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1.

Summary

The purpose of this test is to show students how tensile tests are fundamental for
understanding properties of different materials, and how they will behave under load.
The data from each test was used to determine valuable material properties such
as ultimate tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, and yield strength. And the material
properties were used for comparing the materials to each other, and to define the material
as brittle or ductile.

2. Introduction

In tensile testing we attempted to obtain the maximum force to which two
different types of brass, one of steel and one of aluminium may be subjected to traction,
as well as their corresponding graph Stress vs Strain. The experiment also aimed to real-
time behavior of the tested material, with the aid of computer interconnected with the
testing machine.

3. Equipment

1 - SATEC Material Testing System
1 - PC with data capture software
1 - T-1M LVDT Extensometer (50 mm gauge length)
1 MTS 810 materials Testing System
1 PC with MTS control software
1 Extensometer 50 mm gauge length

4. Procedure

Before the beginning of the test it is needed to measure the length and the cross-
sectional area of each sample for future calculations.

4.1. SATEC Material Testing System

1. Fix the sample in the testing machine fixing first the bottom of the sample to the
lower claw and after the upper claw. Leave the sample centralized between the
claws.
2. To fix the extensometer, first it is needed to locate it in the middle of the sample.
After that fix the lower part of the extensometer to the sample and then the upper
part.
3. Apply the load cell and begin the test.

4.2. MTS 810 materials Testing System

1. Using clippers, fix the sample to the testing machine. First the bottom of the
sample to the lower claw and then the top of the sample to the upper claw. Leave
the sample centralized between the claws.
2. Still using claws, fix the extensometer to the middle of the sample. First the lower
part of the extensometer and ten the upper part.
3. Apply the load cell and begin the test.


5. Procedure

To do the procedure first open the configuration of the software and open the program that will
catch the information from the machine. Than load in w clamps, for the hands be not in danger
that machine must be off. Clamp the lower jaw first, than adjust to be firm and symmetric, than
clamp upper jaw grip strength. Place extensometer on test region, and completely vertical, pull
out to zero pin, must zero out load cell when machine started charge pod force mode to zero it
out, use auto-zero on LVDT and extensometer, then charge to length mode again, then run the
test from the computer.

6. Graphs:
0
200
400
0 0,1 0,2
S
t
r
e
s
s

(
M
p
a
)
Strain (mm/mm)
Stress vs Strain
Aluminium
Brass 1
Brass 2
Steel
Graphic 1
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
0 0,02 0,04 0,06 0,08 0,1 0,12 0,14 0,16
S
t
r
e
s
s

(
M
p
a
)
Distance (mm)
Stress vs Distance
Aluminium
Brass 1
Brass 2
Steel

Graphic 2

y = 47354x +
3,8559
y = 37272x +
38,745
y = 16737x +
34,596
y = 34260x +
20,872
0
200
400
0 0,01 0,02
S
t
r
e
s
s

(
M
p
a
)
Strain (mm/mm)
Aluminium
Brass 1
Brass 2

Graphic 3


7. Conclusion

From the tests realised in the laboratory it is possible to obtain some
characteristics of each material such as: fracture stress, ultimate stress, modulus of
elasticity and ductility. It was possible to realize that the most ductile sample among the
four tested samples was the steel sample. It means that the steel sample can support a
higher load than the others, but it also deforms more than the others. This can be good or
bad depending on what purpose the material is going to be used.











8. References

Callister, W. D. (1991). Materials Science and Engineering. John Wiley & Sons