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A PRO1ECT REPORT

Submitted by
RIZMA KARIM
122602069
in partial fulfilment of the requirement of Anna University, Chennai
for the award of the degree
of
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
IN
SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
SRI KRISHNA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY,
COIMBATORE-641008
(An Autonomous Institution)
MARCH 2014
A STUDY ON PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL OF THE
EMPLOYEES AT AIRPORTS AUTHORITY OF INDIA,
SOUTHERN REGION, CHENNAI.
SRI KRISHNA COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY
SUGUNAPURAM, COIMBATORE-641008
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
PRO1ECT REPORT
MARCH 2014
This is to certify that the report entitled
PRO1ECT UNDERGONE AT
AIRPORTS AUTHORITY OF INDIA, SOUTHERN
REGION, CHENNAI
is the bonafide record of training undergone by
RIZMA KARIM
122602069
of MBA degree during the year 2012-2014.
......... ..........
HO irector

!ub"itted for the #i$a-#oce e%a"ination held on ........
......... .................
&nternal '%a"iner '%ternal '%a"iner
DECLARATION
& affir" that the pro(ect undergone at AIRPORTS AUTHORITY OF INDIA, SOUTHERN
REGION, CHENNAI, being sub"itted in partial fulfil"ent for the a)ard of MBA degree is
the original )or* carried out by "e. &t has not for"ed the part of any other pro(ect sub"itted
for a)ard of any degree or diplo"a+ either in this or any other ,ni$ersity.
-&.MA /A-&M
122002001

& certify that the declaration "ade abo$e by the candidate is true.
esignation
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
&t is )ith great enthusias" and learning spirit that & a" bringing out this pro(ect report. & also
feel that it is the right opportunity to ac*no)ledge the support and guidance that ca"e fro"
$arious 2uarters during the period of "y pro(ect.
& e%press "y sincere gratitude to Dr. S. Annadurai, 3rincipal+ !ri /rishna college of
'ngineering and Technology+ 4oi"batore for pro$iding e%cellent opportunity to undergo the
pro(ect.
& e%tend "y sincere than*s to Prof. Dr. K. Nagarajan, Head of epart"ent, !chool of
Manage"ent+ !ri /rishna 4ollege of 'ngineering and Technology+ 4oi"batore for his support
and encourage"ent to underta*e the pro(ect.
& a" fore$er indebted to "y guide+ Dr. D. Visagamoorthy, Assistant 3rofessor+ !chool of
Manage"ent+ !ri /rishna 4ollege of 'ngineering and Technology+ 4oi"batore for pro$iding
$aluable suggestions and for guiding "e throughout the pro(ect.
& also e%press "y hearty than*s to "y corporate guide Mrs R.S Sundari, Airports Authority
of India, Southern Region, Chennai and other staff "e"bers of the Organisation for
i""ense support and to the organisation for gi$ing "e an opportunity to co"plete "y pro(ect
5inhouse6 training.
7inally+ & than* all "y fa"ily "e"bers and friends )ho supported "e for the successful
co"pletion of "y pro(ect.
Chapter
No.
Title Page No.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
& Introduction
1.1 About the pro(ect
1.2 &ndustry profile
1.8 4o"pany profile
1.4 9iterature re$ie)
1.: Ob(ecti$es
1.0 !cope of the pro(ect
&& Research Methodology
2.1 -esearch esign
2.2 ata 4ollection
2.8 3ri"ary ata
2.4 !econdary ata
2.: &nstru"ent esign
2.0 !a"pling Techni2ue
2.; !tatistical tools used
2.< 9i"itations
&&& Data Analysis and Interpretation
8.1 Analysis and interpretation
8.2 !u""ary of 7indings
&# Suggestions and Recommendations
4.1 !uggestions
4.2 -eco""endations
# Conclusions
#& Bibliography
0.1 Anne%ure &
0.2 Anne%ure &&
TABLE OF CONTENTS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This pro(ect report is a re$ie) based on theory as )ell as the industry outloo* of
3erfor"ance Appraisal !yste" of the Organi=ation a"ong e"ployees of AA&+ 4hennai. The
report starts )ith the &ntroduction and 9iterature -e$ie) of 3erfor"ance Appraisal !yste"
that outlines its History+ efinitions+ purposes+ process+ "ethods+ para"eters of e$aluation and
the essentials of an effecti$e Appraisal !yste".
7urther the 3erfor"ance Appraisal !yste" of AA&+ 4hennai+ collected through
$arious pri"ary and secondrary sources ha$e been included in the report )hich gi$es a fair
idea of the *ind of Appraisal !yste" being follo)ed in the organi=ation. My research )or*
includes one 2uestionnaire.
3erfor"ance Appraisal >uestionnaire
My research includes the research "ethodology )hich contains the infor"ation
as follo)s?
-esearch ob(ecti$es
!a"pling 5types and "ethods of sa"pling6
-esearch instru"ent
ata used
ata analysis and interpretation
9i"itation of sur$ey
ata analysis and interpretation
7inding and suggestions
9ast+ the conclusions and references ha$e been "entioned.
CHAPTER I
1. INTRODUCTION
3erfor"ance appraisal can be an effecti$e instru"ent for helping people gro) and
de$elop in organi=ational setting. &t is a syste" through )hich perfor"ance of e"ployee rated
by his superiors or personnel depart"ent. &t could be used as a "echanis" of continuing
education and learning fro" one another. Through a )ell-organi=ed appraisal syste" an
e"ployee can create learning space for hi"self in an organi=ation. -ecent researches and
e%perience ha$e sho)n that de$elop"ent-oriented perfor"ance appraisal and re$ie) syste"+
)hen effecti$ely practiced+ substantially contributes to the organi=ational health and facilitates
"ultiplication of "anagerial resources.
1.1 ABOUT THE PRO1ECT
The pro(ect ai"s to study the Performance Appraisal of the Employees at the
National Airport Division (NAD) in Airports Authority of India, Southern Region,
Chennai. The study ai"s at analy=ing the $arious aspects considered in the syste"+ such as+
e"ployee satisfaction+ i"portance and usefulness of the syste". The appraisal syste" is $ery
essential for re$ie)ing the beha$iour of the e"ployees and also for "a*ing i"portant
decisions li*e salary re$ision and pro"otion. &t also helps in i"pro$e"ent of the indi$iduals
and organi=ation. The study helps to enhance the appraisal syste" )hich in turn helps in
ta*ing effecti$e "anage"ent decisions. &n this study the Performance Appraisal of the
Employees at the @ational Airport i$ision 5@A6 of the Airports Authority of India,
Southern Region, Chennai has been e$aluated to see its effecti$eness.
1.1.1 MEANING OF PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL
&n si"ple ter"s+ perfor"ance appraisal "ay be understood as the assess"ent of an
indi$idualAs perfor"ance in a syste"atic )ay+ the perfor"ance being "easured against such
factors as (ob *no)ledge+ 2uality and 2uantity of output+ initiati$e+ leadership abilities+
super$ision+ dependability+ co-operation+ (udg"ent+ $ersatility+ health and the ali*e.
Assess"ent should not be condensed to past perfor"ance alone. 3otentials of the e"ployee
for future perfor"ance "ust also be assessed.
1.1.2 DEFINITIONS OF PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL
A Formal Definition ?
3erfor"ance appraisal is a syste" by )hich an e"ployeeAs (ob perfor"ance is
"easured against so"e e%pectation or standard. A pri"ary goal of perfor"ance appraisal is to
pro$ide feedbac* to e"ployees on ho) )ell they are doing in their (obs and to pro$ide
direction to future de$elop"ent and acco"plish"ents.
A Comprehensive Definition ?
3erfor"ance appraisal is a for"al+ structured syste" of "easuring and e$aluating an
e"ployeeAs (ob related beha$iors and outco"es to disco$er ho) and )hy the e"ployee is
presently perfor"ing on the (ob and ho) the e"ployee can perfor" "ore effecti$ely in the
future so that the e"ployee+ organi=ation and society all benefit.
Uses of Performance Appraisal
516 'sti"ate the o$erall effecti$eness of e"ployees in perfor"ing their (obs+
526 &dentify strengths and )ea*nesses in (ob *no)ledge and s*ills+
586 eter"ine )hether a subordinateAs responsibilities can be e%panded+
546 &dentify future training and de$elop"ent needs+
5:6 -e$ie) progress to)ard goals and ob(ecti$es+
506 eter"ine readiness for pro"otion+ and
5;6 Moti$ate and guide gro)th and de$elop"ent.
'$ery super$isor practices perfor"ance appraisal--)hether for"ally or infor"ally?
1. &n formal appraisal systems+ the super$isor goes through a periodic process of e$aluating
an e"ployeeAs (ob perfor"ance and co""unicating that e$aluation to the e"ployee.
2. &n an informal system+ the super$isor e$aluates the perfor"ance of e"ployees in hisBher
"ind but seldo" co""unicates those feelings to e"ployees.
1.2 INDUSTRY PROFILE
1.2.1 History
A$iation is the design+ de$elop"ent+ production+ operation+ and use of aircraft+ especially
hea$ier-than-air aircraft.
&ndian A$iation &ndustry is one of the fastest gro)ing airline industries in the )orld. The
history of &ndian A$iation &ndustry started in ece"ber 1112 )ith its first do"estic air route
bet)een /arachi and elhi. &t )as opened by the &ndian Air !er$ices in collaboration )ith the
,/ based &"perial Air)ays as an e%tension of 9ondon-/arachi flight of the &"perial Air)ays.
Tata !ons 9td.+ the first &ndian airline+ started a regular air"ail ser$ice bet)een /arachi and
Madras three years later )ithout any bac*ing fro" the &ndian go$ern"ent.
uring the period of independence+ 1 air transport co"panies )ere carrying both air cargo and
passengers in the &ndian Territory. &n 114<+ the &ndian Co$ern"ent and Air &ndia set up a (oint
sector co"pany+ Air &ndia &nternational to further strengthen the A$iation &ndustry of &ndia. As
part of nationali=ation in 11:8 of &ndian Airlines 5&A6 brought the do"estic ci$il a$iation
sector under the pur$ie) of &ndian Co$ern"ent. 9ater till the "id 1110Ds go$ern"ent-o)ned
airlines do"inated &ndian a$iation industry. Ehen the go$ern"ent adopted the Open-s*y
policy in 1110 and other liberali=ation policies the &ndian A$iation &ndian "ade under)ent a
rapid and dra"atic transfor"ation.
By the year 2000 se$eral pri$ate airlines ha$e entered into the a$iation business in succession
and "any "ore )ere about to enter into the arena. &ndian a$iation industry today is do"inated
by pri$ate airlines and lo)-cost carriers li*e eccan Airlines+ CoAir+ and !piceFet+ etc. And
&ndian Airlines+ the giant of &ndian air tra$el industry+ gradually lost its "ar*et share to these
pri$ate airlines. According to the report of 4A3A+ these budget carriers are li*ely to double
their "ar*et share by 2010 -- one of the highest in the )orld.
&ndia is e%pected to beco"e the fourth biggest "ar*et in ter"s of $alue for all ne) aircraft
deli$eries during the ne%t 20 years+ according to aircraft "a*er Airbus. Therefore+ the a$iation
sector in &ndia is beco"ing highly pro"ising. 7urther+ the liberalisation of the sector in the
"id-nineties has resulted in a re"ar*able gro)th as a large nu"ber of pri$ate ser$ice airlines
entered the sector. A "assi$e boo" in the touris" industry and increasing le$els of disposable
inco"es ha$e gi$en an intense i"petus to the &ndian A$iation industryG the "a(or contributor
being ci$il a$iation. !trong go$ern"ent support and pri$ate participation+ coupled )ith the
a$ailability of s*illed "anpo)er+ and fa$ourable business en$iron"ent ha$e positioned &ndia
as an attracti$e in$est"ent destination on the )orld "ap.
1.2.2 Brief Introduction
&ndian A$iation &ndustry has been one of the fastest-gro)ing a$iation industries in the )orld
)ith pri$ate airlines accounting for "ore than ;: H of the sector of the do"estic a$iation
"ar*et. Eith a co"pound annual gro)th rate 54AC-6 of 1< H and 4:4 airports and airstrips
in place in the country+ of )hich 10 are designated as international airports+ it has been stated
that the a$iation sector )ill )itness re$i$al by 2011.
