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ISSN 0019-5723

INDIAN LABOUR JOURNAL


(A MONTHLY PUBLICATION)
Volume 54 August 2013 No. 8

GOVERNMENT OF INDIA MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND EMPLOYMENT LABOUR BUREAU SHIMLA/CHANDIGARH

EDITORIAL COMMITTEE
Chairman Editor Associate Editor Daljeet Singh I.S.Negi R.C.Jarial

Staff Writers

Laxmi Kant Ravinder Kumar

NOTE TO CONTRIBUTORS
Non-controversial articles on labour matters of topical interest (e.g. labour and wage policy; industrial relations; industrial management; trade union movement; labour welfare; workers participation in management; employment/ unemployment; labour research of empirical value and of general interest etc.) are accepted for publication in the Journal. The articles generally not exceeding ten thousand words may be sent in a floppy diskette of 3.5 or C.D in Microsoft Word only with a print out in double space on one side foolscap paper, addressed to the Director General, Labour Bureau, Cleremont, Shimla -171 004 alongwith a declaration by the author that the article has neither been published nor submitted for publication elsewhere. All references and footnotes, may be given only at the end of the articles. Authors are solely responsible for the factual accuracy and the opinion expressed in their signed articles. The Labour Bureau, however, reserves the right to edit, amend and delete any portion of the article with a view to make it more presentable and to reject any article, if not found suitable. The articles which are rejected will not be returned and no correspondence will be entertained on the articles which are rejected by the Editorial Committee. A copy of the Journal, in which the article appears, is supplied to the author. An honorarium up to Rs. 1,000 is also payable as per rules for each article published. Our address: The Director General, Labour Bureau Cleremont, Shimla 171 004 Fax No: 0177-2655253 Website: http://labourbureau.nic.in E-mail dg-lb@nic.in

PREFACE

The Indian Labour Journal earlier known as Indian Labour Gazette is a monthly publication being brought out since July, 1943. This publication is the only official publication of its kind in the country disseminating latest labour statistics and research in the field of labour which has immense utility for diverse stakeholders such as Employers and Employees Organizations, Research Scholars, Central and State Governments, Autonomous Bodies, Courts, Universities etc. The Journal normally contains matters of interest on labour such as Labour Activities, News about Indian & Foreign Labour, Labour Decisions, Labour Literature and Labour Statistics. But, at times, non controversial articles on labour matters of topical interest and the gist of the Reports, Enquiries & Studies conducted by Labour Bureau are also published. Suggestions for further improvement of the publication are welcome.

DALJEET SINGH DIRECTOR GENERAL LABOUR BUREAU, SHIMLA-171004

INDIAN LABOUR JOURNAL Published Monthly by LABOUR BUREAU SHIMLA/CHANDIGARH (First Published in July, 1943 as Indian Labour Gazette) Vol.54 August, 2013 CONTENTS SPECIAL ARTICLE Employment Rights for Persons with Disability in India a Critical Legal Perspective LABOUR ACTIVITIES Labour Situation Industrial Disputes NEWS IN BRIEF (a) INDIAN LABOUR India Inc Gives Approval for Youths On-the-job Training India in the Eye of an Employee Turnover Storm: Survey Call for Ban on All Forms of Child Labour Number of Mining Accidents Falls by 50% in last 7 Years Jobs Growth Up a Tad in Q4 at 0.35% India's Unemployment Increased 2% in FY12 as Slowdown Hits Hiring 47% Graduates in India are Unemployable for any Job: Report CSR Activity Matters for Indian Employees: Ipsos Survey Industries/Services declared Public Utility Services under the Industrial Disputes Act 1947 Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural Labourers and Rural Labourers ( b) FOREIGN LABOUR Uneven Job Recovery Poses Challenges to most Countries Hiring Outlook: US Scores, India Slips Child Domestic Workers Suffer from Statistical Invisibility, says ILO China, Euro Zone Threaten U.S.-Led Economic Recovery Australias Visa Proposal is Bad News for Indian IT Companies US Senate Passes Anti-India Immigration Bill LABOUR DECISIONS Accident Includes any Untoward, Unexpected Event 808 805 805 805 806 806 807 800 800 801 801 801 802 802 803 803 804 804 795 798 783 No 8 Page

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LABOUR LITERATURE Important Articles of Labour Interest Published in the Periodicals Received in the Labour Bureau 809

STATISTICS Section A- Monthly Statistics Section B- Serial Statistics 813 855

ANY REPRODUCTION FROM THE JOURNAL SHOULD BE SUITABLY ACKNOWLEDGED

Subscription and complaints, if any, regarding the distribution of the Indian Labour Journal should be sent only to THE CONTROLLER OF PUBLICATIONS, CIVIL LINES, DELHI 110054 Pre-payable subscription rates for the Indian Labour Journal Annual Rate of Subscription Sale per copy Rs.900.00 Rs. 75.00

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SPECIAL ARTICLE Employment Rights for Persons with Disability in India a Critical Legal Perspective Rumi Ahmed*

Introduction
Financial independence is indispensable for human dignity and self-esteem; and employment is one of the most important tools for an individual to secure financial independence. Persons with disabilities are not an exception and they too want to live a dignified living. They want to be productive members of the society and look for suitable works and employment opportunities for themselves. Persons with disabilities have their own specific skills, talent and capabilities and if these are tapped properly they too can make significant contribution in a countrys development. An inclusive and barrier-free society can play a significant role in making disabled persons productive by creating ample employment opportunities, including reasonable accommodation in access to infrastructure and provision of aids and appliances to enable disabled person in employment to carry out duties effectively. Employment provides livelihood opportunities and self-reliance for persons with disability. While employment is an important livelihood options for persons with disability, they generally face challenges in finding suitable employment opportunities. Employers are often reluctant to employ or retain them. They (employers), in fact, look for ways and means for not complying with the mandatory requirements of reservation/identification of jobs for persons with disabilities. Disabled persons face challenges even after employment. There are also instances where people acquired disability while in service and establishments employing them ignored their concerns. Disability discrimination is at work in most aspects of employment, including appointment, removal, pay, job assignments, promotions, training, service benefits, terms or conditions of employment, etc. The positive aspect is that globally employment related rights for persons with disability are getting increasing recognition. International Labour Organization (ILO), which has been working for the promotion of right to work and labour standards, recognized the importance of the right to work for the persons with disabilities long back in its Employment (Transition from War to Peace) Recommendations 1944, which states that whatever the origin of disabilities, should be provided with full opportunities for rehabilitation, specialized vocational guidance, training and retraining, and employment on useful work 1. ILOs Conventions (such as Convention No. 111 of 1958, Convention No. 159 of 1983, etc.) also allow affirmative action in workplace as means to ensure effective equality of opportunity and treatment between disabled workers and other workers. The Universal Declaration on Human Rights recognizes that everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment (Article 23(1)). Article 7 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights explicitly recognizes the right of everyone to the enjoyment of just and favourable conditions of work, in particular the right to safe working conditions. The right to work is further guaranteed under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Civil Rights (Article 8(3)(a)); the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (Article 5(e)(i)); the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (Article 11(1)(a)); the Convention on the Rights of the Child (Article 32); and the International Convention on the Protection of the *Mrs. Rumi Ahmed is a Ph.D. Scholar at Faculty of Law, Gauhati University, Guwahati, Assam. 783

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Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families (Articles 11, 25, 26, 40, 52 and 54). Several regional instruments also recognize the right to work, such as the European Social Charter of 1996 (Part II, Article 1), the African Charter on Human and Peoples Rights (Article 15) and the Additional Protocol to the American Convention on Human Rights in the Area of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Article 6). Most importantly, Article 27 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (which is the first legally enforceable UN human rights treaty of the 21st century and entered into force in 2008) has made explicit and detailed provisions, establishing therein legal frameworks for State obligations in relation to work and employment of persons with disabilities. In light of the above, this paper is intended to highlight important employment related rights for persons with disability in India. It makes a critical assessment of the legal provision of employment rights under the Persons with Disabilities (Equal Opportunities, Protection of Rights and Full Participation) Act 1995 through the analysis of some significant judgements of the Indian judiciary. Important employment related provisions of the draft Bill for the proposed new disability legislation, which is likely to replace the PWD Act, have also been covered in brief. Legal provisions of employment rights for persons with disability Historically, there exist some important legal provisions of rights for disabled workers/employees. For example, the Workmens Compensation Act, 1923 provides compensation to workmen or their dependent family members in case of an accidental death or disablement during employment. Section 3 of the Act says that if personal injury is caused to a workman by accident arising out of or in the course of his employment, his employer shall be liable to pay compensation. Section 4 of above Act talks about the quantum of compensation to be paid for different categories of disablement underlined within the Act. Section 46(c) of the Employees State Insurance Act, 1948 says that periodical payment shall be made to an insured person suffering from disablement as a result of an employment injury sustained as an employee. Section 51 of the same Act mentions the disablement benefits for temporary disablement and permanent disablement (whether total or partial). As per Section 4 of the Payment of Gratuity Act, 1972, gratuity shall be payable to an employee on the termination of his employment on his death or disablement due to accident or disease, if he has rendered continuous service of five years. Section 3(1) of the All India Services (Special Disability Leave) Regulations, 1957 provides that special disability leave may be granted to a member of the Service who suffers (a disability) as a result of risk of office or special risk of office. The Central Civil Services (Pension) Rules, 1972 and the Central Civil Services (Extraordinary Pension) Rules, 1939 provide for disability pension on account of disablement of a government servant. Similarly, the Railway Services (Extraordinary Pension) Rules, 1993 provides for disability pension on account for disablement of a railway servant. There are other specific rules and regulation (including State government rules and regulations) regarding posting and transfer of disabled employees. Employment rights under the PWD Act Most of the provisions referred above are specific in nature, with limited scope for application for those only who are already in employment and do not make any general provision such as reservation for employment of persons with disabilities. The Persons with Disabilities (Equal Opportunities, Protection of Rights and Full Participation) Act 1995 (briefly, the PWD Act) is the first major legislation in India that legally made explicit recognition of certain basic rights and entitlement for persons with disabilities, including reservation in employment. This Act came to be an important legal tool for persons with disabilities and formed an important basis in pronouncing judicial verdicts.

