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Chapter 1

IN the year 1878 I took my degree of Doctor of Medicine of the University of London, and proceeded to Netley to go through the course prescri ed for surgeons in the army! "aving completed my studies there, I #as duly attached to the $ifth Northum erland $usiliers as %ssistant &urgeon! 'he regiment #as stationed in India at the time, and efore I could (oin it, the second %fghan #ar had roken out! )n landing at *om ay, I learned that my corps had advanced through the passes, and #as already deep in the enemy+s country! I follo#ed, ho#ever, #ith many other officers #ho #ere in the same situation as myself, and succeeded in reaching ,andahar in safety, #here I found my regiment, and at once entered upon my ne# duties! 'he campaign rought honours and promotion to many, ut for me it had nothing ut misfortune and disaster! I #as removed from my rigade and attached to the *erkshires, #ith #hom I served at the fatal attle of Mai#and! 'here I #as struck on the shoulder y a -e.ail ullet, #hich shattered the one and gra.ed the su clavian artery! I should have fallen into the hands of the murderous /ha.is had it not een for the devotion and courage sho#n y Murray, my orderly, #ho thre# me across a pack0horse, and succeeded in ringing me safely to the *ritish lines! 1orn #ith pain, and #eak from the prolonged hardships #hich I had undergone, I #as removed, #ith a great train of #ounded sufferers, to the ase hospital at 2esha#ar! "ere I rallied, and had already improved so far as to e a le to #alk a out the #ards, and even to ask a little upon the verandah, #hen I #as struck do#n y enteric fever, that curse of our Indian possessions! $or months my life #as despaired of, and #hen at last I came to myself and ecame convalescent, I #as so #eak and emaciated that a medical oard determined that not a day should e lost in sending me ack to 3ngland! I #as dispatched, accordingly, in the troopship 4)rontes,4 and landed a month later on 2ortsmouth (etty, #ith my health irretrieva ly ruined, ut #ith permission from a paternal government to spend the ne5t nine months in attempting to improve it! I had neither kith nor kin in 3ngland, and #as therefore as free as air 00 or as free as an income of eleven shillings and si5pence a day #ill permit a man to e! Under such circumstances, I naturally gravitated to London, that great cesspool into #hich all the loungers and idlers of the 3mpire are irresisti ly drained! 'here I stayed for some time at a private hotel in the &trand, leading a comfortless, meaningless e5istence, and spending such money as I had, considera ly more freely than I ought! &o alarming did the state of my finances ecome, that I soon reali.ed that I must either leave the metropolis and rusticate some#here in the country, or that I must make a complete alteration in my style of living! ,hoosing the latter alternative, I egan y making up my mind to leave the hotel, and to take up my 6uarters in some less pretentious and less e5pensive domicile! )n the very day that I had come to this conclusion, I #as standing at the ,riterion *ar, #hen some one tapped me on the shoulder, and turning round I recogni.ed young &tamford, #ho had een a dresser under me at *arts! 'he sight of a friendly face in the great #ilderness of London is a pleasant thing indeed to a lonely man! In old days &tamford had never een a particular crony of mine, ut no# I hailed him #ith enthusiasm, and he, in his turn, appeared to e delighted to see me! In the e5u erance of my (oy, I asked him to lunch #ith me at the "ol orn, and #e started off together in a hansom! 41hatever have you een doing #ith yourself, 1atson74 he asked in undisguised #onder, as #e rattled through the cro#ded London streets! 48ou are as thin as a lath and as ro#n as a nut!4 I gave him a short sketch of my adventures, and had hardly concluded it y the time that #e reached our destination! 42oor devil94 he said, commiseratingly, after he had listened to my misfortunes! 41hat are you up to no#74

4Looking for lodgings!4 :;< I ans#ered! 4'rying to solve the pro lem as to #hether it is possi le to get comforta le rooms at a reasona le price!4 4'hat+s a strange thing,4 remarked my companion= 4you are the second man to0day that has used that e5pression to me!4 4%nd #ho #as the first74 I asked! 4% fello# #ho is #orking at the chemical la oratory up at the hospital! "e #as emoaning himself this morning ecause he could not get someone to go halves #ith him in some nice rooms #hich he had found, and #hich #ere too much for his purse!4 4*y -ove94 I cried, 4if he really #ants someone to share the rooms and the e5pense, I am the very man for him! I should prefer having a partner to eing alone!4 8oung &tamford looked rather strangely at me over his #ine0glass! 48ou don+t kno# &herlock "olmes yet,4 he said= 4perhaps you #ould not care for him as a constant companion!4 41hy, #hat is there against him74 4)h, I didn+t say there #as anything against him! "e is a little 6ueer in his ideas 00 an enthusiast in some ranches of science! %s far as I kno# he is a decent fello# enough!4 4% medical student, I suppose74 said I! 4No 00 I have no idea #hat he intends to go in for! I elieve he is #ell up in anatomy, and he is a first0class chemist= ut, as far as I kno#, he has never taken out any systematic medical classes! "is studies are very desultory and eccentric, ut he has amassed a lot of out0of0the #ay kno#ledge #hich #ould astonish his professors!4 4Did you never ask him #hat he #as going in for74 I asked! 4No= he is not a man that it is easy to dra# out, though he can e communicative enough #hen the fancy sei.es him!4 4I should like to meet him,4 I said! 4If I am to lodge #ith anyone, I should prefer a man of studious and 6uiet ha its! I am not strong enough yet to stand much noise or e5citement! I had enough of oth in %fghanistan to last me for the remainder of my natural e5istence! "o# could I meet this friend of yours74 4"e is sure to e at the la oratory,4 returned my companion! 4"e either avoids the place for #eeks, or else he #orks there from morning to night! If you like, #e shall drive round together after luncheon!4 4,ertainly,4 I ans#ered, and the conversation drifted a#ay into other channels! %s #e made our #ay to the hospital after leaving the "ol orn, &tamford gave me a fe# more particulars a out the gentleman #hom I proposed to take as a fello#0lodger! 48ou mustn+t lame me if you don+t get on #ith him,4 he said= 4I kno# nothing more of him than I have learned from meeting him occasionally in the la oratory! 8ou proposed this arrangement, so you must not hold me responsi le!4 4If #e don+t get on it #ill e easy to part company,4 I ans#ered! 4It seems to me, &tamford,4 I added, looking hard at my companion, 4that you have some reason for #ashing your hands of the matter! Is this fello#+s temper so formida le, or #hat is it7 Don+t e mealy0mouthed a out it!4

4It is not easy to e5press the ine5pressi le,4 he ans#ered #ith a laugh! 4"olmes is a little too scientific for my tastes 00 it approaches to cold0 loodedness! I could imagine his giving a friend a little pinch of the latest vegeta le alkaloid, not out of malevolence, you understand, ut simply out of a spirit of in6uiry in order to have an accurate idea of the effects! 'o do him (ustice, I think that he #ould take it himself #ith the same readiness! "e appears to have a passion for definite and e5act kno#ledge!4 4>ery right too!4 48es, ut it may e pushed to e5cess! 1hen it comes to eating the su (ects in the dissecting0 rooms #ith a stick, it is certainly taking rather a i.arre shape!4 4*eating the su (ects94 48es, to verify ho# far ruises may e produced after death! I sa# him at it #ith my o#n eyes!4 4%nd yet you say he is not a medical student74 4No! "eaven kno#s #hat the o (ects of his studies are! *ut here #e are, and you must form your o#n impressions a out him!4 %s he spoke, #e turned do#n a narro# lane and passed through a small side0door, #hich opened into a #ing of the great hospital! It #as familiar ground to me, and I needed no guiding as #e ascended the leak stone staircase and made our #ay do#n the long corridor #ith its vista of #hite#ashed #all and dun0coloured doors! Near the further end a lo# arched passage ranched a#ay from it and led to the chemical la oratory! 'his #as a lofty cham er, lined and littered #ith countless ottles! *road, lo# ta les #ere scattered a out, #hich ristled #ith retorts, test0tu es, and little *unsen lamps, #ith their lue flickering flames! 'here #as only one student in the room, #ho #as ending over a distant ta le a sor ed in his #ork! %t the sound of our steps he glanced round and sprang to his feet #ith a cry of pleasure! 4I+ve found it9 I+ve found it,4 he shouted to my companion, running to#ards us #ith a test0tu e in his hand! 4I have found a re0agent #hich is precipitated y hoemoglo in, :?< and y nothing else!4 "ad he discovered a gold mine, greater delight could not have shone upon his features! 4Dr! 1atson, Mr! &herlock "olmes,4 said &tamford, introducing us! 4"o# are you74 he said cordially, gripping my hand #ith a strength for #hich I should hardly have given him credit! 48ou have een in %fghanistan, I perceive!4 4"o# on earth did you kno# that74 I asked in astonishment! 4Never mind,4 said he, chuckling to himself! 4'he 6uestion no# is a out hoemoglo in! No dou t you see the significance of this discovery of mine74 4It is interesting, chemically, no dou t,4 I ans#ered, 4 ut practically 00004 41hy, man, it is the most practical medico0legal discovery for years! Don+t you see that it gives us an infalli le test for lood stains! ,ome over here no#94 "e sei.ed me y the coat0sleeve in his eagerness, and dre# me over to the ta le at #hich he had een #orking! 4Let us have some fresh lood,4 he said, digging a long odkin into his finger, and dra#ing off the resulting drop of lood in a chemical pipette! 4No#, I add this small 6uantity of lood to a litre of #ater! 8ou perceive that the resulting mi5ture has the appearance of pure #ater! 'he proportion of lood cannot e more than one in a million! I have no dou t, ho#ever, that #e shall e a le to o tain the characteristic reaction!4 %s he spoke, he thre# into the vessel a fe# #hite crystals, and then added some drops of a transparent fluid! In an instant the contents assumed a dull mahogany colour, and a ro#nish dust #as precipitated to the ottom of the glass (ar! 4"a9 ha94 he cried, clapping his hands, and looking as delighted as a child #ith a ne# toy! 41hat do you think of that74

4It seems to e a very delicate test,4 I remarked! 4*eautiful9 eautiful9 'he old /uiacum test #as very clumsy and uncertain! &o is the microscopic e5amination for lood corpuscles! 'he latter is valueless if the stains are a fe# hours old! No#, this appears to act as #ell #hether the lood is old or ne#! "ad this test een invented, there are hundreds of men no# #alking the earth #ho #ould long ago have paid the penalty of their crimes!4 4Indeed94 I murmured! 4,riminal cases are continually hinging upon that one point! % man is suspected of a crime months perhaps after it has een committed! "is linen or clothes are e5amined, and ro#nish stains discovered upon them! %re they lood stains, or mud stains, or rust stains, or fruit stains, or #hat are they7 'hat is a 6uestion #hich has pu..led many an e5pert, and #hy7 *ecause there #as no relia le test! No# #e have the &herlock "olmes+ test, and there #ill no longer e any difficulty!4 "is eyes fairly glittered as he spoke, and he put his hand over his heart and o#ed as if to some applauding cro#d con(ured up y his imagination! 48ou are to e congratulated,4 I remarked, considera ly surprised at his enthusiasm! 4'here #as the case of >on *ischoff at $rankfort last year! "e #ould certainly have een hung had this test een in e5istence! 'hen there #as Mason of *radford, and the notorious Muller, and Lefevre of Montpellier, and &amson of ne# )rleans! I could name a score of cases in #hich it #ould have een decisive!4 48ou seem to e a #alking calendar of crime,4 said &tamford #ith a laugh! 48ou might start a paper on those lines! ,all it the @2olice Ne#s of the 2ast!+4 4>ery interesting reading it might e made, too,4 remarked &herlock "olmes, sticking a small piece of plaster over the prick on his finger! 4I have to e careful,4 he continued, turning to me #ith a smile, 4for I da le #ith poisons a good deal!4 "e held out his hand as he spoke, and I noticed that it #as all mottled over #ith similar pieces of plaster, and discoloured #ith strong acids! 41e came here on usiness,4 said &tamford, sitting do#n on a high three0legged stool, and pushing another one in my direction #ith his foot! 4My friend here #ants to take diggings, and as you #ere complaining that you could get no one to go halves #ith you, I thought that I had etter ring you together!4 &herlock "olmes seemed delighted at the idea of sharing his rooms #ith me! 4I have my eye on a suite in *aker &treet,4 he said, 4#hich #ould suit us do#n to the ground! 8ou don+t mind the smell of strong to acco, I hope74 4I al#ays smoke @ship+s+ myself,4 I ans#ered! 4'hat+s good enough! I generally have chemicals a out, and occasionally do e5periments! 1ould that annoy you74 4*y no means!4 4Let me see 00 #hat are my other shortcomings! I get in the dumps at times, and don+t open my mouth for days on end! 8ou must not think I am sulky #hen I do that! -ust let me alone, and I+ll soon e right! 1hat have you to confess no#7 It+s (ust as #ell for t#o fello#s to kno# the #orst of one another efore they egin to live together!4 I laughed at this cross0e5amination! 4I keep a ull pup,4 I said, 4and I o (ect to ro#s ecause my nerves are shaken, and I get up at all sorts of ungodly hours, and I am e5tremely la.y! I have another set of vices #hen I+m #ell, ut those are the principal ones at present!4 4Do you include violin0playing in your category of ro#s74 he asked, an5iously!

4It depends on the player,4 I ans#ered! 4% #ell0played violin is a treat for the gods 00 a adly0 played one 00004 4)h, that+s all right,4 he cried, #ith a merry laugh! 4I think #e may consider the thing as settled 00 that is, if the rooms are agreea le to you!4 41hen shall #e see them74 4,all for me here at noon to0morro#, and #e+ll go together and settle everything,4 he ans#ered! 4%ll right 00 noon e5actly,4 said I, shaking his hand! 1e left him #orking among his chemicals, and #e #alked together to#ards my hotel! 4*y the #ay,4 I asked suddenly, stopping and turning upon &tamford, 4ho# the deuce did he kno# that I had come from %fghanistan74 My companion smiled an enigmatical smile! 4'hat+s (ust his little peculiarity,4 he said! 4% good many people have #anted to kno# ho# he finds things out!4 4)h9 a mystery is it74 I cried, ru ing my hands! 4'his is very pi6uant! I am much o liged to you for ringing us together! @'he proper study of mankind is man,+ you kno#!4 48ou must study him, then,4 &tamford said, as he ade me good0 ye! 48ou+ll find him a knotty pro lem, though! I+ll #ager he learns more a out you than you a out him! /ood0 ye!4 4/ood0 ye,4 I ans#ered, and strolled on to my hotel, considera ly interested in my ne# ac6uaintance!

Chapter 2

13 met ne5t day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No! AA1*, :B< *aker &treet, of #hich he had spoken at our meeting! 'hey consisted of a couple of comforta le ed0rooms and a single large airy sitting0room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated y t#o road #indo#s! &o desira le in every #ay #ere the apartments, and so moderate did the terms seem #hen divided et#een us, that the argain #as concluded upon the spot, and #e at once entered into possession! 'hat very evening I moved my things round from the hotel, and on the follo#ing morning &herlock "olmes follo#ed me #ith several o5es and portmanteaus! $or a day or t#o #e #ere usily employed in unpacking and laying out our property to the est advantage! 'hat done, #e gradually egan to settle do#n and to accommodate ourselves to our ne# surroundings! "olmes #as certainly not a difficult man to live #ith! "e #as 6uiet in his #ays, and his ha its #ere regular! It #as rare for him to e up after ten at night, and he had invaria ly reakfasted and gone out efore I rose in the morning! &ometimes he spent his day at the chemical la oratory, sometimes in the dissecting0rooms, and occasionally in long #alks, #hich appeared to take him into the lo#est portions of the ,ity! Nothing could e5ceed his energy #hen the #orking fit #as upon him= ut no# and again a reaction #ould sei.e him, and for days on end he #ould lie upon the sofa in the sitting0room, hardly uttering a #ord or moving a muscle from morning to night! )n these occasions I have noticed such a dreamy, vacant e5pression in his eyes, that I might have suspected him of eing addicted to the use of some narcotic, had not the temperance and cleanliness of his #hole life for idden such a notion! %s the #eeks #ent y, my interest in him and my curiosity as to his aims in life, gradually deepened and increased! "is very person and appearance #ere such as to strike the attention of the most casual o server! In height he #as rather over si5 feet, and so e5cessively lean that he

seemed to e considera ly taller! "is eyes #ere sharp and piercing, save during those intervals of torpor to #hich I have alluded= and his thin, ha#k0like nose gave his #hole e5pression an air of alertness and decision! "is chin, too, had the prominence and s6uareness #hich mark the man of determination! "is hands #ere invaria ly lotted #ith ink and stained #ith chemicals, yet he #as possessed of e5traordinary delicacy of touch, as I fre6uently had occasion to o serve #hen I #atched him manipulating his fragile philosophical instruments! 'he reader may set me do#n as a hopeless usy ody, #hen I confess ho# much this man stimulated my curiosity, and ho# often I endeavoured to reak through the reticence #hich he sho#ed on all that concerned himself! *efore pronouncing (udgment, ho#ever, e it remem ered, ho# o (ectless #as my life, and ho# little there #as to engage my attention! My health for ade me from venturing out unless the #eather #as e5ceptionally genial, and I had no friends #ho #ould call upon me and reak the monotony of my daily e5istence! Under these circumstances, I eagerly hailed the little mystery #hich hung around my companion, and spent much of my time in endeavouring to unravel it! "e #as not studying medicine! "e had himself, in reply to a 6uestion, confirmed &tamford+s opinion upon that point! Neither did he appear to have pursued any course of reading #hich might fit him for a degree in science or any other recogni.ed portal #hich #ould give him an entrance into the learned #orld! 8et his .eal for certain studies #as remarka le, and #ithin eccentric limits his kno#ledge #as so e5traordinarily ample and minute that his o servations have fairly astounded me! &urely no man #ould #ork so hard or attain such precise information unless he had some definite end in vie#! Desultory readers are seldom remarka le for the e5actness of their learning! No man urdens his mind #ith small matters unless he has some very good reason for doing so! "is ignorance #as as remarka le as his kno#ledge! )f contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to kno# ne5t to nothing! Upon my 6uoting 'homas ,arlyle, he in6uired in the naivest #ay #ho he might e and #hat he had done! My surprise reached a clima5, ho#ever, #hen I found incidentally that he #as ignorant of the ,opernican 'heory and of the composition of the &olar &ystem! 'hat any civili.ed human eing in this nineteenth century should not e a#are that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to e to me such an e5traordinary fact that I could hardly reali.e it! 48ou appear to e astonished,4 he said, smiling at my e5pression of surprise! 4No# that I do kno# it I shall do my est to forget it!4 4'o forget it94 48ou see,4 he e5plained, 4I consider that a man+s rain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it #ith such furniture as you choose! % fool takes in all the lum er of every sort that he comes across, so that the kno#ledge #hich might e useful to him gets cro#ded out, or at est is (um led up #ith a lot of other things so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it! No# the skilful #orkman is very careful indeed as to #hat he takes into his rain0attic! "e #ill have nothing ut the tools #hich may help him in doing his #ork, ut of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order! It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic #alls and can distend to any e5tent! Depend upon it there comes a time #hen for every addition of kno#ledge you forget something that you kne# efore! It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts el o#ing out the useful ones!4 4*ut the &olar &ystem94 I protested! 41hat the deuce is it to me74 he interrupted impatiently= 4you say that #e go round the sun! If #e #ent round the moon it #ould not make a penny#orth of difference to me or to my #ork!4 I #as on the point of asking him #hat that #ork might e, ut something in his manner sho#ed me that the 6uestion #ould e an un#elcome one! I pondered over our short conversation, ho#ever, and endeavoured to dra# my deductions from it! "e said that he #ould ac6uire no kno#ledge #hich did not ear upon his o (ect! 'herefore all the kno#ledge #hich he possessed #as such as #ould e useful to him! I enumerated in my o#n mind all the various points upon #hich he had sho#n me that he #as e5ceptionally #ell0informed! I even took a pencil and (otted them do#n! I could not help smiling at the document #hen I had completed it! It ran in this #ay 00

&"3CL),D ")LM3& 00 his limits! 1! Dno#ledge of Literature! 00 Nil! A! 2hilosophy! 00 Nil! ;! %stronomy! 00 Nil! ?! 2olitics! 00 $ee le! B! *otany! 00 >aria le! 1ell up in elladonna, opium, and poisons generally! Dno#s nothing of practical gardening! E! /eology! 00 2ractical, ut limited! 'ells at a glance different soils from each other! %fter #alks has sho#n me splashes upon his trousers, and told me y their colour and consistence in #hat part of London he had received them! 7! ,hemistry! 00 2rofound! 8! %natomy! 00 %ccurate, ut unsystematic! F! &ensational Literature! 00 Immense! "e appears to kno# every detail of every horror perpetrated in the century! 1G! 2lays the violin #ell! 11! Is an e5pert singlestick player, o5er, and s#ordsman! 1A! "as a good practical kno#ledge of *ritish la#!

1hen I had got so far in my list I thre# it into the fire in despair! 4If I can only find #hat the fello# is driving at y reconciling all these accomplishments, and discovering a calling #hich needs them all,4 I said to myself, 4I may as #ell give up the attempt at once!4 I see that I have alluded a ove to his po#ers upon the violin! 'hese #ere very remarka le, ut as eccentric as all his other accomplishments! 'hat he could play pieces, and difficult pieces, I kne# #ell, ecause at my re6uest he has played me some of Mendelssohn+s Lieder, and other favourites! 1hen left to himself, ho#ever, he #ould seldom produce any music or attempt any recogni.ed air! Leaning ack in his arm0chair of an evening, he #ould close his eyes and scrape carelessly at the fiddle #hich #as thro#n across his knee! &ometimes the chords #ere sonorous and melancholy! )ccasionally they #ere fantastic and cheerful! ,learly they reflected the thoughts #hich possessed him, ut #hether the music aided those thoughts, or #hether the playing #as simply the result of a #him or fancy #as more than I could determine! I might have re elled against these e5asperating solos had it not een that he usually terminated them y playing in 6uick succession a #hole series of my favourite airs as a slight compensation for the trial upon my patience! During the first #eek or so #e had no callers, and I had egun to think that my companion #as as friendless a man as I #as myself! 2resently, ho#ever, I found that he had many ac6uaintances, and those in the most different classes of society! 'here #as one little sallo# rat0faced, dark0eyed fello# #ho #as introduced to me as Mr! Lestrade, and #ho came three or four times in a single #eek! )ne morning a young girl called, fashiona ly dressed, and stayed for half an hour or more! 'he same afternoon rought a grey0headed, seedy visitor, looking like a -e# pedlar, #ho appeared to me to e much e5cited, and #ho #as closely follo#ed y a slip0shod elderly #oman! )n another occasion an old #hite0haired gentleman had an intervie# #ith my companion= and on another a rail#ay porter in his velveteen uniform! 1hen any of these nondescript individuals put in an appearance, &herlock "olmes used to eg for the use of the sitting0room, and I #ould retire to my ed0room! "e al#ays apologi.ed to me for putting me to this inconvenience! 4I have to use this room as a place of usiness,4 he said, 4and these people are my clients!4 %gain I had an opportunity of asking him a point lank 6uestion, and again my delicacy prevented me from forcing another man to confide in me! I imagined at the time that he had some strong reason for not alluding to it, ut he soon dispelled the idea y coming round to the su (ect of his o#n accord! It #as upon the ?th of March, as I have good reason to remem er, that I rose some#hat earlier than usual, and found that &herlock "olmes had not yet finished his reakfast! 'he landlady had ecome so accustomed to my late ha its that my place had not een laid nor my coffee prepared! 1ith the unreasona le petulance of mankind I rang the ell and gave a curt intimation that I #as ready! 'hen I picked up a maga.ine from the ta le and attempted to #hile a#ay the time #ith it, #hile my companion munched silently at his toast! )ne of the articles had a pencil mark at the heading, and I naturally egan to run my eye through it! Its some#hat am itious title #as 4'he *ook of Life,4 and it attempted to sho# ho# much an o servant man might learn y an accurate and systematic e5amination of all that came in his #ay! It struck me as eing a remarka le mi5ture of shre#dness and of a surdity! 'he reasoning #as close and intense, ut the deductions appeared to me to e far0fetched and e5aggerated! 'he #riter claimed y a momentary e5pression, a t#itch of a muscle or a glance of an eye, to fathom a man+s inmost thoughts! Deceit, according to him, #as an impossi ility in the case of one trained to o servation and analysis! "is conclusions #ere as infalli le as so many propositions of 3uclid! &o startling #ould his results appear to the uninitiated that until they learned the processes y #hich he had arrived at them they might #ell consider him as a necromancer!