&n 2001 )ith increase in traffic "o$e"ent and increase in re$enues by al"ost ,!I 21.4
"illion+ the Airports Authority of &ndia see"s set to accrue better "argins in 2001-10+ as per
the latest esti"ates released by the Ministry of 4i$il A$iation. This is being pri"arily
attributed because of the increase in the share of re$enue fro" elhi &nternational Airport
9i"ited 5&A96 and Mu"bai &nternational Airport 9i"ited 5M&A96. 3assengers carried by
&ndian do"estic airlines fro" Fanuary-7ebruary 2010 stood at <+0:0+000 as against 0+;01+000
in the corresponding period of 2001-a gro)th of 11.2 H+ according to a report released by the
Ministry of 4i$il A$iation.
Mean)hile+ &ndia has released its first e$er detailed A$iation 4arbon 7ootprint -eport for
2011+ )hich states that 4O2 e"issions fro" &ndian scheduled airline operations as )ell as
fro" foreign airlines to international destinations represent less than 1 per cent of the countryDs
total 4O2 e"issions+ )hich is significantly lo)er than the global a$erage contribution of
airlines.
Hyderabad &nternational Airport has been ran*ed a"ongst the )orldDs top fi$e in the annual
Airport !er$ice >uality 5A!>6 passenger sur$ey along )ith airports at !eoul+ !ingapore+
Hong /ong and Bei(ing. This airport in Hyderabad is "anaged by a public-pri$ate (oint
$enture consisting of the CM- Croup+ Malaysia Airports Holdings Berhad and both the !tate
Co$ern"ent of Andhra 3radesh and the Airports Authority of &ndia 5AA&6. -ecently+ elhiDs
&ndira Candhi &nternational 5&C&6 Airport has been ran*ed the second-best airport in the )orld
for 2011 by the Airports 4ouncil &nternational. The airport scored this distinction in the
category of airports )ith 2:-40 "illion passengers per annu". 9ast year+ it had been ran*ed
fourth in the sa"e category.
The &ndian a$iation sector can be broadly di$ided into the follo)ing "ain categories?
!cheduled air transport ser$ice includes do"estic and international airlines.
@on-scheduled air transport ser$ice consists of charter operators and air ta%i operators.
Air cargo ser$ice+ )hich includes air transportation of cargo and "ail.
1.2.3 Scheduled air transport service
&t is an air transport ser$ice underta*en bet)een t)o or "ore places and operated according to
a published ti"etable. &t includes?
o"estic airlines+ )hich pro$ide scheduled flights )ithin &ndia and to select
international destinations. Air eccan+ !pice Fet+ /ingfisher Airline and &ndiCo are
so"e of the do"estic players in the industry.
&nternational airlines operate fro" scheduled international air ser$ices to and fro"
&ndia.
1.2.4 Non-scheduled air transport service
&t is an air transport ser$ice other than the scheduled one and "ay be on charter basis andBor
non-scheduled basis. The operator is not per"itted to publish ti"e schedule and issue tic*ets
to passengers.
1.2.5 Air cargo services
&t is an air transportation of cargo and "ail. &t "ay be on scheduled or non-scheduled basis.
These operations are to destinations )ithin &ndia. 7or operation outside &ndia+ the operator has
to ta*e specific per"ission of irectorate Ceneral of 4i$il A$iation de"onstrating his capacity
for conducting such an operation.
1.2.6 Size of the Industry
&ndia is one of the fastest gro)ing a$iation "ar*ets in the )orld. A total of 12; airports in the
country+ )hich include 18 international airports+ ; custo" airports+ <0 do"estic airports and
2< ci$il encla$es are "anaged by The Airport Authority of &ndia 5AA&6. There are about 4:0
airports and 1011 registered aircrafts in &ndia today.
1.2.7 Top Leading Companies
3layers in &ndian a$iation industry can be classified into three groups?
1. 3ublic players
2. 3ri$ate players
8. !tart up players
There are three public players? Air &ndia+ &ndian Airlines and Alliance Air.
The pri$ate players include Fet Air)ays+ Air !ahara+ 3ara"ount air)ays+ Co Air
Airlines+ /ingfisher Airlines+ !pice Fet+ Air eccan and "any "ore.
The start up players is those )hich are planning to enter into the "ar*ets. !o"e of
the" are O"ega Air+ Magic Air+ 3re"ier !tar Air and M9- Airlines.
'"ploy"ent opportunities Today &ndia A$iation &ndustry re2uires appro%i"ately ;+:00-<+000
pilots and an e2ual nu"ber or "ore air cabin cre) by 2010. Hea$y pay pac*ages are a)aiting
pilots )ith a co""ercial pilot license 54396. An a"ateur pilot can start his career )ith a
salary of -s 2.:-8 la*hs a "onth )ith a co""ercial airline. Eith the sudden increase in the
nu"ber of airlines+ pilots are in great de"and.
1.2.8 Aviation sector provides the following types of opportunities
1. 4o""ercial pilot
2. 4o-pilot
8. Air cargo pilot
4. '%pert cabin cre)
:. Air traffic controller
0. 4abin safety instructor
;. &n-flight "anagers
<. &n-flight base "anagers
1. 4abin ser$ices instructor
10. 4abin cre)
11. Training instructor
12. Maintenance controllers
18. 9icensed aircraft "aintenance engineering
14. >uality control "anager.
1:. 4argo officers
10. Cuest ser$ice agent
1;. Cround staff
1.2.9 Growth in the Sector
-ecording the strongest gro)th in the )orld+ &ndiaDs do"estic a$iation "ar*et has tripled in
the past fi$e years+ according to a latest report of the &nternational Air Transport Association
5&ATA6. &ndia posted a strong do"estic gro)th at 2:.0 per cent in the a$iation sector+ and
continuing its trend of high-speed gro)th for a robust "ar*et.
&ndia is the 1th largest a$iation "ar*et in the )orld as per a report+ &ndian Aerospace &ndustry
Analysis+ published by research fir" -@4O!. The &ndian A$iation sector gre) around 18.0
per cent year-on-year in 7J 2010+ )hich )as a"ongst the highest globally. 7urther+ the
go$ern"entDs open s*y policy has attracted "any o$erseas players to enter the "ar*et and the
industry is gro)ing in ter"s of both players and the nu"ber of aircrafts. On the basis of strong
"ar*et funda"entals+ it is anticipated that the ci$il a$iation "ar*et )ill register "ore than 10
per cent 4AC- during 2010-2018.
7urther+ aircraft "aintenance+ repair and o$erhaul 5M-O6 sector is also on a gro)th path in the
country. The sector holds a lot of opportunities for co"panies )ithin the technical ser$ices
outsourcing business do"ain.
The rapidly e%panding a$iation sector handles 2.: billion passengers across the )orld in a
yearG "o$es 4: "illion tonnes of cargo through 120 airlines+ using 4+200 airports and deploys
2;+000 aircraft. Today+ <; foreign airlines fly to and fro" &ndia and fi$e &ndian carriers fly to
and fro" 40 countries.3assengers carried by do"estic airlines during Fan-!ep 2012 5first three
2uarters of calendar year6 )ere 48<.81 la*hs+ according to the latest data released by the
irectorate Ceneral of 4i$il A$iation 5C4A6.
The countryAs pri$ate carriers are e%pected to post a co"bined profit of ,!I 8:0 "illion K
,!I 400 "illion for the financial year ending March 81+ 2012+ as per a report released by the
4entre for A$iation and Airports Authority of &ndia 54A3A &ndia6. 4A3A &ndia e%pects
do"estic traffic gro)th of 1;-1< per cent+ possibly as high as 20 per cent. &nternational
passenger nu"bers+ )hich gre) by about 10 per cent last year+ are e%pected to increase
to)ards the upper end of a 10-12 per cent range o$er the ne%t 12 "onths.
1.2.10 Recent Initiatives and Development
The ,nion Ministry of 7inance has pa$ed the )ay for the i"ple"entation of rela%ed '%ternal
4o""ercial Borro)ing 5'4B6 nor"s announced in the ,nion Budget 2012-18 for the
a$iation sector. '4Bs under this pro$ision )ould ha$e a ceiling of ,!I 1 billion for the sector.
Buoyed by the success of i"ple"entation of public pri$ate partnership 53336 "odel in airport
de$elop"ent+ the Co$ern"ent plans to in$est ,!I 80 billion in ne%t 10 years )ith "ore
e%isting airports being opened up for "odernisation.
Airport retail business in &ndia reached "ore than ,!I 1 billion in re$enue during 2011+ on the
bac* of robust gro)th in passenger traffic and "ore people shopping on the go+ according to
Bangalore-based consulting fir" Asipac 3ro(ects. The business is gro)ing at 1;-1< per cent
annually+ e"erging as a $iable platfor" for retailers and operators of the ne) airports.
&ndira Candhi &nternational Airport+ @e) elhi is the "ost lucrati$e retail location in the
country+ ha$ing generated sales of :+000 per s2uare feet per "onth in 2011+ )hich is al"ost
four ti"es higher than the second-best location. This figure includes sales fro" duty-free
shops and regular shops as )ell. @e) elhi airport is one of the "ost profitable destinations
for brands )ith "ore than 8: "illion passengers using the airport last year.
Mean)hile+ ,!-based aircraft "anufacturer Boeing predicts that &ndia )ill re2uire 1+820 ne)
aircraft $alued at ,!I 1:0 billion o$er the ne%t 20 years.
L&n the last one year+ there has been an increase of I20 billion in the nu"ber of aircraft &ndia
)ill re2uire o$er the ne%t 20 years. This is pri"arily because of gro)th in C3+ de$elop"ent
of infrastructure and increase in the nu"ber of people )illing to fly - be it for $acation or rest
and recreation+M according to r inesh /es*ar+ 3resident+ Boeing &ndia.
7urther+ the #ision 2020 state"ent announced by the Ministry of 4i$il A$iation+ en$isages
creating infrastructure to handle 2<0 "illion passengers by 2020.
1.2.11 Government Initiatives
To create )orld class airports+ the go$ern"ent has recognised the need for the in$ol$e"ent of
pri$ate players in the de$elop"ent of airport infrastructure. e$elop"ent of airports at elhi
and Mu"bai has been ta*en up under 3ublic 3ri$ate 3artnership 53336 "ode.
The capital e%penditure is funded through pri$ate e2uity+ borro)ings+ and internal resources of
(oint $enture co"panies. The de$elop"ent )or* of Mu"bai airport is li*ely to be co"pleted
by 2012 )hereas the )or* of a ne) ter"inal 5Ter"inal 86 at &ndira Candhi &nternational
Airport at elhi got co"pleted in Fuly 2010. The de$elop"ent )or* of /ol*ata and 4hennai
airport has been ta*en up by Airport Authority of &ndia )hereas Bangalore and Hyderabad
international airports ha$e been de$eloped on 333 "ode as Creenfield airports. The AA& has
ta*en up the de$elop"ent of 8: non "etro airports at an esti"ated cost of ,!I ;;;.<0 "illion.
The Co$ern"ent has also de$eloped a "odel concession agree"ent to de$elop Creenfield
airports under the 333 "ode. The go$ern"ent has also allo)ed 100 per cent 7&+ under the
auto"atic route+ for Creenfield airports. 7& up to 41 per cent is allo)ed in the do"estic
airlines sector under the auto"atic route. -ecently+ the Co$ern"ent has rela%ed rules to allo)
foreign carriers to buy up to 41 per cent sta*e in &ndian airlines.
The adoption of Open !*y 3olicy has resulted in the entry of se$eral ne) pri$ately o)ned
airlines and increased fre2uency B flights for international airlines.
1.2.12 SECTOR FACTS
The total nu"ber of airports or airfields recognisable fro" the air is 8:2
The nu"ber of scheduled passenger airline operators has gro)n to 1: and the nu"ber of
aircraft in their fleet has risen to "ore than 400. &nternational flights ha$e increased to ;00
flights per )ee*. ue to enhanced opportunities for international connecti$ity+ 01 foreign
airlines fro" 41 countries are flying into &ndia.