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At this point, it is important to highlight that India was among the first to sign and ratify the UN Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) (India ratified it on 1 st October 2007); but it is yet to incorporate the provisions of the Convention within its domestic laws. In keeping with its new international commitment for being party to the UNCRPD and other international instruments, it was felt necessary to amend the PWD Act. The National Policy for Persons with Disabilities, which was adopted on 10.2.2006, also envisages such amendments to the Act. Accordingly, the Committee appointed by the Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment has already come out with a draft Rights of Persons with Disabilities Bill (RPDB), 2011, which, if enacted by the Parliament, is likely to replace the PWD Act. Till such enactment, the PWD Act, enacted in 1995, remains the only major legal instrument for the disabled. Coming to the specific aspect of employment rights, Section 32 of the PWD Act says that appropriate governments shall identify suitable posts, in the establishments, which can be reserved for the persons with disability; and, periodically review the list of posts identified within three years. Section 33 provides that in case of appointments every government establishment shall reserve at least 3% of the posts for persons with disability, of which 1% each shall be reserved for persons suffering from - blindness or low vision; hearing impairment; and locomotor disability or cerebral palsy. However, subsequent to the enactment of the National Trust for Welfare of Persons with Autism, Cerebral Palsy, Mental Retardation and Multiple Disabilities Act, 1999, the PWD Act was amended and the reservation was further expanded to 5% with additional 2% reservation for mentally retarded, cerebral palsy and autism. Section 33 also says that certain departments/ establishments may be exempted (by notification) from such reservation provision, considering the type of work to be carried on by such department or establishment. Section 34 of the PWD Act says that employer in every establishment shall furnish such information or return as may be prescribed in relation to vacancies appointed for persons with disability that have occurred or are about to occur in that establishment to Special Employment Exchange. Under Section 36, where in any recruitment year any vacancy under Section 33 cannot be filled up due to non-availability of a suitable person with disability or, for any other sufficient reason, such vacancy shall be carried forward in the succeeding recruitment year. Section 37 says that every employer shall maintain record in relation to the person with disability employed in the establishment. According to Section 38, appropriate governments and local authorities shall by notification formulate schemes for ensuring employment of persons with disabilities, including training and welfare of persons with disabilities; relaxation of upper age limit; regulating the employment; health and safety measures and creation of a non-handicapping environment in places where persons with disabilities are employed. Additionally, Section 40 provides that appropriate governments and local authorities shall reserve not less than 3% in all poverty alleviation schemes for the benefit of persons with disabilities. A significantly important provision of the PWD Act is the Section 41 which provides that appropriate governments and the local authorities shall, within the limits of their economic capacity and development, provide incentives to employers both in public and private sectors to ensure that at least five percent of their work force is composed of persons with disabilities. This provision, however, did not draw the sufficient attention it deserved. A scheme of incentives to employers in the private sector for providing employment to persons with disabilities could be launched only in 2008. Under the Scheme, called Scheme of Incentives to Employers in the Private Sector for Providing Employment to Persons with Disabilities , the Government of India provides the employers contribution for Employees Provident Fund (EPF) and Employees State

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Insurance (ESI) for 3 years, for employees with disabilities employed in the private sector on or after 01.04.2008, with a monthly salary upto Rs. 25,000. Another most important provision of the PWD Act concerning the issue of employment is the Section 47, which has been included under Non-discrimination provision of a separate Chapter VIII. It deals with disability acquired during service and has effectively been resorted to for the benefit of disabled in several instances. Section 47 reads as follows:
(1) No establishment shall dispense with, or reduce in rank, an employee who acquires a disability during his service: Provided that, if an employee, after acquiring disability is not suitable for the post he was holding, could be shifted to some other post with the same pay scale and service benefits: Provided further that if it is not possible to adjust the employee against any post, he may be kept on a supernumerary post until a suitable post is available or he attains the age of superannuation, whichever is earlier; (2) No promotion shall be denied to a person merely on the ground of his disability: Provided that the appropriate Government may, having regard to the type of work carried on in any establishment, by notification and subject to such conditions, if any, as may be specified in such notification, exempt any establishment from the provisions of this section.

Additionally, Section 67 of the PWD Act provides that appropriate government shall frame insurance scheme for the benefit of its employees with disabilities or an alternative security scheme for its employees with disabilities. Section 68 talks about framing of scheme for payment of an unemployment allowance to persons with disabilities registered with the Special Employment Exchange. The judicial intervention Issues pertaining to employment of persons with disabilities have led to several petitions in courts, including public interest petitions (PILs). The major issues that led to intervention of judiciary included identification and reservation of jobs; promotion, retention and service avenues for disabled employee; disability acquired during the service of an employee; pre-mature retirement of disabled employees; and so on. Identification of posts as per statutory provision under Section 32 of the Act was in fact one of the stumbling blocks in implementation of the reservation mandated under Section 33 of the PWD Act. For a quite long time, after the coming into effect of the Act, establishments neither identified suitable posts nor reserved posts for employment of persons with disabilities. Ironically, they argued non-identification of posts as the reason for non-implementation of reservation. In the case of Ashok M. Shrimali vs. State Bank of India2, the petitioner, who was blind, sought to be accommodated as a bank officer in a suitable position; but the respondent bank stated that posts beyond level II are not suitable for such persons. The Bombay High Court directed the central government to carry out identification of posts and granted the petitioner liberty to move the Court after the process of identification and reservations of posts is completed; and, in the interim, the respondents were directed to appoint the petitioner to a post consistent with his qualifications and results in appropriate examinations. In the case of Amita vs. Union of India3, the petitioner (a visually impaired person) was not allowed to appear examination for the appointment of the post of probationary officer. However, it came to the notice of the Supreme Court that the list of identified posts was not reviewed by the government as per provision of the PWD Act. The Court directed the government to review the list, and based on the direction it was later informed the Court that as per report of the expert committee the post of probationary officer had been identified as suitable for the blind. The Bombay High Court in its hearing in the case of National Federation for the Blind vs. State of Maharashtra4 directed constitution of Committee for the purposes of identification of posts in various government and semi-government organizations for the disabled. It further 786

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directed that the Committee shall not restrict the identification of the post only to the lower categories but also to prepare a reservation at every stage where there is recruitment to be effected. In the case of R. Manoj Kumar vs. University of Hyderbad5, the respondent-University had issued an advertisement for 27 posts of Lecturer, without making any reservation under Section 33 of the Disabilities Act. The respondent sought to justify its action on the pretext that the matter of identification and notification of post for reservation was pending with the executive council of the University; but the Andhra Pradesh High Court held that the decision of the academic or executive council of the University was required only for pragmatic facilitation of this mandate. The Court was very critical of the approach of the University and remarked that a social welfare legislation could not be subverted by the leisurely approach of an University. It, accordingly, passed on a strong stricture directing the University to stay further recruitments till it identifies and declares the three percent reservation for persons with disabilities, in the total posts advertised. It seems that in majority of the cases jobs were identified and accordingly reservation for the disabled was implemented only pursuant to Court orders. The identification of posts was largely a delicate and difficult issue. It had significant negative effect on the most audacious provision of reservation under the Act. There were several discrepancies in identification of jobs among the state governments and between the central government and state governments 6. While there is a statutory obligation to identify posts, what are the posts to be identified is left to the discretion of the government7. There is no uniformity in the pattern or guideline for identification of jobs and appropriate governments have been given almost free hand to decide on their own, based on the nature of the posts and the requirements of particular establishment. The identification of posts was almost arbitrary. The case of Ravi Arora8 brought to the fore the crux of the problem of the identification of posts. Arora qualified the Civil Services Mains of Union Public Service Commission (UPSC) in 2000 but failed to get through the interview. In 2001, he successfully qualified; however, he appeared again for UPSC Preliminary in 2002 to improve his rank. In the meantime, he was declared medically unfit owing to an adverse medical report on his sub -standard vision. Armed with an interim Court order allowing him to write examination, he wrote UPSC Mains of 2002. However, to his surprise, he had not been appointed for the second time not because he had not qualified but because suitable posts for candidates with visual disabilities had not been identified. Nevertheless, the Court ordered his appointment with full retrospective benefits based on the 2001 Civil Services Examination and also granted him Rs. 20,000 as cost of the proceedings. Similar judgement was also delivered by the Delhi High Court in the case of UPSC vs. T.D. Dinakar9. The casual and lackadaisical approaches of the appropriate governments in identification of posts, and the difficulties in identification of posts and non-compliance of the Sections 32 and 33 led to a very landmark judgement in the case of Govt. of India through Secretary vs. Ravi Prakash Gupta10, wherein the Supreme Court did not find any merit in the contention of the Government of India that Section 33 of the PWD Act, 1995 could only be implemented after identification of posts suitable for such appointment under Section 32. Supreme Court observed that the Legislature did not intend that Section 32 be used as a tool to deny the benefits of Section 33 to persons with disabilities and that it could not allow implementation of the Act to be deferred indefinitely by bureaucratic inaction. It concluded that reservation under Section 33 was not dependent upon identification under Section 32. This is a very significant judgement considering the fact that non-identification of posts can no longer be a ground for non-implementation of reservation provision under the Act. The Delhi High Court in its judgement on Pushkar Singh and Ors vs. University of Delhi11, directed the respondents to calculate the total number of seats that ought to have been 787

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reserved and to issue advertisement with specific subject-wise reservations for appointment to teaching posts and also directed that the recruitment for such identified posts for the disabled candidates is to be conducted amongst the disabled candidates by adopting the selection procedure meant for filling up such posts within a period of six months. Most significantly, the Court clarified that in the absence of sufficient number of posts, the respondents were to create supernumerary posts or terminate the appointments that were made subject to the final adjudication in the present matter. In addition to the non-identification of suitable posts for employment of disabled persons, there also seemed to have some reluctance on the part of certain establishments to either employ disabled persons or retain in their establishments an employee who acquired disability during the service in the establishment. Many establishments in fact did not make any provision for reservation of the disabled long after the coming into effect of the PWD Act. Delhi High Court while noting serious failure on the part of the government in implementation of the provisions of Section 33 of the PWD Act, directed the respondents in the case of National Federation of the Blind vs. Union of India and Ors 12 to constitute a Committee to compute the backlog of posts and undertake a special recruitment drive to fill up posts identified. The Court also stayed all recruitment in departments/public sector undertakings till such time as reservation for disabled persons was provided for. In the case of Dilip Baruah vs. State of Assam and Ors13, a government establishment availed the service of a disabled person from time to time against the temporary vacancy by way of continuously renewing/extending his service term and thereafter he was not allowed to continue in his job. The Gauhati High Court found it very unfortunate that the petitioner being a disabled person has not been accommodated in the reserved quota as per the Statute; and directed the respondent to consider the case of the petitioner for appointment in reserved quota of disabled persons within a period of 2 (two) months. One of the most significant aspects of the PWD Act is that while it makes 3% reservation for the disabled it also ensures that persons with different kinds of disabilities can actually share the benefit of reservation. Accordingly, the 3% reservation has further been subcategorized as follows: 1% each for persons with blindness or low vision; hearing impairment; and locomotor disability or cerebral palsy. This sub-categorization has firmly been justified in the judgement of the Division Bench of the Allahabad High Court in the case of Dr Ravindra Kumar Pandey vs. State of UP and Others14. The Division Bench stated: the categorization of physically handicapped, it appears, is founded on the intensity of deprivation or handicap. The Legislature therefore, while categorizing the disability, determined the order in which they should be treated if there were lesser vacancies15. In fact, the Court went ahead further and held that if there was only one vacancy available to be filled from the disabled category, it should first be offered to the candidate suffering from blindness or low vision; and if no such candidate is available, then it should go to the next category of disability, that is, hearing impaired and thereafter to persons with locomotor disability16, i. e. according to the order of the categories of disabilities under Section 33 of the Act. The issue of sub-categorization in the reservation was also upheld in another earlier judgement of the Andhra Pradesh High Court in the case of Perambaduru Murali Krishna and Ors vs. State of Andhra Pradesh and Ors 17. In its judgement on Mahesh Gupta vs. Yashwant Kumar Ahirwar18, the Supreme Court held that person with disability constituted a special class and that there cannot be any further reservation based on caste or religion within disabled candidates. The issue of promotion in employment for the disabled has also been found to be problematic on several occasions and judiciary had to play its role in this issue as well. For example, in the case of Union of India through G.M. Northern Railway vs. Jagmohan Singh 19, an orthopaedically disabled employee was denied promotion on the ground that reservation in promotion is not allowed. The Central Administrative Tribunal ordered that the petitioner was 788