4$rom a drop of #ater,4 said the #riter, 4a logician could infer the possi ility of an %tlantic or a Niagara #ithout having seen or heard of one or the other! &o all life is a great chain, the nature of #hich is kno#n #henever #e are sho#n a single link of it! Like all other arts, the &cience of Deduction and %nalysis is one #hich can only e ac6uired y long and patient study nor is life long enough to allo# any mortal to attain the highest possi le perfection in it! *efore turning to those moral and mental aspects of the matter #hich present the greatest difficulties, let the en6uirer egin y mastering more elementary pro lems! Let him, on meeting a fello#0mortal, learn at a glance to distinguish the history of the man, and the trade or profession to #hich he elongs! 2uerile as such an e5ercise may seem, it sharpens the faculties of o servation, and teaches one #here to look and #hat to look for! *y a man+s finger nails, y his coat0sleeve, y his oot, y his trouser knees, y the callosities of his forefinger and thum , y his e5pression, y his shirt cuffs 00 y each of these things a man+s calling is plainly revealed! 'hat all united should fail to enlighten the competent en6uirer in any case is almost inconceiva le!4 41hat ineffa le t#addle94 I cried, slapping the maga.ine do#n on the ta le, 4I never read such ru ish in my life!4 41hat is it74 asked &herlock "olmes! 41hy, this article,4 I said, pointing at it #ith my egg spoon as I sat do#n to my reakfast! 4I see that you have read it since you have marked it! I don+t deny that it is smartly #ritten! It irritates me though! It is evidently the theory of some arm0chair lounger #ho evolves all these neat little parado5es in the seclusion of his o#n study! It is not practical! I should like to see him clapped do#n in a third class carriage on the Underground, and asked to give the trades of all his fello#0 travellers! I #ould lay a thousand to one against him!4 48ou #ould lose your money,4 &herlock "olmes remarked calmly! 4%s for the article I #rote it myself!4 48ou94 48es, I have a turn oth for o servation and for deduction! 'he theories #hich I have e5pressed there, and #hich appear to you to e so chimerical are really e5tremely practical 00 so practical that I depend upon them for my read and cheese!4 4%nd ho#74 I asked involuntarily! 41ell, I have a trade of my o#n! I suppose I am the only one in the #orld! I+m a consulting detective, if you can understand #hat that is! "ere in London #e have lots of /overnment detectives and lots of private ones! 1hen these fello#s are at fault they come to me, and I manage to put them on the right scent! 'hey lay all the evidence efore me, and I am generally a le, y the help of my kno#ledge of the history of crime, to set them straight! 'here is a strong family resem lance a out misdeeds, and if you have all the details of a thousand at your finger ends, it is odd if you can+t unravel the thousand and first! Lestrade is a #ell0kno#n detective! "e got himself into a fog recently over a forgery case, and that #as #hat rought him here!4 4%nd these other people74 4'hey are mostly sent on y private in6uiry agencies! 'hey are all people #ho are in trou le a out something, and #ant a little enlightening! I listen to their story, they listen to my comments, and then I pocket my fee!4 4*ut do you mean to say,4 I said, 4that #ithout leaving your room you can unravel some knot #hich other men can make nothing of, although they have seen every detail for themselves74 4Huite so! I have a kind of intuition that #ay! No# and again a case turns up #hich is a little more comple5! 'hen I have to ustle a out and see things #ith my o#n eyes! 8ou see I have a lot of special kno#ledge #hich I apply to the pro lem, and #hich facilitates matters #onderfully! 'hose rules of deduction laid do#n in that article #hich aroused your scorn, are invalua le to me in

practical #ork! ) servation #ith me is second nature! 8ou appeared to e surprised #hen I told you, on our first meeting, that you had come from %fghanistan!4 48ou #ere told, no dou t!4 4Nothing of the sort! I Ikne#I you came from %fghanistan! $rom long ha it the train of thoughts ran so s#iftly through my mind, that I arrived at the conclusion #ithout eing conscious of intermediate steps! 'here #ere such steps, ho#ever! 'he train of reasoning ran, @"ere is a gentleman of a medical type, ut #ith the air of a military man! ,learly an army doctor, then! "e has (ust come from the tropics, for his face is dark, and that is not the natural tint of his skin, for his #rists are fair! "e has undergone hardship and sickness, as his haggard face says clearly! "is left arm has een in(ured! "e holds it in a stiff and unnatural manner! 1here in the tropics could an 3nglish army doctor have seen much hardship and got his arm #ounded7 ,learly in %fghanistan!+ 'he #hole train of thought did not occupy a second! I then remarked that you came from %fghanistan, and you #ere astonished!4 4It is simple enough as you e5plain it,4 I said, smiling! 48ou remind me of 3dgar %llen 2oe+s Dupin! I had no idea that such individuals did e5ist outside of stories!4 &herlock "olmes rose and lit his pipe! 4No dou t you think that you are complimenting me in comparing me to Dupin,4 he o served! 4No#, in my opinion, Dupin #as a very inferior fello#! 'hat trick of his of reaking in on his friends+ thoughts #ith an apropos remark after a 6uarter of an hour+s silence is really very sho#y and superficial! "e had some analytical genius, no dou t= ut he #as y no means such a phenomenon as 2oe appeared to imagine!4 4"ave you read /a oriau+s #orks74 I asked! 4Does Leco6 come up to your idea of a detective74 &herlock "olmes sniffed sardonically! 4Leco6 #as a misera le ungler,4 he said, in an angry voice= 4he had only one thing to recommend him, and that #as his energy! 'hat ook made me positively ill! 'he 6uestion #as ho# to identify an unkno#n prisoner! I could have done it in t#enty0four hours! Leco6 took si5 months or so! It might e made a te5t0 ook for detectives to teach them #hat to avoid!4 I felt rather indignant at having t#o characters #hom I had admired treated in this cavalier style! I #alked over to the #indo#, and stood looking out into the usy street! 4'his fello# may e very clever,4 I said to myself, 4 ut he is certainly very conceited!4 4'here are no crimes and no criminals in these days,4 he said, 6uerulously! 41hat is the use of having rains in our profession! I kno# #ell that I have it in me to make my name famous! No man lives or has ever lived #ho has rought the same amount of study and of natural talent to the detection of crime #hich I have done! %nd #hat is the result7 'here is no crime to detect, or, at most, some ungling villany #ith a motive so transparent that even a &cotland 8ard official can see through it!4 I #as still annoyed at his umptious style of conversation! I thought it est to change the topic! 4I #onder #hat that fello# is looking for74 I asked, pointing to a stal#art, plainly0dressed individual #ho #as #alking slo#ly do#n the other side of the street, looking an5iously at the num ers! "e had a large lue envelope in his hand, and #as evidently the earer of a message! 48ou mean the retired sergeant of Marines,4 said &herlock "olmes! 4*rag and ounce94 thought I to myself! 4"e kno#s that I cannot verify his guess!4 'he thought had hardly passed through my mind #hen the man #hom #e #ere #atching caught sight of the num er on our door, and ran rapidly across the road#ay! 1e heard a loud knock, a deep voice elo#, and heavy steps ascending the stair! 4$or Mr! &herlock "olmes,4 he said, stepping into the room and handing my friend the letter!

"ere #as an opportunity of taking the conceit out of him! "e little thought of this #hen he made that random shot! 4May I ask, my lad,4 I said, in the landest voice, 4#hat your trade may e74 4,ommissionaire, sir,4 he said, gruffly! 4Uniform a#ay for repairs!4 4%nd you #ere74 I asked, #ith a slightly malicious glance at my companion! 4% sergeant, sir, Coyal Marine Light Infantry, sir! No ans#er7 Cight, sir!4 "e clicked his heels together, raised his hand in a salute, and #as gone!

Chapter 3

I ,)N$3&& that I #as considera ly startled y this fresh proof of the practical nature of my companion+s theories! My respect for his po#ers of analysis increased #ondrously! 'here still remained some lurking suspicion in my mind, ho#ever, that the #hole thing #as a pre0arranged episode, intended to da..le me, though #hat earthly o (ect he could have in taking me in #as past my comprehension! 1hen I looked at him he had finished reading the note, and his eyes had assumed the vacant, lack0lustre e5pression #hich sho#ed mental a straction! 4"o# in the #orld did you deduce that74 I asked! 4Deduce #hat74 said he, petulantly! 41hy, that he #as a retired sergeant of Marines!4 4I have no time for trifles,4 he ans#ered, rus6uely= then #ith a smile, 435cuse my rudeness! 8ou roke the thread of my thoughts= ut perhaps it is as #ell! &o you actually #ere not a le to see that that man #as a sergeant of Marines74 4No, indeed!4 4It #as easier to kno# it than to e5plain #hy I kne# it! If you #ere asked to prove that t#o and t#o made four, you might find some difficulty, and yet you are 6uite sure of the fact! 3ven across the street I could see a great lue anchor tattooed on the ack of the fello#+s hand! 'hat smacked of the sea! "e had a military carriage, ho#ever, and regulation side #hiskers! 'here #e have the marine! "e #as a man #ith some amount of self0importance and a certain air of command! 8ou must have o served the #ay in #hich he held his head and s#ung his cane! % steady, respecta le, middle0aged man, too, on the face of him 00 all facts #hich led me to elieve that he had een a sergeant!4 41onderful94 I e(aculated! 4,ommonplace,4 said "olmes, though I thought from his e5pression that he #as pleased at my evident surprise and admiration! 4I said (ust no# that there #ere no criminals! It appears that I am #rong 00 look at this94 "e thre# me over the note #hich the commissionaire had rought!4 :7< 41hy,4 I cried, as I cast my eye over it, 4this is terri le94 4It does seem to e a little out of the common,4 he remarked, calmly! 41ould you mind reading it to me aloud74 'his is the letter #hich I read to him 0000

4M8 D3%C MC! &"3CL),D ")LM3&, 00 4'here has een a ad usiness during the night at ;, Lauriston /ardens, off the *ri5ton Coad! )ur man on the eat sa# a light there a out t#o in the morning, and as the house #as an empty one, suspected that something #as amiss! "e found the door open, and in the front room, #hich is are of furniture, discovered the ody of a gentleman, #ell dressed, and having cards in his pocket earing the name of @3noch -! Dre er, ,leveland, )hio, U!&!%!+ 'here had een no ro ery, nor is there any evidence as to ho# the man met his death! 'here are marks of lood in the room, ut there is no #ound upon his person! 1e are at a loss as to ho# he came into the empty house= indeed, the #hole affair is a pu..ler! If you can come round to the house any time efore t#elve, you #ill find me there! I have left everything Iin statu 6uoI until I hear from you! If you are una le to come I shall give you fuller details, and #ould esteem it a great kindness if you #ould favour me #ith your opinion! 8ours faithfully, 4')*I%& /C3/&)N!4

4/regson is the smartest of the &cotland 8arders,4 my friend remarked= 4he and Lestrade are the pick of a ad lot! 'hey are oth 6uick and energetic, ut conventional 00 shockingly so! 'hey have their knives into one another, too! 'hey are as (ealous as a pair of professional eauties! 'here #ill e some fun over this case if they are oth put upon the scent!4 I #as ama.ed at the calm #ay in #hich he rippled on! 4&urely there is not a moment to e lost,4 I cried, 4shall I go and order you a ca 74 4I+m not sure a out #hether I shall go! I am the most incura ly la.y devil that ever stood in shoe leather 00 that is, #hen the fit is on me, for I can e spry enough at times!4 41hy, it is (ust such a chance as you have een longing for!4 4My dear fello#, #hat does it matter to me! &upposing I unravel the #hole matter, you may e sure that /regson, Lestrade, and ,o! #ill pocket all the credit! 'hat comes of eing an unofficial personage!4 4*ut he egs you to help him!4 48es! "e kno#s that I am his superior, and ackno#ledges it to me= ut he #ould cut his tongue out efore he #ould o#n it to any third person! "o#ever, #e may as #ell go and have a look! I shall #ork it out on my o#n hook! I may have a laugh at them if I have nothing else! ,ome on94 "e hustled on his overcoat, and ustled a out in a #ay that sho#ed that an energetic fit had superseded the apathetic one! 4/et your hat,4 he said! 48ou #ish me to come74 48es, if you have nothing etter to do!4 % minute later #e #ere oth in a hansom, driving furiously for the *ri5ton Coad! It #as a foggy, cloudy morning, and a dun0coloured veil hung over the house0tops, looking like the reflection of the mud0coloured streets eneath! My companion #as in the est of spirits, and prattled a#ay a out ,remona fiddles, and the difference et#een a &tradivarius and an %mati! %s for myself, I #as silent, for the dull #eather and the melancholy usiness upon #hich #e #ere engaged, depressed my spirits! 48ou don+t seem to give much thought to the matter in hand,4 I said at last, interrupting "olmes+ musical dis6uisition! 4No data yet,4 he ans#ered! 4It is a capital mistake to theori.e efore you have all the evidence! It iases the (udgment!4

48ou #ill have your data soon,4 I remarked, pointing #ith my finger= 4this is the *ri5ton Coad, and that is the house, if I am not very much mistaken!4 4&o it is! &top, driver, stop94 1e #ere still a hundred yards or so from it, ut he insisted upon our alighting, and #e finished our (ourney upon foot! Num er ;, Lauriston /ardens #ore an ill0omened and minatory look! It #as one of four #hich stood ack some little #ay from the street, t#o eing occupied and t#o empty! 'he latter looked out #ith three tiers of vacant melancholy #indo#s, #hich #ere lank and dreary, save that here and there a 4'o Let4 card had developed like a cataract upon the leared panes! % small garden sprinkled over #ith a scattered eruption of sickly plants separated each of these houses from the street, and #as traversed y a narro# path#ay, yello#ish in colour, and consisting apparently of a mi5ture of clay and of gravel! 'he #hole place #as very sloppy from the rain #hich had fallen through the night! 'he garden #as ounded y a three0foot rick #all #ith a fringe of #ood rails upon the top, and against this #all #as leaning a stal#art police consta le, surrounded y a small knot of loafers, #ho craned their necks and strained their eyes in the vain hope of catching some glimpse of the proceedings #ithin! I had imagined that &herlock "olmes #ould at once have hurried into the house and plunged into a study of the mystery! Nothing appeared to e further from his intention! 1ith an air of nonchalance #hich, under the circumstances, seemed to me to order upon affectation, he lounged up and do#n the pavement, and ga.ed vacantly at the ground, the sky, the opposite houses and the line of railings! "aving finished his scrutiny, he proceeded slo#ly do#n the path, or rather do#n the fringe of grass #hich flanked the path, keeping his eyes riveted upon the ground! '#ice he stopped, and once I sa# him smile, and heard him utter an e5clamation of satisfaction! 'here #ere many marks of footsteps upon the #et clayey soil, ut since the police had een coming and going over it, I #as una le to see ho# my companion could hope to learn anything from it! &till I had had such e5traordinary evidence of the 6uickness of his perceptive faculties, that I had no dou t that he could see a great deal #hich #as hidden from me! %t the door of the house #e #ere met y a tall, #hite0faced, fla5en0haired man, #ith a note ook in his hand, #ho rushed for#ard and #rung my companion+s hand #ith effusion! 4It is indeed kind of you to come,4 he said, 4I have had everything left untouched!4 435cept that94 my friend ans#ered, pointing at the path#ay! 4If a herd of uffaloes had passed along there could not e a greater mess! No dou t, ho#ever, you had dra#n your o#n conclusions, /regson, efore you permitted this!4 4I have had so much to do inside the house,4 the detective said evasively! 4My colleague, Mr! Lestrade, is here! I had relied upon him to look after this!4 "olmes glanced at me and raised his eye ro#s sardonically! 41ith t#o such men as yourself and Lestrade upon the ground, there #ill not e much for a third party to find out,4 he said! /regson ru ed his hands in a self0satisfied #ay! 4I think #e have done all that can e done,4 he ans#ered= 4it+s a 6ueer case though, and I kne# your taste for such things!4 48ou did not come here in a ca 74 asked &herlock "olmes! 4No, sir!4 4Nor Lestrade74 4No, sir!4 4'hen let us go and look at the room!4 1ith #hich inconse6uent remark he strode on into the house, follo#ed y /regson, #hose features e5pressed his astonishment! % short passage, are planked and dusty, led to the kitchen and offices! '#o doors opened out of it to the left and to the right! )ne of these had o viously een closed for many #eeks! 'he other

elonged to the dining0room, #hich #as the apartment in #hich the mysterious affair had occurred! "olmes #alked in, and I follo#ed him #ith that su dued feeling at my heart #hich the presence of death inspires! It #as a large s6uare room, looking all the larger from the a sence of all furniture! % vulgar flaring paper adorned the #alls, ut it #as lotched in places #ith milde#, and here and there great strips had ecome detached and hung do#n, e5posing the yello# plaster eneath! )pposite the door #as a sho#y fireplace, surmounted y a mantelpiece of imitation #hite mar le! )n one corner of this #as stuck the stump of a red #a5 candle! 'he solitary #indo# #as so dirty that the light #as ha.y and uncertain, giving a dull grey tinge to everything, #hich #as intensified y the thick layer of dust #hich coated the #hole apartment! %ll these details I o served after#ards! %t present my attention #as centred upon the single grim motionless figure #hich lay stretched upon the oards, #ith vacant sightless eyes staring up at the discoloured ceiling! It #as that of a man a out forty0three or forty0four years of age, middle0si.ed, road shouldered, #ith crisp curling lack hair, and a short stu ly eard! "e #as dressed in a heavy roadcloth frock coat and #aistcoat, #ith light0coloured trousers, and immaculate collar and cuffs! % top hat, #ell rushed and trim, #as placed upon the floor eside him! "is hands #ere clenched and his arms thro#n a road, #hile his lo#er lim s #ere interlocked as though his death struggle had een a grievous one! )n his rigid face there stood an e5pression of horror, and as it seemed to me, of hatred, such as I have never seen upon human features! 'his malignant and terri le contortion, com ined #ith the lo# forehead, lunt nose, and prognathous (a# gave the dead man a singularly simious and ape0like appearance, #hich #as increased y his #rithing, unnatural posture! I have seen death in many forms, ut never has it appeared to me in a more fearsome aspect than in that dark grimy apartment, #hich looked out upon one of the main arteries of su ur an London! Lestrade, lean and ferret0like as ever, #as standing y the door#ay, and greeted my companion and myself! 4'his case #ill make a stir, sir,4 he remarked! 4It eats anything I have seen, and I am no chicken!4 4'here is no clue74 said /regson! 4None at all,4 chimed in Lestrade! &herlock "olmes approached the ody, and, kneeling do#n, e5amined it intently! 48ou are sure that there is no #ound74 he asked, pointing to numerous gouts and splashes of lood #hich lay all round! 42ositive94 cried oth detectives! 4'hen, of course, this lood elongs to a second individual 00 :8< presuma ly the murderer, if murder has een committed! It reminds me of the circumstances attendant on the death of >an -ansen, in Utrecht, in the year +;?! Do you remem er the case, /regson74 4No, sir!4 4Cead it up 00 you really should! 'here is nothing ne# under the sun! It has all een done efore!4 %s he spoke, his nim le fingers #ere flying here, there, and every#here, feeling, pressing, un uttoning, e5amining, #hile his eyes #ore the same far0a#ay e5pression #hich I have already remarked upon! &o s#iftly #as the e5amination made, that one #ould hardly have guessed the minuteness #ith #hich it #as conducted! $inally, he sniffed the dead man+s lips, and then glanced at the soles of his patent leather oots! 4"e has not een moved at all74 he asked! 4No more than #as necessary for the purposes of our e5amination!4

48ou can take him to the mortuary no#,4 he said! 4'here is nothing more to e learned!4 /regson had a stretcher and four men at hand! %t his call they entered the room, and the stranger #as lifted and carried out! %s they raised him, a ring tinkled do#n and rolled across the floor! Lestrade gra ed it up and stared at it #ith mystified eyes! 4'here+s een a #oman here,4 he cried! 4It+s a #oman+s #edding0ring!4 "e held it out, as he spoke, upon the palm of his hand! 1e all gathered round him and ga.ed at it! 'here could e no dou t that that circlet of plain gold had once adorned the finger of a ride! 4'his complicates matters,4 said /regson! 4"eaven kno#s, they #ere complicated enough efore!4 48ou+re sure it doesn+t simplify them74 o served "olmes! 4'here+s nothing to e learned y staring at it! 1hat did you find in his pockets74 41e have it all here,4 said /regson, pointing to a litter of o (ects upon one of the ottom steps of the stairs! 4% gold #atch, No! F71E;, y *arraud, of London! /old %l ert chain, very heavy and solid! /old ring, #ith masonic device! /old pin 00 ull0dog+s head, #ith ru ies as eyes! Cussian leather card0case, #ith cards of 3noch -! Dre er of ,leveland, corresponding #ith the 3! -! D! upon the linen! No purse, ut loose money to the e5tent of seven pounds thirteen! 2ocket edition of *occaccio+s @Decameron,+ #ith name of -oseph &tangerson upon the fly0leaf! '#o letters 00 one addressed to 3! -! Dre er and one to -oseph &tangerson!4 4%t #hat address74 4%merican 35change, &trand 00 to e left till called for! 'hey are oth from the /uion &teamship ,ompany, and refer to the sailing of their oats from Liverpool! It is clear that this unfortunate man #as a out to return to Ne# 8ork!4 4"ave you made any in6uiries as to this man, &tangerson74 4I did it at once, sir,4 said /regson! 4I have had advertisements sent to all the ne#spapers, and one of my men has gone to the %merican 35change, ut he has not returned yet!4 4"ave you sent to ,leveland74 41e telegraphed this morning!4 4"o# did you #ord your in6uiries74 41e simply detailed the circumstances, and said that #e should e glad of any information #hich could help us!4 48ou did not ask for particulars on any point #hich appeared to you to e crucial74 4I asked a out &tangerson!4 4Nothing else7 Is there no circumstance on #hich this #hole case appears to hinge7 1ill you not telegraph again74 4I have said all I have to say,4 said /regson, in an offended voice! &herlock "olmes chuckled to himself, and appeared to e a out to make some remark, #hen Lestrade, #ho had een in the front room #hile #e #ere holding this conversation in the hall, reappeared upon the scene, ru ing his hands in a pompous and self0satisfied manner!

4Mr! /regson,4 he said, 4I have (ust made a discovery of the highest importance, and one #hich #ould have een overlooked had I not made a careful e5amination of the #alls!4 'he little man+s eyes sparkled as he spoke, and he #as evidently in a state of suppressed e5ultation at having scored a point against his colleague! 4,ome here,4 he said, ustling ack into the room, the atmosphere of #hich felt clearer since the removal of its ghastly inmate! 4No#, stand there94 "e struck a match on his oot and held it up against the #all! 4Look at that94 he said, triumphantly! I have remarked that the paper had fallen a#ay in parts! In this particular corner of the room a large piece had peeled off, leaving a yello# s6uare of coarse plastering! %cross this are space there #as scra#led in lood0red letters a single #ord 00

C%,"3!

41hat do you think of that74 cried the detective, #ith the air of a sho#man e5hi iting his sho#! 4'his #as overlooked ecause it #as in the darkest corner of the room, and no one thought of looking there! 'he murderer has #ritten it #ith his or her o#n lood! &ee this smear #here it has trickled do#n the #all9 'hat disposes of the idea of suicide anyho#! 1hy #as that corner chosen to #rite it on7 I #ill tell you! &ee that candle on the mantelpiece! It #as lit at the time, and if it #as lit this corner #ould e the rightest instead of the darkest portion of the #all!4 4%nd #hat does it mean no# that you IhaveI found it74 asked /regson in a depreciatory voice! 4Mean7 1hy, it means that the #riter #as going to put the female name Cachel, ut #as distur ed efore he or she had time to finish! 8ou mark my #ords, #hen this case comes to e cleared up you #ill find that a #oman named Cachel has something to do #ith it! It+s all very #ell for you to laugh, Mr! &herlock "olmes! 8ou may e very smart and clever, ut the old hound is the est, #hen all is said and done!4 4I really eg your pardon94 said my companion, #ho had ruffled the little man+s temper y ursting into an e5plosion of laughter! 48ou certainly have the credit of eing the first of us to find this out, and, as you say, it ears every mark of having een #ritten y the other participant in last night+s mystery! I have not had time to e5amine this room yet, ut #ith your permission I shall do so no#!4 %s he spoke, he #hipped a tape measure and a large round magnifying glass from his pocket! 1ith these t#o implements he trotted noiselessly a out the room, sometimes stopping, occasionally kneeling, and once lying flat upon his face! &o engrossed #as he #ith his occupation that he appeared to have forgotten our presence, for he chattered a#ay to himself under his reath the #hole time, keeping up a running fire of e5clamations, groans, #histles, and little cries suggestive of encouragement and of hope! %s I #atched him I #as irresisti ly reminded of a pure0 looded #ell0trained fo5hound as it dashes ack#ards and for#ards through the covert, #hining in its eagerness, until it comes across the lost scent! $or t#enty minutes or more he continued his researches, measuring #ith the most e5act care the distance et#een marks #hich #ere entirely invisi le to me, and occasionally applying his tape to the #alls in an e6ually incomprehensi le manner! In one place he gathered up very carefully a little pile of grey dust from the floor, and packed it a#ay in an envelope! $inally, he e5amined #ith his glass the #ord upon the #all, going over every letter of it #ith the most minute e5actness! 'his done, he appeared to e satisfied, for he replaced his tape and his glass in his pocket! 4'hey say that genius is an infinite capacity for taking pains,4 he remarked #ith a smile! 4It+s a very ad definition, ut it does apply to detective #ork!4

/regson and Lestrade had #atched the manoeuvres :F< of their amateur companion #ith considera le curiosity and some contempt! 'hey evidently failed to appreciate the fact, #hich I had egun to reali.e, that &herlock "olmes+ smallest actions #ere all directed to#ards some definite and practical end! 41hat do you think of it, sir74 they oth asked! 4It #ould e ro ing you of the credit of the case if I #as to presume to help you,4 remarked my friend! 48ou are doing so #ell no# that it #ould e a pity for anyone to interfere!4 'here #as a #orld of sarcasm in his voice as he spoke! 4If you #ill let me kno# ho# your investigations go,4 he continued, 4I shall e happy to give you any help I can! In the meantime I should like to speak to the consta le #ho found the ody! ,an you give me his name and address74 Lestrade glanced at his note0 ook! 4-ohn Cance,4 he said! 4"e is off duty no#! 8ou #ill find him at ?E, %udley ,ourt, Dennington 2ark /ate!4 "olmes took a note of the address! 4,ome along, Doctor,4 he said= 4#e shall go and look him up! I+ll tell you one thing #hich may help you in the case,4 he continued, turning to the t#o detectives! 4'here has een murder done, and the murderer #as a man! "e #as more than si5 feet high, #as in the prime of life, had small feet for his height, #ore coarse, s6uare0toed oots and smoked a 'richinopoly cigar! "e came here #ith his victim in a four0#heeled ca , #hich #as dra#n y a horse #ith three old shoes and one ne# one on his off fore leg! In all pro a ility the murderer had a florid face, and the finger0nails of his right hand #ere remarka ly long! 'hese are only a fe# indications, ut they may assist you!4 Lestrade and /regson glanced at each other #ith an incredulous smile! 4If this man #as murdered, ho# #as it done74 asked the former! 42oison,4 said &herlock "olmes curtly, and strode off! 4)ne other thing, Lestrade,4 he added, turning round at the doorJ 4@Cache,+ is the /erman for @revenge=+ so don+t lose your time looking for Miss Cachel!4 1ith #hich 2arthian shot he #alked a#ay, leaving the t#o rivals open0mouthed ehind him!