According to the epart"ent of &ndustrial 3olicy and 3ro"otion 5&336+ the 7& inflo) into
air transport 5including air freight6 has been ,!I 48<.28 "illion fro" April 2000 to May
2012.
1.2.13 AAI:
The airports authority of &ndia5AA&6 )as for"ed on 1st April 111: "erging the international
airports authority of &ndia and the national airports authority )ith a $ie) to accelerate the
integrated de$elop"ent+ e%pansion+ "oderni=ation+ operational+ ter"inal and cargo facilities at
the airport of the country confor"ing to international standards.
1.2.14 MODERN AIRPORTS
AA& has indentified 12 i"portant do"estic airports )hich are de$eloped as "odel
airports based on the traffic potential and i"portant for the city+ tourist potential and co$erage
of all the regions in the country. The run)ays at these airports are designed to cater for A-820
operation is )ith standard approach and landing aids+ "odern co""unication and also
na$igational facilities. The "odern airports are (aipur+ luc* no)+ @agpur+ $adodara+ 4alicut+
4oi"batore+ 3atna+ hyderbad+ and i"pal. Apart fro" this+ AA& is de$eloping so"e of the
cardinal airports. These include goa+ Bangalore+ #aranasi+ and Agra.
1.2.15 CUSTOMER SATISFACTION AND SAFETY
4usto"er satisfaction and safety are the core priorities of AA&. &n its endea$our to
pro$ide )orld class passengers a"enities and ser$ices. The authority is de$eloping "ore
international airports in the country and i"pro$ing facilities in do"estic airports.
1.2.16 MODERNISATION
e$eloping )orld class air na$igation infrastructure to effecti$ely "anage air traffic is
an identified thrust area. As part of this dri$e?
The authority is in process of i"ple"enting a #!AT based satellite co""unication
net)or* to connect <0 airports in the country.
!atellite na$igation has also been one of the initiati$es for enhancing the accuracy and
reliability of C3! signal )hich could be gainfully used by other transport sectors.
A phased induction of AT4 auto"ation syste"s and also induction of ne) facilities to
i"pro$e standards of safety at airports.
1.2.17 OFFICIAL LANGUAGE
3rogressi$e use of Hindi for effecti$e i"ple"entation of Official 9anguage Act and -ules is
constantly encouraged. AA& has bagged a nu"ber of pri=es for successful i"ple"entation of
the -AF Bhasha.
1.2.24 FUNCTION OF AIRPORT
4ontrol and "anage"ent of the &ndian airspace e%tending beyond the
territorial li"its of the country+ as accepted by &4AO.
esign+ e$elop"ent+ operation and "aintenance of international and
o"estic Airports and ci$il encla$es.
4onstruction+ Modification and Manage"ent of 3assenger ter"inals
e$elop"ent and Manage"ent of cargo Ter"inals at &nternationals and
do"estic airports.
3ro$ision of passenger facilities and infor"ation syste" at the
passenger ter"inals at airports.
3ro$ision of passenger facilities and infor"ation syste" at the
passenger ter"inals at airports.
'%pansion and strengthening of operation area $i=. run)ays+ Aprons+
ta%i)ays+ etc.
3ro$ision of $isual aids.
3ro$ision of co""unication and @a$igational aids $i=. &9!+#O-+
M'+ -adar+ etc.+
Functional Chart of AAI
Chairman
Compan
y
Secretar
1.3 COMPANY PROFILE
1.3.1 CHENNAI AIRPORT
Directorate
of Aviation
Safety
Directorate
of Project
Monitoring &
Quality
Control
Directorate
of
Informatio
n
technology
Directorate
of
Integrated
Planning
Cell
Departmen
ts under
Board
Memer
!"inance#
Departmen
ts under
Board
Memer
!$peration
s#
Departments
under Board
Memer
!Personnel &
Administration#
Departmen
ts under
Board
Memer
!Planning#
%igilance
Corporat
e &Q
'egional
&Q
Airports
( "inance &
Accounts
( Internal Audit
( )ey
Infrastructure
Development
*roup
( Consultancy &
Coordination
( Commercial
( +and Management
( +a,
( Personnel &
Administration !-ational
Airports Division#
( Personnel &
Administration
!International Airports
Division#
( Pulic 'elations
( -ational Institute of
Aviation Management &
'esearch !-e, Delhi#
Corporate
&Q
Projects
The Airports Authority of &ndia 5AA&6 for"ed by the "erger of &nternational Airports
Authority of &ndia 5&AA&6 and @ational Airports Authority 5@AA6 through Airports Authority
Act+ ca"e into e%istence on 1st April 111: )ith a $ie) to accelerate the integrated
de$elop"ent+ e%pansion and "oderni=ation of the operational+ ter"inal and cargo facilities at
the airports in the country confor"ing to international standards.
One of the "ain functions of AA& is that it is responsible for designing+ constructing+
operating and "aintaining &nternational Airports and o"estic Airports. Besides+ it controls
and "anages the entire &ndian airspace+ 11 international airports+ <1 do"estic airports and 2<
ci$il encla$es in &ndia.
AA& co"es under the pur$ie) of Ministry of 4i$il A$iation )hich is the nodal "inistry
responsible for the for"ulation of national policies and progra""es for de$elop"ent and
regulation of 4i$il A$iation and for de$ising and i"ple"enting sche"es for the orderly
gro)th and e%pansion of ci$il air transport in &ndia. Ministry of 4i$il A$iation is also
"anaging other attached B autono"ous organi=ations li*e irectorate Ceneral of 4i$il
A$iation 5C4A6+ Bureau of 4i$il A$iation !ecurity 5B4A!6+ Air &ndia 9i"ited and &ndian
Airlines 9td.
AA& is located in Meena"ba**a"+ 11*" south of 4hennai. &t has the &ATA airport
code and it is the third "ost i"portant international gate)ay into the country after Mu"bai
and elhi+ and the "ain air hub for south &ndia. &t is also an i"portant 4argo ter"inal for the
country second only he Mu"bai. 4hennai is also a hub airport for Fet air)ays+ &ndian+ air
eccan+ Air !ahara and internationally+ for air &ndia.
4hennai had one of the first airports in &ndia+ and )as the final destination of air &ndiaAs first
flight fro" Bo"bay 5#ia6 Belgiu" in 11:4.
The first passenger ter"inal )as built at the northeast side of the air field+ )hich lies in the
suburb of Meena"ba**a" due to )hich it )as referred to as Meena"ba**a" airport. A ne)
ter"inal co"ple% )as subse2uently built further south near palla$ara" to )hich passenger
operation )ere shifted. The old ter"inal building is no) used as a cargo ter"inal and is the
bare for the &ndian courier co"pany blue dairy.
4hennai Airport consists of three ter"inals of Meena"ba**a" is used for cargo )hile the ne)
passenger ter"inal co"ple% consists of the do"estic and international ter"inals
interconnected by a lin* building+ )hich houses ad"inistrati$e offices and a restaurant. All
thoughA the co"ple% is one continuous structure it )as built at different periods+ the airports
has the honour of being the first &!O 1001-2000 certificates airport in the country )hich it
recei$ed in 2001.
1.3.1.1 Mission
DDTo achie$e highest standards of safety and 2uality in air traffic ser$ices and airport
"anage"ent by pro$iding state-of-the-art infrastructure for total custo"er satisfaction+
contributing to econo"ic gro)th and prosperity of the nation.DD
1.3.1.2 Vision
DDTo be a )orld-class organi=ation pro$iding leadership in air traffic ser$ices and airport
"anage"ent N "a*ing &ndia a "a(or hub in Asia 3acific region by 2010DD.
1.3.2 AIRPORT POLICIES
1.3.2.1 Quality policy
Ee pro$ide to our passengers a safe s"ooth and en(oyable transit through 4hennai airport. Ee
also pro$ide secured and speedy "o$e"ent of international cargo through 4hennai airport
cargo co"ple%.
1.3.2.2 Other policies
!o"e of the i"portant policies as charted by the airports authority of &ndia ha$e been listed
belo) for the infor"ation N a)areness of all the users of the &ndian airports.
Airport !ecurity
O)nership and "anage"ent
3ri$ate sector participation
-ole of the central and state go$ern"ents
4i$il K "ilitary cooperation
Hu"an -esource e$elop"ent
'n$iron"ental &ssues
-egulatory Mechanis"s
,ser and 4o""unity participation
9egal fra"e)or*
Airport &nfrastructure
Air traffic ser$ices
Cround facilities
4argo Handling
4o""ercial Acti$ities
1.3.3 Manpower position at Chennai airport
GROUP
A- 'B belo) to board "e"bers
B - !enior "anager to general "anager
4 - !enior !uperintendent to "anager
K ,p to !enior.Asst
Total
1.3.4 Level of Employees
Executives Non-Executives
'-1-' @'-10-!r.superintendent5!C6
'-<-CM @'-1-!r.superintendent
';-Add.CM @'-< -!uperintendent
'0-CM @'-;-super$isor
':-ACM @'-0-senior assistant
'4-!M @'-:-assistant
'8-Manager @'-4-(unior assistant
'2-A" @'-8-senior attendant
'1-(unior e%ecuti$es @'-2-attendant
@'-1-(unior attendant
1.3.5 Various departments in AAI, Southern Region Chennai
1. epart"ent of finance
2. epart"ent of 4@! 54o""unication @a$igation and !ur$eillance6
8. epart"ent of 4o""ercial
4. epart"ent of 9egal Manage"ent
:. epart"ent of A$iation safety
0. epart"ent of 9and "anage"ent
;. epart"ent of Air Traffic Manage"ent5ATM6
<. epart"ent of &nternal Audit
1. epart"ent of 'ngineering Eing
10. epart"ent of '2uip"ent
11. epart"ent of Hu"an -esource Manage"ent epart"ent
1.3.5.1 DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
7inance is responsible for co"pilation and consolidating of the accounts and re$enue budgets
of all airports in !outhern -egion. Also responsible for "aintaining all "atters related to the
pay and allo)ances of e"ployees of 4hennai and s"all field stations+ 437 Accounts and
4alculations and eduction of inco"e ta% of all the e"ployees. Besides+ responsible to accord
74 for proposals relating to+ re$enue and capital e%penditure fro" all depart"ents of 4hennai
and field stations+ )here$er the financial proposals are beyond the po)ers of station-in-
chargeB )here finance staff are a$ailable. &t carries out pay"ent action for all third party bills
recei$ed fro" 4hennai and other units of !-+ including filling of ta% returns and issue of )or*
contract ta% certificate to third parties. !ub"ission of $arious M&! relating to re$enue+
e%penditure+ ser$ice ta%+ 4&!7 5central industrial security force6+ sundry debtors etc. To 4H>
54orporate Head >uarters6
1.3.5.2 DEPARTMENT OF CNS (Communication Navigation Surveillance)
4@! is responsible for up-*eeping and uninterrupted pro$ision of 4@! and security
e2uip"ents in 28 field stations+ pro$ision of )atch hours+ "onitoring of 4@! returns and
appropriate re"edial actions thereof+ clearing @O4 on 4@! point of $ie) and ensure
a$ailability of )atch and )ard staff in A4! stations.
1.3.5.3 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCIAL
4o""ercial is responsible to pro$ide a greater e"phasis in increasing re$enue order other
than traffic and to pro$ide unifor" and continuous gro)th li*e creating ne) business $entures
at airports through inno$ati$e co""ercial contracts. &t is also responsible for "onitoring of
perfor"ance of contracts and "onitoring of outstanding dues and ti"ely reco$ery of dues.
1.3.5.4 DEPARTMENT OF LEGAL
9a) is responsible for pro$iding legal opinion+ defending AA&As interest in legal "atters in
$arious courts e"panel"ent of ad$ocates+ filing of #a*alath+ &AB4M3B4a$eatBAppeal 5if
re2uired6+ condone petition in the e$ent of ti"e barred cases. &n case of outstanding dues fro"
concessionaries+ ad$ice gi$en to concerned depart"ent regarding filing of reco$ery suit.