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entitled to a promotion against a reserved post for the disabled and the Railways challenged the order of the Tribunal before Delhi High Court. The Court found that the policy decision of the Railways was arbitrary and irrational and upheld the judgment of the Tribunal. In another case of reservation in promotion in the case of Chandrabhan Tadi vs. Life Insurance Corporation of India20, the petitioner, a totally blind employee (telephone operator) of LIC, was allowed promotion only after the filing of the writ petition in the Bombay High Court. Disabilities acquired during service in the establishments brought in several litigations before the judiciary. In most such cases, the judiciary delivered judgements in favour of disabled persons taking the advantage of the clear and most unambiguous provisions under Section 47 of the PWD Act. In Omvati Kalshan vs. Delhi Development Authority21, the petitioner, a DDA employee, was certified as visually impaired and found it difficult for deskwork due to her deteriorating eyesight. Consequently she was offered a post at a lower grade and she was placed on a separate seniority list that did not have any avenue for promotion. The petitioner was also denied conveyance allowance. The Delhi High Court held that the respondents action of demoting the petitioner and placing her on a separate seniority list was contrary to the provisions of Section 47 of the Act and directed it to treat the petitioner as eligible to the next higher grade, subject to her being otherwise qualified. In the case of O.P. Sharma vs. Delhi Transport Corporation22, the petitioner, a conductor with the DTC, had a paralytic attack which led to severe impairment of his leg. He was thereafter subject to medical treatment, and found to be medically unfit for the job. He was later on prematurely retired from his post on the ground of being medically unfit to perform his job. The Delhi High Court ordered that he was entitled to reinstatement and directed the respondent to assign him suitable alternative duties with pay protection and continuity of service as per the provisions of Section 47 of the Person with Disabilities Act. The respondent was also ordered to provide the petitioner with other benefits that he was entitled to like annual increments, promotion etc. Further, the petitioner was awarded costs. The landmark judgement with regard to the interpretation of Section 47 of the Act and the one which later formed the basis for most of the subsequent cases involving interpretation of Section 47 of the PWD Act is the case of Kunal Singh vs. Union of India and Anr23.. The appellant in this case was a Constable in the Special Service Bureau (SSB) and suffered an injury in his left leg when he was on duty. He was invalidated from service by the respondents. The petitioner went to Supreme Court making an appeal based on section 47 of the Act and the Supreme Court made the following observation: It must be remembered that person does not acquire or suffer disability by choice. An employee, who acquires disability during his service, is sought to be protected under Section 47 of the Act specifically. Such employee, acquiring disability, if not protected, would not only suffer himself, but possibly all those who depend on him also suffer. The very frame and contents of Section 47 clearly indicate its mandatory nature. In construing a provision of social beneficial enactment that too dealing with disabled persons intended to give them equal opportunities, protection of rights and full participation, the view that advances the object of the Act and serves its purpose must be preferred to the one which obstructs the object and paralyses the purpose of the Act. In Supreme Courts view, the language of Section 47 is plain and certain in casting statutory obligation on the employer to protect an employee acquiring disability during service. The Supreme Court also observed that the Act is a special legislation, and the doctrine of generalia specialibus non derogant would apply24. It thus ruled that Rule 38 of the Central Civil Service (Pension) Rules 1972 (on the basis of which it was argued before the Supreme Court that

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the appellant was getting invalidity pension) cannot override Section 47 of the Act. In fact, the Supreme Court cited Section 72 of the PWD Act in this regard, which reads as follows: The provisions of this Act, or the rules made there under shall be in addition to, and not in derogation of any other law for the time being in force or any rules, order or any instructions issued there under, enacted or issued for the benefits of persons with disabilities. The Supreme Court held that the appellant has acquired disability during his service and if found not suitable for the post he was holding, he could be shifted to some other post with same pay-scale and service benefits; if it was not possible to adjust him against any post, he could be kept on supernumerary post until a suitable post was available or he attains the age of superannuation, whichever is earlier. It, accordingly, directed the respondents to give relief in terms of section 47 of the Act. The Kunal Singh judgement25, as mentioned above, formed the basis of many subsequent judgements of the Courts concerning with similar identical question in law and involving the interpretation of Section 47 of the PWD Act. In another very significant judgement of the Supreme Court in the case of Bhagwan Dass vs. Punjab State Electricity Board26, an employee acquiring disability during service was not aware about the beneficial provision under Section 47 and was retired from service in 1999 despite a circular of the Board that an employee acquiring disability during service could not be retired from service. Subsequently, the employee became aware about the provision that he is entitled to protection under Section 47 of the Act and, accordingly, made repeated requests to the respondent for rejoining service; but his request was not considered. The High Court of Punjab and Haryana dismissed his petition and he later on filed a special leave petition before the Supreme Court, which made the following observation: The appellant was a class IV worker and preferred to opt for retirement when he realised that he had become completely blind. It was for the officers of the respondent to explain the correct legal position to him and his entitlement to protection under Section 47 of the Act. The Supreme Court held that the appellant could continue in service till the date of his superannuation and that he would be entitled to all service benefits. The Indian judiciary also brought relief to mentally disabled employees by applying the provision of Section 47 of the Act. For example, in an important case of Ashwini Ashok Desai vs. Chattrapati Shivaji Maharaj General Hospital27, the petitioner, an employee in a government hospital developed a mental illness in 1999 and was under medication for schizophrenia. Later on, he was pre-maturely retired from service. The Commissioner for Persons with Disability held that since there was no reservation for the mentally ill under Section 33 of the PWD Act, a person with a mental illness cannot be given the benefit of Section 47 of the Act. However, the Bombay High Court, relying on the Kunal Singh judgment of the Supreme Court, differed and found that the Commissioner for Persons with Disability had committed an error in concluding that only persons covered under Section 33 were protected under Section 47 of the Act. The Court set aside the order of the Commissioner and the order terminating the petitioners service; and the respondents were directed to identify a suitable post for the petitioner or create a supernumerary post under Section 47. The respondents were further directed to transfer the petitioner to Pune as his family resided at Pune. In yet another recent and significant judgement involving mental disability, the Madras High Court while taking recourse to Section 47 of the Act, in the case of C. Narayanan vs. The Deputy Director-cum-Principal In Charge, Government Industrial Training Institute, Chennai & Anr. 28, said that mental disability cannot be a ground for removal of an employee. Additionally, Indian judiciary has also upheld the rights of reasonable accommodation for the disabled employees. In its judgement in the case of Syed Bashir-ud-din Qadri vs. Nazir 790

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Ahmed Shah and Others29, the Supreme Court said that the doctrine of reasonable accommodation would require the provision of aids and appliances to enable a disabled person in employment to carry out his duties effectively30. Before this, Bombay High Court upheld reasonable accommodation in employment the case of Ranjit Kumar Rajak vs. State Bank of India31 by applying the provisions of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (which India had ratified but is yet to incorporate in its municipal law). Employment rights under the proposed new disability legislation In order to harmonize the provisions of the UN Convention on Disabilities (to which India is a party) with the Indian municipal laws a draft Rights of Persons with Disabilities Bill 2011 (RPDB) has already been prepared and if this draft Bill is approved and enacted as a new legislation by the Parliament, it will replace the existing PWD Act. The RPDB seems to have been influenced by several verdicts of the Indian judiciary, which has made positive interpretation of the PWD Act in order to provide specific relief for employment of persons with disability. RPDB contains several specific provisions for work and employment opportunities of persons with disability. A brief summary of the important Sections of the draft RPDB on employment is given below. Section 56: (1) No establishment shall directly or indirectly discriminate against any person with disability in any matter relating to employment including but not limited to recruitment, promotion and other related issues arising in the course of or through the length of employment in any establishment; (2) No establishment shall dispense with, or reduce in rank, an employee who acquires a disability during service, such employee may if required by the nature of disability, be shifted to another post with the same pay scale and service benefits. Provided further that if it is not possible to adjust the employee against any post, then such employee may be kept on a supernumerary post until a suitable post is available or the age of superannuation whichever is earlier; (4) Every establishment shall facilitate reasonable accommodation of persons with disabilities by taking adequate measures32 to guarantee that persons with disabilities are not disadvantaged in any manner at any stage of employment; (5) Any person with disability, if eligible for any post which is sought to be filled, shall have the right to appear for selection and hold the post if selected; (6) An establishment shall not ordinarily post and transfer a person with disability in a place other than his or her native place or within the vicinity of such place unless such transfer becomes necessary due to exigencies of the job and expertise possessed by the person with disabilities; (7) The appropriate governments may frame such rules and regulations as may be necessary from time to time for the purposes of achieving the objectives outlined above; (8) Every establishment undertaking an exercise of retrenchment or declaring its staff surplus shall as far be not include persons with disabilities in such exercise or process. In the event of persons with disabilities being included in such exercise or process, enhanced benefits shall be payable to them. Section 57: (1) All establishments shall reserve not less than seven percent of all posts and in promotions for persons with disabilities in accordance with the following banding of disabilities, with each band being entitled to 1%: a. Persons with blindness; b. Persons with hearing impairment and speech impairment; c. Persons with locomotor disability and leprosy cured; d. Persons with cerebral palsy and muscular dystrophy; e. Persons with autism, intellectual disability and mental illness; f. Persons with multiple disabilities, deaf-blindness and multiple sclerosis; g. Persons with Low vision and persons who are hard of hearing. Provided that posts identified under Section 32 of the Persons with Disabilities (Equal Opportunities, Protection of Rights and Full Participation) Act of 1995 (Act No 1 of 1996) shall operate as guidelines for implementing this reservation. 791