,hapter four I' #as one o+clock #hen #e left No! ;, Lauriston /ardens! &herlock "olmes led me to the nearest telegraph office, #hence he dispatched a long telegram! "e then hailed a ca , and ordered the driver to take us to the address given us y Lestrade! 4'here is nothing like first hand evidence,4 he remarked= 4as a matter of fact, my mind is entirely made up upon the case, ut still #e may as #ell learn all that is to e learned!4 48ou ama.e me, "olmes,4 said I! 4&urely you are not as sure as you pretend to e of all those particulars #hich you gave!4 4'here+s no room for a mistake,4 he ans#ered! 4'he very first thing #hich I o served on arriving there #as that a ca had made t#o ruts #ith its #heels close to the cur ! No#, up to last night, #e have had no rain for a #eek, so that those #heels #hich left such a deep impression must have een there during the night! 'here #ere the marks of the horse+s hoofs, too, the outline of one of #hich #as far more clearly cut than that of the other three, sho#ing that that #as a ne# shoe! &ince the ca #as there after the rain egan, and #as not there at any time during the morning 00

I have /regson+s #ord for that 00 it follo#s that it must have een there during the night, and, therefore, that it rought those t#o individuals to the house!4 4'hat seems simple enough,4 said I= 4 ut ho# a out the other man+s height74 41hy, the height of a man, in nine cases out of ten, can e told from the length of his stride! It is a simple calculation enough, though there is no use my oring you #ith figures! I had this fello#+s stride oth on the clay outside and on the dust #ithin! 'hen I had a #ay of checking my calculation! 1hen a man #rites on a #all, his instinct leads him to #rite a out the level of his o#n eyes! No# that #riting #as (ust over si5 feet from the ground! It #as child+s play!4 4%nd his age74 I asked! 41ell, if a man can stride four and a0half feet #ithout the smallest effort, he can+t e 6uite in the sere and yello#! 'hat #as the readth of a puddle on the garden #alk #hich he had evidently #alked across! 2atent0leather oots had gone round, and &6uare0toes had hopped over! 'here is no mystery a out it at all! I am simply applying to ordinary life a fe# of those precepts of o servation and deduction #hich I advocated in that article! Is there anything else that pu..les you74 4'he finger nails and the 'richinopoly,4 I suggested! 4'he #riting on the #all #as done #ith a man+s forefinger dipped in lood! My glass allo#ed me to o serve that the plaster #as slightly scratched in doing it, #hich #ould not have een the case if the man+s nail had een trimmed! I gathered up some scattered ash from the floor! It #as dark in colour and flakey 00 such an ash as is only made y a 'richinopoly! I have made a special study of cigar ashes 00 in fact, I have #ritten a monograph upon the su (ect! I flatter myself that I can distinguish at a glance the ash of any kno#n rand, either of cigar or of to acco! It is (ust in such details that the skilled detective differs from the /regson and Lestrade type!4 4%nd the florid face74 I asked! 4%h, that #as a more daring shot, though I have no dou t that I #as right! 8ou must not ask me that at the present state of the affair!4 I passed my hand over my ro#! 4My head is in a #hirl,4 I remarked= 4the more one thinks of it the more mysterious it gro#s! "o# came these t#o men 00 if there #ere t#o men 00 into an empty house7 1hat has ecome of the ca man #ho drove them7 "o# could one man compel another to take poison7 1here did the lood come from7 1hat #as the o (ect of the murderer, since ro ery had no part in it7 "o# came the #oman+s ring there7 % ove all, #hy should the second man #rite up the /erman #ord C%,"3 efore decamping7 I confess that I cannot see any possi le #ay of reconciling all these facts!4 My companion smiled approvingly! 48ou sum up the difficulties of the situation succinctly and #ell,4 he said! 4'here is much that is still o scure, though I have 6uite made up my mind on the main facts! %s to poor Lestrade+s discovery it #as simply a lind intended to put the police upon a #rong track, y suggesting &ocialism and secret societies! It #as not done y a /erman! 'he %, if you noticed, #as printed some#hat after the /erman fashion! No#, a real /erman invaria ly prints in the Latin character, so that #e may safely say that this #as not #ritten y one, ut y a clumsy imitator #ho overdid his part! It #as simply a ruse to divert in6uiry into a #rong channel! I+m not going to tell you much more of the case, Doctor! 8ou kno# a con(uror gets no credit #hen once he has e5plained his trick, and if I sho# you too much of my method of #orking, you #ill come to the conclusion that I am a very ordinary individual after all!4 4I shall never do that,4 I ans#ered= 4you have rought detection as near an e5act science as it ever #ill e rought in this #orld!4

My companion flushed up #ith pleasure at my #ords, and the earnest #ay in #hich I uttered them! I had already o served that he #as as sensitive to flattery on the score of his art as any girl could e of her eauty! 4I+ll tell you one other thing,4 he said! 42atent leathers :1G< and &6uare0toes came in the same ca , and they #alked do#n the path#ay together as friendly as possi le 00 arm0in0arm, in all pro a ility! 1hen they got inside they #alked up and do#n the room 00 or rather, 2atent0leathers stood still #hile &6uare0toes #alked up and do#n! I could read all that in the dust= and I could read that as he #alked he gre# more and more e5cited! 'hat is sho#n y the increased length of his strides! "e #as talking all the #hile, and #orking himself up, no dou t, into a fury! 'hen the tragedy occurred! I+ve told you all I kno# myself no#, for the rest is mere surmise and con(ecture! 1e have a good #orking asis, ho#ever, on #hich to start! 1e must hurry up, for I #ant to go to "alle+s concert to hear Norman Neruda this afternoon!4 'his conversation had occurred #hile our ca had een threading its #ay through a long succession of dingy streets and dreary y0#ays! In the dingiest and dreariest of them our driver suddenly came to a stand! 4'hat+s %udley ,ourt in there,4 he said, pointing to a narro# slit in the line of dead0coloured rick! 48ou+ll find me here #hen you come ack!4 %udley ,ourt #as not an attractive locality! 'he narro# passage led us into a 6uadrangle paved #ith flags and lined y sordid d#ellings! 1e picked our #ay among groups of dirty children, and through lines of discoloured linen, until #e came to Num er ?E, the door of #hich #as decorated #ith a small slip of rass on #hich the name Cance #as engraved! )n en6uiry #e found that the consta le #as in ed, and #e #ere sho#n into a little front parlour to a#ait his coming! "e appeared presently, looking a little irrita le at eing distur ed in his slum ers! 4I made my report at the office,4 he said! "olmes took a half0sovereign from his pocket and played #ith it pensively! 41e thought that #e should like to hear it all from your o#n lips,4 he said! 4I shall e most happy to tell you anything I can,4 the consta le ans#ered #ith his eyes upon the little golden disk! 4-ust let us hear it all in your o#n #ay as it occurred!4 Cance sat do#n on the horsehair sofa, and knitted his ro#s as though determined not to omit anything in his narrative! 4I+ll tell it ye from the eginning,4 he said! 4My time is from ten at night to si5 in the morning! %t eleven there #as a fight at the @1hite "art+= ut ar that all #as 6uiet enough on the eat! %t one o+clock it egan to rain, and I met "arry Murcher 00 him #ho has the "olland /rove eat 00 and #e stood together at the corner of "enrietta &treet a0talkin+! 2resently 00 may e a out t#o or a little after 00 I thought I #ould take a look round and see that all #as right do#n the *ri5ton Coad! It #as precious dirty and lonely! Not a soul did I meet all the #ay do#n, though a ca or t#o #ent past me! I #as a strollin+ do#n, thinkin+ et#een ourselves ho# uncommon handy a four of gin hot #ould e, #hen suddenly the glint of a light caught my eye in the #indo# of that same house! No#, I kne# that them t#o houses in Lauriston /ardens #as empty on account of him that o#ns them #ho #on+t have the drains seed to, though the very last tenant #hat lived in one of them died o+ typhoid fever! I #as knocked all in a heap therefore at seeing a light in the #indo#, and I suspected as something #as #rong! 1hen I got to the door 00004 48ou stopped, and then #alked ack to the garden gate,4 my companion interrupted! 41hat did you do that for74 Cance gave a violent (ump, and stared at &herlock "olmes #ith the utmost ama.ement upon his features! 41hy, that+s true, sir,4 he said= 4though ho# you come to kno# it, "eaven only kno#s! 8e see, #hen I got up to the door it #as so still and so lonesome, that I thought I+d e none the #orse for

some one #ith me! I ain+t afeared of anything on this side o+ the grave= ut I thought that may e it #as him that died o+ the typhoid inspecting the drains #hat killed him! 'he thought gave me a kind o+ turn, and I #alked ack to the gate to see if I could see Murcher+s lantern, ut there #asn+t no sign of him nor of anyone else!4 4'here #as no one in the street74 4Not a livin+ soul, sir, nor as much as a dog! 'hen I pulled myself together and #ent ack and pushed the door open! %ll #as 6uiet inside, so I #ent into the room #here the light #as a0 urnin+! 'here #as a candle flickerin+ on the mantelpiece 00 a red #a5 one 00 and y its light I sa# 00004 48es, I kno# all that you sa#! 8ou #alked round the room several times, and you knelt do#n y the ody, and then you #alked through and tried the kitchen door, and then 00004 -ohn Cance sprang to his feet #ith a frightened face and suspicion in his eyes! 41here #as you hid to see all that74 he cried! 4It seems to me that you kno#s a deal more than you should!4 "olmes laughed and thre# his card across the ta le to the consta le! 4Don+t get arresting me for the murder,4 he said! 4I am one of the hounds and not the #olf= Mr! /regson or Mr! Lestrade #ill ans#er for that! /o on, though! 1hat did you do ne5t74 Cance resumed his seat, #ithout ho#ever losing his mystified e5pression! 4I #ent ack to the gate and sounded my #histle! 'hat rought Murcher and t#o more to the spot!4 41as the street empty then74 41ell, it #as, as far as any ody that could e of any good goes!4 41hat do you mean74 'he consta le+s features roadened into a grin! 4I+ve seen many a drunk chap in my time,4 he said, 4 ut never anyone so cryin+ drunk as that cove! "e #as at the gate #hen I came out, a0leanin+ up agin the railings, and a0singin+ at the pitch o+ his lungs a out ,olum ine+s Ne#0fangled *anner, or some such stuff! "e couldn+t stand, far less help!4 41hat sort of a man #as he74 asked &herlock "olmes! -ohn Cance appeared to e some#hat irritated at this digression! 4"e #as an uncommon drunk sort o+ man,4 he said! 4"e+d ha+ found hisself in the station if #e hadn+t een so took up!4 4"is face 00 his dress 00 didn+t you notice them74 "olmes roke in impatiently! 4I should think I did notice them, seeing that I had to prop him up 00 me and Murcher et#een us! "e #as a long chap, #ith a red face, the lo#er part muffled round 00004 4'hat #ill do,4 cried "olmes! 41hat ecame of him74 41e+d enough to do #ithout lookin+ after him,4 the policeman said, in an aggrieved voice! 4I+ll #ager he found his #ay home all right!4 4"o# #as he dressed74 4% ro#n overcoat!4 4"ad he a #hip in his hand74 4% #hip 00 no!4

4"e must have left it ehind,4 muttered my companion! 48ou didn+t happen to see or hear a ca after that74 4No!4 4'here+s a half0sovereign for you,4 my companion said, standing up and taking his hat! 4I am afraid, Cance, that you #ill never rise in the force! 'hat head of yours should e for use as #ell as ornament! 8ou might have gained your sergeant+s stripes last night! 'he man #hom you held in your hands is the man #ho holds the clue of this mystery, and #hom #e are seeking! 'here is no use of arguing a out it no#= I tell you that it is so! ,ome along, Doctor!4 1e started off for the ca together, leaving our informant incredulous, ut o viously uncomforta le! 4'he lundering fool,4 "olmes said, itterly, as #e drove ack to our lodgings! 4-ust to think of his having such an incompara le it of good luck, and not taking advantage of it!4 4I am rather in the dark still! It is true that the description of this man tallies #ith your idea of the second party in this mystery! *ut #hy should he come ack to the house after leaving it7 'hat is not the #ay of criminals!4 4'he ring, man, the ringJ that #as #hat he came ack for! If #e have no other #ay of catching him, #e can al#ays ait our line #ith the ring! I shall have him, Doctor 00 I+ll lay you t#o to one that I have him! I must thank you for it all! I might not have gone ut for you, and so have missed the finest study I ever came acrossJ a study in scarlet, eh7 1hy shouldn+t #e use a little art (argon! 'here+s the scarlet thread of murder running through the colourless skein of life, and our duty is to unravel it, and isolate it, and e5pose every inch of it! %nd no# for lunch, and then for Norman Neruda! "er attack and her o#ing are splendid! 1hat+s that little thing of ,hopin+s she plays so magnificentlyJ 'ra0la0la0lira0lira0lay!4 Leaning ack in the ca , this amateur loodhound carolled a#ay like a lark #hile I meditated upon the many0sidedness of the human mind!

Chapter 5

)UC morning+s e5ertions had een too much for my #eak health, and I #as tired out in the afternoon! %fter "olmes+ departure for the concert, I lay do#n upon the sofa and endeavoured to get a couple of hours+ sleep! It #as a useless attempt! My mind had een too much e5cited y all that had occurred, and the strangest fancies and surmises cro#ded into it! 3very time that I closed my eyes I sa# efore me the distorted a oon0like countenance of the murdered man! &o sinister #as the impression #hich that face had produced upon me that I found it difficult to feel anything ut gratitude for him #ho had removed its o#ner from the #orld! If ever human features espoke vice of the most malignant type, they #ere certainly those of 3noch -! Dre er, of ,leveland! &till I

recogni.ed that (ustice must e done, and that the depravity of the victim #as no condonment :11< in the eyes of the la#! 'he more I thought of it the more e5traordinary did my companion+s hypothesis, that the man had een poisoned, appear! I remem ered ho# he had sniffed his lips, and had no dou t that he had detected something #hich had given rise to the idea! 'hen, again, if not poison, #hat had caused the man+s death, since there #as neither #ound nor marks of strangulation7 *ut, on the other hand, #hose lood #as that #hich lay so thickly upon the floor7 'here #ere no signs of a struggle, nor had the victim any #eapon #ith #hich he might have #ounded an antagonist! %s long as all these 6uestions #ere unsolved, I felt that sleep #ould e no easy matter, either for "olmes or myself! "is 6uiet self0confident manner convinced me that he had already formed a theory #hich e5plained all the facts, though #hat it #as I could not for an instant con(ecture! "e #as very late in returning 00 so late, that I kne# that the concert could not have detained him all the time! Dinner #as on the ta le efore he appeared! 4It #as magnificent,4 he said, as he took his seat! 4Do you remem er #hat Dar#in says a out music7 "e claims that the po#er of producing and appreciating it e5isted among the human race long efore the po#er of speech #as arrived at! 2erhaps that is #hy #e are so su tly influenced y it! 'here are vague memories in our souls of those misty centuries #hen the #orld #as in its childhood!4 4'hat+s rather a road idea,4 I remarked! 4)ne+s ideas must e as road as Nature if they are to interpret Nature,4 he ans#ered! 41hat+s the matter7 8ou+re not looking 6uite yourself! 'his *ri5ton Coad affair has upset you!4 4'o tell the truth, it has,4 I said! 4I ought to e more case0hardened after my %fghan e5periences! I sa# my o#n comrades hacked to pieces at Mai#and #ithout losing my nerve!4 4I can understand! 'here is a mystery a out this #hich stimulates the imagination= #here there is no imagination there is no horror! "ave you seen the evening paper74 4No!4 4It gives a fairly good account of the affair! It does not mention the fact that #hen the man #as raised up, a #oman+s #edding ring fell upon the floor! It is (ust as #ell it does not!4 41hy74 4Look at this advertisement,4 he ans#ered! 4I had one sent to every paper this morning immediately after the affair!4 "e thre# the paper across to me and I glanced at the place indicated! It #as the first announcement in the 4$ound4 column! 4In *ri5ton Coad, this morning,4 it ran, 4a plain gold #edding ring, found in the road#ay et#een the @1hite "art+ 'avern and "olland /rove! %pply Dr! 1atson, AA1*, *aker &treet, et#een eight and nine this evening!4 435cuse my using your name,4 he said! 4If I used my o#n some of these dunderheads #ould recogni.e it, and #ant to meddle in the affair!4 4'hat is all right,4 I ans#ered! 4*ut supposing anyone applies, I have no ring!4 4)h yes, you have,4 said he, handing me one! 4'his #ill do very #ell! It is almost a facsimile!4 4%nd #ho do you e5pect #ill ans#er this advertisement!4 41hy, the man in the ro#n coat 00 our florid friend #ith the s6uare toes! If he does not come himself he #ill send an accomplice!4

41ould he not consider it as too dangerous74 4Not at all! If my vie# of the case is correct, and I have every reason to elieve that it is, this man #ould rather risk anything than lose the ring! %ccording to my notion he dropped it #hile stooping over Dre er+s ody, and did not miss it at the time! %fter leaving the house he discovered his loss and hurried ack, ut found the police already in possession, o#ing to his o#n folly in leaving the candle urning! "e had to pretend to e drunk in order to allay the suspicions #hich might have een aroused y his appearance at the gate! No# put yourself in that man+s place! )n thinking the matter over, it must have occurred to him that it #as possi le that he had lost the ring in the road after leaving the house! 1hat #ould he do, then7 "e #ould eagerly look out for the evening papers in the hope of seeing it among the articles found! "is eye, of course, #ould light upon this! "e #ould e over(oyed! 1hy should he fear a trap7 'here #ould e no reason in his eyes #hy the finding of the ring should e connected #ith the murder! "e #ould come! "e #ill come! 8ou shall see him #ithin an hour74 4%nd then74 I asked! 4)h, you can leave me to deal #ith him then! "ave you any arms74 4I have my old service revolver and a fe# cartridges!4 48ou had etter clean it and load it! "e #ill e a desperate man, and though I shall take him una#ares, it is as #ell to e ready for anything!4 I #ent to my edroom and follo#ed his advice! 1hen I returned #ith the pistol the ta le had een cleared, and "olmes #as engaged in his favourite occupation of scraping upon his violin! 4'he plot thickens,4 he said, as I entered= 4I have (ust had an ans#er to my %merican telegram! My vie# of the case is the correct one!4 4%nd that is74 I asked eagerly! 4My fiddle #ould e the etter for ne# strings,4 he remarked! 42ut your pistol in your pocket! 1hen the fello# comes speak to him in an ordinary #ay! Leave the rest to me! Don+t frighten him y looking at him too hard!4 4It is eight o+clock no#,4 I said, glancing at my #atch! 48es! "e #ill pro a ly e here in a fe# minutes! )pen the door slightly! 'hat #ill do! No# put the key on the inside! 'hank you9 'his is a 6ueer old ook I picked up at a stall yesterday 00 @De -ure inter /entes+ 00 pu lished in Latin at Liege in the Lo#lands, in 1E?A! ,harles+ head #as still firm on his shoulders #hen this little ro#n0 acked volume #as struck off!4 41ho is the printer74 42hilippe de ,roy, #hoever he may have een! )n the fly0leaf, in very faded ink, is #ritten @35 li ris /uliolmi 1hyte!+ I #onder #ho 1illiam 1hyte #as! &ome pragmatical seventeenth century la#yer, I suppose! "is #riting has a legal t#ist a out it! "ere comes our man, I think!4 %s he spoke there #as a sharp ring at the ell! &herlock "olmes rose softly and moved his chair in the direction of the door! 1e heard the servant pass along the hall, and the sharp click of the latch as she opened it! 4Does Dr! 1atson live here74 asked a clear ut rather harsh voice! 1e could not hear the servant+s reply, ut the door closed, and some one egan to ascend the stairs! 'he footfall #as an uncertain and shuffling one! % look of surprise passed over the face of my companion as he listened to it! It came slo#ly along the passage, and there #as a fee le tap at the door! 4,ome in,4 I cried!

%t my summons, instead of the man of violence #hom #e e5pected, a very old and #rinkled #oman ho led into the apartment! &he appeared to e da..led y the sudden la.e of light, and after dropping a curtsey, she stood linking at us #ith her leared eyes and fum ling in her pocket #ith nervous, shaky fingers! I glanced at my companion, and his face had assumed such a disconsolate e5pression that it #as all I could do to keep my countenance! 'he old crone dre# out an evening paper, and pointed at our advertisement! 4It+s this as has rought me, good gentlemen,4 she said, dropping another curtsey= 4a gold #edding ring in the *ri5ton Coad! It elongs to my girl &ally, as #as married only this time t#elvemonth, #hich her hus and is ste#ard a oard a Union oat, and #hat he+d say if he come +ome and found her #ithout her ring is more than I can think, he eing short enough at the est o+ times, ut more especially #hen he has the drink! If it please you, she #ent to the circus last night along #ith 00004 4Is that her ring74 I asked! 4'he Lord e thanked94 cried the old #oman= 4&ally #ill e a glad #oman this night! 'hat+s the ring!4 4%nd #hat may your address e74 I in6uired, taking up a pencil! 41;, Duncan &treet, "oundsditch! % #eary #ay from here!4 4'he *ri5ton Coad does not lie et#een any circus and "oundsditch,4 said &herlock "olmes sharply! 'he old #oman faced round and looked keenly at him from her little red0rimmed eyes! 4'he gentleman asked me for ImyI address,4 she said! 4&ally lives in lodgings at ;, Mayfield 2lace, 2eckham!4 4%nd your name is 000074 4My name is &a#yer 00 her+s is Dennis, #hich 'om Dennis married her 00 and a smart, clean lad, too, as long as he+s at sea, and no ste#ard in the company more thought of= ut #hen on shore, #hat #ith the #omen and #hat #ith li6uor shops 00004 4"ere is your ring, Mrs! &a#yer,4 I interrupted, in o edience to a sign from my companion= 4it clearly elongs to your daughter, and I am glad to e a le to restore it to the rightful o#ner!4 1ith many mum led lessings and protestations of gratitude the old crone packed it a#ay in her pocket, and shuffled off do#n the stairs! &herlock "olmes sprang to his feet the moment that she #as gone and rushed into his room! "e re turned in a fe# seconds enveloped in an ulster and a cravat! 4I+ll follo# her,4 he said, hurriedly= 4she must e an accomplice, and #ill lead me to him! 1ait up for me!4 'he hall door had hardly slammed ehind our visitor efore "olmes had descended the stair! Looking through the #indo# I could see her #alking fee ly along the other side, #hile her pursuer dogged her some little distance ehind! 43ither his #hole theory is incorrect,4 I thought to myself, 4or else he #ill e led no# to the heart of the mystery!4 'here #as no need for him to ask me to #ait up for him, for I felt that sleep #as impossi le until I heard the result of his adventure! It #as close upon nine #hen he set out! I had no idea ho# long he might e, ut I sat stolidly puffing at my pipe and skipping over the pages of "enri Murger+s 4>ie de *oheme!4 :1A< 'en o+clock passed, and I heard the footsteps of the maid as they pattered off to ed! 3leven, and the more stately tread of the landlady passed my door, ound for the same destination! It #as close upon t#elve efore I heard the sharp sound of his latch0key! 'he instant he entered I sa# y his face that he had not een successful! %musement and chagrin seemed to e struggling for the mastery, until the former suddenly carried the day, and he urst into a hearty laugh! 4I #ouldn+t have the &cotland 8arders kno# it for the #orld,4 he cried, dropping into his chair= 4I have chaffed them so much that they #ould never have let me hear the end of it! I can afford to laugh, ecause I kno# that I #ill e even #ith them in the long run!4

41hat is it then74 I asked! 4)h, I don+t mind telling a story against myself! 'hat creature had gone a little #ay #hen she egan to limp and sho# every sign of eing foot0sore! 2resently she came to a halt, and hailed a four0#heeler #hich #as passing! I managed to e close to her so as to hear the address, ut I need not have een so an5ious, for she sang it out loud enough to e heard at the other side of the street, @Drive to 1;, Duncan &treet, "oundsditch,+ she cried! 'his egins to look genuine, I thought, and having seen her safely inside, I perched myself ehind! 'hat+s an art #hich every detective should e an e5pert at! 1ell, a#ay #e rattled, and never dre# rein until #e reached the street in 6uestion! I hopped off efore #e came to the door, and strolled do#n the street in an easy, lounging #ay! I sa# the ca pull up! 'he driver (umped do#n, and I sa# him open the door and stand e5pectantly! Nothing came out though! 1hen I reached him he #as groping a out frantically in the empty ca , and giving vent to the finest assorted collection of oaths that ever I listened to! 'here #as no sign or trace of his passenger, and I fear it #ill e some time efore he gets his fare! )n in6uiring at Num er 1; #e found that the house elonged to a respecta le paperhanger, named Des#ick, and that no one of the name either of &a#yer or Dennis had ever een heard of there!4 48ou don+t mean to say,4 I cried, in ama.ement, 4that that tottering, fee le old #oman #as a le to get out of the ca #hile it #as in motion, #ithout either you or the driver seeing her74 4)ld #oman e damned94 said &herlock "olmes, sharply! 41e #ere the old #omen to e so taken in! It must have een a young man, and an active one, too, esides eing an incompara le actor! 'he get0up #as inimita le! "e sa# that he #as follo#ed, no dou t, and used this means of giving me the slip! It sho#s that the man #e are after is not as lonely as I imagined he #as, ut has friends #ho are ready to risk something for him! No#, Doctor, you are looking done0up! 'ake my advice and turn in!4 I #as certainly feeling very #eary, so I o eyed his in(unction! I left "olmes seated in front of the smouldering fire, and long into the #atches of the night I heard the lo#, melancholy #ailings of his violin, and kne# that he #as still pondering over the strange pro lem #hich he had set himself to unravel!

Chapter 6

'"3 papers ne5t day #ere full of the 4*ri5ton Mystery,4 as they termed it! 3ach had a long account of the affair, and some had leaders upon it in addition! 'here #as some information in them #hich #as ne# to me! I still retain in my scrap0 ook numerous clippings and e5tracts earing upon the case! "ere is a condensation of a fe# of themJ00 'he IDaily 'elegraphI remarked that in the history of crime there had seldom een a tragedy #hich presented stranger features! 'he /erman name of the victim, the a sence of all other motive, and the sinister inscription on the #all, all pointed to its perpetration y political refugees and revolutionists! 'he &ocialists had many ranches in %merica, and the deceased had, no dou t, infringed their un#ritten la#s, and een tracked do#n y them! %fter alluding airily to the >ehmgericht, a6ua tofana, ,ar onari, the Marchioness de *rinvilliers, the Dar#inian theory, the principles of Malthus, and the Catcliff "igh#ay murders, the article concluded y admonishing the /overnment and advocating a closer #atch over foreigners in 3ngland!