1.3.5.5 DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION SAFETY
A#! is responsible for conducting safety audits of all functional AA& o)ned Aerodro"es+
4i$il encla$es and facilities in !-. &t is also responsible for ensuring that facilities li*e AT4+
4@!+ '>+ approach and landing $isual-aids+ -escue and 7ire fighting ser$ice and 'lectrical
installations and -un)ay+ Ta%i)ay are pro$ided and "aintained in confor"ity )ith &4AO
5&nternational 4i$il A$iation Organisation6+ standard and reco""ended practices B 4i$il
A$iation -e2uire"ent 54A-6 and reco""ended practices issued by irector Ceneral of 4i$il
A$iation.
1.3.5.6 DEPARTMENT OF LAND MANAGEMENT
9and "anage"ent is responsible for ac2uisition of land re2uired for construction+
de$elop"ent and e%tension of airports in !-+ protect and possess the land by updating the land
records in fa$our of AA&+ sur$ey of lands. &t is also responsible for co""ercial e%ploitation of
land )hich is not re2uired for operation purposes+ lease of land to airlines B agencies operating
in airport and decides o allot"ent of land for beautification of roads+ path)ay+ etc.+ in airports
)here in-charge of ran* less than airport irectors are posted.
1.3.5.7 DEPARTMENT OF AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT - (Sothern
Region)
ATM-!- is responsible for all operational "atters related to !-+ "onitoring and training of
AT4Os at field stations+ conducting rating boards of AT! in charges B radar rating boards in
!-+ )atch hour e%tension of field stations and dealing )ith 4&!7 54entral &ndustrial !ecurity
7orce6 B @o Ob(ection 4ertificate 5@O46 B Ter"inal Manage"ent 5TM6 "atters.
1.3.5.8 DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTS (INTERNAL AUDIT)
'%a"ination of syste"s of internal chec*s and controls+ consultant scrutiny of all syste"s of
authori=ation of pay"ents to ensure ade2uate control of e%penditure+ deduction and pre$ention
of errors and frauds+ e%a"ination of trail balance+ financial state"ents and other reports+
coordination bet)een e%ternal auditors and $arious directorates of AA&.
1.3.5.9 DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING
'@CC !- is responsible for pro$iding all necessary infrastructures )ith ATM+ 4@!+ 3 N A+
A#!+ 4OMM+ 9M+ 7ire !er$ice and ' N M )or*shop. Besides+ 'ngineering Eing e%ecutes
and also "onitors the progress of capital B original )or*s such as+ e%tension of run)ays B
apron+ construction of ne) run)ay+ e%tension B "odification to ter"inal building+ 7ire station+
3eri"eter road+ !ecurity )all and residential 2uarters at 4hennai as )ell as !-.
1.3.5.10 DEPARTMENT OF EQUIPMENT
'>3T is responsible for pro$ision of transport ser$ices as per re2uire"ent to users such as
AT4+ 4@!+ '@CC+ 7inance and 3 N A and also gi$en necessary guidance and assistance inn
"aintenance of Abs+ fire and safety ser$ice $ehicles+ MT $ehicles and other "echanical
e2uip"ents to the airports in !-.
1.3.5.11 DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMNT
As li*e any other organisation+ H- depart"ent at AA& also ta*es the responsibility in
"aintaining its e"ployeeAs )elfare as )ell as its policy.
H-M is responsible for pro$iding total ad"inistrati$e support to "an po)er posted at -H>+
4hennai+ in the areas of recruit"ent+ pro"otions+ transfers and separations+ H-+ Allot"ent of
residential acco""odation B co"pany leased acco""odation+ industrial relations+ pension+
processing of grants of loans and ad$ances+ issue of photo identity cards+ pro"oting Hindi
language in official correspondence etc. Besides also responsible for recruiting people to the
grade of @'-0 irrespecti$e of discipline in !- is one of the core responsibilities of H-M
depart"ent of -H>+ 4hennai.
1.3.5.11.1 DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL & ADMINISTRATION
There are t)o types of di$isions
&. &nternational Airport i$ision 5&A6
&&. @ational Airport i$ision 5@A6
INHOUSE TRAINING
& ha$e been deployed in @ational Airport i$ision of 3ersonnel N Ad"inistration
depart"ent. There are $arious sections in 3 N A epart"ent+ they areG
&. 3ension 4ell
&&. 'stablish"ent 4o""unication
&&&. 'stablish"ent Aerodro"e
&#. 'stablish"ent Head2uarters
#. 'state !ection
#&. Ceneral 4o-ordination
#&&. -eceipt N &ssues !ection
I. PENSION CELL
The senior "anager of this section is !hri.C./,MA-AC,-, and assisted by Mrs.
Mahala*sh"i as Asst. Manager. Here they are "aintaining the !er$ice boo*s and 3ension
papers of the -etiredB-esignedBeath officials and also present staff "e"bers.
Apart fro" this all retired officials are gi$en final settle"ent pertaining to the follo)ing?-
5a6 Cratuity
5b6 Croup !a$ings 9in*ed &nsurance !che"e 5C!9&!6
5c6 4ontributory 3ro$ident 7und 54376
5d6 Bene$olent 7und
II ESTABLISHMENT - COMMUNICATION
III ESTABLISHMENT - AERODROME
IV ESTABLISHMENT - HEADQUARTERS
The functions of these three sections are sa"e but the only difference is '4 !ection
staffs doing their )or*s for co""unication e"ployees+ 'A !ection staffs doing their )or*s
for aerodro"e e"ployees and 'H !ection staffs are doing their )or*s for head2uarters
e"ployees. The follo)ing functions are carried out by these depart"ents. They are+
O Maintaining ser$ice boo*s and personal files
O Maintaining of sanction+ actual $acancy position
O Maintaining of roaster point
O Maintaining of perfor"ance appraisal report
O &ssuing of $arious circulars and orders
O &ssuing of 9T4 sanction+ 9T4 encash"ent+ '9 encash"ent
O Crand of per"ission for higher studies
O Crand of incre"ents for fa"ily planning
O 3er"ission for purchase of property
O sending periodical returns to central head2uarters
O 3ro(ection of "anpo)er re2uire"ent
O #igilance a)areness )ee*
O 7ire safety )ee*
O 4o-ordination )ith other depart"ents
O 4o-ordination )ith outside agencies
O &ssuing internal transfer order
O #arious letter correspondence
O 3er"ission for outsiders
O 3er"ission for pro(ect )ith issuing orders
O &ssuing $arious ad$ance orders
O ispatch and receipts of letters
O 3reparing absenteeAs state"ent
O 9ea$e entry
O 3ay fi%ation
O -ecruit"ent
O 3ro"otion
O Transfer
O -esignation
Combination of different kinds of leaves / holidays
-egular lea$e K !aturday+ !undays
4asual lea$e
-estricted holidays
Holidays
!pecial casual lea$e
V ESTATE SECTION
The senior "anager of this section is !hri.-a$i. Here they are "aintaining the
allocation of places for AA&As staffAs acco""odations in -esidential colony and @on
-esidential 4olony.
RESIDENTIAL COLONY
-esidential colony "eans AA& e"ployeeAs 2uarters. The rent of their acco""odation
is fi%ing for their basic salary. &t )as di$ided into se$en categories. They are
Particulars A B 4 ' 7
Basic Salary 4400-
::00
::01-
;:00
;:01-
14411
14:00-
1;411
1;:00-
28;:0
Abo$e 28;:0

VILLA
-egional '%ecuti$e irector is pro$ided )ith a separate #illa.
COMPANY LEASED ACCOMMODATION
All e%ecuti$es )ho are not pro$ided acco""odation by the authority are eligible for
subsidi=ed 4o"pany 9eased Acco""odation. 9eased Acco""odation is also e%tended to
non-e%ecuti$es )ho are holding *ey positions in operational category such as Aerodro"e
Assistant+ 4o""unication Assistant+ Technical Assistant+ 'lectronics Assistant and !enior 7ire
7ore"en.
The rental li"its for leasing acco""odation )ill be as under for e%ecuti$es and non-
e%ecuti$es?
EXECUTIVES / NON-EXECUTIVES
S.NO Class of City Basic Pay in
1. A :0H
2. B 40H
3. B2 80H
4. 4 20H
&f the e%ecuti$e e"ployees are not ha$ing acco""odation house in the 2uarters they are
allo)ed to stay outside rental house )ith :0H of their basic pay. These *inds of situations AA&
follo)ed certain rules and regulations. They are
O The concerned e"ployees should bargain )ith o)ner for reducing the rental e%penses.
O Eillingness letter in the na"e of AA&
O The letter should containsG
&. -ental rate
&&. 3eriod of 9ease
&&&. !ecurity eposit
O The concerned e"ployees should collect the !ite plan fro" the o)ner for identification
proof of the o)ner
After all the process is co"pleted the Authorities for" a co""ittee of 1 person fro"
personnel+ 1 person fro" finance and 1 person fro" ci$il. This for"ed co""ittee goes to the
site of the house for $erification and they reco""end for sanctioning the 9easing of
Acco""odation.
NON-RESIDENTIAL COLONY
AT! 4o"ple%+ &n future "ay be Operational offices.
The "ain custo"er of the residential colony is Meteorological epart"ent 5M'T6+ B!@9 and
Air force ,nit 54A7M9,6
All are inter related and co-ordinate )ith each other depart"ents.
VI GENERAL CO-ORDINATION
This section is also headed by !"t. !hya"ala ra(a+ Manager. Here they scrutini=e and
sanction the $arious loans offered by AA&+ according to the AA& rules. They are
SL.
NO
Nature of
Advances
Eligibility
Criteria
Loan Amount No of
Instalment
Interest Recovery
Instalment
1. House building
ad$ances
8yrs regular
ser$ice
Ma% -s.;.:9 for
purchase of
1<0 "onths
e2ual &nstal"ents
00 "onths e2ual
&nstal"ents
houseBflats 80H can
be utili=ed for plot
purchase
2. Moped ad$ance 1 yr regular
ser$ice )ith
basic pay of -s
0000B-
Ma% -s 20000 or
10H of the cost of
$ehicle )hiche$er is
lo)
;0 "onths e2ual
&nstal"ents
!uitable &nstal"ents for
interest
3. !cooterBMotorc
ycle Ad$ance
1 yr regular
ser$ice )ith
basic pay of
-s.;200B-
Ma% -s 40000 or
10H of the cost of
$ehicle )hiche$er is
lo)
;: "onths e2ual
&nstal"ents
!uitable &nstal"ents for
interest
4. 4ar Ad$ance '%ecuti$es in
the pay scale of
'-1 to '-:
Ma% -s 2.:9 or 10H
of the cost of the car
)hiche$er is lo)
Ma% 1<0
&nstal"ents
20 &nstal"ents for
interest
5. 4ar Ad$ance '%ecuti$es in
the pay scale of
'-0 and abo$e
Ma% -s 8.:9 or 10H
of the cost of the car
)hiche$er is lo)
Ma% 1<0
&nstal"ents
20 &nstal"ents for
interest
6. 3ersonal
4o"puter
0 "onths
regular ser$ices
)ith basic pay
of -s.;:00B-
Ma% -s.4:000B- or
anticipated price of
the co"puter
)hiche$er is lo)
Ma% 100
&nstal"ents
20 &nstal"ents for
interest
VII RECEIPTS AND ISSUES SECTION
This section is also headed by !hri C./,MA-AC,-,+ Manager. &t is also called as
espatch section. Here all the in and out AA& letters and also other organi=ational letters are
recei$ed+ through postal+ speed post+ or courier etc.
!o"eti"es the letters are )rongly recei$ed by &A or @AG the concerned dispatch
authorities for)ard the letters to the correct official.
1.3 LITERATURE REVIEW
The ob(ecti$e of this literature re$ie) is to establish the basis for this research pro(ect.
The literature re$ie) phase included an e%tensi$e e%a"ination of the $arious resources that
)ere a$ailable at the 9-4. This included an i"pressi$e list of te%tboo*s+ periodicals+ business
publications and research pro(ects. The literature re$ie) phase also included obtaining *ey
resources that )ere obtainable $ia the &nternet.