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Section 58: (1) All establishments shall put in place an Equal Opportunity Policy detailing measures and commitments initiated by the Establishment; (2) An Equal Opportunity Policy shall: a. delineate measures taken in order to comply with the provisions of the Act; b. provide strategies to increase employment opportunities with specific attention to all schemes and reasonable accommodation measures; c. specifically detail measures taken and strategies employed to reasonably accommodate and increase employment opportunities for women with disabilities. Section 59: (1) Every establishment shall maintain records in relation to employment, facilities provided and other necessary information in such form and in such manner as may be prescribed by the appropriate government; (2) These records shall specifically include information on women with disabilities in relation to their employment, facilities provided and other information as prescribed; (3) Every employment exchange shall register in accordance with prescribed procedure and thereby maintain records of persons with disabilities seeking employment. These records shall specifically include data on women with disabilities; (4) Such records shall be relevant and authentic evidence of a person with disability seeking unemployment allowance under Section 64 (6) (d) of this Act; (5) Any person authorized by the State Disability Rights Authority may inspect the records during the working hours of the establishment. Section 60: (1) The appropriate governments shall take all necessary measures with respect to formulation of schemes and programmes to facilitate and support employment of persons with disabilities, with special reference to self-employment and vocational training of persons with disabilities; (2) The appropriate governments shall establish in each district work centres where persons with disabilities in rural areas can be imparted necessary skills and provided work opportunities in different trades including rural trades; (3) The appropriate governments shall ensure imparting of skills through convergence in existing training centers and institutions and establish centers where none exists so that persons with disabilities in rural areas can be imparted necessary skills in crafts, trades and domiciliary occupations and provide work; (4) The appropriate governments shall provide adequate loans at concessional rates under the existing micro-credit and loan schemes to persons with disabilities in order to facilitate self-employment schemes; (5) If, in the opinion of the person recruited, there is a need to impart specific training prior to recruitment in order to ensure that a person with disability has adequate support, then such facilities should be made available; (6) The appropriate governments shall institute suitable schemes to promote and support the creative skills of persons with disabilities in rural and urban areas by establishing networks between the artisans and marketing federations and handicraft boards. Section 61: The appropriate governments shall provide incentives to all establishments to ensure that at least ten per cent of their work force is composed of persons with disabilities. Section 63: (1) The appropriate governments may retain the special employment exchanges established under Section 34 of the Persons with Disabilities (Equal Opportunities, Protection of Rights and Full Participation) Act, 1995 and establish new exchanges. In addition, the RPDB also includes a specific provision for employment of disabled woman under Section 8, which reads as follows: Section 8: (1) No woman with disability shall be directly or indirectly discriminate against in recruitment, promotion, or any other related matter arising in the course of or 792

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through the length of employment; (2) The appropriate governments shall take all effective and appropriate measures, including formulation of schemes and programmes, to ensure that women with disabilities have access to opportunities for employment, vocational training, micro-credit and self-employment on an equal basis with others. Conclusion Disability does not imply inability. Persons with disability do have their own specific talents, capabilities and skills and may, in fact, turn out to be very productive members of the society if suitable works and employment opportunities are available for them. However, the attitude of employers/society, lack of adequate government policies for secure employment, ignorance of the provisions of law, non-availability of affordable aids and appliances and inaccessible work places still remain the major concerns with regard to works and employment opportunities for persons with disabilities. Finding and holding employment opportunities of their choice is really a problem for person with disabilities. As per the original provision of the PWD Act, the three percent reservation under the Act is limited to only three categories of disability (namely blindness or low vision; hearing impairment; and locomotor disability or cerebral palsy, with 1% reservation for each category)33. The PWD Act has defined disability narrowly and many categories of disabled persons have, in fact, been left outside its scope. The Act provides reservation for the employment of the disabled persons in government sector only34; and that too with provisions of exemption clause for certain establishments. The requirement of identification of jobs under the PWD Act was a major stumbling block for implementing reservation as many establishments cited, till recently, the non-identification of jobs as the reason for non-implementation of reservation. Further, non-compliance by appropriate authorities does not impose any specific sanction or responsibility to such authorities. In case of the private sector the provision for reservation of jobs has remained at recommendation level as the Act only talks about the incentive policy, which has not been properly spelt out so far. The Indian judiciary has, of course, played a significant role in upholding the employment rights for persons with disability through its positive interpretation of the PWD Act. Based on the experience gained through judicial interpretation of the PWD Act, the draft of the new disability legislation (as mentioned above) has also come out with several explicit provisions in order to address various employment related rights of the persons with disability. It is important that this new legislation be enacted at the earliest after incorporating all the important provisions of the UN Convention on Disabilities. Most importantly, employers and their establishment need to change their attitude and work culture. It is very essential that they nurture and nourish the skills and capabilities of persons with disabilities. Notes & References
1

cited in UNESCAP (2012): Disability, Livelihood and Poverty in Asia and the Pacific: An Executive Summary of Research Findings, p.13 (http://www.unescap.org/sdd/publications/ DL/SDD-DisabilityLivilihood.pdf, accessed on 26 July 2013) 2 2001 (Supp) Bom CR 132 (Bom HC) 3 2005 (13) SCC 721 4 2005 (1) Bom CR 740 (Bom HC) 5 WP No. 70074/ 2002 (AP HC), judgement order dated 18 November 2002 6 Kothari, Jayna (2012): The Future of Disability Law in India, (New Delhi: Oxford University Press) 96 7 Id., p. 97 8 Ravi Kumar Arora vs. Union of India and Another [2004 (111) DLT 126] 9 The petitioner in the case of T. D. Dinakar vs. Union of India [WP(C) 4574 of 2003 (Del HC)] appeared for UPSC Civil Services Examination in 2001 as visually impaired candidate; but was considered as general category and was not accordingly appointed based on the cut off marks for the general category. Based on the Ravi Arora judgement, the single Judge of the Delhi High Court in the present case directed the respondents to appoint the petitioner to a Civil Services post and also ordered that costs of Rs. 20,000 to be paid to the petitioner. The UPSC preferred an appeal, i. e. UPSC vs. T.D. Dinakar [LPA 588/2006 (Del

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HC)] against this order of the single Judge on the grounds that the respondent had not qualified as he had failed to meet the standards fixed for general category candidates and there was no vacancy reserved for visually impaired candidates. However, the review petition was dismissed. The Court in fact pulled up the Secretary, Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment (MSJE) on the aspect of identification of posts and conveyed its un-satisfaction with the stand taken by the Ministry and further observing that the laudable Parliamentary object of the PWD Act to benefit the disabled had been thwarted for a decade by the Executive by not identifying posts. 10 SLP No. 14889 of 2009, judgement order dated 7 July 2010 11 C.W.P. No. 2549 of 1995 (Del HC), judgement order dated 30 January 2001; (2005) 1 PDD (CC) 252 12 W. P. (C) NO. 15828/2006, (Delhi HC), judgement order dated 19 December 2008 (http://indiankanoon.org/doc/226777/, accessed on 26 March 2013) 13 W.P. (C) No. 1065 of 2000 (Gau HC), judgement order dated 4 January 2001; (2005) 1 PDD (CC) 197 14 Writ Petition No. 12603/2003 15 cited in Kothari, Jayna (2012): The Future of Disability Law in India, (New Delhi: Oxford University Press) 106 16 Id. 17 W. P. No. 3997 of 2002 and 4041 of 2002 (Andhra HC), judgement order dated 20 December 2002; (2005) 1 PDD (CC) 231 18 2007 (8) SCC 621 19 2008 (3) SLJ 80 (Del HC) 20 W.P 1184 of 2006 (Bom HC), judgement order dated 13 November 2006 21 2005 (125) DLT 57 (Del HC) 22 2005 (125)DLT 742 (Del HC) 23 Civil Appeal No. 1789 of 2000 (SC), judgement order dated 13 February 2003; (2005) 1 PDD (CC) 373 24 In the case of Dalip Kumar vs. AIIMS [WP(C) No. 8926/2005 (Del HC), judgement order dated 14 January 2008], the Delhi High Court also upheld the Disabilities Act as a lex specialis; and, therefore, it was held that in cases where the rights of the persons with disabilities are involved, it will take precedence over other general legislation. 25 Kunal Singh judgement was not the first case where the Supreme Court held that the persons acquiring disability during service would enjoy the same pay-scale and service benefits even after they are rendered physically handicapped. In fact, before coming into effect of the Disability Act, Supreme Court in the case of State of Haryana vs. Narender Kumar Chawla [1994 (4) SCC 460], held that in case of employees rendered physically handicapped during the course of employment, the Court has power to give directions regarding observation of such employee carrying a pay scale equal to that of his original post. 26 AIR 2008 SC 990 27 W.P No. 3545 of 2005 (Bom HC), judgement order dated 5 August 2005 28 W.P.No.11728 of 2007, (Madras HC) judgement order dated 13 December 2010 (http://indiankanoon.org/doc/1578659/, accessed on 2 April 2013) 29 Civil Appeal Nos. 2281-2282 of 2010, judgement order dated 10 March 2010 30 Kothari, Jayna (2012): p. 130-131 31 Writ Petition No. 576 of 2008 (Bom HC), judgement order dated 8 May 2009 32 adequate measures include, but are not limited to the provision of necessary aids and equipment, adequate healthcare facilities, necessary physical changes in buildings to ensure accessibility at workplaces, flexible work timings, continuous monitoring with regard to necessary support, or any arrangements or facilities created for equality with regard to competitive public service examinations and other such service related tests 33 Amendment to the Act further expanded this to 5% with additional 2% reservation for mentally retarded, cerebral palsy and autism. 33 The interpretation of the PWD Act by the Bombay High Court, in the case of Shree Satish Prabhakar Padhye and Others vs. Dalco Engineering Private Ltd., found that non-discrimination in employment would also extend to the private sector since the term establishment in Section 2(k) has been defined in such a manner that it would cover private establishments as well. However, the Supreme Court later reversed this decision.

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LABOUR ACTIVITIES

LABOUR SITUATION Information relating to Closures, Retrenchments and Lay-offs in respect of various States/Union Territories in the country for the month of January to May 2013 (Provisional) received in the Bureau upto 28th June, 2013 is presented in the following Tables:Table-I State-wise Number of Permanent Closures and Workers Affected during January to May, 2013 (P) States/Union Territories No. of Units No. of Workers Affected 1. Goa 3 151 2. Karnataka 1 36 3. Tripura 5 58 Total :State Sphere Central Sphere Grand Total 9 (-) 9 Table-II Industry-wise Number of Permanent Closures and Workers Affected during January to May, 2013 (P) Section NIC-2008 A C F I Description Agriculture, Forestry and fishing Manufacturing Construction Accommodation and Food Service activities Total : State Sphere Central Sphere Grand Total No. of Units 1 6 1 1 9 (-) 9 No. of Workers Affected 7 198 36 4 245 (-) 245 245 (-) 245

(P): Provisional - : Nil. Note: Information within brackets relate to Central Sphere.