'he I&tandardI commented upon the fact that la#less outrages of the sort usually occurred under a Li eral %dministration! 'hey arose from the unsettling of the minds of the masses, and the conse6uent #eakening of all authority! 'he deceased #as an %merican gentleman #ho had een residing for some #eeks in the Metropolis! "e had stayed at the oarding0house of Madame ,harpentier, in 'or6uay 'errace, ,am er#ell! "e #as accompanied in his travels y his private secretary, Mr! -oseph &tangerson! 'he t#o ade adieu to their landlady upon 'uesday, the ?th inst!, and departed to 3ustonK &tation #ith the avo#ed intention of catching the Liverpool e5press! 'hey #ere after#ards seen together upon the platform! Nothing more is kno#n of them until Mr! Dre er+s ody #as, as recorded, discovered in an empty house in the *ri5ton Coad, many miles from 3uston! "o# he came there, or ho# he met his fate, are 6uestions #hich are still involved in mystery! Nothing is kno#n of the #herea outs of &tangerson! 1e are glad to learn that Mr! Lestrade and Mr! /regson, of &cotland 8ard, are oth engaged upon the case, and it is confidently anticipated that these #ell0kno#n officers #ill speedily thro# light upon the matter! 'he IDaily Ne#sI o served that there #as no dou t as to the crime eing a political one! 'he despotism and hatred of Li eralism #hich animated the ,ontinental /overnments had had the effect of driving to our shores a num er of men #ho might have made e5cellent citi.ens #ere they not soured y the recollection of all that they had undergone! %mong these men there #as a stringent code of honour, any infringement of #hich #as punished y death! 3very effort should e made to find the secretary, &tangerson, and to ascertain some particulars of the ha its of the deceased! % great step had een gained y the discovery of the address of the house at #hich he had oarded 00 a result #hich #as entirely due to the acuteness and energy of Mr! /regson of &cotland 8ard! &herlock "olmes and I read these notices over together at reakfast, and they appeared to afford him considera le amusement! 4I told you that, #hatever happened, Lestrade and /regson #ould e sure to score!4 4'hat depends on ho# it turns out!4 4)h, less you, it doesn+t matter in the least! If the man is caught, it #ill e Ion accountI of their e5ertions= if he escapes, it #ill e Iin spiteI of their e5ertions! It+s heads I #in and tails you lose! 1hatever they do, they #ill have follo#ers! @Un sot trouve tou(ours un plus sot 6ui l+admire!+4 41hat on earth is this74 I cried, for at this moment there came the pattering of many steps in the hall and on the stairs, accompanied y audi le e5pressions of disgust upon the part of our landlady! 4It+s the *aker &treet division of the detective police force,4 said my companion, gravely= and as he spoke there rushed into the room half a do.en of the dirtiest and most ragged street %ra s that ever I clapped eyes on! 4+'ention94 cried "olmes, in a sharp tone, and the si5 dirty little scoundrels stood in a line like so many disreputa le statuettes! 4In future you shall send up 1iggins alone to report, and the rest of you must #ait in the street! "ave you found it, 1iggins74 4No, sir, #e hain+t,4 said one of the youths! 4I hardly e5pected you #ould! 8ou must keep on until you do! "ere are your #ages! :1;< "e handed each of them a shilling! 4No#, off you go, and come ack #ith a etter report ne5t time!4 "e #aved his hand, and they scampered a#ay do#nstairs like so many rats, and #e heard their shrill voices ne5t moment in the street! 4'here+s more #ork to e got out of one of those little eggars than out of a do.en of the force,4 "olmes remarked! 4'he mere sight of an official0looking person seals men+s lips! 'hese youngsters, ho#ever, go every#here and hear everything! 'hey are as sharp as needles, too= all they #ant is organisation!4

4Is it on this *ri5ton case that you are employing them74 I asked! 48es= there is a point #hich I #ish to ascertain! It is merely a matter of time! "ullo9 #e are going to hear some ne#s no# #ith a vengeance9 "ere is /regson coming do#n the road #ith eatitude #ritten upon every feature of his face! *ound for us, I kno#! 8es, he is stopping! 'here he is94 'here #as a violent peal at the ell, and in a fe# seconds the fair0haired detective came up the stairs, three steps at a time, and urst into our sitting0room! 4My dear fello#,4 he cried, #ringing "olmes+ unresponsive hand, 4congratulate me9 I have made the #hole thing as clear as day!4 % shade of an5iety seemed to me to cross my companion+s e5pressive face! 4Do you mean that you are on the right track74 he asked! 4'he right track9 1hy, sir, #e have the man under lock and key!4 4%nd his name is74 4%rthur ,harpentier, su 0lieutenant in "er Ma(esty+s navy,4 cried /regson, pompously, ru fat hands and inflating his chest! &herlock "olmes gave a sigh of relief, and rela5ed into a smile! 4'ake a seat, and try one of these cigars,4 he said! 41e are an5ious to kno# ho# you managed it! 1ill you have some #hiskey and #ater74 4I don+t mind if I do,4 the detective ans#ered! 4'he tremendous e5ertions #hich I have gone through during the last day or t#o have #orn me out! Not so much odily e5ertion, you understand, as the strain upon the mind! 8ou #ill appreciate that, Mr! &herlock "olmes, for #e are oth rain0#orkers!4 48ou do me too much honour,4 said "olmes, gravely! 4Let us hear ho# you arrived at this most gratifying result!4 'he detective seated himself in the arm0chair, and puffed complacently at his cigar! 'hen suddenly he slapped his thigh in a paro5ysm of amusement! 4'he fun of it is,4 he cried, 4that that fool Lestrade, #ho thinks himself so smart, has gone off upon the #rong track altogether! "e is after the secretary &tangerson, #ho had no more to do #ith the crime than the a e un orn! I have no dou t that he has caught him y this time!4 'he idea tickled /regson so much that he laughed until he choked! 4%nd ho# did you get your clue74 4%h, I+ll tell you all a out it! )f course, Doctor 1atson, this is strictly et#een ourselves! 'he first difficulty #hich #e had to contend #ith #as the finding of this %merican+s antecedents! &ome people #ould have #aited until their advertisements #ere ans#ered, or until parties came for#ard and volunteered information! 'hat is not 'o ias /regson+s #ay of going to #ork! 8ou remem er the hat eside the dead man74 48es,4 said "olmes= 4 y -ohn Under#ood and &ons, 1AF, ,am er#ell Coad!4 /regson looked 6uite crest0fallen! 4I had no idea that you noticed that,4 he said! 4"ave you een there74 ing his

4No!4 4"a94 cried /regson, in a relieved voice= 4you should never neglect a chance, ho#ever small it may seem!4 4'o a great mind, nothing is little,4 remarked "olmes, sententiously! 41ell, I #ent to Under#ood, and asked him if he had sold a hat of that si.e and description! "e looked over his ooks, and came on it at once! "e had sent the hat to a Mr! Dre er, residing at ,harpentier+s *oarding 3sta lishment, 'or6uay 'errace! 'hus I got at his address!4 4&mart 00 very smart94 murmured &herlock "olmes! 4I ne5t called upon Madame ,harpentier,4 continued the detective! 4I found her very pale and distressed! "er daughter #as in the room, too 00 an uncommonly fine girl she is, too= she #as looking red a out the eyes and her lips trem led as I spoke to her! 'hat didn+t escape my notice! I egan to smell a rat! 8ou kno# the feeling, Mr! &herlock "olmes, #hen you come upon the right scent 00 a kind of thrill in your nerves! @"ave you heard of the mysterious death of your late oarder Mr! 3noch -! Dre er, of ,leveland7+ I asked! 4'he mother nodded! &he didn+t seem a le to get out a #ord! 'he daughter urst into tears! I felt more than ever that these people kne# something of the matter! 4@%t #hat o+clock did Mr! Dre er leave your house for the train7+ I asked!

4@%t eight o+clock,+ she said, gulping in her throat to keep do#n her agitation! @"is secretary, Mr! &tangerson, said that there #ere t#o trains 00 one at F!1B and one at 11! "e #as to catch the first! :1?< 4@%nd #as that the last #hich you sa# of him7+ 4% terri le change came over the #oman+s face as I asked the 6uestion! "er features turned perfectly livid! It #as some seconds efore she could get out the single #ord @8es+ 00 and #hen it did come it #as in a husky unnatural tone! 4'here #as silence for a moment, and then the daughter spoke in a calm clear voice! 4@No good can ever come of falsehood, mother,+ she said! @Let us e frank #ith this gentleman! 1e IdidI see Mr! Dre er again!+ 4@/od forgive you9+ cried Madame ,harpentier, thro#ing up her hands and sinking ack in her chair! @8ou have murdered your rother!+ 4@%rthur #ould rather that #e spoke the truth,+ the girl ans#ered firmly! 4@8ou had est tell me all a out it no#,+ I said! @"alf0confidences are #orse than none! *esides, you do not kno# ho# much #e kno# of it!+ 4@)n your head e it, %lice9+ cried her mother= and then, turning to me, @I #ill tell you all, sir! Do not imagine that my agitation on ehalf of my son arises from any fear lest he should have had a hand in this terri le affair! "e is utterly innocent of it! My dread is, ho#ever, that in your eyes and in the eyes of others he may appear to e compromised! 'hat ho#ever is surely impossi le! "is high character, his profession, his antecedents #ould all for id it!+ 4@8our est #ay is to make a clean reast of the facts,+ I ans#ered! @Depend upon it, if your son is innocent he #ill e none the #orse!+

4@2erhaps, %lice, you had etter leave us together,+ she said, and her daughter #ithdre#! @No#, sir,+ she continued, @I had no intention of telling you all this, ut since my poor daughter has disclosed it I have no alternative! "aving once decided to speak, I #ill tell you all #ithout omitting any particular!+ 4@It is your #isest course,+ said I! 4@Mr! Dre er has een #ith us nearly three #eeks! "e and his secretary, Mr! &tangerson, had een travelling on the ,ontinent! I noticed a 4,openhagen4 la el upon each of their trunks, sho#ing that that had een their last stopping place! &tangerson #as a 6uiet reserved man, ut his employer, I am sorry to say, #as far other#ise! "e #as coarse in his ha its and rutish in his #ays! 'he very night of his arrival he ecame very much the #orse for drink, and, indeed, after t#elve o+clock in the day he could hardly ever e said to e so er! "is manners to#ards the maid0 servants #ere disgustingly free and familiar! 1orst of all, he speedily assumed the same attitude to#ards my daughter, %lice, and spoke to her more than once in a #ay #hich, fortunately, she is too innocent to understand! )n one occasion he actually sei.ed her in his arms and em raced her 00 an outrage #hich caused his o#n secretary to reproach him for his unmanly conduct!+ 4@*ut #hy did you stand all this,+ I asked! @I suppose that you can get rid of your oarders #hen you #ish!+ 4Mrs! ,harpentier lushed at my pertinent 6uestion! @1ould to /od that I had given him notice on the very day that he came,+ she said! @*ut it #as a sore temptation! 'hey #ere paying a pound a day each 00 fourteen pounds a #eek, and this is the slack season! I am a #ido#, and my oy in the Navy has cost me much! I grudged to lose the money! I acted for the est! 'his last #as too much, ho#ever, and I gave him notice to leave on account of it! 'hat #as the reason of his going!+ 4@1ell7+ 4@My heart gre# light #hen I sa# him drive a#ay! My son is on leave (ust no#, ut I did not tell him anything of all this, for his temper is violent, and he is passionately fond of his sister! 1hen I closed the door ehind them a load seemed to e lifted from my mind! %las, in less than an hour there #as a ring at the ell, and I learned that Mr! Dre er had returned! "e #as much e5cited, and evidently the #orse for drink! "e forced his #ay into the room, #here I #as sitting #ith my daughter, and made some incoherent remark a out having missed his train! "e then turned to %lice, and efore my very face, proposed to her that she should fly #ith him! 48ou are of age,4 he said, 4and there is no la# to stop you! I have money enough and to spare! Never mind the old girl here, ut come along #ith me no# straight a#ay! 8ou shall live like a princess!4 2oor %lice #as so frightened that she shrunk a#ay from him, ut he caught her y the #rist and endeavoured to dra# her to#ards the door! I screamed, and at that moment my son %rthur came into the room! 1hat happened then I do not kno#! I heard oaths and the confused sounds of a scuffle! I #as too terrified to raise my head! 1hen I did look up I sa# %rthur standing in the door#ay laughing, #ith a stick in his hand! 4I don+t think that fine fello# #ill trou le us again,4 he said! 4I #ill (ust go after him and see #hat he does #ith himself!4 1ith those #ords he took his hat and started off do#n the street! 'he ne5t morning #e heard of Mr! Dre er+s mysterious death!+ 4'his statement came from Mrs! ,harpentier+s lips #ith many gasps and pauses! %t times she spoke so lo# that I could hardly catch the #ords! I made shorthand notes of all that she said, ho#ever, so that there should e no possi ility of a mistake!4 4It+s 6uite e5citing,4 said &herlock "olmes, #ith a ya#n! 41hat happened ne5t74 41hen Mrs! ,harpentier paused,4 the detective continued, 4I sa# that the #hole case hung upon one point! $i5ing her #ith my eye in a #ay #hich I al#ays found effective #ith #omen, I asked her at #hat hour her son returned! 4@I do not kno#,+ she ans#ered! 4@Not kno#7+

4@No= he has a latch0key, and he let himself in!+ 4@%fter you #ent to ed7+ 4@8es!+ 4@1hen did you go to ed7+ 4@% out eleven!+ 4@&o your son #as gone at least t#o hours7+ 4@8es!+ 4@2ossi ly four or five7+ 4@8es!+ 4@1hat #as he doing during that time7+ 4@I do not kno#,+ she ans#ered, turning #hite to her very lips! 4)f course after that there #as nothing more to e done! I found out #here Lieutenant ,harpentier #as, took t#o officers #ith me, and arrested him! 1hen I touched him on the shoulder and #arned him to come 6uietly #ith us, he ans#ered us as old as rass, @I suppose you are arresting me for eing concerned in the death of that scoundrel Dre er,+ he said! 1e had said nothing to him a out it, so that his alluding to it had a most suspicious aspect!4 4>ery,4 said "olmes! 4"e still carried the heavy stick #hich the mother descri ed him as having #ith him #hen he follo#ed Dre er! It #as a stout oak cudgel!4 41hat is your theory, then74 41ell, my theory is that he follo#ed Dre er as far as the *ri5ton Coad! 1hen there, a fresh altercation arose et#een them, in the course of #hich Dre er received a lo# from the stick, in the pit of the stomach, perhaps, #hich killed him #ithout leaving any mark! 'he night #as so #et that no one #as a out, so ,harpentier dragged the ody of his victim into the empty house! %s to the candle, and the lood, and the #riting on the #all, and the ring, they may all e so many tricks to thro# the police on to the #rong scent!4 41ell done94 said "olmes in an encouraging voice! 4Ceally, /regson, you are getting along! 1e shall make something of you yet!4 4I flatter myself that I have managed it rather neatly,4 the detective ans#ered proudly! 4'he young man volunteered a statement, in #hich he said that after follo#ing Dre er some time, the latter perceived him, and took a ca in order to get a#ay from him! )n his #ay home he met an old shipmate, and took a long #alk #ith him! )n eing asked #here this old shipmate lived, he #as una le to give any satisfactory reply! I think the #hole case fits together uncommonly #ell! 1hat amuses me is to think of Lestrade, #ho had started off upon the #rong scent! I am afraid he #on+t make much of :1B< 1hy, y -ove, here+s the very man himself94 It #as indeed Lestrade, #ho had ascended the stairs #hile #e #ere talking, and #ho no# entered the room! 'he assurance and (auntiness #hich generally marked his demeanour and dress #ere, ho#ever, #anting! "is face #as distur ed and trou led, #hile his clothes #ere disarranged and untidy! "e had evidently come #ith the intention of consulting #ith &herlock "olmes, for on perceiving his colleague he appeared to e em arrassed and put out! "e stood in the centre of the

room, fum ling nervously #ith his hat and uncertain #hat to do! 4'his is a most e5traordinary case,4 he said at last 00 4a most incomprehensi le affair!4 4%h, you find it so, Mr! Lestrade94 cried /regson, triumphantly! 4I thought you #ould come to that conclusion! "ave you managed to find the &ecretary, Mr! -oseph &tangerson74 4'he &ecretary, Mr! -oseph &tangerson,4 said Lestrade gravely, 4#as murdered at "alliday+s 2rivate "otel a out si5 o+clock this morning!4

Chapter 7

'"3 intelligence #ith #hich Lestrade greeted us #as so momentous and so une5pected, that #e #ere all three fairly dumfoundered! /regson sprang out of his chair and upset the remainder of his #hiskey and #ater! I stared in silence at &herlock "olmes, #hose lips #ere compressed and his ro#s dra#n do#n over his eyes! 4&tangerson too94 he muttered! 4'he plot thickens!4 4It #as 6uite thick enough efore,4 grum led Lestrade, taking a chair! 4I seem to have dropped into a sort of council of #ar!4 4%re you 00 are you sure of this piece of intelligence74 stammered /regson! 4I have (ust come from his room,4 said Lestrade! 4I #as the first to discover #hat had occurred!4 41e have een hearing /regson+s vie# of the matter,4 "olmes o served! 41ould you mind letting us kno# #hat you have seen and done74 4I have no o (ection,4 Lestrade ans#ered, seating himself! 4I freely confess that I #as of the opinion that &tangerson #as concerned in the death of Dre er! 'his fresh development has sho#n me that I #as completely mistaken! $ull of the one idea, I set myself to find out #hat had ecome of the &ecretary! 'hey had een seen together at 3uston &tation a out half0past eight on the evening of the third! %t t#o in the morning Dre er had een found in the *ri5ton Coad! 'he 6uestion #hich confronted me #as to find out ho# &tangerson had een employed et#een 8!;G and the time of the crime, and #hat had ecome of him after#ards! I telegraphed to Liverpool, giving a description of the man, and #arning them to keep a #atch upon the %merican oats! I then set to #ork calling upon all the hotels and lodging0houses in the vicinity of 3uston! 8ou see, I argued that if Dre er and his companion had ecome separated, the natural course for the latter #ould e to put up some#here in the vicinity for the night, and then to hang a out the station again ne5t morning!4 4'hey #ould e likely to agree on some meeting0place eforehand,4 remarked "olmes! 4&o it proved! I spent the #hole of yesterday evening in making en6uiries entirely #ithout avail! 'his morning I egan very early, and at eight o+clock I reached "alliday+s 2rivate "otel, in Little /eorge &treet! )n my en6uiry as to #hether a Mr! &tangerson #as living there, they at once ans#ered me in the affirmative! 4@No dou t you are the gentleman #hom he #as e5pecting,+ they said! @"e has een #aiting for a gentleman for t#o days!+ 4@1here is he no#7+ I asked!

4@"e is upstairs in ed! "e #ished to e called at nine!+ 4@I #ill go up and see him at once,+ I said! 4It seemed to me that my sudden appearance might shake his nerves and lead him to say something unguarded! 'he *oots volunteered to sho# me the roomJ it #as on the second floor, and there #as a small corridor leading up to it! 'he *oots pointed out the door to me, and #as a out to go do#nstairs again #hen I sa# something that made me feel sickish, in spite of my t#enty years+ e5perience! $rom under the door there curled a little red ri on of lood, #hich had meandered across the passage and formed a little pool along the skirting at the other side! I gave a cry, #hich rought the *oots ack! "e nearly fainted #hen he sa# it! 'he door #as locked on the inside, ut #e put our shoulders to it, and knocked it in! 'he #indo# of the room #as open, and eside the #indo#, all huddled up, lay the ody of a man in his nightdress! "e #as 6uite dead, and had een for some time, for his lim s #ere rigid and cold! 1hen #e turned him over, the *oots recogni.ed him at once as eing the same gentleman #ho had engaged the room under the name of -oseph &tangerson! 'he cause of death #as a deep sta in the left side, #hich must have penetrated the heart! %nd no# comes the strangest part of the affair! 1hat do you suppose #as a ove the murdered man74 I felt a creeping of the flesh, and a presentiment of coming horror, even efore &herlock "olmes ans#ered! 4'he #ord C%,"3, #ritten in letters of lood,4 he said! 4'hat #as it,4 said Lestrade, in an a#e0struck voice= and #e #ere all silent for a #hile! 'here #as something so methodical and so incomprehensi le a out the deeds of this unkno#n assassin, that it imparted a fresh ghastliness to his crimes! My nerves, #hich #ere steady enough on the field of attle tingled as I thought of it! 4'he man #as seen,4 continued Lestrade! 4% milk oy, passing on his #ay to the dairy, happened to #alk do#n the lane #hich leads from the me#s at the ack of the hotel! "e noticed that a ladder, #hich usually lay there, #as raised against one of the #indo#s of the second floor, #hich #as #ide open! %fter passing, he looked ack and sa# a man descend the ladder! "e came do#n so 6uietly and openly that the oy imagined him to e some carpenter or (oiner at #ork in the hotel! "e took no particular notice of him, eyond thinking in his o#n mind that it #as early for him to e at #ork! "e has an impression that the man #as tall, had a reddish face, and #as dressed in a long, ro#nish coat! "e must have stayed in the room some little time after the murder, for #e found lood0stained #ater in the asin, #here he had #ashed his hands, and marks on the sheets #here he had deli erately #iped his knife!4 I glanced at "olmes on hearing the description of the murderer, #hich tallied so e5actly #ith his o#n! 'here #as, ho#ever, no trace of e5ultation or satisfaction upon his face! 4Did you find nothing in the room #hich could furnish a clue to the murderer74 he asked! 4Nothing! &tangerson had Dre er+s purse in his pocket, ut it seems that this #as usual, as he did all the paying! 'here #as eighty odd pounds in it, ut nothing had een taken! 1hatever the motives of these e5traordinary crimes, ro ery is certainly not one of them! 'here #ere no papers or memoranda in the murdered man+s pocket, e5cept a single telegram, dated from ,leveland a out a month ago, and containing the #ords, @-! "! is in 3urope!+ 'here #as no name appended to this message!4 4%nd there #as nothing else74 "olmes asked! 4Nothing of any importance! 'he man+s novel, #ith #hich he had read himself to sleep #as lying upon the ed, and his pipe #as on a chair eside him! 'here #as a glass of #ater on the ta le, and on the #indo#0sill a small chip ointment o5 containing a couple of pills!4 &herlock "olmes sprang from his chair #ith an e5clamation of delight!

4'he last link,4 he cried, e5ultantly! 4My case is complete!4 'he t#o detectives stared at him in ama.ement! 4I have no# in my hands,4 my companion said, confidently, 4all the threads #hich have formed such a tangle! 'here are, of course, details to e filled in, ut I am as certain of all the main facts, from the time that Dre er parted from &tangerson at the station, up to the discovery of the ody of the latter, as if I had seen them #ith my o#n eyes! I #ill give you a proof of my kno#ledge! ,ould you lay your hand upon those pills74 4I have them,4 said Lestrade, producing a small #hite o5= 4I took them and the purse and the telegram, intending to have them put in a place of safety at the 2olice &tation! It #as the merest chance my taking these pills, for I am ound to say that I do not attach any importance to them!4 4/ive them here,4 said "olmes! 4No#, Doctor,4 turning to me, 4are those ordinary pills74 'hey certainly #ere not! 'hey #ere of a pearly grey colour, small, round, and almost transparent against the light! 4$rom their lightness and transparency, I should imagine that they are solu le in #ater,4 I remarked! 42recisely so,4 ans#ered "olmes! 4No# #ould you mind going do#n and fetching that poor little devil of a terrier #hich has een ad so long, and #hich the landlady #anted you to put out of its pain yesterday!4 I #ent do#nstairs and carried the dog upstair in my arms! It+s la oured reathing and gla.ing eye sho#ed that it #as not far from its end! Indeed, its sno#0#hite mu..le proclaimed that it had already e5ceeded the usual term of canine e5istence! I placed it upon a cushion on the rug! 4I #ill no# cut one of these pills in t#o,4 said "olmes, and dra#ing his penknife he suited the action to the #ord! 4)ne half #e return into the o5 for future purposes! 'he other half I #ill place in this #ine glass, in #hich is a teaspoonful of #ater! 8ou perceive that our friend, the Doctor, is right, and that it readily dissolves!4 4'his may e very interesting,4 said Lestrade, in the in(ured tone of one #ho suspects that he is eing laughed at, 4I cannot see, ho#ever, #hat it has to do #ith the death of Mr! -oseph &tangerson!4 42atience, my friend, patience9 8ou #ill find in time that it has everything to do #ith it! I shall no# add a little milk to make the mi5ture palata le, and on presenting it to the dog #e find that he laps it up readily enough!4 %s he spoke he turned the contents of the #ine glass into a saucer and placed it in front of the terrier, #ho speedily licked it dry! &herlock "olmes+ earnest demeanour had so far convinced us that #e all sat in silence, #atching the animal intently, and e5pecting some startling effect! None such appeared, ho#ever! 'he dog continued to lie stretched upon tho :1E< cushion, reathing in a la oured #ay, ut apparently neither the etter nor the #orse for its draught! "olmes had taken out his #atch, and as minute follo#ed minute #ithout result, an e5pression of the utmost chagrin and disappointment appeared upon his features! "e gna#ed his lip, drummed his fingers upon the ta le, and sho#ed every other symptom of acute impatience! &o great #as his emotion, that I felt sincerely sorry for him, #hile the t#o detectives smiled derisively, y no means displeased at this check #hich he had met! 4It can+t e a coincidence,4 he cried, at last springing from his chair and pacing #ildly up and do#n the room= 4it is impossi le that it should e a mere coincidence! 'he very pills #hich I suspected in the case of Dre er are actually found after the death of &tangerson! %nd yet they are inert! 1hat can it mean7 &urely my #hole chain of reasoning cannot have een false! It is impossi le9 %nd yet this #retched dog is none the #orse! %h, I have it9 I have it94 1ith a perfect shriek of delight he rushed to the o5, cut the other pill in t#o, dissolved it, added milk, and presented it to the terrier!

'he unfortunate creature+s tongue seemed hardly to have een moistened in it efore it gave a convulsive shiver in every lim , and lay as rigid and lifeless as if it had een struck y lightning! &herlock "olmes dre# a long reath, and #iped the perspiration from his forehead! 4I should have more faith,4 he said= 4I ought to kno# y this time that #hen a fact appears to e opposed to a long train of deductions, it invaria ly proves to e capa le of earing some other interpretation! )f the t#o pills in that o5 one #as of the most deadly poison, and the other #as entirely harmless! I ought to have kno#n that efore ever I sa# the o5 at all!4 'his last statement appeared to me to e so startling, that I could hardly elieve that he #as in his so er senses! 'here #as the dead dog, ho#ever, to prove that his con(ecture had een correct! It seemed to me that the mists in my o#n mind #ere gradually clearing a#ay, and I egan to have a dim, vague perception of the truth! 4%ll this seems strange to you,4 continued "olmes, 4 ecause you failed at the eginning of the in6uiry to grasp the importance of the single real clue #hich #as presented to you! I had the good fortune to sei.e upon that, and everything #hich has occurred since then has served to confirm my original supposition, and, indeed, #as the logical se6uence of it! "ence things #hich have perple5ed you and made the case more o scure, have served to enlighten me and to strengthen my conclusions! It is a mistake to confound strangeness #ith mystery! 'he most commonplace crime is often the most mysterious ecause it presents no ne# or special features from #hich deductions may e dra#n! 'his murder #ould have een infinitely more difficult to unravel had the ody of the victim een simply found lying in the road#ay #ithout any of those IoutreI :17< and sensational accompaniments #hich have rendered it remarka le! 'hese strange details, far from making the case more difficult, have really had the effect of making it less so!4 Mr! /regson, #ho had listened to this address #ith considera le impatience, could contain himself no longer! 4Look here, Mr! &herlock "olmes,4 he said, 4#e are all ready to ackno#ledge that you are a smart man, and that you have your o#n methods of #orking! 1e #ant something more than mere theory and preaching no#, though! It is a case of taking the man! I have made my case out, and it seems I #as #rong! 8oung ,harpentier could not have een engaged in this second affair! Lestrade #ent after his man, &tangerson, and it appears that he #as #rong too! 8ou have thro#n out hints here, and hints there, and seem to kno# more than #e do, ut the time has come #hen #e feel that #e have a right to ask you straight ho# much you do kno# of the usiness! ,an you name the man #ho did it74 4I cannot help feeling that /regson is right, sir,4 remarked Lestrade! 41e have oth tried, and #e have oth failed! 8ou have remarked more than once since I have een in the room that you had all the evidence #hich you re6uire! &urely you #ill not #ithhold it any longer!4 4%ny delay in arresting the assassin,4 I o served, 4might give him time to perpetrate some fresh atrocity!4 'hus pressed y us all, "olmes sho#ed signs of irresolution! "e continued to #alk up and do#n the room #ith his head sunk on his chest and his ro#s dra#n do#n, as #as his ha it #hen lost in thought! 4'here #ill e no more murders,4 he said at last, stopping a ruptly and facing us! 48ou can put that consideration out of the 6uestion! 8ou have asked me if I kno# the name of the assassin! I do! 'he mere kno#ing of his name is a small thing, ho#ever, compared #ith the po#er of laying our hands upon him! 'his I e5pect very shortly to do! I have good hopes of managing it through my o#n arrangements= ut it is a thing #hich needs delicate handling, for #e have a shre#d and desperate man to deal #ith, #ho is supported, as I have had occasion to prove, y another #ho is as clever as himself! %s long as this man has no idea that anyone can have a clue there is some chance of securing him= ut if he had the slightest suspicion, he #ould change his name, and vanish in an instant among the four million inha itants of this great city! 1ithout meaning to hurt either of your feelings, I am ound to say that I consider these men to e more than a match for the official force, and that is #hy I have not asked your assistance! If I fail I shall, of course, incur all the lame due to this omission= ut that I am prepared for! %t present I am ready to promise that the instant that I can communicate #ith you #ithout endangering my o#n com inations, I shall do so!4