3rior to e"bar*ing on the research 2uestions+ this student sought to obtain a definition of
'3A! that )ould ser$e as the foundation for this literature re$ie) for )hich the research
2uestions could then be built upon. enhardt 511116 defines perfor"ance appraisal as a
specific e$aluation )ith respect to an indi$idualDs progress in co"pleting specified tas*s.
e$ries+ Morrison+ !hull"an and Cerlach 511<16 define perfor"ance appraisal as a process by
)hich an organi=ation "easures and e$aluates an indi$idual e"ployeeDs beha$ior and
acco"plish"ents for a finite period. 'd)ards 520006 defines '3A! as the for"al+ syste"atic
assess"ent of ho) )ell e"ployees are perfor"ing in their (obs in relation to established
standards+ including co""unication of that assess"ent to the e"ployee and the organi=ation.
'd)ards notes that the goal of the perfor"ance appraisal process is to i"pro$e the 2uality of
)or* and the indi$idual e"ployees in$ol$ed in the )or*. 'd)ards goes on to state that
perfor"ance appraisal+ if done properly+ can strengthen the organi=ation as it prepares and
de$elops the personnel in that organi=ation. After all+ 'd)ardsD states+ the su" total of the
indi$idual perfor"ance is the perfor"ance of the organi=ation.
Moulder 520016 states that perfor"ance appraisals are $alued for defining e%pectations and
"easuring the e%tent to )hich e%pectations are "et. !he goes on to 3erfor"ance appraisal 10
state that appraisals can "a*e clear to e"ployees )here they are ha$ing success and )here
they need to i"pro$e perfor"ance. Moulder indicates that appraisals are useful in setting
goals and in fostering i"pro$ed co""unications a"ong )or* groups and bet)een e"ployees
and super$isors.
4ascio 5111<6 defines perfor"ance appraisal as a process to i"pro$e e"ployeeDs )or*
perfor"ance by helping the" reali=e and use their full potential in carrying out the
organi=ationDs "issions and to pro$ide infor"ation to e"ployees and "anagers for use in
"a*ing )or* related decisions. He goes onto define '3A! as an e%ercise in obser$ation and
(udg"ent+ a feedbac* process and an organi=ational inter$ention. &t is a "easure"ent process
as )ell as an intensely e"otional process. Abo$e all+ 4ascio states+ it is an ine%act+ hu"an
process that is utili=ed differently in al"ost e$ery organi=ation regardless of industry.
Another i"portant ele"ent that )ill enhance this paper is to de$elop a historical
perspecti$e of '3A!. #ersions of e"ployee perfor"ance appraisal can be traced bac* to the
third century A.+ specifically during the period 221 up to 20:. ata produced by 'ichel and
Bender 511<46 found that an i"perial rater e$aluated the perfor"ance of the "e"bers of the
official fa"ily. His "ethod of appraisal )as sub(ecti$e+ )hich is still co""on )ith '3A! in
"any agencies today 5#roo"+ 11106. 4enturies later+ &gnatius 9oyola established a syste" of
for"al rating of the "e"bers of the Fesuit !ociety 5/oont=+ 11;16. /oont= goes on to state
that the first for"al e"ployee perfor"ance appraisal in this country )as in syste"s utili=ed by
the 7ederal go$ern"ent and for certain city ad"inistrators in the latter part of the 11th
4entury. Additionally+ one of the first accounts of for"al '3A! began in 1<18 )hen Ar"y
Ceneral 9e)is 4ass sub"itted to the Ear epart"ent an e$aluation of each of his "en+ using
such ter"s as Pgood naturedP+ Phard )or*erP and Pdespised by allP 5/oont=+ 11;16. Ar"strong
and Appelbau" 520086 report that in the pri$ate sector+ one of the first perfor"ance appraisal
processes centered on pay by "easurable input and )as ai"ed at hourly )age )or*ers.
uring the 7irst Eorld Ear+ 7rederic* Taylor tied producti$ity to nu"erical
efficiency factors in order to achie$e the highest possible output fro" )or*ers. According to
9a)ler 520006+ Taylor "ade indi$idual pay for perfor"ance an i"portant part of scientific
"anage"ent in the early 1100Ds. -esearch published by /oont= as )ell as Ar"strong and
Appelbau" indicate that the focus on '3A! during the first part of the 20th century focused
"ainly on output+ )hich often )as at the e%pense of the e"ployee.
'3A! during this period+ sought organi=ational benefit in the for" of units produced
and ulti"ately profit. Ar"strong and Appelbau" 520086 concur that e"ployee appraisal
during this period )as based on pay for perfor"ance. The authors note that pay by "easurable
output )as the pri"ary "oti$e for appraisal. &t )as not centered on "utually de$eloped goals
or e"ployee career enhance"ent as is found today. According to #roo" 511106 it is esti"ated
that o$er three-fourths of ,.!. co"panies no) utili=e perfor"ance appraisal progra"s. &n
actual practice ho)e$er+ #roo" states that for"al perfor"ance appraisal progra"s ha$e often
yielded unsatisfactory and disappointing results.
Before the 1100Ds+ perfor"ance e$aluations )ere designed pri"arily as tools for the
organi=ation to use in controlling e"ployees 5'ichel and Bender+ 11<16. 'ichel and Bender go
on to state that past perfor"ance )as used to guide or (ustify "anage"entDs actions in dealing
)ith the e"ployee. At the ti"e+ according to these authors+ perfor"ance appraisal pro$ided
the basis for salary+ retention+ discharge+ or pro"otional decisions.
'3A! use in the public sector beca"e "ore )idespread in the 11;0Ds+ according to
the &nternational 4ity Manage"ent Association 5&4MA+ 111<6 and beca"e an increasingly
i"portant personnel practice. &n public e"ploy"ent at the federal le$el+ the "a(or i"petus for
'3A! is the 4i$il !er$ice -efor" Act of 11;<. This act calls for perfor"ance appraisal
syste"s that )ill encourage e"ployee participation in setting perfor"ance standards and that
)ill also co""unicate (ob re2uire"ents to e"ployees 5&4MA+ 111<6. The shift in the purpose
of e"ployee perfor"ance appraisal during the 11;0s )as in part caused by legal pressures
re2uiring organi=ations to docu"ent and (ustify for '2ual '"ploy"ent Opportunity purposes+
all ad"inistrati$e actions including salary+ pro"otion+ and retention or discharge 5'ichel and
Bender+ 11<46. uring this decade+ so"e atte"pts in the public sector to i"pro$e '3A! )ere
noted. &n 11;:+ a re$ision of the @e) Jor* 4ity charter "andated the installation of a ne)
perfor"ance appraisal syste" for "iddle and senior le$el "anagers. Also+ at least fourteen
states atte"pted to i"pro$e e"ployee producti$ity by basing "erit pay raises on a "ore
syste"atic appraisal of perfor"ance 5&4MA+ 11<<6. O$er the past 2uarter century+ the purpose
of perfor"ance appraisal has shifted fro" tools supporting the acti$ities of "anage"ent to an
increasing trend to)ards personnel de$elop"ent 5'ichel and Bender+ 11<46. Another issue that
this student feels should be addressed in the literature re$ie) is to cite so"e of the current
reasons for perfor"ance appraisal in both public and pri$ate sector organi=ations.
Maddu% 511<;6 reports that perfor"ance appraisal pro$ides a periodic opportunity for
co""unication bet)een the person )ho assigns the )or* and the person )ho perfor"s it+ to
discuss )hat they e%pect fro" the other+ and ho) )ell those e%pectations are being "et.
Maddu% adds that '3A! inter$ie)s are not ad$ersary proceedings or social chitchat. They are
intended to be an essential co""unication lin* bet)een t)o people )ith a co""on purpose.
&4MA 5200:6 states that al"ost all e"ployees are eager to *no) ho) )ell they are doing in
their (obs+ but "any dread the "eetings in )hich their perfor"ance is to be discussed.
Additionally+ according to &4MA 5200:6+ "ost super$isors donDt loo* for)ard to e$aluation
sessions and in fact one of the pri"ary reasons )hy '3A! fails or is o$erloo*ed is because
pro$iding honest feedbac* does not co"e naturally. !uper$isors generally are also reluctant to
tell e"ployees that they are doing unsatisfactory )or* 5&4MA+ 200:6. Ar"strong and
Appelbau" 520086 note that '3A! can be one of the "ost an%iety pro$o*ing aspects of )or*
for both super$isors and e"ployees due to the difficulty of deli$ering or recei$ing infor"ation
that is critical or relates to less than ade2uate )or*.
&4MA 5200:6 cites the i"portance of '3A! in order to help the e"ployee achie$e full
potential. Additionally+ '3A! enables the super$isor to establish bench"ar*s that can be used
to "easure perfor"ance. #roo" 511106 states that for"al perfor"ance appraisal plans can be
designed to "eet the follo)ing *ey needs? 5a6 the organi=ationG 5b6 the super$isorG and 5c6 the
e"ployee. He stresses the need for effecti$e e$aluation as it can effecti$ely ser$e these critical
areas.
!upporting #roo"Ds research+ Fohnson 511;16 cites the need for '3A! )ithin the sa"e
categories and further elaborates? He notes that in the organi=ation+ '3A! is a *ey co"ponent
of the personnel syste". &t is utili=ed to trac* the perfor"ance of the e"ployee in order to
"a*e critical decisions regarding pro"otion and pay increases.
@e%t+ Fohnson states that the super$isor "ust ha$e a recogni=ed "ethod in )hich to
correct substandard perfor"ance or to substantiate pro"otion+ de"otion+ or pay ad(ust"ent.
Fohnson then stresses that the e"ployee needs to *no) ho) perfor"ance is co"pared to
super$isorDs e%pectations. '3A! is an essential lin* bet)een the super$isor and the e"ployee.
Fohnson 511;16 states that )ithout '3A!+ serious perfor"ance proble"s could de$elop. 7ro"
an organi=ational perspecti$e+ 'd)ards 520006 notes that '3A! can pro$ide useful infor"ation
regarding the effecti$eness of recruit"ent efforts+ selection strategies+ training progra"s+ and
career de$elop"ent. 'd)ards also states that '3A! can pro$ide "ultiple benefits including
feedbac* and recognition+ goal setting+ proper docu"entation+ personnel de$elop"ent+ and the
establish"ent of organi=ational bench"ar*s.
Another co"ponent & feel co"pelled to address in this literature re$ie) is an
e%a"ination of so"e of the $arious types of perfor"ance appraisals currently utili=ed. As
stated pre$iously+ perfor"ance appraisal )as first co""only used for nu"erical efficiency
factors and pay for perfor"ance. !i"ply put+ appraisal )as lin*ed directly to the a"ount of
units produced by the e"ployee. The nu"erical output )as then used as the pri"ary basis for
co"pensation. A "odern e%tension of the pay for perfor"ance is a syste" *no)n as "erit pay.
According to 9a)ler 520006 )hen using the "erit pay "ethod+ indi$idual perfor"ance is
appraised+ usually by a super$isor+ and as a result of that appraisal an ad(ust"ent 5usually
up)ard6 is "ade to a personDs salary. Ho) large that ad(ust"ent is depends on the
fa$orableness of the appraisal and the si=e of the salary increase budget+ )hich is usually
strongly influenced by the labor "ar*et and inflation 59a)ler+ 20006. Merit pay is typically not
co""on in the public sector+ as salaries are "ore closely regulated by labor contracts and
established )age scales. 7ire agency e"ployees typically recei$e step increases based on ti"e
in grade rather than actual perfor"ance 5'$ans+ 20026.
One of the "ore co""on "ethods of '3A! used in the public sector is forced choice
rating 5#roo"+ 11106. This type of rating syste" )as de$eloped to reduce bias and establish
ob(ecti$e standards of co"parison bet)een indi$idual goals+ but it does not in$ol$e the
inter$ention of a third party 5#roo"+ 11106. Typically+ the super$isor chooses fro" a"ong
groups of state"ents that best fit the indi$idual. The results are then )eighted or scored.
3eople )ith high scores are by definition the better e"ployeesG those )ith lo) scores are the
poorer ones 5#roo"+ 11106. #ariations of forced choice include general trait scale and
chec*lists+ each of )hich forces the rater to select fro" certain options based on their
obser$ations.