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Table-III State-wise Number of Units affecting Retrenchments and Workers Retrenched thereby during January to May, 2013 (P) State/Union Territory Goa Gujarat Karnataka Odisha State Sphere Central Sphere Grand Total No. of Units (13) 1 (-) 1 (-) (1) 2 (14) 16 Table-IV Industry-wise Number of Units affecting Retrenchments and Workers Retrenched during January to May, 2013 (P) Section NIC-2008 B C H M Description Mining and quarrying Manufacturing Transportation Professional, scientific and technical activities .. Total: State Sphere Central Sphere Grand Total (P): Provisional - : Nil. .. : Not available. Note: Information within brackets relate to Central Sphere. 796 No. of Units (6) 1 (1) (4) 1 (2) (1) 2 (14) 16 No. of Workers affected (225) 109 (27) (58) 2 (63) (794) 111 (1167) 1278 No. of Workers affected (373) 109 (-) 2 (-) (794) 111 (1167) 1278

1. 2. 3. 4.

Total :

..

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table-V State-wise Number of Units Affecting Lay-offs, Workers Laid-off and Mandays Lost during January to May, 2013 (P) States/Union Territories No. of Units No. of Workers No. of Mandays Lost Affected 1. Kerala 4 119 10254 (-) (-) (-) Total : State Sphere 4 119 10254 Central Sphere (-) (-) (-) Grand 4 119 10254 Total Table- VI Industry-wise Number of Units Affecting Lay-offs, Workers Laid-off and Mandays Lost during January to May, 2013 (P) Section NIC2008 C .. Total : Description No. of Units 3 (-) 1 (-) State Sphere Central Sphere Grand Total 4 (-) 4 No. of Workers Affected 83 (-) 36 (-) 119 (-) 119 Mandays Lost

Manufacturing ..

7698 (-) 2556 (-) 10254 (-) 10254

Table-VII Month-wise break-up of Mandays Lost due to Lay-off during January to May, 2013 (P) Month January February March April May Total: State Sphere Central Sphere Grand Total (P): Provisional - : Nil. .. : Not available. Note: Information within brackets relate to Central Sphere. 797 Mandays Lost 1,805 (-) 2,737 (-) 2,737 (-) 2,975 (-) .. (..) 10,254 (-) 10,254

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Industrial Disputes during January to May, 2013 (Provisional) The statistics of work-stoppages due to Industrial Disputes during January to May 2013 based on the returns received from different State Labour Departments / Regional Labour Commissioners (Central) are presented in the following tables: As per available information 62 Industrial Disputes resulting in work-stoppages were reported during January to May, 2013 in which 212985 workers were involved and 855432 mandays lost were reported. Besides, there were 11 disputes which occurred due to reasons other than Industrial Disputes also. In the said disputes 6149 workers were involved and 553737 mandays were lost. Table VIII Number of Mandays Lost on Account of Work-stoppages during January to May, 2012 and 2013 Month 1 January February March April May Total Number of Mandays Lost on Account of Industrial Disputes Reasons Other Than Industrial Disputes 2012 (P) 2013(P) 2012 (P) 2013 (P) 2 3 4 5 177980 147082 163336 152180 740202 125222 178520 113068 1334992 538964 69568 67418 32400 855432 150987 168259 160953 162155 805690 141557 130000 130000 553737

(P) = Provisional and based on the returns /clarifications received in the Bureau till 28th June, 2013 N.B:- Figures for 2013 are not comparable with those for 2012 due to non-receipt of data from various States / Union Territories.

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Table IX State-wise Major* Industrial Disputes in India including Industrial Disputes Due to Reasons other than Industrial Disputes till January to May, 2013 (P) Name of the State / Union Territory / Sphere / Sector / Number of Establishments affected 1 CENTRAL SPHERE STATE SPHERE Punjab One Unit (Private Sector) Strike Wages & Allowances 1200 67.2 .. .. Strike/ Lockout Cause No. of Workers involved No. of Manda ys lost (in 000s) 5 Wages lost (Rs. In Lakhs) 6 Production loss (Rs. in Lakhs) 7

2 NIL

(P) = Provisional and based on the returns /clarifications received in the Bureau till 28th June, 2013 .. = Not reported * = All disputes in which there was a time loss of 50,000 or more mandays during the period under review or beginning of the disputes are classified as Major disputes

First keep the peace within yourself, and then you can also bring peace to others. -Thomas a Kempis

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NEWS IN BRIEF

(a) INDIAN LABOUR


The news items reported below have been gleaned from various official and unofficial sources. Hence, the Labour Bureau is not in a position to vouchsafe the authenticity of the unofficial news items. India Inc Gives Approval for Youths On-the-job Training - Youth aspiring for jobs in the services sector could soon pick up the necessary skills through on-the-job training with India Inc agreeing to a mandate for services firms to hire at least 2.5% of their workforce as apprentices. Traditionally used in India for imparting technical and manufacturing skills, the apprenticeship model has had limited success due to a very rigid 52 year-old law governing such training. India has just 2.5 lakh youth in apprenticeships, which is far too low for a workforce that is growing by 12 million a year. Japan and Germany have 3 million and 1 million apprentices, respectively. Now, industry has told the government it could do more to train Indias youth on -the-job if the legal regime that includes penal provisions such as imprisonment up to six months for violations was eased. Firms outside the services sectors are ready to offer apprenticeships to train youth of at least 5% of their total workforce and have proposed a cap of 10% so that the option is not abused. The 10% cap would discourage companies from recruiting abnormally high number of apprentices instead of regular workers with a possibility of using them as cheap labour, said a senior official, referring to the industrys proposals to amend the Apprenticeship Act of 1961. Amendments to the law, proposed since 2009, have been held up in inter-ministerial conflicts and hence Labour Ministry has now been asked to try and move forward on issues where a consensus is feasible. These expansions in apprenticeship capacity would need a change in the rules that allow the government to set the number of training seats for each trade in each firm. The industrys proposals steered by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) have got the backing of Prime Minister Manmohan Singhs advisor on Skills S Ramadorai. On the low stipends paid to apprentices, India Inc has said that they must be linked to the minimum wages for each trade at the state level, with the stipend starting at 60 % of such wages in the first year of training going up to 90% in the fourth year. At the same time, it has been proposed that the duration of longer apprenticeships be rationalised and the minimum duration be reduced to two months considering the needs of the services sector. Companies should be allowed to terminate apprentices if they face an adverse business cycle or if a trainee performs poorly, following a one month notice period. (The Economic Times, 03.06.2013) India in the Eye of an Employee Turnover Storm: Survey - As the growth trends firm up in job market, India is set to witness highest attrition rate globally with possibility of one in four employees switching jobs in the country, a survey said. The survey conducted by global human resource and management consultancy major Hay Group also said that the concerns among the Indian employees about fairness of their compensation and career objectives could be the key reasons for them to switch jobs. Global management consultancy, Hay Group, in association with the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR), found that 49 million more employees are likely to leave their employers worldwide over the next five years compared to 2012, owing to improvement in economic and labour market conditions. The Asia-Pacific will experience its largest spike in employee turnover (job switch) levels this year, and organisations in the region will experience the highest increase in turnover rates worldwide. India is expected to lead the region in turnover rates at 26.9 per cent (in the organised sector) in 2013 the highest attrition rate globally; this figure is expected to go up further in 2014 to stand at 27.5 per cent. Indian employees expressed concerns about the fairness of their compensation (55 per cent) 800

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and the extent to which benefits meet their needs (48 per cent). One in every three employees expressed concern over lack of confidence in being able to achieve their career objectives with their current employers (37 per cent). As a result, they are concerned about opportunities for learning and development (39 per cent) and supervisory coaching for their development (36 per cent), the report added. Globally, the number of workers taking flight is expected to reach 161.7 million in 2014 a 12.9 per cent increase in people leaving compared to 2012. (The Hindu Business Line, 07.06.2013) Call for Ban on All Forms of Child Labour - As the world celebrated International Day Against Child Labour on June 12, leading child rights organisations, including Child Rights and You (CRY) and Save the Children, reiterated that the persistence of child labour in India was primarily due to lack of political will. The International Labour Organisation (ILO) has marked 2013 as the year to combat child domestic labour, a growing menace in India. The ban on child labour in homes and eateries has been there since 2010, but still thousands of children are working as domestic workers or in dhabas and even in factories in the national Capital, said Save the Children CEO Thomas Chandy. Unfortunately, there are no special laws to control these placement agencies. The good thing is that police takes action against the employers in case of a report, but the law needs to be strengthened in order for it to act as a deterrent against child labour, Mr. Chandy added, asking the government to pass the amended law banning all forms of child labour. Child labour in India is governed by the Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulation) Act, 1986, which is considered primarily a work-centric legislation rather than a child-centric one, argued CRY CEO Puja Marwaha. The legislation addresses children engaged in hazardous occupations and processes in a limited way, as the purview of the Act covers only 18 occupations and 65 processes. It has a few glaring gaps as it still allows children to work in home-based work. This allows uncontrolled employment of children in bidi-rolling, embroidery work and making fire crackers as these are sub-contracted jobs that children do at home, she added. (The Hindu, 14.06.2013) Number of Mining Accidents Falls by 50% in last 7 Years - Consistently clocking negative growth for the past two years, the mining industry now has some good news: this has been the safest period with the number of fatal accidents hitting an all-time low of 112 in 2011 and rising marginally to 116 in 2012. "Mining accidents and fatalities have gone down, but even a single death is unacceptable," says Director General of Mines Safety Rahul Guha, who feels that lowering mining mishaps beyond this level would be a challenge and need concerted efforts and investments. The total number of accidents across coal, metal and oil mines, has more than halved in the last seven years, falling from 1,358 in 2005 to just 591 in 2012. Where fatalities are concerned, India has a better track record than China. According to official Chinese data, 1,384 workers died in coal mine accidents in 2012, sharply down from 1,973 people in 2011 and around 7,000 deaths recorded a decade ago. "One of the key reasons for better mine safety is the shift in technology from underground mining to open-cast mining. The decades of higher fatalities were those when there were underground mines," explains Dipesh Dipu, partner at Jenissi Management Consultants, who feels that improving safety beyond this level would mean striving to bring accidents to zero. Officials say that production from open-cast mines now accounts for over 95% of India's mineral output, leading to a dramatic fall in miner deaths. (The Economic Times, 14.06.2013) Jobs Growth Up a Tad in Q4 at 0.35% - A survey of the Labour Bureau revealed that employment growth in the eight labour-intensive sectors grew by 0.35% quarter-on-quarter during January-March 2013, from 0.24-0.28% in the previous three quarters, on the back of some uptick in select sectors like jewellery, auto and leather industries. However, employment 801