/regson and Lestrade seemed to e far from satisfied y this assurance, or y the depreciating allusion to the detective police! 'he former had flushed up to the roots of his fla5en hair, #hile the other+s eady eyes glistened #ith curiosity and resentment! Neither of them had time to speak, ho#ever, efore there #as a tap at the door, and the spokesman of the street %ra s, young 1iggins, introduced his insignificant and unsavoury person! 42lease, sir,4 he said, touching his forelock, 4I have the ca do#nstairs!4 4/ood oy,4 said "olmes, landly! 41hy don+t you introduce this pattern at &cotland 8ard74 he continued, taking a pair of steel handcuffs from a dra#er! 4&ee ho# eautifully the spring #orks! 'hey fasten in an instant!4 4'he old pattern is good enough,4 remarked Lestrade, 4if #e can only find the man to put them on!4 4>ery good, very good,4 said "olmes, smiling! 4'he ca man may as #ell help me #ith my o5es! -ust ask him to step up, 1iggins!4 I #as surprised to find my companion speaking as though he #ere a out to set out on a (ourney, since he had not said anything to me a out it! 'here #as a small portmanteau in the room, and this he pulled out and egan to strap! "e #as usily engaged at it #hen the ca man entered the room! 4-ust give me a help #ith this uckle, ca man,4 he said, kneeling over his task, and never turning his head! 'he fello# came for#ard #ith a some#hat sullen, defiant air, and put do#n his hands to assist! %t that instant there #as a sharp click, the (angling of metal, and &herlock "olmes sprang to his feet again! 4/entlemen,4 he cried, #ith flashing eyes, 4let me introduce you to Mr! -efferson "ope, the murderer of 3noch Dre er and of -oseph &tangerson!4 'he #hole thing occurred in a moment 00 so 6uickly that I had no time to reali.e it! I have a vivid recollection of that instant, of "olmes+ triumphant e5pression and the ring of his voice, of the ca man+s da.ed, savage face, as he glared at the glittering handcuffs, #hich had appeared as if y magic upon his #rists! $or a second or t#o #e might have een a group of statues! 'hen, #ith an inarticulate roar of fury, the prisoner #renched himself free from "olmes+s grasp, and hurled himself through the #indo#! 1ood#ork and glass gave #ay efore him= ut efore he got 6uite through, /regson, Lestrade, and "olmes sprang upon him like so many staghounds! "e #as dragged ack into the room, and then commenced a terrific conflict! &o po#erful and so fierce #as he, that the four of us #ere shaken off again and again! "e appeared to have the convulsive strength of a man in an epileptic fit! "is face and hands #ere terri ly mangled y his passage through the glass, ut loss of lood had no effect in diminishing his resistance! It #as not until Lestrade succeeded in getting his hand inside his neckcloth and half0strangling him that #e made him reali.e that his struggles #ere of no avail= and even then #e felt no security until #e had pinioned his feet as #ell as his hands! 'hat done, #e rose to our feet reathless and panting! 41e have his ca ,4 said &herlock "olmes! 4It #ill serve to take him to &cotland 8ard! %nd no#, gentlemen,4 he continued, #ith a pleasant smile, 4#e have reached the end of our little mystery! 8ou are very #elcome to put any 6uestions that you like to me no#, and there is no danger that I #ill refuse to ans#er them!4

Chapter 8

IN the central portion of the great North %merican ,ontinent there lies an arid and repulsive desert, #hich for many a long year served as a arrier against the advance of civilisation! $rom the &ierra Nevada to Ne raska, and from the 8ello#stone Civer in the north to the ,olorado upon the south, is a region of desolation and silence! Nor is Nature al#ays in one mood throughout this grim district! It comprises sno#0capped and lofty mountains, and dark and gloomy valleys! 'here are s#ift0flo#ing rivers #hich dash through (agged canons= :18< and there are enormous plains, #hich in #inter are #hite #ith sno#, and in summer are grey #ith the saline alkali dust! 'hey all preserve, ho#ever, the common characteristics of arrenness, inhospitality, and misery! 'here are no inha itants of this land of despair! % and of 2a#nees or of *lackfeet may occasionally traverse it in order to reach other hunting0grounds, ut the hardiest of the raves are glad to lose sight of those a#esome plains, and to find themselves once more upon their prairies! 'he coyote skulks among the scru , the u..ard flaps heavily through the air, and the clumsy gri..ly ear lum ers through the dark ravines, and picks up such sustenance as it can amongst the rocks! 'hese are the sole d#ellers in the #ilderness! In the #hole #orld there can e no more dreary vie# than that from the northern slope of the &ierra *lanco! %s far as the eye can reach stretches the great flat plain0land, all dusted over #ith patches of alkali, and intersected y clumps of the d#arfish chaparral ushes! )n the e5treme verge of the hori.on lie a long chain of mountain peaks, #ith their rugged summits flecked #ith sno#! In this great stretch of country there is no sign of life, nor of anything appertaining to life! 'here is no ird in the steel0 lue heaven, no movement upon the dull, grey earth 00 a ove all, there is a solute silence! Listen as one may, there is no shado# of a sound in all that mighty #ilderness= nothing ut silence 00 complete and heart0su duing silence! It has een said there is nothing appertaining to life upon the road plain! 'hat is hardly true! Looking do#n from the &ierra *lanco, one sees a path#ay traced out across the desert, #hich #inds a#ay and is lost in the e5treme distance! It is rutted #ith #heels and trodden do#n y the feet of many adventurers! "ere and there there are scattered #hite o (ects #hich glisten in the sun, and stand out against the dull deposit of alkali! %pproach, and e5amine them9 'hey are onesJ some large and coarse, others smaller and more delicate! 'he former have elonged to o5en, and the latter to men! $or fifteen hundred miles one may trace this ghastly caravan route y these scattered remains of those #ho had fallen y the #ayside! Looking do#n on this very scene, there stood upon the fourth of May, eighteen hundred and forty0 seven, a solitary traveller! "is appearance #as such that he might have een the very genius or demon of the region! %n o server #ould have found it difficult to say #hether he #as nearer to forty or to si5ty! "is face #as lean and haggard, and the ro#n parchment0like skin #as dra#n tightly over the pro(ecting ones= his long, ro#n hair and eard #ere all flecked and dashed #ith #hite= his eyes #ere sunken in his head, and urned #ith an unnatural lustre= #hile the hand #hich grasped his rifle #as hardly more fleshy than that of a skeleton! %s he stood, he leaned upon his #eapon for support, and yet his tall figure and the massive frame#ork of his ones suggested a #iry and vigorous constitution! "is gaunt face, ho#ever, and his clothes, #hich hung so aggily over his shrivelled lim s, proclaimed #hat it #as that gave him that senile and decrepit appearance! 'he man #as dying 00 dying from hunger and from thirst! "e had toiled painfully do#n the ravine, and on to this little elevation, in the vain hope of seeing some signs of #ater! No# the great salt plain stretched efore his eyes, and the distant elt of savage mountains, #ithout a sign any#here of plant or tree, #hich might indicate the presence of moisture! In all that road landscape there #as no gleam of hope! North, and east, and #est he looked #ith #ild 6uestioning eyes, and then he realised that his #anderings had come to an end, and that there, on that arren crag, he #as a out to die! 41hy not here, as #ell as in a feather ed, t#enty years hence,4 he muttered, as he seated himself in the shelter of a oulder! *efore sitting do#n, he had deposited upon the ground his useless rifle, and also a large undle tied up in a grey sha#l, #hich he had carried slung over his right shoulder! It appeared to e some#hat too heavy for his strength, for in lo#ering it, it came do#n on the ground #ith some

little violence! Instantly there roke from the grey parcel a little moaning cry, and from it there protruded a small, scared face, #ith very right ro#n eyes, and t#o little speckled, dimpled fists! 48ou+ve hurt me94 said a childish voice reproachfully! 4"ave I though,4 the man ans#ered penitently, 4I didn+t go for to do it!4 %s he spoke he un#rapped the grey sha#l and e5tricated a pretty little girl of a out five years of age, #hose dainty shoes and smart pink frock #ith its little linen apron all espoke a mother+s care! 'he child #as pale and #an, ut her healthy arms and legs sho#ed that she had suffered less than her companion! 4"o# is it no#74 he ans#ered an5iously, for she #as still ru covered the ack of her head! ing the to#sy golden curls #hich

4Diss it and make it #ell,4 she said, #ith perfect gravity, shoving :1F< the in(ured part up to him! 4'hat+s #hat mother used to do! 1here+s mother74 4Mother+s gone! I guess you+ll see her efore long!4 4/one, eh94 said the little girl! 4$unny, she didn+t say good0 ye= she +most al#ays did if she #as (ust goin+ over to %untie+s for tea, and no# she+s een a#ay three days! &ay, it+s a#ful dry, ain+t it7 %in+t there no #ater, nor nothing to eat74 4No, there ain+t nothing, dearie! 8ou+ll (ust need to e patient a#hile, and then you+ll e all right! 2ut your head up agin me like that, and then you+ll feel ullier! It ain+t easy to talk #hen your lips is like leather, ut I guess I+d est let you kno# ho# the cards lie! 1hat+s that you+ve got74 42retty things9 fine things94 cried the little girl enthusiastically, holding up t#o glittering fragments of mica! 41hen #e goes ack to home I+ll give them to rother *o !4 48ou+ll see prettier things than them soon,4 said the man confidently! 48ou (ust #ait a it! I #as going to tell you though 00 you remem er #hen #e left the river74 4)h, yes!4 41ell, #e reckoned #e+d strike another river soon, d+ye see! *ut there #as somethin+ #rong= compasses, or map, or somethin+, and it didn+t turn up! 1ater ran out! -ust e5cept a little drop for the likes of you and 00 and 00004 4%nd you couldn+t #ash yourself,4 interrupted his companion gravely, staring up at his grimy visage! 4No, nor drink! %nd Mr! *ender, he #as the fust to go, and then Indian 2ete, and then Mrs! Mc/regor, and then -ohnny "ones, and then, dearie, your mother!4 4'hen mother+s a deader too,4 cried the little girl dropping her face in her pinafore and so itterly! ing

48es, they all #ent e5cept you and me! 'hen I thought there #as some chance of #ater in this direction, so I heaved you over my shoulder and #e tramped it together! It don+t seem as though #e+ve improved matters! 'here+s an almighty small chance for us no#94 4Do you mean that #e are going to die too74 asked the child, checking her so s, and raising her tear0stained face! 4I guess that+s a out the si.e of it!4 41hy didn+t you say so efore74 she said, laughing gleefully! 48ou gave me such a fright! 1hy, of course, no# as long as #e die #e+ll e #ith mother again!4

48es, you #ill, dearie!4 4%nd you too! I+ll tell her ho# a#ful good you+ve een! I+ll et she meets us at the door of "eaven #ith a ig pitcher of #ater, and a lot of uck#heat cakes, hot, and toasted on oth sides, like *o and me #as fond of! "o# long #ill it e first74 4I don+t kno# 00 not very long!4 'he man+s eyes #ere fi5ed upon the northern hori.on! In the lue vault of the heaven there had appeared three little specks #hich increased in si.e every moment, so rapidly did they approach! 'hey speedily resolved themselves into three large ro#n irds, #hich circled over the heads of the t#o #anderers, and then settled upon some rocks #hich overlooked them! 'hey #ere u..ards, the vultures of the #est, #hose coming is the forerunner of death! 4,ocks and hens,4 cried the little girl gleefully, pointing at their ill0omened forms, and clapping her hands to make them rise! 4&ay, did /od make this country74 4In course "e did,4 said her companion, rather startled y this une5pected 6uestion! 4"e made the country do#n in Illinois, and "e made the Missouri,4 the little girl continued! 4I guess some ody else made the country in these parts! It+s not nearly so #ell done! 'hey forgot the #ater and the trees!4 41hat #ould ye think of offering up prayer74 the man asked diffidently! 4It ain+t night yet,4 she ans#ered! 4It don+t matter! It ain+t 6uite regular, ut "e #on+t mind that, you et! 8ou say over them ones that you used to say every night in the #aggon #hen #e #as on the 2lains!4 41hy don+t you say some yourself74 the child asked, #ith #ondering eyes! 4I disremem er them,4 he ans#ered! 4I hain+t said none since I #as half the height o+ that gun! I guess it+s never too late! 8ou say them out, and I+ll stand y and come in on the choruses!4 4'hen you+ll need to kneel do#n, and me too,4 she said, laying the sha#l out for that purpose! 48ou+ve got to put your hands up like this! It makes you feel kind o+ good!4 It #as a strange sight had there een anything ut the u..ards to see it! &ide y side on the narro# sha#l knelt the t#o #anderers, the little prattling child and the reckless, hardened adventurer! "er chu y face, and his haggard, angular visage #ere oth turned up to the cloudless heaven in heartfelt entreaty to that dread eing #ith #hom they #ere face to face, #hile the t#o voices 00 the one thin and clear, the other deep and harsh 00 united in the entreaty for mercy and forgiveness! 'he prayer finished, they resumed their seat in the shado# of the oulder until the child fell asleep, nestling upon the road reast of her protector! "e #atched over her slum er for some time, ut Nature proved to e too strong for him! $or three days and three nights he had allo#ed himself neither rest nor repose! &lo#ly the eyelids drooped over the tired eyes, and the head sunk lo#er and lo#er upon the reast, until the man+s gri..led eard #as mi5ed #ith the gold tresses of his companion, and oth slept the same deep and dreamless slum er! "ad the #anderer remained a#ake for another half hour a strange sight #ould have met his eyes! $ar a#ay on the e5treme verge of the alkali plain there rose up a little spray of dust, very slight at first, and hardly to e distinguished from the mists of the distance, ut gradually gro#ing higher and roader until it formed a solid, #ell0defined cloud! 'his cloud continued to increase in si.e until it ecame evident that it could only e raised y a great multitude of moving creatures! In more fertile spots the o server #ould have come to the conclusion that one of those great herds of isons #hich gra.e upon the prairie land #as approaching him! 'his #as o viously impossi le in these arid #ilds! %s the #hirl of dust dre# nearer to the solitary luff upon #hich the t#o casta#ays #ere reposing, the canvas0covered tilts of #aggons and the figures of armed horsemen egan to sho# up through the ha.e, and the apparition revealed itself as eing a great caravan upon its (ourney for the 1est! *ut #hat a caravan9 1hen the head of it had reached the ase of

the mountains, the rear #as not yet visi le on the hori.on! Cight across the enormous plain stretched the straggling array, #aggons and carts, men on horse ack, and men on foot! Innumera le #omen #ho staggered along under urdens, and children #ho toddled eside the #aggons or peeped out from under the #hite coverings! 'his #as evidently no ordinary party of immigrants, ut rather some nomad people #ho had een compelled from stress of circumstances to seek themselves a ne# country! 'here rose through the clear air a confused clattering and rum ling from this great mass of humanity, #ith the creaking of #heels and the neighing of horses! Loud as it #as, it #as not sufficient to rouse the t#o tired #ayfarers a ove them! %t the head of the column there rode a score or more of grave ironfaced men, clad in som re homespun garments and armed #ith rifles! )n reaching the ase of the luff they halted, and held a short council among themselves! 4'he #ells are to the right, my rothers,4 said one, a hard0lipped, clean0shaven man #ith gri..ly hair! 4'o the right of the &ierra *lanco 00 so #e shall reach the Cio /rande,4 said another! 4$ear not for #ater,4 cried a third! 4"e #ho could dra# it from the rocks #ill not no# a andon "is o#n chosen people!4 4%men9 %men94 responded the #hole party! 'hey #ere a out to resume their (ourney #hen one of the youngest and keenest0eyed uttered an e5clamation and pointed up at the rugged crag a ove them! $rom its summit there fluttered a little #isp of pink, sho#ing up hard and right against the grey rocks ehind! %t the sight there #as a general reining up of horses and unslinging of guns, #hile fresh horsemen came galloping up to reinforce the vanguard! 'he #ord @Cedskins+ #as on every lip! 4'here can+t e any num er of In(uns here,4 said the elderly man #ho appeared to e in command! 41e have passed the 2a#nees, and there are no other tri es until #e cross the great mountains!4 4&hall I go for#ard and see, *rother &tangerson,4 asked one of the and! 4%nd I,4 4and I,4 cried a do.en voices! 4Leave your horses elo# and #e #ill a#ait you here,4 the 3lder ans#ered! In a moment the young fello#s had dismounted, fastened their horses, and #ere ascending the precipitous slope #hich led up to the o (ect #hich had e5cited their curiosity! 'hey advanced rapidly and noiselessly, #ith the confidence and de5terity of practised scouts! 'he #atchers from the plain elo# could see them flit from rock to rock until their figures stood out against the skyline! 'he young man #ho had first given the alarm #as leading them! &uddenly his follo#ers sa# him thro# up his hands, as though overcome #ith astonishment, and on (oining him they #ere affected in the same #ay y the sight #hich met their eyes! )n the little plateau #hich cro#ned the arren hill there stood a single giant oulder, and against this oulder there lay a tall man, long0 earded and hard0featured, ut of an e5cessive thinness! "is placid face and regular reathing sho#ed that he #as fast asleep! *eside him lay a little child, #ith her round #hite arms encircling his ro#n sine#y neck, and her golden haired head resting upon the reast of his velveteen tunic! "er rosy lips #ere parted, sho#ing the regular line of sno#0#hite teeth #ithin, and a playful smile played over her infantile features! "er plump little #hite legs terminating in #hite socks and neat shoes #ith shining uckles, offered a strange contrast to the long shrivelled mem ers of her companion! )n the ledge of rock a ove this strange couple there stood three solemn u..ards, #ho, at the sight of the ne# comers uttered raucous screams of disappointment and flapped sullenly a#ay! 'he cries of the foul irds a#oke the t#o sleepers #ho stared a out :AG< them in e#ilderment! 'he man staggered to his feet and looked do#n upon the plain #hich had een so desolate #hen sleep had overtaken him, and #hich #as no# traversed y this enormous ody of men and of easts! "is face assumed an e5pression of incredulity as he ga.ed, and he passed his oney hand

over his eyes! 4'his is #hat they call delirium, I guess,4 he muttered! 'he child stood eside him, holding on to the skirt of his coat, and said nothing ut looked all round her #ith the #ondering 6uestioning ga.e of childhood! 'he rescuing party #ere speedily a le to convince the t#o casta#ays that their appearance #as no delusion! )ne of them sei.ed the little girl, and hoisted her upon his shoulder, #hile t#o others supported her gaunt companion, and assisted him to#ards the #aggons! 4My name is -ohn $errier,4 the #anderer e5plained= 4me and that little un are all that+s left o+ t#enty0one people! 'he rest is all dead o+ thirst and hunger a#ay do#n in the south!4 4Is she your child74 asked someone! 4I guess she is no#,4 the other cried, defiantly= 4she+s mine +cause I saved her! No man #ill take her from me! &he+s Lucy $errier from this day on! 1ho are you, though74 he continued, glancing #ith curiosity at his stal#art, sun urned rescuers= 4there seems to e a po#erful lot of ye!4 4Nigh upon ten thousand,4 said one of the young men= 4#e are the persecuted children of /od 00 the chosen of the %ngel Merona!4 4I never heard tell on him,4 said the #anderer! 4"e appears to have chosen a fair cro#d of ye!4 4Do not (est at that #hich is sacred,4 said the other sternly! 41e are of those #ho elieve in those sacred #ritings, dra#n in 3gyptian letters on plates of eaten gold, #hich #ere handed unto the holy -oseph &mith at 2almyra! 1e have come from Nauvoo, in the &tate of Illinois, #here #e had founded our temple! 1e have come to seek a refuge from the violent man and from the godless, even though it e the heart of the desert!4 'he name of Nauvoo evidently recalled recollections to -ohn $errier! 4I see,4 he said, 4you are the Mormons!4 41e are the Mormons,4 ans#ered his companions #ith one voice! 4%nd #here are you going74 41e do not kno#! 'he hand of /od is leading us under the person of our 2rophet! 8ou must come efore him! "e shall say #hat is to e done #ith you!4 'hey had reached the ase of the hill y this time, and #ere surrounded y cro#ds of the pilgrims 00 pale0faced meek0looking #omen, strong laughing children, and an5ious earnest0eyed men! Many #ere the cries of astonishment and of commiseration #hich arose from them #hen they perceived the youth of one of the strangers and the destitution of the other! 'heir escort did not halt, ho#ever, ut pushed on, follo#ed y a great cro#d of Mormons, until they reached a #aggon, #hich #as conspicuous for its great si.e and for the gaudiness and smartness of its appearance! &i5 horses #ere yoked to it, #hereas the others #ere furnished #ith t#o, or, at most, four a0piece! *eside the driver there sat a man #ho could not have een more than thirty years of age, ut #hose massive head and resolute e5pression marked him as a leader! "e #as reading a ro#n0 acked volume, ut as the cro#d approached he laid it aside, and listened attentively to an account of the episode! 'hen he turned to the t#o casta#ays! 4If #e take you #ith us,4 he said, in solemn #ords, 4it can only e as elievers in our o#n creed! 1e shall have no #olves in our fold! *etter far that your ones should leach in this #ilderness than that you should prove to e that little speck of decay #hich in time corrupts the #hole fruit! 1ill you come #ith us on these terms74 4/uess I+ll come #ith you on any terms,4 said $errier, #ith such emphasis that the grave 3lders could not restrain a smile! 'he leader alone retained his stern, impressive e5pression!

4'ake him, *rother &tangerson,4 he said, 4give him food and drink, and the child like#ise! Let it e your task also to teach him our holy creed! 1e have delayed long enough! $or#ard9 )n, on to Lion94 4)n, on to Lion94 cried the cro#d of Mormons, and the #ords rippled do#n the long caravan, passing from mouth to mouth until they died a#ay in a dull murmur in the far distance! 1ith a cracking of #hips and a creaking of #heels the great #aggons got into motion, and soon the #hole caravan #as #inding along once more! 'he 3lder to #hose care the t#o #aifs had een committed, led them to his #aggon, #here a meal #as already a#aiting them! 48ou shall remain here,4 he said! 4In a fe# days you #ill have recovered from your fatigues! In the meantime, remem er that no# and for ever you are of our religion! *righam 8oung has said it, and he has spoken #ith the voice of -oseph &mith, #hich is the voice of /od!4

Chapter 9

'"I& is not the place to commemorate the trials and privations endured y the immigrant Mormons efore they came to their final haven! $rom the shores of the Mississippi to the #estern slopes of the Cocky Mountains they had struggled on #ith a constancy almost unparalleled in history! 'he savage man, and the savage east, hunger, thirst, fatigue, and disease 00 every impediment #hich Nature could place in the #ay, had all een overcome #ith %nglo0&a5on tenacity! 8et the long (ourney and the accumulated terrors had shaken the hearts of the stoutest among them! 'here #as not one #ho did not sink upon his knees in heartfelt prayer #hen they sa# the road valley of Utah athed in the sunlight eneath them, and learned from the lips of their leader that this #as the promised land, and that these virgin acres #ere to e theirs for evermore! 8oung speedily proved himself to e a skilful administrator as #ell as a resolute chief! Maps #ere dra#n and charts prepared, in #hich the future city #as sketched out! %ll around farms #ere apportioned and allotted in proportion to the standing of each individual! 'he tradesman #as put to his trade and the artisan to his calling! In the to#n streets and s6uares sprang up, as if y magic! In the country there #as draining and hedging, planting and clearing, until the ne5t summer sa# the #hole country golden #ith the #heat crop! 3verything prospered in the strange settlement! % ove all, the great temple #hich they had erected in the centre of the city gre# ever taller and larger! $rom the first lush of da#n until the closing of the t#ilight, the clatter of the hammer and the rasp of the sa# #as never a sent from the monument #hich the immigrants erected to "im #ho had led them safe through many dangers! 'he t#o casta#ays, -ohn $errier and the little girl #ho had shared his fortunes and had een adopted as his daughter, accompanied the Mormons to the end of their great pilgrimage! Little Lucy $errier #as orne along pleasantly enough in 3lder &tangerson+s #aggon, a retreat #hich she shared #ith the Mormon+s three #ives and #ith his son, a headstrong for#ard oy of t#elve! "aving rallied, #ith the elasticity of childhood, from the shock caused y her mother+s death, she soon ecame a pet #ith the #omen, and reconciled herself to this ne# life in her moving canvas0 covered home! In the meantime $errier having recovered from his privations, distinguished himself as a useful guide and an indefatiga le hunter! &o rapidly did he gain the esteem of his ne# companions, that #hen they reached the end of their #anderings, it #as unanimously agreed that he should e provided #ith as large and as fertile a tract of land as any of the settlers, #ith the e5ception of 8oung himself, and of &tangerson, Dem all, -ohnston, and Dre er, #ho #ere the four principal 3lders!