Another "ethod of appraisal+ )hich has gained in use in both pri$ate and public
sectors+ is the 800-perfor"ance re$ie). &t is also *no)n as the "ulti rater or "ulti source
assess"ents. This type of appraisal uses "ultiple sources of input in order to assess the
e"ployee 5&4MA+ 200:6. Me"bers of the organi=ation )ho "ay be in$ol$ed in 800-degree
re$ie) include super$isors+ top "anage"ent+ subordinates+ co-)or*ers and representati$es
fro" other depart"ents )ho interact )ith the e"ployee. &n fact+ according to &4MA 5200:6+
anyone )ho has useful infor"ation on ho) the e"ployee does the (ob "ay be a source in the
appraisal+ pro$iding a broader $ie) of the e"ployeeDs perfor"ance.
According to 4ochran 520006+ the 800-degree feedbac* tool has "any positi$e aspects
and "any proponents+ and its use is beco"ing "ore )idespread. 'd)ards 520006 notes that
the po)er of the 800-degree feedbac* tool is that it pro$ides clear and i"portant perfor"ance
infor"ation fro" a $ariety of sources. !o"e of the *ey ad$antages include reduced
discri"ination ris*+ personal and organi=ational perfor"ance de$elop"ent+ and tea"
de$elop"ent 5About.co"? Hu"an -esources+ 200;6 Manning and 4urtis 511<<6 identify a
$ariation to "ore co""on appraisal "ethods. The authors suggest a self-e$aluation
co"ponent be added to the standard super$isor re$ie). This is then co"pared and contrasted
)ith the e$aluation that is co"pleted by the super$isor. The results potentially lead the
e"ployee and super$isor to a "ore "eaningful and in depth '3A! discussion. Manning and
4urtis e"phasi=e that this e$aluation process al"ost al)ays results in an engaging discussion
bet)een the e"ployee and "anager. They note that "ost other appraisal instru"ents allo) for
only "ini"al discussion. The authors also indicate that an appraisal that does not include
"eaningful discussion bet)een the "anager and super$isor potentially erodes the usefulness
and effecti$eness of the process.
OB1ECTIVES OF THE STUDY
PRIMARY OB1ECTIVE:
To study and analy=e the e%isting perfor"ance appraisal syste"+ '"ployee
satisfaction+ and $arious aspects considered in the syste"+ usefulness and i"portance
of the syste".
SECONDARY OB1ECTIVE:
To identify the changes re2uired in the e%isting syste" and to suggest changes to
enhance the syste".
To re$ie) the perfor"ance of the e"ployees o$er a period of ti"e and to help the
"anage"ent in e%ercising organisational control.
SCOPE OF THE STUDY:
a6 Help the e"ployee to o$erco"e his )ea*nesses and i"pro$e o$er his strengths and
thus enable hi" to i"pro$er his perfor"ance that of the depart"ent.
b6 Cenerate ade2uate feedbac* and guidance fro" the reporting officers to the
e"ployee.
c6 4ontribute to the gro)th and de$elop"ent of the e"ployee through helping hi" in
realistic goal setting.
d6 Help in creating a desirable culture and traditions in the organi=ations.
e6 Help identifying e"ployees for the purp0ose of "oti$ating+ training and
de$eloping the".
f6 Cenerate significant+ rele$ant+ free and $alid infor"ation about e"ployees.
Thus+ a good appraisal syste" should pri"arily focus on e"ployee de$elop"ent and at the
sa"e ti"e+ pro$ide a significant input for salary and re)ard "anage"ent.
CHAPTER II
1. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
iscusses the research design+ research proble"s+ i"portant of the study+ scope and
significance of the study+ source of data+ 2uestionnaire+ sa"ple design statistically
techni2ues used+ and ob(ecti$e of the study and li"itations of the study.
2.1 RESEARCH DESIGN
A research design is an arrange"ent of conditions for collection and analysis of data in
a "anner that ai"s to co"bine rele$ance to the research.
&t is the conceptual structure )ithin )hich research is conducted and it constitutes the
blueprint for the collection+ "easure"ent and analysis of data. &t includes an outline of )hat
the researcher )ill do fro" )ithin the hypothesis and its operational i"plications to the final
analysis of data.
The research design used for the study is descripti$e design. escripti$e research
design includes sur$eys and fact finding en2uires of different *inds. The "a(or purpose of
descripti$e research is description of the state of affairs+ as it e%ists at present.
2.2 DATA COLLECTION
The rele$ant data has been collected fro" the pri"ary sources and secondary
sources. The pri"ary data is collected by a 2uestionnaire fro" the e"ployees. 7or this purpose
of data collection+ the 2uestionnaire )as circulated a"ong the e"ployees to collect
infor"ation. The secondary data is collected by ne)s paper co"pany (ournals+ "aga=ines
)ebsites etc.
2.3 PRIMARY DATA
The pri"ary data is defined as the data+ )hich is collected for the first ti"e and
fresh nature+ and happen to be original in character through field sur$ey.
There are "any "ethods of collecting pri"ary data and the "ain "ethods include?
>uestionnaires
Obser$ation
2.4 SECONDARY DATA
The secondary data are those )hich ha$e already been collected by so"eone else
and ha$e been passed through statistical process. The secondary data for this study are
already a$ailable in the fir"Ds internal records+ annual report+ broaches+ and co"panyDs
)ebsite.
2.5 INSTRUMENT DESIGN
The construction of the 2uestionnaire is an i"portant li"iting criterion for collecting
pri"ary data. The 2uestionnaire is constructed for the purpose of e$aluating the responses of
the respondents. The 2uestionnaire is constructed in 'nglish.
The 2uestionnaire has been structured and constructed in such a )ay that
1. >uestions ha$e been )orded appro%i"ately so that it is easy for the respondents to
understand it.
2. A logical se2uence of 2uestions has been for"ed in order to help the thought process of the
respondent.
8. The layout of the 2uestionnaire is in such a )ay that it is easy to be filled by the
respondents.
2.6 SAMPLING TECHNIQUE
-ando" !a"pling "ethod is used to "a*e the research.
2.7 TOOLS USED
The research instru"ent used for the sur$ey is a structured undisguised
2uestionnaire. The 2uestionnaire has been fra"ed in structures and undisguised for"+ )ith a
total nu"ber of 20 2uestions. &t has both open ended and closed ended 2uestions. The
infor"ation collected through personal inter$ie) is also being used. 3re-testing )as
conducted to find if there )ere any discrepancies in the 2uestionnaire designed. @ecessary
changes )ere "ade+ after designing the 2uestionnaire for )hich data )as collected. Tools and
iagra"s used for analysis?
Bar 4harts
3ie 4harts
3i$ot table
II.8 Limitations
&n spite of the precautions ta*en by "e to "a*e the study ob(ecti$e+ it cannot be denied that
there are certain li"itations.
Temporal: The period of the study )ill be li"ited to the "onth of Fanuary to March 2014.
Hence the data and their te"poral conte%t )ould be li"ited to the abo$e "entioned period
only.
Area/Geographical: The study is li"ited to the e"ployees of the @ational Airport i$ision
5@A6 of the AA&+ !outhern -egion+ and 4hennai.
Procedural: All the data collected )ill be li"ited to the "ethod that )ill be adopted for
analysis. &n the current study+ the sole "ethod for collection of data being >uestionnaire+
li"its the data to the e%tent of data generation a$ailable through that "ethod.
Specific:
&t is also assu"ed that the respondents )ill be true and honest in e%pressing their
$ie)s..
As the study )as done )ithin a li"ited ti"e+ the sa"ple si=e chosen is co$ered only a
s"all portion of the )hole population of AA&+ 4hennai
Accuracy of the study is purely based on the infor"ation as gi$en by the respondents.
ata collected "ay not be accurate to the e%act condition of the organi=ation+ as the
sa"ple si=e restricted to li"ited e"ployees.
The 2uestionnaire )as filled by 100 e"ployees of different designations. !o the point
of $ie) of e"ployees differs as per their designations.
CHAPTER III
DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
Performance appraisal system is needed in organization
Category Head Count
!A :1 :1H
A 82 82H
!A 0 0H
@@ 8 8H
A 0 0H
Crand Total 100 100H
TABLE : 3.1
FIG. 3.1
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the 3A needed in the organisation
is strongly agreed by :1H+ agreed by 82H+ strongly disagreed by 0H+ neither agreed or
disagreed by 8H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents strongly agree for
the need of 3A in the organisation.
TABLE :3.2
Satisfied with the existing performance of the appraisal system.
Category Head Count
!A 24 24H
A 44 44H
!A 4 4H
@@ 20 20H
A < <H
Crand Total 100 100H
FIG. 3.2
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the !atisfaction )ith the e%isting
3A is strongly agreed by 24H+ agreed by 44H+ strongly disagreed by 4H+ neither agreed or
disagreed by 20H+ disagreed by <H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents
agree )ith the satisfaction of e%isting 3A.
TABLE : 3.3
The performance appraisal is helpful in reducing grievance among the employees.
Category Head Count
!A 1< 1<H
A 4< 4<H
!A 0 0H
@@ 14 14H
A 14 14H
Crand Total 100 100H
FIG. 3.3
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the perfor"ance appraisal is
helpful in reducing grie$ance a"ong the e"ployees is strongly agreed by 1<H+ agreed by
4<H+ strongly disagreed by 0H+ neither agreed or disagreed by 14H and disagreed by 14H of
the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the perfor"ance appraisal is
helpful in reducing grie$ance a"ong the e"ployees.
TABLE: 3.4
The performance appraisal is helpful for improving personnel skill
Category Head Count
!A 88 88H
A 4: 4:H
!A 8 8H
@@ 11 11H
A < <H
Crand Total 100 100H
FIG. 3.4
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the perfor"ance appraisal is
helpful for i"pro$ing personnel s*ill is strongly agreed by 88H+ agreed by 4:H+ strongly
disagreed by 8H+ neither agreed or disagreed by 11H and disagree by <H of the e"ployees.
!o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the perfor"ance appraisal is helpful for
i"pro$ing personnel s*ill.
TABLE: 3.5
Post appraisal training programmes are effective for individual and organization
development
Category Head Count
!A 2; 2;H
A :2 :2H
!A 8 8H
@@ 12 12H
A 0 0H
Crand Total 100 100H
FIG. 3.5
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the 3ost appraisal
training progra""es are effecti$e for indi$idual and organi=ation de$elop"ent is strongly
agreed by 2;H+ agreed by :2H+ strongly disagreed by 8H+ neither agreed or disagreed by 12H
and disagree by 0H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agree for the 3ost
appraisal training progra""es are effecti$e for indi$idual and organi=ation de$elop"ent.
TABLE: 3.6
The performance ratings were done periodically
Category Head Count
!A 28 28H
A 48 48H
!A 1 1H
@@ 11 11H
A 14 14H
Crand Total 100 100H
FIG. 3.6
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the perfor"ance ratings )ere
done periodically is strongly agreed by 28H+ agreed by 48H+ strongly disagreed by 1H+
neither agreed or disagreed by 11H and disagreed by 14H of the e"ployees. !o the highest
nu"ber of respondents agrees for the perfor"ance ratings )ere done periodically.
.
TABLE: 3 7
The performance appraisal system helps to identify the strength and weakness of the
employee
Category Head Count
!A 1< 1<H
A :1 :1H
!A 0 0H
@@ 12 12H
A : :H
Crand Total 100 100H
FIG. 3.7
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the perfor"ance appraisal
syste" helps to identify the strength and )ea*ness of the e"ployee is strongly agreed by 1<H+
agreed by :1H+ strongly disagreed by 0H+ neither agreed or disagreed by 12H and disagreed
by :H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the
3erfor"ance appraisal syste" helps to identify the strength and )ea*ness of the e"ployee
TABLE: 3.8
The performance rating is helpful for the management to provide employee counseling
Category Head Count
!A 1< 1<H
A 44 44H
!A 8 8H
@@ 21 21H
A 0 0H
Crand Total 100 100H
FIG. 3.8
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the perfor"ance rating is helpful
for the "anage"ent to pro$ide e"ployee counseling is strongly agreed by 1<H+ agreed by
44H+ strongly disagreed by 8H+ neither agreed or disagreed by 21H and disagreed by 0H of
the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the
perfor"ance rating is helpful for the "anage"ent to pro$ide e"ployee counselling.