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growth during the entire FY13 was at 1.14%, lagging the 1.77% in FY12, as the overall economic growth slumped to a decades low of 5% last year from 6.2% in 2011 -12, following a dismal industrial growth and decline in exports. The employment growth rates in the two previous fiscals were over 2.6% as the economy was growing faster. The overall increase in employment during 2012-13 was 3.48 lakh, said the latest quarterly survey on 2,344 units covering textiles, handloom, leather, metals, automobiles, jewellery, transport and IT/BPO sectors employing a little over 3 crore workers. These sectors generated 8.37 lakh jobs during 2011-12, and 9.79 lakh jobs during 2010-11, when the economy grew by 9.3%. At the sectoral level, textiles generated 1.4 lakh employment in 2012-13, followed by IT/BPO with 1.19 lakh jobs, metals generated 39,000 and automobiles 22,000 jobs. The survey revealed that the latest quarter of 2012-13 has experienced an increase of 107,000 in employment, an increase of 0.35% quarter-on-quarter, the survey said. This was slightly higher than 0.28% in the two previous quarters and 0.24% in first quarter of 2012-13. Of the total 3.48 lakh jobs created in 2012-13, about 2.86 lakh were direct employment and the remaining 62,000 were contractual jobs. Export-oriented units generated 1.94 lakh jobs, or 56%, of the fresh jobs during 2012-13, with textile exporting companies hiring 1.13 lakh workers followed by IT/BPO sector with 41,000 new jobs. (The Financial Express, 15.06.2013) India's Unemployment Increased 2% in FY12 as Slowdown Hits Hiring - Indias unemployment rose by 2% during July 2011-June 2012, almost the same rate as in 2009-10, as the economic slowdown prompted companies to slow hiring to cut cost. The rise in unemployment rate comes despite 13.9 million new job creation between 2010 and 2012, as the countrys workforce increased to 472.9 million from 459.0 million, data collated by the ministry of statistics and programme implementation showed. During 2011-12, economic growth slipped to 6.2% from 9.3% in 2010-11, mainly due to industrial slowdown and decline in overseas orders for Indian merchandise. The growth rate further fell to decade's low of 5% in 2012-13. This had prompted many companies to cut jobs or freeze hiring. With thousands of fresh graduates pouring into the job market and job creation almost stagnating, unemployment rate rose. India still fared better than developed nations especially for some debt-ridden European nations where unemployment rate was much higher. The number of unemployed to labour force ratio increasing to 22 per 1,000 in 2011-12 from 20 in 2009-10 measured in terms of usual status basis, while the urban employment rate rose 3%, it was up 2% in the rural areas. Male unemployment was up 3% and female jobless rate was up by 5% in urban areas while it was nearly 2% for both in rural areas. The labour force participation rate (LFPR), the ratio of labour force to the population, declined a tad to 39.5% in 2011-12 from 40% in 2009-10, with the LFPR for men almost flat at 55.6% compared with 55.7% earlier while the LFPR for women dropping to 22.5% from 23.3%. The working population ratio (WPR), the proportion of workforce to population, fell to 38.6% in 2011-12 from 39.2% two years ago as the male WPR nearly dipped to 54.4% from 54.6% while female WPR dipped to 21.9% from 22.8%. Of the total workforce, the share of self-employed like farmers, traders and businessmen was 52% while regular wage/salaried employees constituted 18% and casual labourers made up for 30%. (The Financial Express, 21.06.2013) 47% Graduates in India are Unemployable for any Job: Report - At least 47% of graduates in India are not employable for any industry role, according the latest report by employability solutions firm Aspiring Minds. The report is based on a pan-India study of 60,000 graduates across colleges. The employability of graduates varies from 2.59% in functional roles such as accounting to 15.88% in sales-related roles and 21.37% for roles in the business process outsourcing (BPO/ITeS) sector. A significant proportion of graduates, nearly 47%, were found not employable in any sector, given their lack of proficiency in English and cognitive skills. Since a graduation degree is considered a pathway to a job in the knowledge economy, 802

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substantive intervention at the school and college level is needed to improve basic skills of students. A renewed focus on vocational training should be re-emphasised, said the report. The employability varies from role to role based on varying degrees of proficiency required in language and cognitive skills. "This study is a first of its kind for three-year degree graduates across India evaluating employability for major roles being offered by industry. The alarming statistics of nearly half of the country's graduates not being employable in the knowledge economy needs great attention with interventions at both the school and higher education levels," Varun Aggarwal, co-founder, Aspiring Minds said in a statement. (The Economic Times, 24.06.2013) CSR Activity Matters for Indian Employees: Ipsos Survey - Employees in India have one of the highest regards for corporate social responsibility as more than half of the employees in the country are concerned about companies behaviour towards society, says a survey. The Ipsos survey of 24 nations showed that workers in emerging market economies are much more concerned about their employers responsibility towards the society than the developed nations. The feelings on corporate responsibility were highest in Brazil (65%), Mexico (59%), Argentina (57%), Indonesia (55%) and India (51 %), the survey said. In contrast, in Japan and France less than 20% of workers felt the same way, and in Spain, Belgium, Germany, South Korea and China the number was less than 30%. In other developed nations it ranged from 30% in Britain and 32% in the United States to 35% in Australia and 37 % in Canada. The key message that comes out of the survey is that companies cant neg lect corporate social responsibility. Employees believe it is important for their employers to be a responsible corporate citizen for being respected as a socially responsible organisation, said Biswarup Banerjee, head of marketing communication and in charge of CSR for Ipsos in India. Banerjee added that CSR is a vital tool to boost business and employee morale, it brings in a sense of pride in the organisation, engenders teamwork and is a source of inspiration and connectedness. In addition, seven in 10 (67%) Indians think that companies should pay more attention to the environment and more than half (58%) Indians expect companies should do more to contribute towards the society, the study said. (The Financial Express, 28.06.2013) Industries/Services Declared/Granted Extension as Public Utility Services under the Industrial Disputes Act, 1947 As per the information received in the Bureau, the following Industries/Services have been declared Public Utility Services for a period of six months with effect from the date mentioned against them. Sl. No. 1 Authority Making Declaration Central Government I) I) II) Industry/Service Services in the Iron and Steel Industry Services in the Iron Ore Mining Industry Date of Declaration 15.06.2013 18.06.2013 21.06.2013

III) Services in the Uranium Industry

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Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers(CPI-IW) on base 2001=100 and Agricultural and Rural Labourers on base 1986-87=100 for the month May, 2013 Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers- The All-India CPI-IW for May, 2013 rose by 2 points and pegged at 228 (two hundred and twenty eight). On 1-month percentage change, it increased by 0.88 per cent between April and May compared with 0.49 per cent between the same two months a year ago.The largest upward contribution to the change in current index came from Food group which increased by 1.22 per cent, contributing 1.64 percentage points to the total change. At item level, Rice, Arhar Dal, Fish Fresh, Poultry (Chicken), Milk, Chillies Green, Garlic, Ginger, Tomato, Root & Green Vegetables, Tea Leaf, Tea (Readymade), Cigarette, Country Liquor, Electricity Charges, Medicine (Allopathic), Repair Charges, etc. are responsible for the rise in index. However, this was compensated by Petrol putting downward pressure on the index. The year-on-year inflation measured by monthly CPIIW stood at 10.68 per cent for May, 2013 as compared to 10.24 per cent for the previous month and 10.16 per cent during the corresponding month of the previous year. Similarly, the Food inflation stood at 13.24 per cent against 12.39 per cent of the previous month and 10.61 per cent during the corresponding month of the previous year. At centre level, Chennai and Nagpur recorded the largest increase of 8 points each followed by Nasik (7 points) and Warrangal, Coonoor, Hubli Dharwar, Madurai and Tripura (6 points each). Among others, 5 points rise was registered in 2 centres, 4 points in 14 centres, 3 points in 6 centres, 2 points in 12 centres, and 1 point in 12 centres. On the contrary, a decline of 6 points was reported in Delhi, 5 points in Ghaziabad, 4 points in Srinagar, 3 points in 2 centres, 2 points in 2 centres and 1 point in 7 centres. Rest of the 10 centres indices remained stationary. The indices of 38 cent res are above All-India Index and other 38 centres indices are below national average. The index of Jabalpur and Haldia centres remained at par with all-India index. (Labour Bureau) Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural Labourers and Rural Labourers - The All-India Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural Labourers and Rural Labourers (Base: 1986-87=100) for May, 2013 increased by 8 points and 9 points respectively to stand at 719 ( Seven hundred and nineteen) points for Agricultural Labourers and 720 points (Seven hundred and twenty) for Rural Labourers. The rise/fall in index varied from State to State. In case of Agricultural Labourers, it recorded an increase which varied between 3 to 19 points in 19 States and a decrease of 11 points in 1 State. Karnataka with 792 points topped the index table whereas Himachal Pradesh with the index level of 560 points stood at the bottom. In case of Rural Labourers, it recorded an increase between 2 to 20 points in 19 States and a decrease of 10 points in 1 State. Karnataka with 789 points topped the index table whereas Himachal Pradesh and Tripura States with the index level of 592 points each stood at the bottom.West Bengal State registered the maximum increase of 19 and 20 points respectively for Agricultural Labourers and Rural Labourers mainly due to increase in the prices of rice, wheat, meat goat, fish fresh, ginger, vegetables & fruits, gur, bidi, firewood, shirting cloth cotton (mill) and plastic shoes. On the other hand, Bihar State registered a decline of 11 points and 10 points respectively for CPI-AL and CPI-RL due to decrease in the prices of rice, wheat/wheat atta, maize, onion and vegetable & fruits. Point to point rate of inflation based on the CPI-AL and CPI-RL increased from 12.32% and 12.15% in April, 2013 to 12.70% and 12.50% in May, 2013. Inflation based on food index of CPI-AL and CPI-RL are 13.37% and 13.14 % respectively during May, 2013. (Labour Bureau)