)n the farm thus ac6uired -ohn $errier uilt himself a su stantial log0house, #hich received so many additions in succeeding years that it gre# into a roomy villa! "e #as a man of a practical turn of mind, keen in his dealings and skilful #ith his hands! "is iron constitution ena led him to #ork morning and evening at improving and tilling his lands! "ence it came a out that his farm and all that elonged to him prospered e5ceedingly! In three years he #as etter off than his neigh ours, in si5 he #as #ell0to0do, in nine he #as rich, and in t#elve there #ere not half a do.en men in the #hole of &alt Lake ,ity #ho could compare #ith him! $rom the great inland sea to the distant 1ahsatch Mountains there #as no name etter kno#n than that of -ohn $errier! 'here #as one #ay and only one in #hich he offended the suscepti ilities of his co0religionists! No argument or persuasion could ever induce him to set up a female esta lishment after the manner of his companions! "e never gave reasons for this persistent refusal, ut contented himself y resolutely and infle5i ly adhering to his determination! 'here #ere some #ho accused him of luke#armness in his adopted religion, and others #ho put it do#n to greed of #ealth and reluctance to incur e5pense! )thers, again, spoke of some early love affair, and of a fair0haired girl #ho had pined a#ay on the shores of the %tlantic! 1hatever the reason, $errier remained strictly celi ate! In every other respect he conformed to the religion of the young settlement, and gained the name of eing an orthodo5 and straight0#alking man! Lucy $errier gre# up #ithin the log0house, and assisted her adopted father in all his undertakings! 'he keen air of the mountains and the alsamic odour of the pine trees took the place of nurse and mother to the young girl! %s year succeeded to year she gre# taller and stronger, her cheek more rudy, and her step more elastic! Many a #ayfarer upon the high road #hich ran y $errier+s farm felt long0forgotten thoughts revive in their mind as they #atched her lithe girlish figure tripping through the #heatfields, or met her mounted upon her father+s mustang, and managing it #ith all the ease and grace of a true child of the 1est! &o the ud lossomed into a flo#er, and the year #hich sa# her father the richest of the farmers left her as fair a specimen of %merican girlhood as could e found in the #hole 2acific slope! It #as not the father, ho#ever, #ho first discovered that the child had developed into the #oman! It seldom is in such cases! 'hat mysterious change is too su tle and too gradual to e measured y dates! Least of all does the maiden herself kno# it until the tone of a voice or the touch of a hand sets her heart thrilling #ithin her, and she learns, #ith a mi5ture of pride and of fear, that a ne# and a larger nature has a#oken #ithin her! 'here are fe# #ho cannot recall that day and remem er the one little incident #hich heralded the da#n of a ne# life! In the case of Lucy $errier the occasion #as serious enough in itself, apart from its future influence on her destiny and that of many esides! It #as a #arm -une morning, and the Latter Day &aints #ere as usy as the ees #hose hive they have chosen for their em lem! In the fields and in the streets rose the same hum of human industry! Do#n the dusty high roads defiled long streams of heavily0laden mules, all heading to the #est, for the gold fever had roken out in ,alifornia, and the )verland Coute lay through the ,ity of the 3lect! 'here, too, #ere droves of sheep and ullocks coming in from the outlying pasture lands, and trains of tired immigrants, men and horses e6ually #eary of their intermina le (ourney! 'hrough all this motley assem lage, threading her #ay #ith the skill of an accomplished rider, there galloped Lucy $errier, her fair face flushed #ith the e5ercise and her long chestnut hair floating out ehind her! &he had a commission from her father in the ,ity, and #as dashing in as she had done many a time efore, #ith all the fearlessness of youth, thinking only of her task and ho# it #as to e performed! 'he travel0stained adventurers ga.ed after her in astonishment, and even the unemotional Indians, (ourneying in #ith their pelties, rela5ed their accustomed stoicism as they marvelled at the eauty of the pale0faced maiden! &he had reached the outskirts of the city #hen she found the road locked y a great drove of cattle, driven y a half0do.en #ild0looking herdsmen from the plains! In her impatience she endeavoured to pass this o stacle y pushing her horse into #hat appeared to e a gap! &carcely had she got fairly into it, ho#ever, efore the easts closed in ehind her, and she found herself completely im edded in the moving stream of fierce0eyed, long0horned ullocks! %ccustomed as she #as to deal #ith cattle, she #as not alarmed at her situation, ut took advantage of every opportunity to urge her horse on in the hopes of pushing her #ay through the cavalcade! Unfortunately the horns of one of the creatures, either y accident or design, came in violent contact #ith the flank of the mustang, and e5cited it to madness! In an instant it reared up upon its hind legs #ith a snort of rage, and pranced and tossed in a #ay that #ould have unseated any

ut a most skilful rider! 'he situation #as full of peril! 3very plunge of the e5cited horse rought it against the horns again, and goaded it to fresh madness! It #as all that the girl could do to keep herself in the saddle, yet a slip #ould mean a terri le death under the hoofs of the un#ieldy and terrified animals! Unaccustomed to sudden emergencies, her head egan to s#im, and her grip upon the ridle to rela5! ,hoked y the rising cloud of dust and y the steam from the struggling creatures, she might have a andoned her efforts in despair, ut for a kindly voice at her el o# #hich assured her of assistance! %t the same moment a sine#y ro#n hand caught the frightened horse y the cur , and forcing a #ay through the drove, soon rought her to the outskirts! 48ou+re not hurt, I hope, miss,4 said her preserver, respectfully! &he looked up at his dark, fierce face, and laughed saucily! 4I+m a#ful frightened,4 she said, naively= 4#hoever #ould have thought that 2oncho #ould have een so scared y a lot of co#s74 4'hank /od you kept your seat,4 the other said earnestly! "e #as a tall, savage0looking young fello#, mounted on a po#erful roan horse, and clad in the rough dress of a hunter, #ith a long rifle slung over his shoulders! 4I guess you are the daughter of -ohn $errier,4 he remarked, 4I sa# you ride do#n from his house! 1hen you see him, ask him if he remem ers the -efferson "opes of &t! Louis! If he+s the same $errier, my father and he #ere pretty thick!4 4"adn+t you etter come and ask yourself74 she asked, demurely! 'he young fello# seemed pleased at the suggestion, and his dark eyes sparkled #ith pleasure! 4I+ll do so,4 he said, 4#e+ve een in the mountains for t#o months, and are not over and a ove in visiting condition! "e must take us as he finds us!4 4"e has a good deal to thank you for, and so have I,4 she ans#ered, 4he+s a#ful fond of me! If those co#s had (umped on me he+d have never got over it!4 4Neither #ould I,4 said her companion! 48ou9 1ell, I don+t see that it #ould make much matter to you, anyho#! 8ou ain+t even a friend of ours!4 'he young hunter+s dark face gre# so gloomy over this remark that Lucy $errier laughed aloud! 4'here, I didn+t mean that,4 she said= 4of course, you are a friend no#! 8ou must come and see us! No# I must push along, or father #on+t trust me #ith his usiness any more! /ood0 ye94 4/ood0 ye,4 he ans#ered, raising his road som rero, and ending over her little hand! &he #heeled her mustang round, gave it a cut #ith her riding0#hip, and darted a#ay do#n the road road in a rolling cloud of dust! 8oung -efferson "ope rode on #ith his companions, gloomy and taciturn! "e and they had een among the Nevada Mountains prospecting for silver, and #ere returning to &alt Lake ,ity in the hope of raising capital enough to #ork some lodes #hich they had discovered! "e had een as keen as any of them upon the usiness until this sudden incident had dra#n his thoughts into another channel! 'he sight of the fair young girl, as frank and #holesome as the &ierra ree.es, had stirred his volcanic, untamed heart to its very depths! 1hen she had vanished from his sight, he reali.ed that a crisis had come in his life, and that neither silver speculations nor any other 6uestions could ever e of such importance to him as this ne# and all0a sor ing one! 'he love #hich had sprung up in his heart #as not the sudden, changea le fancy of a oy, ut rather the #ild, fierce passion of a man of strong #ill and imperious temper! "e had een accustomed to succeed in all that he undertook! "e s#ore in his heart that he #ould not fail in this if human effort and human perseverance could render him successful! "e called on -ohn $errier that night, and many times again, until his face #as a familiar one at the farm0house! -ohn, cooped up in the valley, and a sor ed in his #ork, had had little chance of learning the ne#s of the outside #orld during the last t#elve years! %ll this -efferson "ope #as a le to tell him, and in a style #hich interested Lucy as #ell as her father! "e had een a pioneer in

,alifornia, and could narrate many a strange tale of fortunes made and fortunes lost in those #ild, halcyon days! "e had een a scout too, and a trapper, a silver e5plorer, and a ranchman! 1herever stirring adventures #ere to e had, -efferson "ope had een there in search of them! "e soon ecame a favourite #ith the old farmer, #ho spoke elo6uently of his virtues! )n such occasions, Lucy #as silent, ut her lushing cheek and her right, happy eyes, sho#ed only too clearly that her young heart #as no longer her o#n! "er honest father may not have o served these symptoms, ut they #ere assuredly not thro#n a#ay upon the man #ho had #on her affections! It #as a summer evening #hen he came galloping do#n the road and pulled up at the gate! &he #as at the door#ay, and came do#n to meet him! "e thre# the ridle over the fence and strode up the path#ay! 4I am off, Lucy,4 he said, taking her t#o hands in his, and ga.ing tenderly do#n into her face= 4I #on+t ask you to come #ith me no#, ut #ill you e ready to come #hen I am here again74 4%nd #hen #ill that e74 she asked, lushing and laughing! 4% couple of months at the outside! I #ill come and claim you then, my darling! 'here+s no one #ho can stand et#een us!4 4%nd ho# a out father74 she asked! 4"e has given his consent, provided #e get these mines #orking all right! I have no fear on that head!4 4)h, #ell= of course, if you and father have arranged it all, there+s no more to e said,4 she #hispered, #ith her cheek against his road reast! 4'hank /od94 he said, hoarsely, stooping and kissing her! 4It is settled, then! 'he longer I stay, the harder it #ill e to go! 'hey are #aiting for me at the canon! /ood0 ye, my o#n darling 00 good0 ye! In t#o months you shall see me!4 "e tore himself from her as he spoke, and, flinging himself upon his horse, galloped furiously a#ay, never even looking round, as though afraid that his resolution might fail him if he took one glance at #hat he #as leaving! &he stood at the gate, ga.ing after him until he vanished from her sight! 'hen she #alked ack into the house, the happiest girl in all Utah!

Chapter 10

'"C33 #eeks had passed since -efferson "ope and his comrades had departed from &alt Lake ,ity! -ohn $errier+s heart #as sore #ithin him #hen he thought of the young man+s return, and of the impending loss of his adopted child! 8et her right and happy face reconciled him to the arrangement more than any argument could have done! "e had al#ays determined, deep do#n in his resolute heart, that nothing #ould ever induce him to allo# his daughter to #ed a Mormon! &uch a marriage he regarded as no marriage at all, ut as a shame and a disgrace! 1hatever he might think of the Mormon doctrines, upon that one point he #as infle5i le! "e had to seal his mouth on the su (ect, ho#ever, for to e5press an unorthodo5 opinion #as a dangerous matter in those days in the Land of the &aints!

8es, a dangerous matter 00 so dangerous that even the most saintly dared only #hisper their religious opinions #ith ated reath, lest something #hich fell from their lips might e misconstrued, and ring do#n a s#ift retri ution upon them! 'he victims of persecution had no# turned persecutors on their o#n account, and persecutors of the most terri le description! Not the In6uisition of &eville, nor the /erman >ehm0gericht, nor the &ecret &ocieties of Italy, #ere ever a le to put a more formida le machinery in motion than that #hich cast a cloud over the &tate of Utah! Its invisi ility, and the mystery #hich #as attached to it, made this organi.ation dou ly terri le! It appeared to e omniscient and omnipotent, and yet #as neither seen nor heard! 'he man #ho held out against the ,hurch vanished a#ay, and none kne# #hither he had gone or #hat had efallen him! "is #ife and his children a#aited him at home, ut no father ever returned to tell them ho# he had fared at the hands of his secret (udges! % rash #ord or a hasty act #as follo#ed y annihilation, and yet none kne# #hat the nature might e of this terri le po#er #hich #as suspended over them! No #onder that men #ent a out in fear and trem ling, and that even in the heart of the #ilderness they dared not #hisper the dou ts #hich oppressed them! %t first this vague and terri le po#er #as e5ercised only upon the recalcitrants #ho, having em raced the Mormon faith, #ished after#ards to pervert or to a andon it! &oon, ho#ever, it took a #ider range! 'he supply of adult #omen #as running short, and polygamy #ithout a female population on #hich to dra# #as a arren doctrine indeed! &trange rumours egan to e andied a out 00 rumours of murdered immigrants and rifled camps in regions #here Indians had never een seen! $resh #omen appeared in the harems of the 3lders 00 #omen #ho pined and #ept, and ore upon their faces the traces of an une5tinguisha le horror! *elated #anderers upon the mountains spoke of gangs of armed men, masked, stealthy, and noiseless, #ho flitted y them in the darkness! 'hese tales and rumours took su stance and shape, and #ere corro orated and re0 corro orated, until they resolved themselves into a definite name! 'o this day, in the lonely ranches of the 1est, the name of the Danite *and, or the %venging %ngels, is a sinister and an ill0 omened one! $uller kno#ledge of the organi.ation #hich produced such terri le results served to increase rather than to lessen the horror #hich it inspired in the minds of men! None kne# #ho elonged to this ruthless society! 'he names of the participators in the deeds of lood and violence done under the name of religion #ere kept profoundly secret! 'he very friend to #hom you communicated your misgivings as to the 2rophet and his mission, might e one of those #ho #ould come forth at night #ith fire and s#ord to e5act a terri le reparation! "ence every man feared his neigh our, and none spoke of the things #hich #ere nearest his heart! )ne fine morning, -ohn $errier #as a out to set out to his #heatfields, #hen he heard the click of the latch, and, looking through the #indo#, sa# a stout, sandy0haired, middle0aged man coming up the path#ay! "is heart leapt to his mouth, for this #as none other than the great *righam 8oung himself! $ull of trepidation 00 for he kne# that such a visit oded him little good 00 $errier ran to the door to greet the Mormon chief! 'he latter, ho#ever, received his salutations coldly, and follo#ed him #ith a stern face into the sitting0room! 4*rother $errier,4 he said, taking a seat, and eyeing the farmer keenly from under his light0 coloured eyelashes, 4the true elievers have een good friends to you! 1e picked you up #hen you #ere starving in the desert, #e shared our food #ith you, led you safe to the ,hosen >alley, gave you a goodly share of land, and allo#ed you to #a5 rich under our protection! Is not this so74 4It is so,4 ans#ered -ohn $errier! 4In return for all this #e asked ut one conditionJ that #as, that you should em race the true faith, and conform in every #ay to its usages! 'his you promised to do, and this, if common report says truly, you have neglected!4 4%nd ho# have I neglected it74 asked $errier, thro#ing out his hands in e5postulation! 4"ave I not given to the common fund7 "ave I not attended at the 'emple7 "ave I not 000074 41here are your #ives74 asked 8oung, looking round him! 4,all them in, that I may greet them!4

4It is true that I have not married,4 $errier ans#ered! 4*ut #omen #ere fe#, and there #ere many #ho had etter claims than I! I #as not a lonely manJ I had my daughter to attend to my #ants!4 4It is of that daughter that I #ould speak to you,4 said the leader of the Mormons! 4&he has gro#n to e the flo#er of Utah, and has found favour in the eyes of many #ho are high in the land!4 -ohn $errier groaned internally! 4'here are stories of her #hich I #ould fain dis elieve 00 stories that she is sealed to some /entile! 'his must e the gossip of idle tongues! 1hat is the thirteenth rule in the code of the sainted -oseph &mith7 @Let every maiden of the true faith marry one of the elect= for if she #ed a /entile, she commits a grievous sin!+ 'his eing so, it is impossi le that you, #ho profess the holy creed, should suffer your daughter to violate it!4 -ohn $errier made no ans#er, ut he played nervously #ith his riding0#hip! 4Upon this one point your #hole faith shall e tested 00 so it has een decided in the &acred ,ouncil of $our! 'he girl is young, and #e #ould not have her #ed grey hairs, neither #ould #e deprive her of all choice! 1e 3lders have many heifers, M ut our children must also e provided! &tangerson has a son, and Dre er has a son, and either of them #ould gladly #elcome your daughter to their house! Let her choose et#een them! 'hey are young and rich, and of the true faith! 1hat say you to that74 $errier remained silent for some little time #ith his ro#s knitted! 48ou #ill give us time,4 he said at last! 4My daughter is very young 00 she is scarce of an age to marry!4 4&he shall have a month to choose,4 said 8oung, rising from his seat! 4%t the end of that time she shall give her ans#er!4 "e #as passing through the door, #hen he turned, #ith flushed face and flashing eyes! 4It #ere etter for you, -ohn $errier,4 he thundered, 4that you and she #ere no# lying lanched skeletons upon the &ierra *lanco, than that you should put your #eak #ills against the orders of the "oly $our94 1ith a threatening gesture of his hand, he turned from the door, and $errier heard his heavy step scrunching along the shingly path! "e #as still sitting #ith his el o#s upon his knees, considering ho# he should roach the matter to his daughter #hen a soft hand #as laid upon his, and looking up, he sa# her standing eside him! )ne glance at her pale, frightened face sho#ed him that she had heard #hat had passed! 4I could not help it,4 she said, in ans#er to his look! 4"is voice rang through the house! )h, father, father, #hat shall #e do74 4Don+t you scare yourself,4 he ans#ered, dra#ing her to him, and passing his road, rough hand caressingly over her chestnut hair! 41e+ll fi5 it up someho# or another! 8ou don+t find your fancy kind o+ lessening for this chap, do you74 % so and a s6uee.e of his hand #as her only ans#er! 4No= of course not! I shouldn+t care to hear you say you did! "e+s a likely lad, and he+s a ,hristian, #hich is more than these folk here, in spite o+ all their praying and preaching! 'here+s a party starting for Nevada to0morro#, and I+ll manage to send him a message letting him kno# the hole #e are in! If I kno# anything o+ that young man, he+ll e ack here #ith a speed that #ould #hip electro0telegraphs!4 Lucy laughed through her tears at her father+s description!

41hen he comes, he #ill advise us for the est! *ut it is for you that I am frightened, dear! )ne hears 00 one hears such dreadful stories a out those #ho oppose the 2rophetJ something terri le al#ays happens to them!4 4*ut #e haven+t opposed him yet,4 her father ans#ered! 4It #ill e time to look out for s6ualls #hen #e do! 1e have a clear month efore us= at the end of that, I guess #e had est shin out of Utah!4 4Leave Utah94 4'hat+s a out the si.e of it!4 4*ut the farm74 41e #ill raise as much as #e can in money, and let the rest go! 'o tell the truth, Lucy, it isn+t the first time I have thought of doing it! I don+t care a out knuckling under to any man, as these folk do to their darned prophet! I+m a free0 orn %merican, and it+s all ne# to me! /uess I+m too old to learn! If he comes ro#sing a out this farm, he might chance to run up against a charge of uckshot travelling in the opposite direction!4 4*ut they #on+t let us leave,4 his daughter o (ected! 41ait till -efferson comes, and #e+ll soon manage that! In the meantime, don+t you fret yourself, my dearie, and don+t get your eyes s#elled up, else he+ll e #alking into me #hen he sees you! 'here+s nothing to e afeared a out, and there+s no danger at all!4 -ohn $errier uttered these consoling remarks in a very confident tone, ut she could not help o serving that he paid unusual care to the fastening of the doors that night, and that he carefully cleaned and loaded the rusty old shotgun #hich hung upon the #all of his edroom!

Chapter 11

)N the morning #hich follo#ed his intervie# #ith the Mormon 2rophet, -ohn $errier #ent in to &alt Lake ,ity, and having found his ac6uaintance, #ho #as ound for the Nevada Mountains, he entrusted him #ith his message to -efferson "ope! In it he told the young man of the imminent danger #hich threatened them, and ho# necessary it #as that he should return! "aving done thus he felt easier in his mind, and returned home #ith a lighter heart! %s he approached his farm, he #as surprised to see a horse hitched to each of the posts of the gate! &till more surprised #as he on entering to find t#o young men in possession of his sitting0 room! )ne, #ith a long pale face, #as leaning ack in the rocking0chair, #ith his feet cocked up upon the stove! 'he other, a ull0necked youth #ith coarse loated features, #as standing in front of the #indo# #ith his hands in his pocket, #histling a popular hymn! *oth of them nodded to $errier as he entered, and the one in the rocking0chair commenced the conversation! 4May e you don+t kno# us,4 he said! 4'his here is the son of 3lder Dre er, and I+m -oseph &tangerson, #ho travelled #ith you in the desert #hen the Lord stretched out "is hand and gathered you into the true fold!4 4%s "e #ill all the nations in "is o#n good time,4 said the other in a nasal voice= 4"e grindeth slo#ly ut e5ceeding small!4

-ohn $errier o#ed coldly! "e had guessed #ho his visitors #ere! 41e have come,4 continued &tangerson, 4at the advice of our fathers to solicit the hand of your daughter for #hichever of us may seem good to you and to her! %s I have ut four #ives and *rother Dre er here has seven, it appears to me that my claim is the stronger one!4 4Nay, nay, *rother &tangerson,4 cried the other= 4the 6uestion is not ho# many #ives #e have, ut ho# many #e can keep! My father has no# given over his mills to me, and I am the richer man!4 4*ut my prospects are etter,4 said the other, #armly! 41hen the Lord removes my father, I shall have his tanning yard and his leather factory! 'hen I am your elder, and am higher in the ,hurch!4 4It #ill e for the maiden to decide,4 re(oined young Dre glass! 41e #ill leave it all to her decision!4 er, smirking at his o#n reflection in the

During this dialogue, -ohn $errier had stood fuming in the door#ay, hardly a le to keep his riding0 #hip from the acks of his t#o visitors! 4Look here,4 he said at last, striding up to them, 4#hen my daughter summons you, you can come, ut until then I don+t #ant to see your faces again!4 'he t#o young Mormons stared at him in ama.ement! In their eyes this competition et#een them for the maiden+s hand #as the highest of honours oth to her and her father! 4'here are t#o #ays out of the room,4 cried $errier= 4there is the door, and there is the #indo#! 1hich do you care to use74 "is ro#n face looked so savage, and his gaunt hands so threatening, that his visitors sprang to their feet and eat a hurried retreat! 'he old farmer follo#ed them to the door! 4Let me kno# #hen you have settled #hich it is to e,4 he said, sardonically! 48ou shall smart for this94 &tangerson cried, #hite #ith rage! 48ou have defied the 2rophet and the ,ouncil of $our! 8ou shall rue it to the end of your days!4 4'he hand of the Lord shall e heavy upon you,4 cried young Dre you94 er= 4"e #ill arise and smite

4'hen I+ll start the smiting,4 e5claimed $errier furiously, and #ould have rushed upstairs for his gun had not Lucy sei.ed him y the arm and restrained him! *efore he could escape from her, the clatter of horses+ hoofs told him that they #ere eyond his reach! 4'he young canting rascals94 he e5claimed, #iping the perspiration from his forehead= 4I #ould sooner see you in your grave, my girl, than the #ife of either of them!4 4%nd so should I, father,4 she ans#ered, #ith spirit= 4 ut -efferson #ill soon e here!4 48es! It #ill not e long efore he comes! 'he sooner the etter, for #e do not kno# #hat their ne5t move may e!4 It #as, indeed, high time that someone capa le of giving advice and help should come to the aid of the sturdy old farmer and his adopted daughter! In the #hole history of the settlement there had never een such a case of rank diso edience to the authority of the 3lders! If minor errors #ere punished so sternly, #hat #ould e the fate of this arch re el! $errier kne# that his #ealth and position #ould e of no avail to him! )thers as #ell kno#n and as rich as himself had een spirited a#ay efore no#, and their goods given over to the ,hurch! "e #as a rave man, ut he trem led at the vague, shado#y terrors #hich hung over him! %ny kno#n danger he could face #ith a firm lip, ut this suspense #as unnerving! "e concealed his fears from his daughter, ho#ever, and

affected to make light of the #hole matter, though she, #ith the keen eye of love, sa# plainly that he #as ill at ease! "e e5pected that he #ould receive some message or remonstrance from 8oung as to his conduct, and he #as not mistaken, though it came in an unlooked0for manner! Upon rising ne5t morning he found, to his surprise, a small s6uare of paper pinned on to the coverlet of his ed (ust over his chest! )n it #as printed, in old straggling lettersJ00 4'#enty0nine days are given you for amendment, and then 00004 'he dash #as more fear0inspiring than any threat could have een! "o# this #arning came into his room pu..led -ohn $errier sorely, for his servants slept in an outhouse, and the doors and #indo#s had all een secured! "e crumpled the paper up and said nothing to his daughter, ut the incident struck a chill into his heart! 'he t#enty0nine days #ere evidently the alance of the month #hich 8oung had promised! 1hat strength or courage could avail against an enemy armed #ith such mysterious po#ers7 'he hand #hich fastened that pin might have struck him to the heart, and he could never have kno#n #ho had slain him! &till more shaken #as he ne5t morning! 'hey had sat do#n to their reakfast #hen Lucy #ith a cry of surprise pointed up#ards! In the centre of the ceiling #as scra#led, #ith a urned stick apparently, the num er A8! 'o his daughter it #as unintelligi le, and he did not enlighten her! 'hat night he sat up #ith his gun and kept #atch and #ard! "e sa# and he heard nothing, and yet in the morning a great A7 had een painted upon the outside of his door! 'hus day follo#ed day= and as sure as morning came he found that his unseen enemies had kept their register, and had marked up in some conspicuous position ho# many days #ere still left to him out of the month of grace! &ometimes the fatal num ers appeared upon the #alls, sometimes upon the floors, occasionally they #ere on small placards stuck upon the garden gate or the railings! 1ith all his vigilance -ohn $errier could not discover #hence these daily #arnings proceeded! % horror #hich #as almost superstitious came upon him at the sight of them! "e ecame haggard and restless, and his eyes had the trou led look of some hunted creature! "e had ut one hope in life no#, and that #as for the arrival of the young hunter from Nevada! '#enty had changed to fifteen and fifteen to ten, ut there #as no ne#s of the a sentee! )ne y one the num ers d#indled do#n, and still there came no sign of him! 1henever a horseman clattered do#n the road, or a driver shouted at his team, the old farmer hurried to the gate thinking that help had arrived at last! %t last, #hen he sa# five give #ay to four and that again to three, he lost heart, and a andoned all hope of escape! &ingle0handed, and #ith his limited kno#ledge of the mountains #hich surrounded the settlement, he kne# that he #as po#erless! 'he more0fre6uented roads #ere strictly #atched and guarded, and none could pass along them #ithout an order from the ,ouncil! 'urn #hich #ay he #ould, there appeared to e no avoiding the lo# #hich hung over him! 8et the old man never #avered in his resolution to part #ith life itself efore he consented to #hat he regarded as his daughter+s dishonour! "e #as sitting alone one evening pondering deeply over his trou les, and searching vainly for some #ay out of them! 'hat morning had sho#n the figure A upon the #all of his house, and the ne5t day #ould e the last of the allotted time! 1hat #as to happen then7 %ll manner of vague and terri le fancies filled his imagination! %nd his daughter 00 #hat #as to ecome of her after he #as gone7 1as there no escape from the invisi le net#ork #hich #as dra#n all round them! "e sank his head upon the ta le and so ed at the thought of his o#n impotence! 1hat #as that7 In the silence he heard a gentle scratching sound 00 lo#, ut very distinct in the 6uiet of the night! It came from the door of the house! $errier crept into the hall and listened intently! 'here #as a pause for a fe# moments, and then the lo# insidious sound #as repeated! &omeone #as evidently tapping very gently upon one of the panels of the door! 1as it some midnight assassin #ho had come to carry out the murderous orders of the secret tri unal7 )r #as it some agent #ho #as marking up that the last day of grace had arrived! -ohn $errier felt that instant death #ould e etter than the suspense #hich shook his nerves and chilled his heart! &pringing for#ard he dre# the olt and thre# the door open!

)utside all #as calm and 6uiet! 'he night #as fine, and the stars #ere t#inkling rightly overhead! 'he little front garden lay efore the farmer+s eyes ounded y the fence and gate, ut neither there nor on the road #as any human eing to e seen! 1ith a sigh of relief, $errier looked to right and to left, until happening to glance straight do#n at his o#n feet he sa# to his astonishment a man lying flat upon his face upon the ground, #ith arms and legs all aspra#l! &o unnerved #as he at the sight that he leaned up against the #all #ith his hand to his throat to stifle his inclination to call out! "is first thought #as that the prostrate figure #as that of some #ounded or dying man, ut as he #atched it he sa# it #rithe along the ground and into the hall #ith the rapidity and noiselessness of a serpent! )nce #ithin the house the man sprang to his feet, closed the door, and revealed to the astonished farmer the fierce face and resolute e5pression of -efferson "ope! 4/ood /od94 gasped -ohn $errier! 4"o# you scared me9 1hatever made you come in like that!4 4/ive me food,4 the other said, hoarsely! 4I have had no time for ite or sup for eight0and0forty hours!4 "e flung himself upon the :A1< cold meat and read #hich #ere still lying upon the ta le from his host+s supper, and devoured it voraciously! 4Does Lucy ear up #ell74 he asked, #hen he had satisfied his hunger! 48es! &he does not kno# the danger,4 her father ans#ered! 4'hat is #ell! 'he house is #atched on every side! 'hat is #hy I cra#led my #ay up to it! 'hey may e darned sharp, ut they+re not 6uite sharp enough to catch a 1ashoe hunter!4 -ohn $errier felt a different man no# that he reali.ed that he had a devoted ally! "e sei.ed the young man+s leathery hand and #rung it cordially! 48ou+re a man to e proud of,4 he said! 4'here are not many #ho #ould come to share our danger and our trou les!4 48ou+ve hit it there, pard,4 the young hunter ans#ered! 4I have a respect for you, ut if you #ere alone in this usiness I+d think t#ice efore I put my head into such a hornet+s nest! It+s Lucy that rings me here, and efore harm comes on her I guess there #ill e one less o+ the "ope family in Utah!4 41hat are #e to do74 4'o0morro# is your last day, and unless you act to0night you are lost! I have a mule and t#o horses #aiting in the 3agle Cavine! "o# much money have you74 4'#o thousand dollars in gold, and five in notes!4 4'hat #ill do! I have as much more to add to it! 1e must push for ,arson ,ity through the mountains! 8ou had est #ake Lucy! It is as #ell that the servants do not sleep in the house!4 1hile $errier #as a sent, preparing his daughter for the approaching (ourney, -efferson "ope packed all the eata les that he could find into a small parcel, and filled a stone#are (ar #ith #ater, for he kne# y e5perience that the mountain #ells #ere fe# and far et#een! "e had hardly completed his arrangements efore the farmer returned #ith his daughter all dressed and ready for a start! 'he greeting et#een the lovers #as #arm, ut rief, for minutes #ere precious, and there #as much to e done! 41e must make our start at once,4 said -efferson "ope, speaking in a lo# ut resolute voice, like one #ho reali.es the greatness of the peril, ut has steeled his heart to meet it! 4'he front and ack entrances are #atched, ut #ith caution #e may get a#ay through the side #indo# and across the fields! )nce on the road #e are only t#o miles from the Cavine #here the horses are #aiting! *y day reak #e should e half0#ay through the mountains!4 41hat if #e are stopped,4 asked $errier!