TABLE: 3.9
Promotion is purely based on performance appraisal
Category Head Count
!A 1< 1<H
A 21 21H
!A 10 10H
@@ 2: 2:H
A 1< 1<H
Crand Total 100 100H
FIG. 3.9
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the 3ro"otion is purely
based on perfor"ance appraisal is strongly agreed by 1<H+ agreed by 21H+ strongly disagreed
by 10H+ neither agreed or disagreed by 2:H and disagreed by 1<H of the e"ployees. !o the
highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the 3ro"otion is purely based on perfor"ance
appraisal.
TABLE: 3.10
Management fixes salary through the performance rating
Category Head Count
!A 18 18H
A 28 28H
!A 10 10H
@@ 21 21H
A 88 88H
Crand Total 100 100H
FIG.3.10
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the Manage"ent fi%es salary
through the perfor"ance rating is strongly agreed by 21H+ agreed by 28H+ strongly disagreed
by 10H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 21H and disagreed by 88H of the e"ployees. !o the
highest nu"ber of respondents disagrees for the Manage"ent fi%es salary through
the perfor"ance rating.
.
You should be given an opportunity to rate your own performance
Category Head Count
!A 20 20H
A 42 42H
!A 2 2H
@@ 24 24H
A 12 12H
Crand Total 100 100H
TABLE: 3.11
FIG.3.11
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that they be gi$en an opportunity to
rate their o)n perfor"ance in the organisation is strongly agreed by 20H+ agreed by 42H+
strongly disagreed by 2H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 24H and disagreed by 12H of the
e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agree for that they be gi$en an opportunity
to rate their o)n perfor"ance in the organisation.
TABLE : 3.12
Transfer, demotion, suspension and dismissal is based on performance appraisal
Category Head Count
!A 1; 1;H
A 2: 2:H
!A 12 12H
@@ 24 24H
A 22 22H
Crand Total 100 100H
FIG. 3.12
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the transfer+ de"otion+ suspension
and dis"issal is based on perfor"ance appraisal rating is strongly agreed by 1;H+ agreed by
2:H+ strongly disagreed by 12H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 24H and disagreed by 22H
of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the transfer+ de"otion+
suspension and dis"issal is based on perfor"ance appraisal.
TABLE : 3.13
The desired target of the organization is achieved through the performance appraisal
Category Head Count
!A 21 21H
A 8; 8;H
!A 0 0H
@@ 2< 2<H
A < <H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.13
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the desired target of the
organi=ation is achie$ed through the perfor"ance appraisal rating is strongly agreed by 21H+
agreed by 8;H+ strongly disagreed by 0H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 2<H and disagreed
by <H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the
desired target of the organi=ation is achie$ed through the perfor"ance appraisal.
TABLE : 3.14
Performance appraisal increases employee motivation towards work.
Category Head Count
!A 8< 8<H
A 8; 8;H
!A < <H
@@ 10 10H
A ; ;H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.14
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the perfor"ance appraisal
increases e"ployee "oti$ation to)ards )or* rating is strongly agreed by 8<H+ agreed by
8;H+ strongly disagreed by <H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 10H and disagreed by ;H of
the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents strongly agrees for the perfor"ance
appraisal increases e"ployee "oti$ation to)ards )or*.
TABLE : 3.15
Appraisal system is the major reason for achievement and failure or success of work
Category Head Count
!A 28 28H
A 84 84H
!A ; ;H
@@ 20 20H
A 10 10H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.15
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the appraisal syste" is
the "a(or reason for achie$e"ent and failure or success of )or* rating is strongly agreed by
28H+ agreed by 84H+ strongly disagreed by ;H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 20H and
disagreed by 10H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the
appraisal syste" is the "a(or reason for achie$e"ent and failure or success of )or*.
TABLE : 3.16
Organization have separate committee to review the performance appraisal result
Category Head Count
!A 21 21H
A 88 88H
!A 0 0H
@@ 1; 1;H
A 28 28H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.16
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the organi=ation ha$e separate
co""ittee to re$ie) the perfor"ance appraisal result rating is strongly agreed by 21H+ agreed
by 88H+ strongly disagreed by 0H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 1;H and disagreed by
28H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the organi=ation
has separate co""ittee to re$ie) the perfor"ance appraisal result.
TABLE : 3.17
There is no conflict arise between the employees after PA is made
Category Head Count
!A 18 18H
A 8< 8<H
!A : :H
@@ 2; 2;H
A 1; 1;H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.17
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that there is no conflict arise bet)een
the e"ployees after 3A is "ade rating is strongly agreed by 18H+ agreed by 8<H+ strongly
disagreed by :H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 2;H and disagreed by 1;H of the
e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for there is no conflicts arise bet)een
the e"ployees after 3A is "ade.
TABLE : 3.18
The appraisal system exactly reflects your job performance.
Category Head Count
!A 1< 1<H
A 48 48H
!A 1 1H
@@ 20 20H
A 10 10H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.18
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the appraisal syste" e%actly
reflects their (ob perfor"ance rating is strongly agreed by 1<H+ agreed by 48H+ strongly
disagreed by 1H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 20H and disagreed by 10H of the
e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the appraisal syste" e%actly
reflects their (ob perfor"ance.
TABLE : 3.19
PA helping you to plan your work well
Category Head Count
!A 1< 1<H
A 48 48H
!A 4 4H
@@ 14 14H
A 21 21H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.19
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the 3A helping the" to plan your
)or* )ell rating is strongly agreed by 1<H+ agreed by 48H+ strongly disagreed by 4H+ neither
agreed nor disagreed by 14H and disagreed by 21H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber
of respondents agrees for the 3A helping the" to plan your )or* )ell.
TABLE : 3.20
PA System provides you a chance to communicate the support you need from your
subordinate to perform the job well.
Category Head Count
!A 1< 1<H
A 40 40H
!A 4 4H
@@ 2: 2:H
A ; ;H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.20
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the 3A syste" pro$ides the" a
chance to co""unicate the support the" need fro" their subordinate to perfor" the (ob )ell
rating is strongly agreed by 1<H+ agreed by 40H+ strongly disagreed by 4H+ neither agreed
nor disagreed by 2:H and disagreed by ;H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of
respondents agrees for the 3A syste" pro$ides the" a chance to co""unicate the support you
need fro" their subordinate to perfor" the (ob )ell.
TABLE : 3.21
PA successful in giving a clear understanding of the appraises job to both
appraiser and appraise.
Category Head Count
!A 20 20H
A :2 :2H
!A : :H
@@ 10 10H
A 18 18H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.21
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the 3A successful in gi$ing a clear
understanding of the appraises (ob to both appraiser and appraise rating is strongly agreed by
20H+ agreed by :2H+ strongly disagreed by :H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 10H and
disagreed by 18H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the 3A
successful in gi$ing a clear understanding of the appraises (ob to both appraiser and appraise.
Satisfactory performance management system is directly related to employee
turnover.
Category Head Count
!A 14 14H
A :1 :1H
!A 8 8H
@@ 20 20H
A 12 12H
Crand Total 100 100H
TABLE : 3.22
Fig: 3.22
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the satisfactory perfor"ance
"anage"ent syste" is directly related to e"ployee turno$er rating is strongly agreed by 14H+
agreed by :1H+ strongly disagreed by 8H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 20H and disagreed
by 12H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the satisfactory
perfor"ance "anage"ent syste" is directly related to e"ployee turno$er.

TABLE : 3.23
People with potentials spotted and developed for the future at the time of
conducting PMS
Category Head Count
!A 12 12H
A 41 41H
!A 4 4H
@@ 24 24H
A 11 11H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.23
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that people )ith potentials spotted and
de$eloped for the future at the ti"e of conducting 3M! rating is strongly agreed by 12H+
agreed by 41H+ strongly disagreed by 4H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 24H and disagreed
by 11H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for people )ith
potentials spotted and de$eloped for the future at the ti"e of conducting 3M!.

TABLE : 3.24
We follow certain criteria`s to manage performance appraisal system.
Category Head Count
!A 20 20H
A 44 44H
!A 2 2H
@@ 22 22H
A 12 12H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.24
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that they follo) certain criteriaAs to
"anage perfor"ance appraisal syste" rating is strongly agreed by 20H+ agreed by 44H+
strongly disagreed by 2H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 22H and disagreed by 12H of the
e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for they follo) certain criteriaAs to
"anage perfor"ance appraisal syste".

TABLE : 3.25
Merit, grading,team work, uniform and punctuality are the methods of PA
implemented in the organisation.
Category Head Count
!A 28 28H
A 4< 4<H
!A 0 0H
@@ 10 10H
A ; ;H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.25
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the "erit+ grading+ tea" )or*+
unifor" and punctuality are the "ethods of 3A i"ple"ented in the organisation rating is
strongly agreed by 28H+ agreed by 4<H+ strongly disagreed by 0H+ neither agreed nor
disagreed by 10H and disagreed by ;H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of
respondents agrees for the "erit+ grading+ tea" )or*+ unifor" and punctuality are the "ethods
of 3A i"ple"ented in the organisation.
TABLE : 3.26
System facilitate in improving the performance of both the individual and
organization.
Category Head Count
!A 11 11H
A 81 81H
!A 8 8H
@@ 21 21H
A 1< 1<H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.26
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the syste" facilitate in i"pro$ing
the perfor"ance of both the indi$idual and organi=ation rating is strongly agreed by 11H+
agreed by 81H+ strongly disagreed by 8H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 21H and disagreed
by 1<H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the syste"
facilitate in i"pro$ing the perfor"ance of both the indi$idual and organi=ation.
TABLE : 3.27
Salary administration and benefits to retain performing employees
Category Head Count
!A 2< 2<H
A 81 81H
!A ; ;H
@@ 2: 2:H
A 1 1H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.27
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the salary ad"inistration and
benefits to retain perfor"ing e"ployees rating is strongly agreed by 2<H+ agreed by 81H+
strongly disagreed by ;H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 2:H and disagreed by 1H of the
e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the salary ad"inistration and
benefits to retain perfor"ing e"ployees.

TABLE : 3.28
PA has positive effect on productivity
Category Head Count
!A 2< 2<H
A 4< 4<H
!A 4 4H
@@ 14 14H
A 0 0H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.28
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that 3A has positi$e effect on
producti$ity rating is strongly agreed by 2<H+ agreed by 4<H+ strongly disagreed by 4H+
neither agreed nor disagreed by 14H and disagreed by 0H of the e"ployees. !o the highest
nu"ber of respondents agrees for 3A has positi$e effect on producti$ity.
TABLE : 3.29
PA should be a base for promotion, job satisfaction and motivation of employees
Category Head Count
!A 20 20H
A 8; 8;H
!A < <H
@@ 1< 1<H
A 11 11H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.29
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that 3A should be a base for
pro"otion+ (ob satisfaction and "oti$ation of e"ployees rating is strongly agreed by 20H+
agreed by 8;H+ strongly disagreed by <H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 1<H and disagreed
by 11H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for 3A should be a
base for pro"otion+ (ob satisfaction and "oti$ation of e"ployees.
TABLE : 3.30
The objective of PA is promotion, assessing training and development needs and
pay rise
Category Head Count
!A 82 82H
A 84 84H
!A 10 10H
@@ 1< 1<H
A 0 0H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.30
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the ob(ecti$e of 3A is pro"otion+
assessing training and de$elop"ent needs and pay rise rating is strongly agreed by 82H+
agreed by 84H+ strongly disagreed by 10H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 1<H and
disagreed by 0H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the
ob(ecti$e of 3A is pro"otion+ assessing training and de$elop"ent needs and pay rise.
TABLE : 3.31
Performance management system the most effective tool used for managing the
organisation successfully .
Category Head Count
!A 11 11H
A 81 81H
!A 0 0H
@@ 11 11H
A 1; 1;H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.31
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the perfor"ance "anage"ent
syste" the "ost effecti$e tool used for "anaging the organisation successfully rating is
strongly agreed by 11H+ agreed by 81H+ strongly disagreed by 0H+ neither agreed nor
disagreed by 11H and disagreed by 1;H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of
respondents agrees for the perfor"ance "anage"ent syste" the "ost effecti$e tool used for
"anaging the organisation successfully.