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(b) FOREIGN LABOUR Uneven Job Recovery Poses Challenges to most Countries - As the global economy continues a slow recovery from the financial crisis, most emerging and developing countries are experiencing rising employment and narrowing income inequalities compared to their highincome counterparts. However, the gap between rich and poor in most low and middle-income countries remains wide. Many families who have managed to rise above the poverty line are at risk of lapsing back. By contrast, income inequalities have increased in advanced economies over the past two years, against the backdrop of increasing global unemployment predicted to rise from the current 200 million to nearly 208 million by 2015. According to the ILOs World of Work report 2013 Repairing the economic and social fabric, income inequalities rose between 2010 and 2011 in 14 of the 26 advanced economies surveyed, including France, Denmark, Spain and the United States. Inequality levels in seven of the remaining 12 countries were still higher than before the start of the crisis. Economic inequalities are also on the rise, as small firms lag behind their larger counterparts in terms of profits and productive investment. While most large enterprises have regained access to capital markets, start-ups and small enterprises are disproportionately affected by bank credit conditions. This is a problem for job recovery now and affects economic prospects over the longer term. The report shows that middle-income groups in many advanced economies are shrinking, fuelled in part, by long-term unemployment, weakening job quality and workers dropping out of the labour market altogether. The report also shows how productive investment, minimum wages and social protection have contributed to reducing poverty and inequality in countries like Brazil, Costa Rica, India, Indonesia, Turkey and Viet Nam. (ILO News, 03.06.2013) Hiring Outlook: US Scores, India Slips - More employers in the US plan to hire workers next quarter than in any period since the fourth quarter of 2008, according to a survey by Manpower Group. Manpower's quarterly survey found that most employers around the globe were uncertain about hiring workers in the July through September period given tepid consumer demand. Manpower, which surveyed 42 economies, found that employers in 31 countries and territories planned to hire next quarter. Hiring intentions strengthened in 17 economies, including Spain, Greece and the US, compared to the previous quarter. Hiring outlook weakened in most of AsiaPacific, most significantly in India, which reported the weakest expectations since joining Manpower's survey eight years ago. While none of the Indian employers surveyed by Manpower said they intended to reduce their workforce this quarter, hiring expectations dropped 6 points from the previous quarter and 28 points from a year earlier to a plus-18. (The Financial Express, 12.06.2013) Child Domestic Workers Suffer from Statistical Invisibility, says ILO - The world over, around 15 million children work as paid or unpaid domestic workers, of which at least 10.5 million are below the legal minimum age, according to an International Labour Organization (ILO) report titled Ending Child Labour in Domestic Work , released on the occasion of World Day Against Child Labour. These children work under conditions either hazardous or tantamount to slavery says the report. Not surprisingly, in these slavery -like conditions where physical, mental and sexual abuse is rampant the report establishes through individual case studies from across the world girls far outnumber boys. In fact, 71.3 per cent of children employed between the ages of five and 17 in domestic work are girls (2008 statistics). The report looks at the many factors that contribute to the abusive situation around domestic child labour; 805

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the vulnerability to physical and sexual abuse, the impact on health, how they move far from their homes and families leading to isolation and discrimination. Significantly, the ILO observes that this sector in general suffers from statistical invisibility, and emphasises the need to work toward collecting data on child labour, an imperative to policy-making. This, it notes, has hindered action in this sector. The ILO recommends stepping up research efforts particularly by public institutions to improve methodologies to capture and monitor the number of child domestic workers and working conditions, with a focus on those at the bottom rung. The ILO reiterates the role of governments in providing more accessible and quality education. (The Hindu, 13.06.2013) China, Euro Zone Threaten U.S.-Led Economic Recovery - Factory output in China, the world's second largest economy, weakened to a nine-month low in June, combining with a continued recession in the euro zone to threaten a global recovery led by the United States. Faltering demand pushed the flash China HSBC Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) down to 48.3 in June from 49.2, increasing pressure on the People's Bank of China to loosen the monetary reins. Meanwhile, Markit's Flash Eurozone Composite PMI, which is seen as a reliable economic growth indicator for the bloc, remained below the dividing line between growth and contraction. It did, however, rise to 48.9 in June from May's 47.7, suggesting the decay has eased across the 17-nation bloc. China's economy grew at its slowest pace for 13 years in 2012 and data so far this year has been weaker than forecast, bringing warnings the country could miss its 7.5 percent growth target, though possibly not by much. It stands in contrast with U.S. data, which has been generally positive. The euro zone PMI was at its highest since March 2012, and beat forecasts in a Reuters poll of 23 economists for a more modest upturn to 48.1. But the index has been below the 50 mark dividing growth from contraction for all apart from one of the last 22 months. Markit, however, said the latest PMI data suggested the economy would contract 0.2 percent in the current quarter. The European Central Bank has come under growing heat to take more action to help bring a quicker end to the bloc's longest recession, but economists polled by Reuters last month did not predict any easing of policy in coming months. (The Indian Express, 20.06.2013) Australias Visa Proposal is Bad News for Indian IT Companies - Battling protectionist measures in the US, Indian IT players may now have to probably face a similar situation in Australia where the government is planning to place curbs on visas used by highly skilled foreign workforce. The Labour party-led government is planning to introduce a new Bill where there will be tightening of the regulatory regime governing the employment of non-citizens through the '457 visa scheme'. This would essentially ask Australian businesses to make every effort to employ citizens first before hiring foreign professionals. This could have a bearing on Indian IT firms operating in Australia. However, according to the Australian Information Industry Association (AIIA), 457 visa arrangements are used legitimately by the information and communications technology (ICT) sector to meet a genuine gap that exists between the domestic supply and demand of ICT skills. Individuals, who hold 457 visas, not only fill real and immediate needs within ICT organisations, but also make a significant and positive contribution to the Australian economy. According to the Australian government's department of immigration and citizenship, 457 visa allows eligible employers to address skills shortages that cannot be filled from the local labour market. The subclass 457 visa is the most commonly used Australian visa program to sponsor overseas skilled workers on a temporary basis. Over the last several months, the $76-billion Indian IT-export industry has been fighting against the protectionist 806

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stance in the US. The big concern for the Indian IT sector has always been on restricting the number of H-1B visas with a view generally expressed in the US that it is taking away local jobs. (The Financial Express, 24.06.2013) US Senate Passes Anti-India Immigration Bill - The United States senate has passed an immigration reform Bill that makes it harder and costlier for Indian tech firms to use H-1B workers at their US operations. But the Bill is not law yet, and it may never become one in its present form because the House of Representatives, the other chamber of US Congress, is considering its own set of bills. And they dont tally with the senate version. In its present shape, the bill is bad news for India. And not only because of its impact on firms such as Infosys, Wipro and TCS. But also because it may trigger brain drain from India. Vice-president Joe Biden, who is also the president of the Senate, presided at the voting, signaling the Bills importance to the Obama administration. The bill has three central themes: strengthening border security, citizenship for 11 million illegals, and legal immigration revamp to expand talent pool and keep American jobs home. The third part, which seeks to overhaul the H-1B and L-1 visa programmes for highly skilled foreign workers, hits Indian tech firms such as Infosys, TCS and Wipro directly. They depend heavily on foreign workers, mostly from India. But they will find it increasingly difficult and costlier. And from 2016, they will have to maintain a 50-50 balance. The bill also seeks to fast-track permanent residency -- Green Card -- for foreign students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math courses to keep them in the US. This will, one, encourage Indian students, who are the second largest component of foreign students in the US, to come to the US and stay, depriving India of their skills. And, two, discourage those in the US from thinking of returning home, a trend that had begun picking up recently specially for those stuck in the immigrations system. (Hindustan Times, 28.06.2013)

An ounce of practice is worth more than tons of preaching. -Mahatma Gandhi

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LABOUR DECISIONS

Termination on account of medical unfitness - In this case, the appellant, Sohan Lal, employed as a regular driver in the Haryana Roadways was removed/terminated from service on ground of medical unfitness as he sustained certain injuries as a result of a road accident. The appellant raised an industrial dispute on the issue of his termination/retirement under Section 10 (1) of the Industrial Disputes Act, 1947. The claim of the workman was rejected by the learned Labour Court as it was observed that the respondent had made an attempt to find an alternative job to the workman and was also paid all retiral benefits as well as additional compensation in accordance with the decision of the Supreme Court in Anand Bihari & Ors. Vs. Rajasthan State Road Transport Corporation, Jaipur & Anr. [AIR 1991 Supreme Court 1003]. Aggrieved by the said award, the appellant filed a writ petition before the High Court. The same having been dismissed by the High Court, the present appeal has been filed. Following the judgment of the Supreme Court in Anand Bihari (supra), a scheme engrafting the essential parameters prescribed by the Court had been brought into force in the State of Haryana by a Memorandum, which creates an obligation on the employer (Haryana Roadways) to find suitable alternative employment for an employee proposed to be discharged on the ground of medical disability if such disability is attributable to the service rendered. If such alternative employment cannot be provided, additional compensation at the rate prescribed by the Court is required to be paid to the concerned employee. In the present case, the order by which the service of the appellant has been dispensed with clearly shows that no alternative employment was available under the General Manager of Haryana Roadways commensurate with the qualifications and skills of the appellant and accordingly additional compensation was paid to the appellant. The materials on record further showed that the superannuation of the appellant, if he had continued in service, was due on 30.09.2004. The applicability of the provisions of Section 47 of the Persons with Disabilities (Equal Opportunities, Protection of Rights and Full Participation) Act, 1995 to the case of the appellant was also rejected in view of the percentage of disability reported as 10% was far below the percentage prescribed/defined (not less than 40%) under Section 2(t) of the Act. Taking into account the totality of the facts of the present case, the Supreme Court was of the view that the award of the learned Labour Court dated 27.02.2004 affirmed by the High Court by its order dated 22.08.2005 will not require any interference. Accordingly, the appeal was dismissed. ( Sohan Lal v. State of Haryana & Ors.; Current Labour Reports, June, 2013, pp.321-324 )

A nation' s strength ultimately consists in what it can do on its own, and not in what it can borrow from others. -Indira Gandhi

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LABOUR LITERATURE

IMPORTANT ARTICLES OF LABOUR INTEREST PUBLISHED IN THE PERIODICALS AND NEWSPAPERS RECEIVED IN THE LABOUR BUREAU EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT Hedva SARFATI Saritha Rai Anumeha Chaturvedi & Rahul Sachitanand LEAVE AND HOURS OF WORK Richard N. BLOCK, Joo-Young PARK and Young-Hee KANG

Coping with the Unemployment Crisis in Europe; International Labour Review, Vol.152, March, 2013; pp. 145-156. From Unemployment to Innovation; The Indian Express, dated 24th June, 2013; p. 11. The Workforce in the Cloud; The Financial Express, dated 3rd June, 2013; p. 4. A Million Engineers, But Where are the Jobs? The Economic Times, dated 18th June, 2013; p. 14. Statutory Leave Entitlements Across Developed Countries: Why US Workers Lose Out on Work-Family Balance; International Labour Review, Vol.152, March, 2013; pp. 125-143.

LABOUR LAWS AND REGULATIONS Akira Kawaguchi

Akira Wakisaka Nicole BUSBY

Manish Sabharwal OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Naroo Lee Howard Morris

Equal Employment Opportunity Act and Work-Life Balance: Do Work-Family Balance Policies Contribute to Achieving Gender Equality? Japan Labor Review, Vol. 10, No.2, Spring 2013; pp. 35-56. Changes in Human Resource Management of Women after the 1985 Equal Employment Opportunity Act; ibid. pp. 57-81. A Right to Care? Unpaid Care Work in European Employment Law; International Labour Review, Vol.152, March, 2013; pp.157-160. The Youth Unemployment Bill; The Indian Express, dated 26th June, 2013; p.11.