"ope slapped the revolver utt #hich protruded from the front of his tunic! 4If they are too many for us #e shall take t#o or three of them #ith us,4 he said #ith a sinister smile! 'he lights inside the house had all een e5tinguished, and from the darkened #indo# $errier peered over the fields #hich had een his o#n, and #hich he #as no# a out to a andon for ever! "e had long nerved himself to the sacrifice, ho#ever, and the thought of the honour and happiness of his daughter out#eighed any regret at his ruined fortunes! %ll looked so peaceful and happy, the rustling trees and the road silent stretch of grain0land, that it #as difficult to reali.e that the spirit of murder lurked through it all! 8et the #hite face and set e5pression of the young hunter sho#ed that in his approach to the house he had seen enough to satisfy him upon that head! $errier carried the ag of gold and notes, -efferson "ope had the scanty provisions and #ater, #hile Lucy had a small undle containing a fe# of her more valued possessions! )pening the #indo# very slo#ly and carefully, they #aited until a dark cloud had some#hat o scured the night, and then one y one passed through into the little garden! 1ith ated reath and crouching figures they stum led across it, and gained the shelter of the hedge, #hich they skirted until they came to the gap #hich opened into the cornfields! 'hey had (ust reached this point #hen the young man sei.ed his t#o companions and dragged them do#n into the shado#, #here they lay silent and trem ling! It #as as #ell that his prairie training had given -efferson "ope the ears of a lyn5! "e and his friends had hardly crouched do#n efore the melancholy hooting of a mountain o#l #as heard #ithin a fe# yards of them, #hich #as immediately ans#ered y another hoot at a small distance! %t the same moment a vague shado#y figure emerged from the gap for #hich they had een making, and uttered the plaintive signal cry again, on #hich a second man appeared out of the o scurity! 4'o0morro# at midnight,4 said the first #ho appeared to e in authority! 41hen the 1hip0poor01ill calls three times!4 4It is #ell,4 returned the other! 4&hall I tell *rother Dre er74

42ass it on to him, and from him to the others! Nine to seven94 4&even to five94 repeated the other, and the t#o figures flitted a#ay in different directions! 'heir concluding #ords had evidently een some form of sign and countersign! 'he instant that their footsteps had died a#ay in the distance, -efferson "ope sprang to his feet, and helping his companions through the gap, led the #ay across the fields at the top of his speed, supporting and half0carrying the girl #hen her strength appeared to fail her! 4"urry on9 hurry on94 he gasped from time to time! 41e are through the line of sentinels! 3verything depends on speed! "urry on94 )nce on the high road they made rapid progress! )nly once did they meet anyone, and then they managed to slip into a field, and so avoid recognition! *efore reaching the to#n the hunter ranched a#ay into a rugged and narro# footpath #hich led to the mountains! '#o dark (agged peaks loomed a ove them through the darkness, and the defile #hich led et#een them #as the 3agle ,anon in #hich the horses #ere a#aiting them! 1ith unerring instinct -efferson "ope picked his #ay among the great oulders and along the ed of a dried0up #atercourse, until he came to the retired corner, screened #ith rocks, #here the faithful animals had een picketed! 'he girl #as placed upon the mule, and old $errier upon one of the horses, #ith his money0 ag, #hile -efferson "ope led the other along the precipitous and dangerous path! It #as a e#ildering route for anyone #ho #as not accustomed to face Nature in her #ildest moods! )n the one side a great crag to#ered up a thousand feet or more, lack, stern, and menacing, #ith long asaltic columns upon its rugged surface like the ri s of some petrified monster! )n the other hand a #ild chaos of oulders and de ris made all advance impossi le! *et#een the t#o ran the irregular track, so narro# in places that they had to travel in Indian file, and so rough that only practised riders could have traversed it at all! 8et in spite of all dangers and difficulties, the hearts of the fugitives #ere light #ithin them, for every step increased the distance et#een them and the terri le despotism from #hich they #ere flying!

'hey soon had a proof, ho#ever, that they #ere still #ithin the (urisdiction of the &aints! 'hey had reached the very #ildest and most desolate portion of the pass #hen the girl gave a startled cry, and pointed up#ards! )n a rock #hich overlooked the track, sho#ing out dark and plain against the sky, there stood a solitary sentinel! "e sa# them as soon as they perceived him, and his military challenge of 41ho goes there74 rang through the silent ravine! 4'ravellers for Nevada,4 said -efferson "ope, #ith his hand upon the rifle #hich hung y his saddle! 'hey could see the lonely #atcher fingering his gun, and peering do#n at them as if dissatisfied at their reply! 4*y #hose permission74 he asked! 4'he "oly $our,4 ans#ered $errier! "is Mormon e5periences had taught him that that #as the highest authority to #hich he could refer! 4Nine from seven,4 cried the sentinel! 4&even from five,4 returned -efferson "ope promptly, remem ering the countersign #hich he had heard in the garden! 42ass, and the Lord go #ith you,4 said the voice from a ove! *eyond his post the path roadened out, and the horses #ere a le to reak into a trot! Looking ack, they could see the solitary #atcher leaning upon his gun, and kne# that they had passed the outlying post of the chosen people, and that freedom lay efore them!

Chapter 12

%LL night their course lay through intricate defiles and over irregular and rock0stre#n paths! More than once they lost their #ay, ut "ope+s intimate kno#ledge of the mountains ena led them to regain the track once more! 1hen morning roke, a scene of marvellous though savage eauty lay efore them! In every direction the great sno#0capped peaks hemmed them in, peeping over each other+s shoulders to the far hori.on! &o steep #ere the rocky anks on either side of them, that the larch and the pine seemed to e suspended over their heads, and to need only a gust of #ind to come hurtling do#n upon them! Nor #as the fear entirely an illusion, for the arren valley #as thickly stre#n #ith trees and oulders #hich had fallen in a similar manner! 3ven as they passed, a great rock came thundering do#n #ith a hoarse rattle #hich #oke the echoes in the silent gorges, and startled the #eary horses into a gallop! %s the sun rose slo#ly a ove the eastern hori.on, the caps of the great mountains lit up one after the other, like lamps at a festival, until they #ere all ruddy and glo#ing! 'he magnificent spectacle cheered the hearts of the three fugitives and gave them fresh energy! %t a #ild torrent #hich s#ept out of a ravine they called a halt and #atered their horses, #hile they partook of a hasty reakfast! Lucy and her father #ould fain have rested longer, ut -efferson "ope #as ine5ora le! 4'hey #ill e upon our track y this time,4 he said! 43verything depends upon our speed! )nce safe in ,arson #e may rest for the remainder of our lives!4 During the #hole of that day they struggled on through the defiles, and y evening they calculated that they #ere more than thirty miles from their enemies! %t night0time they chose the ase of a

eetling crag, #here the rocks offered some protection from the chill #ind, and there huddled together for #armth, they en(oyed a fe# hours+ sleep! *efore day reak, ho#ever, they #ere up and on their #ay once more! 'hey had seen no signs of any pursuers, and -efferson "ope egan to think that they #ere fairly out of the reach of the terri le organi.ation #hose enmity they had incurred! "e little kne# ho# far that iron grasp could reach, or ho# soon it #as to close upon them and crush them! % out the middle of the second day of their flight their scanty store of provisions egan to run out! 'his gave the hunter little uneasiness, ho#ever, for there #as game to e had among the mountains, and he had fre6uently efore had to depend upon his rifle for the needs of life! ,hoosing a sheltered nook, he piled together a fe# dried ranches and made a la.ing fire, at #hich his companions might #arm themselves, for they #ere no# nearly five thousand feet a ove the sea level, and the air #as itter and keen! "aving tethered the horses, and ade Lucy adieu, he thre# his gun over his shoulder, and set out in search of #hatever chance might thro# in his #ay! Looking ack he sa# the old man and the young girl crouching over the la.ing fire, #hile the three animals stood motionless in the ack0ground! 'hen the intervening rocks hid them from his vie#! "e #alked for a couple of miles through one ravine after another #ithout success, though from the marks upon the ark of the trees, and other indications, he (udged that there #ere numerous ears in the vicinity! %t last, after t#o or three hours+ fruitless search, he #as thinking of turning ack in despair, #hen casting his eyes up#ards he sa# a sight #hich sent a thrill of pleasure through his heart! )n the edge of a (utting pinnacle, three or four hundred feet a ove him, there stood a creature some#hat resem ling a sheep in appearance, ut armed #ith a pair of gigantic horns! 'he ig0horn 00 for so it is called 00 #as acting, pro a ly, as a guardian over a flock #hich #ere invisi le to the hunter= ut fortunately it #as heading in the opposite direction, and had not perceived him! Lying on his face, he rested his rifle upon a rock, and took a long and steady aim efore dra#ing the trigger! 'he animal sprang into the air, tottered for a moment upon the edge of the precipice, and then came crashing do#n into the valley eneath! 'he creature #as too un#ieldy to lift, so the hunter contented himself #ith cutting a#ay one haunch and part of the flank! 1ith this trophy over his shoulder, he hastened to retrace his steps, for the evening #as already dra#ing in! "e had hardly started, ho#ever, efore he reali.ed the difficulty #hich faced him! In his eagerness he had #andered far past the ravines #hich #ere kno#n to him, and it #as no easy matter to pick out the path #hich he had taken! 'he valley in #hich he found himself divided and su 0divided into many gorges, #hich #ere so like each other that it #as impossi le to distinguish one from the other! "e follo#ed one for a mile or more until he came to a mountain torrent #hich he #as sure that he had never seen efore! ,onvinced that he had taken the #rong turn, he tried another, ut #ith the same result! Night #as coming on rapidly, and it #as almost dark efore he at last found himself in a defile #hich #as familiar to him! 3ven then it #as no easy matter to keep to the right track, for the moon had not yet risen, and the high cliffs on either side made the o scurity more profound! 1eighed do#n #ith his urden, and #eary from his e5ertions, he stum led along, keeping up his heart y the reflection that every step rought him nearer to Lucy, and that he carried #ith him enough to ensure them food for the remainder of their (ourney! "e had no# come to the mouth of the very defile in #hich he had left them! 3ven in the darkness he could recogni.e the outline of the cliffs #hich ounded it! 'hey must, he reflected, e a#aiting him an5iously, for he had een a sent nearly five hours! In the gladness of his heart he put his hands to his mouth and made the glen re0echo to a loud halloo as a signal that he #as coming! "e paused and listened for an ans#er! None came save his o#n cry, #hich clattered up the dreary silent ravines, and #as orne ack to his ears in countless repetitions! %gain he shouted, even louder than efore, and again no #hisper came ack from the friends #hom he had left such a short time ago! % vague, nameless dread came over him, and he hurried on#ards frantically, dropping the precious food in his agitation! 1hen he turned the corner, he came full in sight of the spot #here the fire had een lit! 'here #as still a glo#ing pile of #ood ashes there, ut it had evidently not een tended since his departure! 'he same dead silence still reigned all round! 1ith his fears all changed to convictions, he hurried on! 'here #as no living creature near the remains of the fireJ animals, man, maiden, all #ere gone! It #as only too clear that some sudden and terri le disaster had occurred during his a sence 00 a disaster #hich had em raced them all, and yet had left no traces ehind it!

*e#ildered and stunned y this lo#, -efferson "ope felt his head spin round, and had to lean upon his rifle to save himself from falling! "e #as essentially a man of action, ho#ever, and speedily recovered from his temporary impotence! &ei.ing a half0consumed piece of #ood from the smouldering fire, he le# it into a flame, and proceeded #ith its help to e5amine the little camp! 'he ground #as all stamped do#n y the feet of horses, sho#ing that a large party of mounted men had overtaken the fugitives, and the direction of their tracks proved that they had after#ards turned ack to &alt Lake ,ity! "ad they carried ack oth of his companions #ith them7 -efferson "ope had almost persuaded himself that they must have done so, #hen his eye fell upon an o (ect #hich made every nerve of his ody tingle #ithin him! % little #ay on one side of the camp #as a lo#0lying heap of reddish soil, #hich had assuredly not een there efore! 'here #as no mistaking it for anything ut a ne#ly0dug grave! %s the young hunter approached it, he perceived that a stick had een planted on it, #ith a sheet of paper stuck in the cleft fork of it! 'he inscription upon the paper #as rief, ut to the pointJ -)"N $3CCI3C, $)CM3CL8 )$ &%L' L%D3 ,I'8, :AA< Died %ugust ?th, 18EG! 'he sturdy old man, #hom he had left so short a time efore, #as gone, then, and this #as all his epitaph! -efferson "ope looked #ildly round to see if there #as a second grave, ut there #as no sign of one! Lucy had een carried ack y their terri le pursuers to fulfil her original destiny, y ecoming one of the harem of the 3lder+s son! %s the young fello# reali.ed the certainty of her fate, and his o#n po#erlessness to prevent it, he #ished that he, too, #as lying #ith the old farmer in his last silent resting0place! %gain, ho#ever, his active spirit shook off the lethargy #hich springs from despair! If there #as nothing else left to him, he could at least devote his life to revenge! 1ith indomita le patience and perseverance, -efferson "ope possessed also a po#er of sustained vindictiveness, #hich he may have learned from the Indians amongst #hom he had lived! %s he stood y the desolate fire, he felt that the only one thing #hich could assuage his grief #ould e thorough and complete retri ution, rought y his o#n hand upon his enemies! "is strong #ill and untiring energy should, he determined, e devoted to that one end! 1ith a grim, #hite face, he retraced his steps to #here he had dropped the food, and having stirred up the smouldering fire, he cooked enough to last him for a fe# days! 'his he made up into a undle, and, tired as he #as, he set himself to #alk ack through the mountains upon the track of the avenging angels! $or five days he toiled footsore and #eary through the defiles #hich he had already traversed on horse ack! %t night he flung himself do#n among the rocks, and snatched a fe# hours of sleep= ut efore day reak he #as al#ays #ell on his #ay! )n the si5th day, he reached the 3agle ,anon, from #hich they had commenced their ill0fated flight! 'hence he could look do#n upon the home of the saints! 1orn and e5hausted, he leaned upon his rifle and shook his gaunt hand fiercely at the silent #idespread city eneath him! %s he looked at it, he o served that there #ere flags in some of the principal streets, and other signs of festivity! "e #as still speculating as to #hat this might mean #hen he heard the clatter of horse+s hoofs, and sa# a mounted man riding to#ards him! %s he approached, he recogni.ed him as a Mormon named ,o#per, to #hom he had rendered services at different times! "e therefore accosted him #hen he got up to him, #ith the o (ect of finding out #hat Lucy $errier+s fate had een! 4I am -efferson "ope,4 he said! 48ou remem er me!4 'he Mormon looked at him #ith undisguised astonishment 00 indeed, it #as difficult to recogni.e in this tattered, unkempt #anderer, #ith ghastly #hite face and fierce, #ild eyes, the spruce young hunter of former days! "aving, ho#ever, at last, satisfied himself as to his identity, the man+s surprise changed to consternation! 48ou are mad to come here,4 he cried! 4It is as much as my o#n life is #orth to e seen talking #ith you! 'here is a #arrant against you from the "oly $our for assisting the $erriers a#ay!4 4I don+t fear them, or their #arrant,4 "ope said, earnestly! 48ou must kno# something of this matter, ,o#per! I con(ure you y everything you hold dear to ans#er a fe# 6uestions! 1e have al#ays een friends! $or /od+s sake, don+t refuse to ans#er me!4 41hat is it74 the Mormon asked uneasily! 4*e 6uick! 'he very rocks have ears and the trees eyes!4

41hat has ecome of Lucy $errier74 4&he #as married yesterday to young Dre er! "old up, man, hold up, you have no life left in you!4

4Don+t mind me,4 said "ope faintly! "e #as #hite to the very lips, and had sunk do#n on the stone against #hich he had een leaning! 4Married, you say74 4Married yesterday 00 that+s #hat those flags are for on the 3ndo#ment "ouse! 'here #as some #ords et#een young Dre er and young &tangerson as to #hich #as to have her! 'hey+d oth een in the party that follo#ed them, and &tangerson had shot her father, #hich seemed to give him the est claim= ut #hen they argued it out in council, Dre er+s party #as the stronger, so the 2rophet gave her over to him! No one #on+t have her very long though, for I sa# death in her face yesterday! &he is more like a ghost than a #oman! %re you off, then74 48es, I am off,4 said -efferson "ope, #ho had risen from his seat! "is face might have een chiselled out of mar le, so hard and set #as its e5pression, #hile its eyes glo#ed #ith a aleful light! 41here are you going74 4Never mind,4 he ans#ered= and, slinging his #eapon over his shoulder, strode off do#n the gorge and so a#ay into the heart of the mountains to the haunts of the #ild easts! %mongst them all there #as none so fierce and so dangerous as himself! 'he prediction of the Mormon #as only too #ell fulfilled! 1hether it #as the terri le death of her father or the effects of the hateful marriage into #hich she had een forced, poor Lucy never held up her head again, ut pined a#ay and died #ithin a month! "er sottish hus and, #ho had married her principally for the sake of -ohn $errier+s property, did not affect any great grief at his ereavement= ut his other #ives mourned over her, and sat up #ith her the night efore the urial, as is the Mormon custom! 'hey #ere grouped round the ier in the early hours of the morning, #hen, to their ine5pressi le fear and astonishment, the door #as flung open, and a savage0looking, #eather0 eaten man in tattered garments strode into the room! 1ithout a glance or a #ord to the co#ering #omen, he #alked up to the #hite silent figure #hich had once contained the pure soul of Lucy $errier! &tooping over her, he pressed his lips reverently to her cold forehead, and then, snatching up her hand, he took the #edding0ring from her finger! 4&he shall not e uried in that,4 he cried #ith a fierce snarl, and efore an alarm could e raised sprang do#n the stairs and #as gone! &o strange and so rief #as the episode, that the #atchers might have found it hard to elieve it themselves or persuade other people of it, had it not een for the undenia le fact that the circlet of gold #hich marked her as having een a ride had disappeared! $or some months -efferson "ope lingered among the mountains, leading a strange #ild life, and nursing in his heart the fierce desire for vengeance #hich possessed him! 'ales #ere told in the ,ity of the #eird figure #hich #as seen pro#ling a out the su ur s, and #hich haunted the lonely mountain gorges! )nce a ullet #histled through &tangerson+s #indo# and flattened itself upon the #all #ithin a foot of him! )n another occasion, as Dre er passed under a cliff a great oulder crashed do#n on him, and he only escaped a terri le death y thro#ing himself upon his face! 'he t#o young Mormons #ere not long in discovering the reason of these attempts upon their lives, and led repeated e5peditions into the mountains in the hope of capturing or killing their enemy, ut al#ays #ithout success! 'hen they adopted the precaution of never going out alone or after nightfall, and of having their houses guarded! %fter a time they #ere a le to rela5 these measures, for nothing #as either heard or seen of their opponent, and they hoped that time had cooled his vindictiveness! $ar from doing so, it had, if anything, augmented it! 'he hunter+s mind #as of a hard, unyielding nature, and the predominant idea of revenge had taken such complete possession of it that there #as no room for any other emotion! "e #as, ho#ever, a ove all things practical! "e soon reali.ed that even his iron constitution could not stand the incessant strain #hich he #as putting upon it! 35posure and #ant of #holesome food #ere #earing him out! If he died like a dog among the mountains, #hat #as to ecome of his revenge then7 %nd yet such a death #as sure to overtake him if he persisted! "e felt that that #as to play his enemy+s game, so he reluctantly returned to

the old Nevada mines, there to recruit his health and to amass money enough to allo# him to pursue his o (ect #ithout privation! "is intention had een to e a sent a year at the most, ut a com ination of unforeseen circumstances prevented his leaving the mines for nearly five! %t the end of that time, ho#ever, his memory of his #rongs and his craving for revenge #ere 6uite as keen as on that memora le night #hen he had stood y -ohn $errier+s grave! Disguised, and under an assumed name, he returned to &alt Lake ,ity, careless #hat ecame of his o#n life, as long as he o tained #hat he kne# to e (ustice! 'here he found evil tidings a#aiting him! 'here had een a schism among the ,hosen 2eople a fe# months efore, some of the younger mem ers of the ,hurch having re elled against the authority of the 3lders, and the result had een the secession of a certain num er of the malcontents, #ho had left Utah and ecome /entiles! %mong these had een Dre er and &tangerson= and no one kne# #hither they had gone! Cumour reported that Dre er had managed to convert a large part of his property into money, and that he had departed a #ealthy man, #hile his companion, &tangerson, #as comparatively poor! 'here #as no clue at all, ho#ever, as to their #herea outs! Many a man, ho#ever vindictive, #ould have a andoned all thought of revenge in the face of such a difficulty, ut -efferson "ope never faltered for a moment! 1ith the small competence he possessed, eked out y such employment as he could pick up, he travelled from to#n to to#n through the United &tates in 6uest of his enemies! 8ear passed into year, his lack hair turned gri..led, ut still he #andered on, a human loodhound, #ith his mind #holly set upon the one o (ect upon #hich he had devoted his life! %t last his perseverance #as re#arded! It #as ut a glance of a face in a #indo#, ut that one glance told him that ,leveland in )hio possessed the men #hom he #as in pursuit of! "e returned to his misera le lodgings #ith his plan of vengeance all arranged! It chanced, ho#ever, that Dre er, looking from his #indo#, had recogni.ed the vagrant in the street, and had read murder in his eyes! "e hurried efore a (ustice of the peace, accompanied y &tangerson, #ho had ecome his private secretary, and represented to him that they #ere in danger of their lives from the (ealousy and hatred of an old rival! 'hat evening -efferson "ope #as taken into custody, and not eing a le to find sureties, #as detained for some #eeks! 1hen at last he #as li erated, it #as only to find that Dre er+s house #as deserted, and that he and his secretary had departed for 3urope! %gain the avenger had een foiled, and again his concentrated hatred urged him to continue the pursuit! $unds #ere #anting, ho#ever, and for some time he had to return to #ork, saving every dollar for his approaching (ourney! %t last, having collected enough to keep life in him, he departed for 3urope, and tracked his enemies from city to city, #orking his #ay in any menial capacity, ut never overtaking the fugitives! 1hen he reached &t! 2eters urg they had departed for 2aris= and #hen he follo#ed them there he learned that they had (ust set off for ,openhagen! %t the Danish capital he #as again a fe# days late, for they had (ourneyed on to London, #here he at last succeeded in running them to earth! %s to #hat occurred there, #e cannot do etter than 6uote the old hunter+s o#n account, as duly recorded in Dr! 1atson+s -ournal, to #hich #e are already under such o ligations!

Chapter 13

)UC prisoner+s furious resistance did not apparently indicate any ferocity in his disposition to#ards ourselves, for on finding himself po#erless, he smiled in an affa le manner, and e5pressed his hopes that he had not hurt any of us in the scuffle! 4I guess you+re going to take me to the police0 station,4 he remarked to &herlock "olmes! 4My ca +s at the door! If you+ll loose my legs I+ll #alk do#n to it! I+m not so light to lift as I used to e!4 /regson and Lestrade e5changed glances as if they thought this proposition rather a old one= ut "olmes at once took the prisoner at his #ord, and loosened the to#el #hich #e had ound round his ancles! :A;< "e rose and stretched his legs, as though to assure himself that they #ere free

once more! I remem er that I thought to myself, as I eyed him, that I had seldom seen a more po#erfully uilt man= and his dark sun urned face ore an e5pression of determination and energy #hich #as as formida le as his personal strength! 4If there+s a vacant place for a chief of the police, I reckon you are the man for it,4 he said, ga.ing #ith undisguised admiration at my fello#0lodger! 4'he #ay you kept on my trail #as a caution!4 48ou had etter come #ith me,4 said "olmes to the t#o detectives! 4I can drive you,4 said Lestrade! 4/ood9 and /regson can come inside #ith me! 8ou too, Doctor, you have taken an interest in the case and may as #ell stick to us!4 I assented gladly, and #e all descended together! )ur prisoner made no attempt at escape, ut stepped calmly into the ca #hich had een his, and #e follo#ed him! Lestrade mounted the o5, #hipped up the horse, and rought us in a very short time to our destination! 1e #ere ushered into a small cham er #here a police Inspector noted do#n our prisoner+s name and the names of the men #ith #hose murder he had een charged! 'he official #as a #hite0faced unemotional man, #ho #ent through his duties in a dull mechanical #ay! 4'he prisoner #ill e put efore the magistrates in the course of the #eek,4 he said= 4in the mean time, Mr! -efferson "ope, have you anything that you #ish to say7 I must #arn you that your #ords #ill e taken do#n, and may e used against you!4 4I+ve got a good deal to say,4 our prisoner said slo#ly! 4I #ant to tell you gentlemen all a out it!4 4"adn+t you etter reserve that for your trial74 asked the Inspector! 4I may never e tried,4 he ans#ered! 48ou needn+t look startled! It isn+t suicide I am thinking of! %re you a Doctor74 "e turned his fierce dark eyes upon me as he asked this last 6uestion! 48es= I am,4 I ans#ered! 4'hen put your hand here,4 he said, #ith a smile, motioning #ith his manacled #rists to#ards his chest! I did so= and ecame at once conscious of an e5traordinary thro ing and commotion #hich #as going on inside! 'he #alls of his chest seemed to thrill and 6uiver as a frail uilding #ould do inside #hen some po#erful engine #as at #ork! In the silence of the room I could hear a dull humming and u..ing noise #hich proceeded from the same source! 41hy,4 I cried, 4you have an aortic aneurism94 4'hat+s #hat they call it,4 he said, placidly! 4I #ent to a Doctor last #eek a out it, and he told me that it is ound to urst efore many days passed! It has een getting #orse for years! I got it from over0e5posure and under0feeding among the &alt Lake Mountains! I+ve done my #ork no#, and I don+t care ho# soon I go, ut I should like to leave some account of the usiness ehind me! I don+t #ant to e remem ered as a common cut0throat!4 'he Inspector and the t#o detectives had a hurried discussion as to the advisa ility of allo#ing him to tell his story! 4Do you consider, Doctor, that there is immediate danger74 the former asked, :A?< 4Most certainly there is,4 I ans#ered! 4In that case it is clearly our duty, in the interests of (ustice, to take his statement,4 said the Inspector! 48ou are at li erty, sir, to give your account, #hich I again #arn you #ill e taken do#n!4

