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Seawater

Greenhouses
Sean Brady
EDT 321
A World in Crisis
20% of the worlds population live in regions that have
less water than they need

The worlds population is increasing by 80 million per
year

By 2025, 1/3 of the worlds population will face water
shortages

70% of all fresh water consumed annually is linked to
agriculture
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Looking to Nature for Solutions
Charlie Patton, inventor of the seawater greenhouse, was
inspired by the natural water cycle

His design requires only the sun and seawater to produce
both fresh water and food

It is based entirely on the simple principles of
evaporation and condensation
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Basic Design
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Similar to any greenhouse, it can produce a variety of crops
including
Tomatoes
Lettuce
Peppers
Herbs
Flowers
Economic Viability
Seawater Greenhouse
vs. Conventional
Greenhouse
Why
Revenue No Difference Similar Crop Yields
Operating Costs 10-25% Less Free Water
No Fossil Fuel Inputs
No/Reduced Pesticide
Costs
Fixed Costs 10-15% Less No Heating or Cooling
costs
No Desalination Costs
Cheaper Land Costs
Returns 15-35% Greater
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Concentrating Solar Power
Linking Seawater Greenhouses with Concentrating Solar
Power:

Creates not just energy independence but an energy
surplus

Energy surplus can be routed through existing
distribution networks (at a profit)
Energy surplus can be used to supply power for
traditional desalination (energy rich)
Cogeneration can produce even more fresh water
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Cogeneration
By utilizing the waste heat of the concentrating solar
power more fresh water can be produced

Why cogeneration?
CSP plants operate at an ideal range between 300-
550 C
Desalination operates between 80-120 C
After passing through the turbine the steam must be
condensed before beginning the process again
This heat is usually just wasted but is perfectly
suited for desalinization
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Sahara Forest Project
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Sahara Forest Project
A 200,000 m
2
demonstration center in Jordan on the Red
Sea
Fresh water
Food
Energy (CSP)
Biofuels (algae ponds and halophytes)
Encourage vegetation restoration surrounding the
facility through its micro climate
Salt production in evaporative ponds

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Sahara Forest Project
Projected numbers:
34,000 tons of produce
155 GWh Electricity
1500 tons of CO
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Sequestration

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References
http://www.seawatergreenhouse.com/index.html

http://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2011/02/18/seawater-
greenhouses-produce-tomatoes-in-the-desert/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rO5rUqeCFY4

http://solareis.anl.gov/guide/solar/csp/

http://saharaforestproject.com/

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