Sharing: The student will share journal writing on assigned exercise.
Instructional Input: Semester Wrap-Up, Presentation expectations, and Evaluation.
Assignment for Wk 15: Burroway: Ch. 11: Play It Again, Sam. Prepare double media
student presentations and manuscripts.

Class 15- Wed., December 3, 2008


Student Presentations. Turn in manuscripts and make presentations.
Alternative Essays on Writing: Raymond Carver: “On Writing.” Joyce Carol Oates:
“Why is Your Writing so Violent.” Grace Paley: “Wants.” “The Value of Not
Understanding Everything.” Flannery O’Conner: “Writing Short Stories.”
Alternative writing assignment: Write a piece of any genre using the epigraphs
porvided.

COURSE POLICIES
Attendance
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You are expected to be punctual, to attend class daily, and to participate in all in-class
editing, revising, and discussion sessions. Excessive absenteeism (6 absences) will result
in failure of the course. There is no difference between excused or unexcused
absences. Save any absences to use when you are sick or when you have an emergency.
If you find that an unavoidable problem prevents you from attending class, please discuss
the problem with me before you have reached your absence limit.

Late Assignments and Drafts


Poems, papers, and other out-of-class assignments will be turned in at the time they are
due. If you cannot attend class on the date an assignment is due, arrange to have a
classmate or friend drop it off during scheduled class time. There is no makeup of in-
class work. I do not accept late drafts or late papers. I do not accept poems or papers
via e-mail.

GRADING POLICY:

Grading Matrix Percent


CRWT 2301-12710-001 Fall 2008 of Grade

Course Segmentation

Paper 1 15%
Paper 2 20%
Student Oral Presentation
25%
Accompanied by Hand-in Report
The Exquisite Corpse 5%
Class Participation 10%
Class Attendance 10%
Weekly Journal 15%

Total 100%

Extra Credit - Augmented Journal Assignment 5%


Total of Course Segments + Full Extra Credit 105%
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Course & Instructor Policies


Students will be expected to read and be prepared to discuss all assigned readings and to
complete all assigned writing exercises. Failure to perform these assignments will have a
negative effect upon the student’s class participation grade. All written assignments
including exercises must be typed, double spaced, and legible. Work submitted after the
due date will be accepted, but the grade on the assignment will be lowered one full letter
grade, and the professor will not make editorial comments on late work. In addition, the
professor will not accept handwritten work or work submitted by email. Class
attendance and participation in discussions and workshop sessions are mandatory.
Attendance will be checked each week, and a student who misses more than 3 classes
should not expect to receive a passing grade. (3 absences in this class are equivalent to 9
classes in as course that meets for one hour 3 times a week.) NOTE: No make-up work
will be assigned; no extra credit projects will be offered, and no absences will be excused
except those mandated by the administration of this university.

No exams will be given in this workshop class. In lieu of a final exam, each student will
select one original story to submit to a journal or possible publication and submit proof of
submission in the form of a mailing receipt to the professor on or before the final exam
date.

Student Conduct & Discipline


The University of Texas System and The University of Texas at Dallas have rules and
regulations for the orderly and efficient conduct of their business. It is the responsibility
of each student and each student organization to be knowledgeable about the rules and
regulations, which govern student conduct and activities. General information on student
conduct and discipline is contained in the UTD publication, A to Z Guide, which is
provided to all registered students each academic year.

The University of Texas at Dallas administrates student discipline within the procedures
of recognized and established due process. Procedures are defined and described in the
Rules and Regulations, Board of Regents, The University of Texas System, Part 1,
Chapter VI, Section 3, and in Title V, Rules on Student Services and Activities of the
university’s Handbook of Operating Procedures. Copies of these rules and regulations
are available to students in the Office of the Dean of Students, where staff members are
available to assist students in interpreting the rules and regulations (SU 1.602, 972/883-
6391) and online at http://www.utdallas.edu/judicialaffairs/UTDJudicialAffairs-
HOPV.html

A student at the university neither loses the rights nor escapes the responsibilities of
citizenship. He or she is expected to obey federal, state, and local laws as well as the
Regents’ Rules, university regulations, and administrative rules. Students are subject to
discipline for violating the standards of conduct whether such conduct takes place on or
off campus, or whether civil or criminal penalties are also imposed for such conduct.

Academic Integrity
The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty.
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Because the value of an academic degree depends upon the absolute integrity of the work
done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that a student demonstrate a high
standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work.

Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, statements, acts or omissions related
to applications for enrollment or the award of a degree, and/or the submission as one’s
own work or material that is not one’s own. As a general rule, scholastic dishonesty
involves one of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion and/or falsifying
academic records. Students suspected of academic dishonesty are subject to
disciplinary proceedings. Plagiarism, especially from the web, from portions of papers for
other classes, and from any other source is unacceptable and will be dealt with under the
university’s policy on plagiarism (see general catalog for details). This course will use
the resources of turnitin.com, which searches the web for possible plagiarism and is over
90% effective.

Copyright Notice
The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making
of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted materials, including music and
software. Copying, displaying, reproducing, or distributing copyrighted works may
infringe the copyright owner’s rights and such infringement is subject to appropriate
disciplinary action as well as criminal penalties provided by federal law. Usage of such
material is only appropriate when that usage constitutes “fair use” under the Copyright
Act. As a UT Dallas student, you are required to follow the institution’s copyright policy
(Policy Memorandum 84-I.3-46). For more information about the fair use exemption, see
http://www.utsystem.edu/ogc/intellectualproperty/copypol2.htm

Email Use
The University of Texas at Dallas recognizes the value and efficiency of communication
between faculty/staff and students through electronic mail. At the same time, email raises
some issues concerning security and the identity of each individual in an email exchange.
The university encourages all official student email correspondence be sent only to a
student’s U.T. Dallas email address and that faculty and staff consider email from
students official only if it originates from a UTD student account. This allows the
university to maintain a high degree of confidence in the identity of all individual
corresponding and the security of the transmitted information. UTD furnishes each
student with a free email account that is to be used in all communication with university
personnel. The Department of Information Resources at U.T. Dallas provides a method
for students to have their U.T. Dallas mail forwarded to other accounts.

Withdrawal from Class


The administration of this institution has set deadlines for withdrawal of any college-level
courses. These dates and times are published in that semester's course catalog.
Administration procedures must be followed. It is the student's responsibility to handle
withdrawal requirements from any class. In other words, I cannot drop or withdraw any
student. You must do the proper paperwork to ensure that you will not receive a final
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grade of "F" in a course if you choose not to attend the class once you are enrolled.

Student Grievance Procedures


Procedures for student grievances are found in Title V, Rules on Student Services and
Activities, of the university’s Handbook of Operating Procedures. In attempting to
resolve any student grievance regarding grades, evaluations, or other fulfillments of
academic responsibility, it is the obligation of the student first to make a serious effort to
resolve the matter with the instructor, supervisor, administrator, or committee with whom
the grievance originates (hereafter called “the respondent”). Individual faculty members
retain primary responsibility for assigning grades and evaluations. If the matter cannot be
resolved at that level, the grievance must be submitted in writing to the respondent with a
copy of the respondent’s School Dean. If the matter is not resolved by the written
response provided by the respondent, the student may submit a written appeal to the
School Dean. If the grievance is not resolved by the School Dean’s decision, the student
may make a written appeal to the Dean of Graduate or Undergraduate Education, and the
deal will appoint and convene an Academic Appeals Panel. The decision of theAcademic
Appeals Panel is final. The results of the academic appeals process will be distributed to
all involved parties. Copies of these rules and regulations are available to students in the
Office of the Dean of Students, where staff members are available to assist students in
interpreting the rules and regulations.

Incomplete Grade Policy


As per university policy, incomplete grades will be granted only for work unavoidably
missed at the semester’s end and only if 70% of the course work has been completed. An
incomplete grade must be resolved within eight (8) weeks from the first day of the
subsequent long semester. If the required work to complete the course and to remove the
incomplete grade is not submitted by the specified deadline, the incomplete grade is
changed automatically to a grade of F.

Disability Services
The goal of Disability Services is to provide students with disabilities educational
opportunities equal to those of their non-disabled peers. Disability Services is located in
room 1.610 in the Student Union. Office hours are Monday and Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to
6:30 p.m.; Tuesday and Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.; and Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30
p.m.

The contact information for the Office of Disability Services is:


The University of Texas at Dallas, SU 22
PO Box 830688
Richardson, Texas 75083-0688
(972) 883-2098 (voice or TTY)
disabilityservice@utdallas.edu

If you anticipate issues related to the format or requirements of this course, please meet
with the Coordinator of Disability Services. The Coordinator is available to discuss ways
to ensure your full participation in the course. If you determine that formal, disability-
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related accommodations are necessary, it is very important that you be registered with
Disability Services to notify them of your eligibility.
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I have read the policies for Introduction to Creative Writing and understood them. I agree to
comply with the policies for the Fall 2008 semester. I realize that failure to comply with these
policies will result in a reduced grade the course.

Signature: ______________________ Date: ________________________

Name (print): __________________________