TABLE : 3.32
PA system followed in your organisation help you in giving honest and objective
feedback of your behaviour
Category Head Count
A 48 48H
@@ 21 21H
!A 1: 1:H
A 10 10H
!A 8 8H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.32
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the 3A syste" follo)ed in their
organisation help the" in gi$ing honest and ob(ecti$e feedbac* of their beha$iour rating is
strongly agreed by 48H+ agreed by 21H+ strongly disagreed by 1:H+ neither agreed nor
disagreed by 10H and disagreed by 8H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of
respondents strongly agrees for the 3A syste" follo)ed in their organisation help the" in
gi$ing honest and ob(ecti$e feedbac* of their beha$iour.

TABLE : 3.33
System facilitate in improving the performance of both the individual and
organization.
Category Head Count
A 40 40H
@@ 21 21H
!A 1; 1;H
A 12 12H
!A 4 4H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.33
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and bar chart it is inferred that the syste" facilitate in i"pro$ing
the perfor"ance of both the indi$idual and organi=ation rating is strongly agreed by 1;H+
agreed by 40H+ strongly disagreed by 4H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 21H and disagreed
by 12H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the syste"
facilitate in i"pro$ing the perfor"ance of both the indi$idual and organi=ation.
TABLE : 3.34
Result of PA will have an effect on the future performance of the employee.
Category Head Count
A 80 80H
!A 22 22H
@@ 20 20H
A 1; 1;H
!A : :H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.34
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and bar chart it is inferred that the result of 3A )ill ha$e an effect
on the future perfor"ance of the e"ployee rating is strongly agreed by 22H+ agreed by 80H+
strongly disagreed by :H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 20H and disagreed by 1;H of the
e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the result of 3A )ill ha$e an
effect on the future perfor"ance of the e"ployee.
TABLE : 3.35
The appraisal system exactly reflects your job performance.
Category Head Count
A 4: 4:H
!A 20 20H
@@ 1; 1;H
A 1: 1:H
!A 8 8H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.35
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and bar chart it is inferred that the appraisal syste" e%actly
reflects their (ob perfor"ance rating is strongly agreed by 20H+ agreed by 4:H+ strongly
disagreed by 8H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 1;H and disagreed by 1:H of the
e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for the appraisal syste" e%actly
reflects their (ob perfor"ance.
TABLE : 3.36
De - motivation, Retention, Ineffective Teamwork is the effect of a poor appraisal
system.
Category Head Count
A 8: 8:H
@@ 20 20H
!A 1; 1;H
A 18 18H
!A 1 1H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.36
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and bar chart it is inferred that e K "oti$ation+ -etention+
&neffecti$e Tea")or* is the effect of a poor appraisal syste" rating is strongly agreed by 1;H+
agreed by 8:H+ strongly disagreed by 1H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 20H and disagreed
by 18H of the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for e K "oti$ation+
-etention+ &neffecti$e Tea")or* is the effect of a poor appraisal syste".
TABLE: 3.37
Employee's comments and suggestions taken into consideration before the
appraisal
Category Head Count
A 41 41H
@@ 28 28H
A 10 10H
!A 1: 1:H
!A : :H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.37
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the e"ployees co""ents and
suggestions ta*en into consideration before the appraisal is strongly agreed by 1:H+ agreed by
41H+ strongly disagreed by :H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 28H and disagreed by10H of
the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agree that the e"ployeeAs co""ents and
suggestions are ta*en into consideration before the appraisal process.
TABLE: 3.38
I act upon the results of your PA
Category Head Count
A 80 80H
!A 20 20H
@@ 24 24H
A 11 11H
!A 8 8H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.38
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and pie chart it is inferred that the e"ployees act according to the
perfor"ance appraisalAs results are strongly agreed by 20H+ agreed by 80H+ strongly
disagreed by 8H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 24H and disagree by 11H of the e"ployees.
!o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees that they act according to the results of their
perfor"ance appraisal.
TABLE : 3.39
Recognition given to high performer helps in motivating the employees.
Category Head Count
A 40 40H
@@ 24 24H
!A 11 11H
A 12 12H
!A : :H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.39
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and bar chart it is inferred that recognition gi$en to high
perfor"er helps in "oti$ating the e"ployees rating is strongly agreed by 11H+ agreed by
40H+ strongly disagreed by :H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 24H and disagreed by 12H of
the e"ployees. !o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for recognition gi$en to high
perfor"er helps in "oti$ating the e"ployees.
TABLE : 3.40
PA is made on the basis of total output and behavioural efficiency.
Category Head Count
A 8; 8;H
!A 80 80H
@@ 21 21H
A < <H
!A 4 4H
Crand Total 100 100H
Fig: 3.40
INTERPRETATION:
7ro" the abo$e table and bar chart it is inferred that 3A is "ade on the basis of total
output and beha$ioural efficiency rating is strongly agreed by 80H+ agreed by 8;H+ strongly
disagreed by 4H+ neither agreed nor disagreed by 21H and disagreed by <H of the e"ployees.
!o the highest nu"ber of respondents agrees for 3A is "ade on the basis of total output and
beha$ioural efficiency.
3.2 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS
&t has been found that !uper$isors and "anagers responsible for conducting
3erfor"ance Appraisal are included and the e%ecuti$e to )ho" they report.
&t has been found that "ore nu"ber of e"ployees out of total nu"ber of e"ployees
strongly agree for the needs of 3A in the organi=ation.
&t has been found that "ore nu"ber of e"ployees agree )ith the e%isting perfor"ance
appraisal syste" and also 3A helps in reducing grie$ances a"ong the e"ployees.
&t is found that "ore nu"ber of e"ployees agree )ith the the 3ost appraisal
training progra""es )hich are effecti$e for indi$idual and organi=ation de$elop"ent
&t is found that "ore nu"ber of e"ployees agree that the 3A helps the" to identify the
strengths and )ea*ness and the desired target of an organi=ation is achie$ed by 3A
syste".
&t is found that 3A helps to plan the )or* of the e"ployees $ery )ell.
&t is found that that the e"ployees agree )ith the 3A+ )hich is successful in gi$ing a
clear understanding of the appraises (ob to both appraiser and appraise.
&t is found that Merit+ grading+tea" )or*+ unifor" and punctuality are the "ethods of
3A i"ple"ented in the organisation.
3erfor"ance Appraisal !yste" facilitate in i"pro$ing the perfor"ance of both the
indi$idual and organi=ation.
&t is found that "ore nu"ber of e"ployees agree that the salary ad"inistration and
benefits are for retaining the e"ployees.
&t is found that "ore nu"ber of e"ployees agree that the 3A should be a base for
pro"otion+ (ob satisfaction and "oti$ation of e"ployees.
&t is found that the 3erfor"ance "anage"ent syste" is the "ost effecti$e tool used for
"anaging the organisation successfully .
&t is found that the -esult of 3A )ill ha$e an effect on the future perfor"ance of the
e"ployee.
&t is found that the '"ployeeDs co""ents and suggestions ta*en into consideration
before the appraisal
&t is found that the 3A is "ade on the basis of total output and beha$ioural efficiency
CHAPTER IV
4.1SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
4.1.1 SUGGESTIONS
The 3erfor"ance Appraisal !yste" process "ust operate at least t)ice or thrice in a year
so that it can lead to the proper (udge"ent of perfor"ance for the co"plete appraisal
period.
To generate significant+ rele$ant+ open and $alid infor"ation about the e"ployeeAs
perfor"ance based on /ey 3erfor"ance Areas 5 /3AAs6
To generate ade2uate feedbac* and guidelines fro" the i""ediate superior.
To pro$ide inputs for re)ards and to bring out openness.
To i"pro$e the >uality and e%tent of co""unication bet)een the officers and their
subordinates.
4.1.1.1 EMPLOYEE`S SUGGESTIONS ABOUT PERFORMANCE
APPRAISAL
This pro(ect consists of the infor"ation about the perfor"ance appraisal of the
e"ployees. !o considering this factor+ this topic beco"es one of the "ost i"portant parts of
the pro(ect as it consists of the opinion of the e"ployees )ho )or* in the Airports Authority of
&ndia+ 4hennai. The response of e"ployees )as "ar$ellous and they ha$e gi$en their $aluable
opinion about perfor"ance appraisal as a result of the last 2uestion included in the
2uestionnaire. !o the opinions of the e"ployees )ere as follo)s?
The e%isting perfor"ance appraisal "ust be i"pro$ed.
'"ployeeAs perfor"ance rating "ust be infor"ed after the appraisal syste"
is done and '"ployeeAs co""ents and suggestions "ust be considered..
3A "ust be ta*en sincerely and also "ust be e$aluated sincerely.
3A "ust be done 2uarterly rather than annually.
The result of 3A "ust be infor"ed to the e"ployees for the further
i"pro$isation in the future.
iscussion of each e"ployees perfor"ance rating and the super$isorAs
reasons for that rating "ust be "ade.
These opinions are see"ed to be $aluable and effecti$e as one of the effecti$e things has been
noticed that the 3A "ust be ta*en sincerely and also "ust be e$aluated sincerely and
iscussion of each e"ployees perfor"ance rating and the super$isorAs reasons for that rating
"ust be "ade.
4.2 RECOMMENDATIONS
&t has reco""ended to the co"pany that if the e"ployees )ere gi$en the recognition
for their perfor"ance+ this )ill help to "oti$ate the e"ployees in their )or* )hich
results in reaching the "ission of the organi=ation.
&t is reco""ended that the co"pany should allo) the appraise and the reporting
Officer needs to be in$ol$ed in inter$ie)s "ore often.
&t is reco""ended that the reporting officer should offer an opportunity for the
e"ployee to tal* about their strength and their )ea*ness.
&t is reco""ended that 3A syste" process "ust operate atleast t)ice or thrice in a
year.
&t is reco""ended to the co"pany that it should allo) the e"ployeeAs to rate their
o)n 3erfor"ance.
&t is reco""ended to the co"pany to follo) the 800 degree appraisal
&t is reco""ended to the co"pany that+ interpersonal relationships a"ong the
e"ployees of different depart"ents should i"pro$e by bridging the gap bet)een
superiors and subordinates.
&t is reco""ended to the co"pany that in the beginning of each year+ each e"ployee
"ust *no) the perfor"ance standards on )hich their perfor"ance )ill be (udged at
the end of the year.
&t is reco""ended to the co"pany that the o$er ti"e should be ta*en care of at ti"e of
3A+ )hich )ould "oti$ate the e"ployees to perfor" better for longer hours.
&t is reco""ended to the co"pany to instantly recogni=e any good )or* done by the
e"ployees ho)e$er s"all it "ay be+ they should be identified and re)arded to
encourage and support the" in )or*. This )ill help in the long run in sustaining the
high "orale of the e"ployees and also enhancing it in the future.
&t is reco""ended that e"ployees shouldnAt be burdened )ith )or*load but initially
they should be gi$en distributed )or* and gradually the a"ount of )or*load can be
increased )ith the passage of ti"e as they gain "ore e%perience.
CHAPTER V
CONCLUSION
3ro(ect at AA& )as $ery "uch useful+ educati$e and infor"ati$e and has gi$en "e an
opportunity to *no) the functioning of Airports Authority &ndia. The e%perience gained at this
estee"ed organi=ation )ill help "e in "y future. This "onth long progra" has gi$en "e an
idea of Ho) an organi=ation )or*s )ith $arious ran*ing staff )ith hierarchy+ the decision
"a*ing and Managerial !*ills.
3erfor"ance Appraisal is a $ehicle to $alidate and refine organisational actions. &t
pro$ides feedbac* to e"ployees )ith an eye on i"pro$ing future perfor"ance.3erfor"ance of
al"ost all e"ployees is good and also the en$iron"ent of the co"pany.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
http?BB))).aai.aeroBpublicQnoticesBaaisiteQtestB"ainQne).(sp
http?BBen.)i*ipedia.orgB)i*iB3erfor"nceQappraisal
http?BBen.)i*ipedia.orgB)i*iBAirportsQAuthorityQofQindia
http?BB))).google.co.inBi"agresR
u"S1Nh1SenNsaS@Nbi)S1800NbihS00;Ntb"SischNtbnidSly$nT*yQnn4(uM?Ni"grefurl
http?BB))).aai.aeroBpublicQnoticesBaaisiteQtestBOrgQstru.(spNdocidSB."781bdon&1MNi"g
url
ANNEXURE I