4I+ll sit do#n, #ith your leave,4 the prisoner said, suiting the action to the #ord! 4'his aneurism of mine makes me easily tired, and the tussle #e had half an hour ago has not mended matters! I+m on the rink of the grave, and I am not likely to lie to you! 3very #ord I say is the a solute truth, and ho# you use it is a matter of no conse6uence to me!4 1ith these #ords, -efferson "ope leaned ack in his chair and egan the follo#ing remarka le statement! "e spoke in a calm and methodical manner, as though the events #hich he narrated #ere commonplace enough! I can vouch for the accuracy of the su (oined account, for I have had access to Lestrade+s note0 ook, in #hich the prisoner+s #ords #ere taken do#n e5actly as they #ere uttered! 4It don+t much matter to you #hy I hated these men,4 he said= 4it+s enough that they #ere guilty of the death of t#o human eings 00 a father and a daughter 00 and that they had, therefore, forfeited their o#n lives! %fter the lapse of time that has passed since their crime, it #as impossi le for me to secure a conviction against them in any court! I kne# of their guilt though, and I determined that I should e (udge, (ury, and e5ecutioner all rolled into one! 8ou+d have done the same, if you have any manhood in you, if you had een in my place! 4'hat girl that I spoke of #as to have married me t#enty years ago! &he #as forced into marrying that same Dre er, and roke her heart over it! I took the marriage ring from her dead finger, and I vo#ed that his dying eyes should rest upon that very ring, and that his last thoughts should e of the crime for #hich he #as punished! I have carried it a out #ith me, and have follo#ed him and his accomplice over t#o continents until I caught them! 'hey thought to tire me out, ut they could not do it! If I die to0morro#, as is likely enough, I die kno#ing that my #ork in this #orld is done, and #ell done! 'hey have perished, and y my hand! 'here is nothing left for me to hope for, or to desire! 4'hey #ere rich and I #as poor, so that it #as no easy matter for me to follo# them! 1hen I got to London my pocket #as a out empty, and I found that I must turn my hand to something for my living! Driving and riding are as natural to me as #alking, so I applied at a ca o#ner+s office, and soon got employment! I #as to ring a certain sum a #eek to the o#ner, and #hatever #as over that I might keep for myself! 'here #as seldom much over, ut I managed to scrape along someho#! 'he hardest (o #as to learn my #ay a out, for I reckon that of all the ma.es that ever #ere contrived, this city is the most confusing! I had a map eside me though, and #hen once I had spotted the principal hotels and stations, I got on pretty #ell! 4It #as some time efore I found out #here my t#o gentlemen #ere living= ut I in6uired and in6uired until at last I dropped across them! 'hey #ere at a oarding0house at ,am er#ell, over on the other side of the river! 1hen once I found them out I kne# that I had them at my mercy! I had gro#n my eard, and there #as no chance of their recogni.ing me! I #ould dog them and follo# them until I sa# my opportunity! I #as determined that they should not escape me again! 4'hey #ere very near doing it for all that! /o #here they #ould a out London, I #as al#ays at their heels! &ometimes I follo#ed them on my ca , and sometimes on foot, ut the former #as the est, for then they could not get a#ay from me! It #as only early in the morning or late at night that I could earn anything, so that I egan to get ehind hand #ith my employer! I did not mind that, ho#ever, as long as I could lay my hand upon the men I #anted! 4'hey #ere very cunning, though! 'hey must have thought that there #as some chance of their eing follo#ed, for they #ould never go out alone, and never after nightfall! During t#o #eeks I drove ehind them every day, and never once sa# them separate! Dre er himself #as drunk half the time, ut &tangerson #as not to e caught napping! I #atched them late and early, ut never sa# the ghost of a chance= ut I #as not discouraged, for something told me that the hour had almost come! My only fear #as that this thing in my chest might urst a little too soon and leave my #ork undone! 4%t last, one evening I #as driving up and do#n 'or6uay 'errace, as the street #as called in #hich they oarded, #hen I sa# a ca drive up to their door! 2resently some luggage #as rought out, and after a time Dre er and &tangerson follo#ed it, and drove off! I #hipped up my horse and kept #ithin sight of them, feeling very ill at ease, for I feared that they #ere going to shift their 6uarters! %t 3uston &tation they got out, and I left a oy to hold my horse, and follo#ed them on

to the platform! I heard them ask for the Liverpool train, and the guard ans#er that one had (ust gone and there #ould not e another for some hours! &tangerson seemed to e put out at that, ut Dre er #as rather pleased than other#ise! I got so close to them in the ustle that I could hear every #ord that passed et#een them! Dre er said that he had a little usiness of his o#n to do, and that if the other #ould #ait for him he #ould soon re(oin him! "is companion remonstrated #ith him, and reminded him that they had resolved to stick together! Dre er ans#ered that the matter #as a delicate one, and that he must go alone! I could not catch #hat &tangerson said to that, ut the other urst out s#earing, and reminded him that he #as nothing more than his paid servant, and that he must not presume to dictate to him! )n that the &ecretary gave it up as a ad (o , and simply argained #ith him that if he missed the last train he should re(oin him at "alliday+s 2rivate "otel= to #hich Dre er ans#ered that he #ould e ack on the platform efore eleven, and made his #ay out of the station! 4'he moment for #hich I had #aited so long had at last come! I had my enemies #ithin my po#er! 'ogether they could protect each other, ut singly they #ere at my mercy! I did not act, ho#ever, #ith undue precipitation! My plans #ere already formed! 'here is no satisfaction in vengeance unless the offender has time to reali.e #ho it is that strikes him, and #hy retri ution has come upon him! I had my plans arranged y #hich I should have the opportunity of making the man #ho had #ronged me understand that his old sin had found him out! It chanced that some days efore a gentleman #ho had een engaged in looking over some houses in the *ri5ton Coad had dropped the key of one of them in my carriage! It #as claimed that same evening, and returned= ut in the interval I had taken a moulding of it, and had a duplicate constructed! *y means of this I had access to at least one spot in this great city #here I could rely upon eing free from interruption! "o# to get Dre er to that house #as the difficult pro lem #hich I had no# to solve! 4"e #alked do#n the road and #ent into one or t#o li6uor shops, staying for nearly half0an0hour in the last of them! 1hen he came out he staggered in his #alk, and #as evidently pretty #ell on! 'here #as a hansom (ust in front of me, and he hailed it! I follo#ed it so close that the nose of my horse #as #ithin a yard of his driver the #hole #ay! 1e rattled across 1aterloo *ridge and through miles of streets, until, to my astonishment, #e found ourselves ack in the 'errace in #hich he had oarded! I could not imagine #hat his intention #as in returning there= ut I #ent on and pulled up my ca a hundred yards or so from the house! "e entered it, and his hansom drove a#ay! /ive me a glass of #ater, if you please! My mouth gets dry #ith the talking!4 I handed him the glass, and he drank it do#n! 4'hat+s etter,4 he said! 41ell, I #aited for a 6uarter of an hour, or more, #hen suddenly there came a noise like people struggling inside the house! Ne5t moment the door #as flung open and t#o men appeared, one of #hom #as Dre er, and the other #as a young chap #hom I had never seen efore! 'his fello# had Dre er y the collar, and #hen they came to the head of the steps he gave him a shove and a kick #hich sent him half across the road! @8ou hound,+ he cried, shaking his stick at him= @I+ll teach you to insult an honest girl9+ "e #as so hot that I think he #ould have thrashed Dre er #ith his cudgel, only that the cur staggered a#ay do#n the road as fast as his legs #ould carry him! "e ran as far as the corner, and then, seeing my ca , he hailed me and (umped in! @Drive me to "alliday+s 2rivate "otel,+ said he! 41hen I had him fairly inside my ca , my heart (umped so #ith (oy that I feared lest at this last moment my aneurism might go #rong! I drove along slo#ly, #eighing in my o#n mind #hat it #as est to do! I might take him right out into the country, and there in some deserted lane have my last intervie# #ith him! I had almost decided upon this, #hen he solved the pro lem for me! 'he cra.e for drink had sei.ed him again, and he ordered me to pull up outside a gin palace! "e #ent in, leaving #ord that I should #ait for him! 'here he remained until closing time, and #hen he came out he #as so far gone that I kne# the game #as in my o#n hands! 4Don+t imagine that I intended to kill him in cold lood! It #ould only have een rigid (ustice if I had done so, ut I could not ring myself to do it! I had long determined that he should have a sho# for his life if he chose to take advantage of it! %mong the many illets #hich I have filled in %merica during my #andering life, I #as once (anitor and s#eeper out of the la oratory at 8ork ,ollege! )ne day the professor #as lecturing on poisions, :AB< and he sho#ed his students some alkaloid, as he called it, #hich he had e5tracted from some &outh %merican arro# poison, and #hich #as so po#erful that the least grain meant instant death! I spotted the ottle in #hich this preparation #as kept, and #hen they #ere all gone, I helped myself to a little of it! I #as a fairly

good dispenser, so I #orked this alkaloid into small, solu le pills, and each pill I put in a o5 #ith a similar pill made #ithout the poison! I determined at the time that #hen I had my chance, my gentlemen should each have a dra# out of one of these o5es, #hile I ate the pill that remained! It #ould e 6uite as deadly, and a good deal less noisy than firing across a handkerchief! $rom that day I had al#ays my pill o5es a out #ith me, and the time had no# come #hen I #as to use them! 4It #as nearer one than t#elve, and a #ild, leak night, lo#ing hard and raining in torrents! Dismal as it #as outside, I #as glad #ithin 00 so glad that I could have shouted out from pure e5ultation! If any of you gentlemen have ever pined for a thing, and longed for it during t#enty long years, and then suddenly found it #ithin your reach, you #ould understand my feelings! I lit a cigar, and puffed at it to steady my nerves, ut my hands #ere trem ling, and my temples thro ing #ith e5citement! %s I drove, I could see old -ohn $errier and s#eet Lucy looking at me out of the darkness and smiling at me, (ust as plain as I see you all in this room! %ll the #ay they #ere ahead of me, one on each side of the horse until I pulled up at the house in the *ri5ton Coad! 4'here #as not a soul to e seen, nor a sound to e heard, e5cept the dripping of the rain! 1hen I looked in at the #indo#, I found Dre er all huddled together in a drunken sleep! I shook him y the arm, @It+s time to get out,+ I said! 4@%ll right, ca y,+ said he!

4I suppose he thought #e had come to the hotel that he had mentioned, for he got out #ithout another #ord, and follo#ed me do#n the garden! I had to #alk eside him to keep him steady, for he #as still a little top0heavy! 1hen #e came to the door, I opened it, and led him into the front room! I give you my #ord that all the #ay, the father and the daughter #ere #alking in front of us! 4@It+s infernally dark,+ said he, stamping a out! 4@1e+ll soon have a light,+ I said, striking a match and putting it to a #a5 candle #hich I had rought #ith me! @No#, 3noch Dre er,+ I continued, turning to him, and holding the light to my o#n face, @#ho am I7+ 4"e ga.ed at me #ith leared, drunken eyes for a moment, and then I sa# a horror spring up in them, and convulse his #hole features, #hich sho#ed me that he kne# me! "e staggered ack #ith a livid face, and I sa# the perspiration reak out upon his ro#, #hile his teeth chattered in his head! %t the sight, I leaned my ack against the door and laughed loud and long! I had al#ays kno#n that vengeance #ould e s#eet, ut I had never hoped for the contentment of soul #hich no# possessed me! 4@8ou dog9+ I said= @I have hunted you from &alt Lake ,ity to &t! 2eters urg, and you have al#ays escaped me! No#, at last your #anderings have come to an end, for either you or I shall never see to0morro#+s sun rise!+ "e shrunk still further a#ay as I spoke, and I could see on his face that he thought I #as mad! &o I #as for the time! 'he pulses in my temples eat like sledge0hammers, and I elieve I #ould have had a fit of some sort if the lood had not gushed from my nose and relieved me! 4@1hat do you think of Lucy $errier no#7+ I cried, locking the door, and shaking the key in his face! @2unishment has een slo# in coming, ut it has overtaken you at last!+ I sa# his co#ard lips trem le as I spoke! "e #ould have egged for his life, ut he kne# #ell that it #as useless! 4@1ould you murder me7+ he stammered! 4@'here is no murder,+ I ans#ered! @1ho talks of murdering a mad dog7 1hat mercy had you upon my poor darling, #hen you dragged her from her slaughtered father, and ore her a#ay to your accursed and shameless harem!+ 4@It #as not I #ho killed her father,+ he cried!

4@*ut it #as you #ho roke her innocent heart,+ I shrieked, thrusting the o5 efore him! @Let the high /od (udge et#een us! ,hoose and eat! 'here is death in one and life in the other! I shall take #hat you leave! Let us see if there is (ustice upon the earth, or if #e are ruled y chance!+ 4"e co#ered a#ay #ith #ild cries and prayers for mercy, ut I dre# my knife and held it to his throat until he had o eyed me! 'hen I s#allo#ed the other, and #e stood facing one another in silence for a minute or more, #aiting to see #hich #as to live and #hich #as to die! &hall I ever forget the look #hich came over his face #hen the first #arning pangs told him that the poison #as in his system7 I laughed as I sa# it, and held Lucy+s marriage ring in front of his eyes! It #as ut for a moment, for the action of the alkaloid is rapid! % spasm of pain contorted his features= he thre# his hands out in front of him, staggered, and then, #ith a hoarse cry, fell heavily upon the floor! I turned him over #ith my foot, and placed my hand upon his heart! 'here #as no movement! "e #as dead9 4'he lood had een streaming from my nose, ut I had taken no notice of it! I don+t kno# #hat it #as that put it into my head to #rite upon the #all #ith it! 2erhaps it #as some mischievous idea of setting the police upon a #rong track, for I felt light0hearted and cheerful! I remem ered a /erman eing found in Ne# 8ork #ith C%,"3 #ritten up a ove him, and it #as argued at the time in the ne#spapers that the secret societies must have done it! I guessed that #hat pu..led the Ne# 8orkers #ould pu..le the Londoners, so I dipped my finger in my o#n lood and printed it on a convenient place on the #all! 'hen I #alked do#n to my ca and found that there #as no ody a out, and that the night #as still very #ild! I had driven some distance #hen I put my hand into the pocket in #hich I usually kept Lucy+s ring, and found that it #as not there! I #as thunderstruck at this, for it #as the only memento that I had of her! 'hinking that I might have dropped it #hen I stooped over Dre er+s ody, I drove ack, and leaving my ca in a side street, I #ent oldly up to the house 00 for I #as ready to dare anything rather than lose the ring! 1hen I arrived there, I #alked right into the arms of a police0officer #ho #as coming out, and only managed to disarm his suspicions y pretending to e hopelessly drunk! 4'hat #as ho# 3noch Dre er came to his end! %ll I had to do then #as to do as much for &tangerson, and so pay off -ohn $errier+s de t! I kne# that he #as staying at "alliday+s 2rivate "otel, and I hung a out all day, ut he never came out! :AE< fancy that he suspected something #hen Dre er failed to put in an appearance! "e #as cunning, #as &tangerson, and al#ays on his guard! If he thought he could keep me off y staying indoors he #as very much mistaken! I soon found out #hich #as the #indo# of his edroom, and early ne5t morning I took advantage of some ladders #hich #ere lying in the lane ehind the hotel, and so made my #ay into his room in the grey of the da#n! I #oke him up and told him that the hour had come #hen he #as to ans#er for the life he had taken so long efore! I descri ed Dre er+s death to him, and I gave him the same choice of the poisoned pills! Instead of grasping at the chance of safety #hich that offered him, he sprang from his ed and fle# at my throat! In self0defence I sta ed him to the heart! It #ould have een the same in any case, for 2rovidence #ould never have allo#ed his guilty hand to pick out anything ut the poison! 4I have little more to say, and it+s as #ell, for I am a out done up! I #ent on ca ing it for a day or so, intending to keep at it until I could save enough to take me ack to %merica! I #as standing in the yard #hen a ragged youngster asked if there #as a ca y there called -efferson "ope, and said that his ca #as #anted y a gentleman at AA1*, *aker &treet! I #ent round, suspecting no harm, and the ne5t thing I kne#, this young man here had the racelets on my #rists, and as neatly snackled :A7< as ever I sa# in my life! 'hat+s the #hole of my story, gentlemen! 8ou may consider me to e a murderer= ut I hold that I am (ust as much an officer of (ustice as you are!4 &o thrilling had the man+s narrative een, and his manner #as so impressive that #e had sat silent and a sor ed! 3ven the professional detectives, I laseI :A8< as they #ere in every detail of crime, appeared to e keenly interested in the man+s story! 1hen he finished #e sat for some minutes in a stillness #hich #as only roken y the scratching of Lestrade+s pencil as he gave the finishing touches to his shorthand account! 4'here is only one point on #hich I should like a little more information,4 &herlock "olmes said at last! 41ho #as your accomplice #ho came for the ring #hich I advertised74

'he prisoner #inked at my friend (ocosely! 4I can tell my o#n secrets,4 he said, 4 ut I don+t get other people into trou le! I sa# your advertisement, and I thought it might e a plant, or it might e the ring #hich I #anted! My friend volunteered to go and see! I think you+ll o#n he did it smartly!4 4Not a dou t of that,4 said "olmes heartily! 4No#, gentlemen,4 the Inspector remarked gravely, 4the forms of the la# must e complied #ith! )n 'hursday the prisoner #ill e rought efore the magistrates, and your attendance #ill e re6uired! Until then I #ill e responsi le for him!4 "e rang the ell as he spoke, and -efferson "ope #as led off y a couple of #arders, #hile my friend and I made our #ay out of the &tation and took a ca ack to *aker &treet!

Chapter 14

13 had all een #arned to appear efore the magistrates upon the 'hursday= ut #hen the 'hursday came there #as no occasion for our testimony! % higher -udge had taken the matter in hand, and -efferson "ope had een summoned efore a tri unal #here strict (ustice #ould e meted out to him! )n the very night after his capture the aneurism urst, and he #as found in the morning stretched upon the floor of the cell, #ith a placid smile upon his face, as though he had een a le in his dying moments to look ack upon a useful life, and on #ork #ell done! 4/regson and Lestrade #ill e #ild a out his death,4 "olmes remarked, as #e chatted it over ne5t evening! 41here #ill their grand advertisement e no#74 4I don+t see that they had very much to do #ith his capture,4 I ans#ered! 41hat you do in this #orld is a matter of no conse6uence,4 returned my companion, itterly! 4'he 6uestion is, #hat can you make people elieve that you have done! Never mind,4 he continued, more rightly, after a pause! 4I #ould not have missed the investigation for anything! 'here has een no etter case #ithin my recollection! &imple as it #as, there #ere several most instructive points a out it!4 4&imple94 I e(aculated! 41ell, really, it can hardly e descri ed as other#ise,4 said &herlock "olmes, smiling at my surprise! 4'he proof of its intrinsic simplicity is, that #ithout any help save a fe# very ordinary deductions I #as a le to lay my hand upon the criminal #ithin three days!4 4'hat is true,4 said I! 4I have already e5plained to you that #hat is out of the common is usually a guide rather than a hindrance! In solving a pro lem of this sort, the grand thing is to e a le to reason ack#ards! 'hat is a very useful accomplishment, and a very easy one, ut people do not practise it much! In the every0day affairs of life it is more useful to reason for#ards, and so the other comes to e neglected! 'here are fifty #ho can reason synthetically for one #ho can reason analytically!4 4I confess,4 said I, 4that I do not 6uite follo# you!4 4I hardly e5pected that you #ould! Let me see if I can make it clearer! Most people, if you descri e a train of events to them, #ill tell you #hat the result #ould e! 'hey can put those events together in their minds, and argue from them that something #ill come to pass! 'here are fe# people, ho#ever, #ho, if you told them a result, #ould e a le to evolve from their o#n inner consciousness #hat the steps #ere #hich led up to that result! 'his po#er is #hat I mean #hen I talk of reasoning ack#ards, or analytically!4

4I understand,4 said I! 4No# this #as a case in #hich you #ere given the result and had to find everything else for yourself! No# let me endeavour to sho# you the different steps in my reasoning! 'o egin at the eginning! I approached the house, as you kno#, on foot, and #ith my mind entirely free from all impressions! I naturally egan y e5amining the road#ay, and there, as I have already e5plained to you, I sa# clearly the marks of a ca , #hich, I ascertained y in6uiry, must have een there during the night! I satisfied myself that it #as a ca and not a private carriage y the narro# gauge of the #heels! 'he ordinary London gro#ler is considera ly less #ide than a gentleman+s rougham! 4'his #as the first point gained! I then #alked slo#ly do#n the garden path, #hich happened to e composed of a clay soil, peculiarly suita le for taking impressions! No dou t it appeared to you to e a mere trampled line of slush, ut to my trained eyes every mark upon its surface had a meaning! 'here is no ranch of detective science #hich is so important and so much neglected as the art of tracing footsteps! "appily, I have al#ays laid great stress upon it, and much practice has made it second nature to me! I sa# the heavy footmarks of the consta les, ut I sa# also the track of the t#o men #ho had first passed through the garden! It #as easy to tell that they had een efore the others, ecause in places their marks had een entirely o literated y the others coming upon the top of them! In this #ay my second link #as formed, #hich told me that the nocturnal visitors #ere t#o in num er, one remarka le for his height Nas I calculated from the length of his strideO, and the other fashiona ly dressed, to (udge from the small and elegant impression left y his oots! 4)n entering the house this last inference #as confirmed! My #ell0 ooted man lay efore me! 'he tall one, then, had done the murder, if murder there #as! 'here #as no #ound upon the dead man+s person, ut the agitated e5pression upon his face assured me that he had foreseen his fate efore it came upon him! Men #ho die from heart disease, or any sudden natural cause, never y any chance e5hi it agitation upon their features! "aving sniffed the dead man+s lips I detected a slightly sour smell, and I came to the conclusion that he had had poison forced upon him! %gain, I argued that it had een forced upon him from the hatred and fear e5pressed upon his face! *y the method of e5clusion, I had arrived at this result, for no other hypothesis #ould meet the facts! Do not imagine that it #as a very unheard of idea! 'he forci le administration of poison is y no means a ne# thing in criminal annals! 'he cases of Dolsky in )dessa, and of Leturier in Montpellier, #ill occur at once to any to5icologist! 4%nd no# came the great 6uestion as to the reason #hy! Co ery had not een the o (ect of the murder, for nothing #as taken! 1as it politics, then, or #as it a #oman7 'hat #as the 6uestion #hich confronted me! I #as inclined from the first to the latter supposition! 2olitical assassins are only too glad to do their #ork and to fly! 'his murder had, on the contrary, een done most deli erately, and the perpetrator had left his tracks all over the room, sho#ing that he had een there all the time! It must have een a private #rong, and not a political one, #hich called for such a methodical revenge! 1hen the inscription #as discovered upon the #all I #as more inclined than ever to my opinion! 'he thing #as too evidently a lind! 1hen the ring #as found, ho#ever, it settled the 6uestion! ,learly the murderer had used it to remind his victim of some dead or a sent #oman! It #as at this point that I asked /regson #hether he had en6uired in his telegram to ,leveland as to any particular point in Mr! Dre er+s former career! "e ans#ered, you remem er, in the negative! 4I then proceeded to make a careful e5amination of the room, #hich confirmed me in my opinion as to the murderer+s height, and furnished me #ith the additional details as to the 'richinopoly cigar and the length of his nails! I had already come to the conclusion, since there #ere no signs of a struggle, that the lood #hich covered the floor had urst from the murderer+s nose in his e5citement! I could perceive that the track of lood coincided #ith the track of his feet! It is seldom that any man, unless he is very full0 looded, reaks out in this #ay through emotion, so I ha.arded the opinion that the criminal #as pro a ly a ro ust and ruddy0faced man! 3vents proved that I had (udged correctly! 4"aving left the house, I proceeded to do #hat /regson had neglected! I telegraphed to the head of the police at ,leveland, limiting my en6uiry to the circumstances connected #ith the marriage of 3noch Dre er! 'he ans#er #as conclusive! It told me that Dre er had already applied for the protection of the la# against an old rival in love, named -efferson "ope, and that this same "ope

#as at present in 3urope! I kne# no# that I held the clue to the mystery in my hand, and all that remained #as to secure the murderer! 4I had already determined in my o#n mind that the man #ho had #alked into the house #ith Dre er, #as none other than the man #ho had driven the ca ! 'he marks in the road sho#ed me that the horse had #andered on in a #ay #hich #ould have een impossi le had there een anyone in charge of it! 1here, then, could the driver e, unless he #ere inside the house7 %gain, it is a surd to suppose that any sane man #ould carry out a deli erate crime under the very eyes, as it #ere, of a third person, #ho #as sure to etray him! Lastly, supposing one man #ished to dog another through London, #hat etter means could he adopt than to turn ca driver! %ll these considerations led me to the irresisti le conclusion that -efferson "ope #as to e found among the (arveys of the Metropolis! 4If he had een one there #as no reason to elieve that he had ceased to e! )n the contrary, from his point of vie#, any sudden chance #ould e likely to dra# attention to himself! "e #ould, pro a ly, for a time at least, continue to perform his duties! 'here #as no reason to suppose that he #as going under an assumed name! 1hy should he change his name in a country #here no one kne# his original one7 I therefore organi.ed my &treet %ra detective corps, and sent them systematically to every ca proprietor in London until they ferreted out the man that I #anted! "o# #ell they succeeded, and ho# 6uickly I took advantage of it, are still fresh in your recollection! 'he murder of &tangerson #as an incident #hich #as entirely une5pected, ut #hich could hardly in any case have een prevented! 'hrough it, as you kno#, I came into possession of the pills, the e5istence of #hich I had already surmised! 8ou see the #hole thing is a chain of logical se6uences #ithout a reak or fla#!4 4It is #onderful94 I cried! 48our merits should e pu licly recogni.ed! 8ou should pu lish an account of the case! If you #on+t, I #ill for you!4 48ou may do #hat you like, Doctor,4 he ans#ered! 4&ee here94 he continued, handing a paper over to me, 4look at this94 It #as the I3choI for the day, and the paragraph to #hich he pointed #as devoted to the case in 6uestion! 4'he pu lic,4 it said, 4have lost a sensational treat through the sudden death of the man "ope, #ho #as suspected of the murder of Mr! 3noch Dre er and of Mr! -oseph &tangerson! 'he details of the case #ill pro a ly e never kno#n no#, though #e are informed upon good authority that the crime #as the result of an old standing and romantic feud, in #hich love and Mormonism ore a part! It seems that oth the victims elonged, in their younger days, to the Latter Day &aints, and "ope, the deceased prisoner, hails also from &alt Lake ,ity! If the case has had no other effect, it, at least, rings out in the most striking manner the efficiency of our detective police force, and #ill serve as a lesson to all foreigners that they #ill do #isely to settle their feuds at home, and not to carry them on to *ritish soil! It is an open secret that the credit of this smart capture elongs entirely to the #ell0kno#n &cotland 8ard officials, Messrs! Lestrade and /regson! 'he man #as apprehended, it appears, in the rooms of a certain Mr! &herlock "olmes, #ho has himself, as an amateur, sho#n some talent in the detective line, and #ho, #ith such instructors, may hope in time to attain to some degree of their skill! It is e5pected that a testimonial of some sort #ill e presented to the t#o officers as a fitting recognition of their services!4 4Didn+t I tell you so #hen #e started74 cried &herlock "olmes #ith a laugh! 4'hat+s the result of all our &tudy in &carletJ to get them a testimonial94 4Never mind,4 I ans#ered, 4I have all the facts in my (ournal, and the pu lic shall kno# them! In the meantime you must make yourself contented y the consciousness of success, like the Coman miser 00 4@2opulus me si ilat, at mihi plaudo Ipse domi simul ac nummos contemplar in arca!+4

Dictionar Dingy Skein Condonment Dunderheads CHAGRIN Sententious Scuffle Jaunty Pinion Meted Menial unner ing !ated "urk !elated !roach Im#erious Demure Motley "ithe