Nanotechnology and Occupational Health in Korea; Asian-Pacific Newsletter,Vol.19, No.3, December, 2012; pp. 60-61. Safe Work Australias Work on Nanotechnology Work Health and Safety; ibid. pp. 62-65.

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Vladimir Murashov WAGES Jakob De Haan, Erik Dietzenbacher, Van Ha Le UNORGANISED LABOUR Jerome Joseph & Srinath Jagannathan

WHO Guidelines on Nanomaterials and Workers Health; ibid. pp. 66-67. High Wages may Reduce Corruption; The Financial Express, dated 18th June, 2013; p. 7. Three Representations of Insecurity in Three Narratives of Unorganized Workers; The Indian Journal of Industrial Relations, Vol.48, No.3, January, 2013; pp. 450-459. Social Protection of the Workers in the Unorganised Sector; The Indian Journal of Industrial Relations, Vol.48, No.3, January, 2013; pp.460-470. Hope to Despair: The Experience of Organizing Indian Call Centre Employees; The Indian Journal of Industrial Relations, Vol.48, No.3, January, 2013; pp.471-486. From Labour-Intensive to Capital-Heavy; The Financial Express, dated 7th June, 2013; p. 11. Tech can Improve Literacy Skills in Rural India; The Financial Express, dated 17th June, 2013; p. 9. Markets Labour Pain; The Economic Times dated 24th June, 2013; p.10. The Changing Face of Rural India; The Financial Express, dated 30th June, 2013; p. 7.

SOCIAL SECURITY R.K.A.Subrahmanya

MISCELLANEOUS Premilla D Cruz & Ernesto Noronha

Chetan Tamboli Aravind Sitaraman Arvind Panagariya Rajesh Shukla

Don't compromise yourself. You are all you've got. -Janis Joplin

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STATISTICS Section A

MONTHLY STATISTICS
Pages Notes 1. Prices and Price Indices 1.1. Industrial Workers Consumer Price Index Table A.1.1.1. Table A.1.1.2. Labour Bureaus Series of All-India Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers (Base : 2001=100) Labour Bureaus Series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers in respect of 78 constituent centres (Base: 2001=100) Average Monthly Consumer Prices of Selected Articles for Industrial Workers 1.2. Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural and Rural Labourers Table A.1.2.1(a) and (b) Table A.1.2.2(a) and (b) Labour Bureaus Series of All-India Average Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural and Rural Labourers (Base : 198687=100) Group- wise and General Average Monthly Consumer Prices of Selected Articles for Agricultural and Rural Labourers (Base : 1986-87 =100) 2. Wages and Earnings Table A 2.1.(a) and (b) Average Daily Wage Rates for Agricultural & Non-Agricultural Occupations in Rural India 3. Industrial Disputes Table A 3.1.Table A 3.2.Sector/Sphere-wise Number of Disputes, Workers Involved and Mandays Lost due to Industrial Disputes State-wise Industrial Disputes (All Strikes and Lockouts) 853 854 845 834 815 816 813

Table A.1.1.3.

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Section B

SERIAL STATISTICS
Notes 1. Prices and Price Indices 1.1. Industrial Workers Consumer Price Index Table B.1.1.1 Table B.1.1.2 All India Average Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers (Base 2001=100) Labour Bureaus Series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrials Workers (Base : 2001=100) 1.2. Agricultural Labourers Consumer Price Index Table B. 1.2.1 (a) and (b) Table B.1.2.2 (a) and (b) All-India Average Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural Labourers (General & Food) (Base 1986-87=100) Labour Bureaus Series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural Labourers (General Index on Base : 1986-87=100) 1.3. Urban Non-Manual Employees Consumer Price Index Table B. 1.3. All India Consumer Price Index Numbers for Urban Non-Manual Employees/Consumer Price Index for Urban and rural Areas 1.4. Wholesale Price Index Table B.1.4. All-India Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices- New Series 2. Wages And Earnings Table B.2.1. Earnings (Basic Wage and Dearness Allowances) of the LowestPaid Workers/Operatives in Cotton Textile Mills 3. Industrial Disputes Table B. 3.1. Industrial Disputes (All Strikes and Lockouts) 883 881 878 877 869 871 857 858 Pages 855

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SECTION A MONTHLY STATISTICS Notes 1. 1. 1. Prices and Price Indices Industrial Workers Consumer Price Index

1. 1. Industrial Workers Consumer Price Index A.1.1.1. Labour Bureaus Series of All India Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers (Base: 2001=100) The All-India Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers on Base : 2001=100 General and Group-wise along with Linking Factors with previous base: 1982=100 are presented in Table A.1.1.1. The All India Index is a weighted average of 78 constituent centre Indices compiled by the Labour Bureau. The current series of the Index Numbers has been introduced with effect from January, 2006 index replacing the series on base: 1982=100. The All India General Index as well as Group Indices for previous series on base:1982=100 can be obtained by multiplying the current series indices by the respective Linking Factors. A note on the scope and methods of construction of these index numbers was published in April 2006 issue of the Indian Labour Journal. The All India Consumer Price Index Number for the month of May, 2013 increased by 2 point and stood at 228. A.1.1.2. Labour Bureaus Series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers in respect of 78 constituent centres on Base: 2001=100 The Consumer Price Index Numbers for industrial workers on Base: 2001=100 for 78 centres compiled by the Labour Bureau are presented group wise in Table A.1.1.2 for the months of April, 2013 and May, 2013. The Index Numbers measure the extent to which the overall levels of retail prices of goods and services consumed by Industrial Workers has changed when compared with the base period viz., 2001=100. As compared to the previous month the magnitude of rise/fall in the General Index varies from centre to centre. During May, 2013, the index recorded an increase of 8 points in Nagpur and Chennai centres followed by Nasik (7 points) and Warrangal, Coonoor, Hubli-Dharwar, Madurai and Tripura (6 Points each). Among others, 2 centres have recorded rise of 5 points followed by 4 points in 14 centres, 3 points in 6 centres and 2 points in 12 centres and 1 point in 12 centres. Delhi centre reported a decline of 6, 5 points in Ghaziabad, 4 points in Srinagar, and 3 points in 2 centres and 2 points in 2centres and 1 point in 7 centres. The remaining 10 centres indices remained stationary. A 1.1.3. Average Monthly Consumer Prices of Selected Articles for Industrial Workers The average monthly consumer prices of selected articles based on individual quotations obtained from the selected outlets which are utilised in the compilation of Consumer Price Index Numbers (Base: 2001=100) for Industrial Workers for 78 centres for the month of May, 2013 are set out in Table A.1.1.3. The prices reported in the table are averages of open markets prices of specified varieties of an item prevailing in the selected outlets in the selected market(s) in a given centre during the month in case of non-rationed items. So far as rationed items are concerned, the prices for the centres covered under informal rationing are the weighted average prices, the weights being the proportion of the quantity available through Public Distribution System and quantity procured from the open market in different centres in relation to base year requirements of an average family. In case of centres covered under Statutory Rationing the prices are average of the fair prices of variety (ies) of an item distributed through Fair Price Shops 1.2 Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural and Rural Labourers: A.1.2.1 (a) and (b) Labour Bureaus Series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural and Rural Labourers on Base: 1986-87=100 - All-India Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural and Rural Labourers on Base: 1986-87=100 replacing the earlier series on base 1960-61=100 were released with effect from November, 1995. The all-India index is a weighted average of 20 constituent State indices compiled by the Labour Bureau for Agricultural and

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Rural Labourers separately. A detailed note on the scope and method of construction of these indices was published in February, 1996 issue of the Indian Labour Journal. The Consumer Price Index Numbers (Base: 1986-87=100) for Agricultural and Rural Labourers for 20 States and All-India are presented group-wise in Tables A.1.2.1 (a) and (b) for the months of April, 2013 and May, 2013. These index numbers measure the extent of change in the retail prices of goods and services consumed by Agricultural and Rural Labourers as compared with the base period viz., 1986-87. The All-India Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural Labourers and Rural Labourers on base 1986-87=100 for May, 2013 increased by 8 points and 9 points respectively to stand at 719 (Seven hundred and nineteen ) points for Agricultural Labourers and 720 (Seven hundred and twenty) points for Rural Labourers. A.1.2.2 (a) and (b) Monthly Consumer Prices of Selected Articles for Agricultural and Rural Labourers The monthly consumer prices of selected articles of index basket of agricultural and rural labourers utilised in the compilation of Consumer Price Index Numbers (Base: 1986-87=100) for 20 States separately for Agricultural and Rural Labourers for the month of May, 2013 are given in Tables A.1.2.2. (a) and (b). Though the spatial coverage and the individual sample village price quotations in both the series relating to the Agricultural and Rural Labourers are the same, the weighted prices of items at the State level will be slightly different from each other due to difference in the regional weights in each of the series. 2 Wages and Earnings A.2.1 (a) and (b) Average Daily Wage Rates for Agricultural and Non-agricultural Occupations As a part of Rural Labour Enquiry, daily wage rates in respect of eighteen agricultural and nonagricultural occupations from a fixed set of 600 sample villages spread over 66 N.S.S. regions in 20 States are being collected alongwith rural retail price data in Schedule 3.01 (R) by the Field Operations Division of the National Sample Survey Organisation since 1986-87. On the recommendations of the Governing Council of the National Sample Survey Organisation in its 61st meeting, Labour Bureau started the compilation and analysis of Wage Rate Data w.e.f. April, 1998. State-wise and all-India average daily wage rates by occupation and sex for the month of May,2013 have been presented in Table A.2.1 (a) for agricultural occupations and Table A.2.1 (b) for non- agricultural occupations. The average wage rates at all-India level are derived by dividing the sum total of wages of all the 20 States by the number of quotations. State-wise averages have been restricted only to those occupations where the number of quotations are five or more in order to avoid inconsistency in wages paid to different categories of workers on account of difference in number of quotations. However, for working out all-India averages all the quotations have been taken into account to arrive at total number of quotations at all-India level. At all-India level also, the number of quotations for working out occupation-wise averages have been restricted to five or more. 3 Industrial Dispute A.3.1 Sector / Sphere-wise Number of Disputes, Workers Involved and Mandays Lost due to Industrial Disputes during January to May, 2013 These statistics are received in the Bureau from the State Labour Departments and Regional Labour Commissioners (Central) in the prescribed format in the shape of monthly voluntary returns covering State and Central Spheres separately. Information on Strikes and Lockouts is collected by the concerned authorities and sent to the Bureau every month. Consolidated information for the year 2013 (As on 28-06-2013) is presented in Table A.3.1. A.3.2. Industrial Disputes (All Strikes and Lockouts) during January to April, 201 3- State-wise scenario of Industrial Disputes during January to May, 2013 is presented in Table A.3.2. NOTES 1. Labour Bureau takes every care to ensure correctness of the information presented in Sections A and B of the Journal. However, any error, if noticed, may kindly be brought to the notice of the Labour Bureau. 2. The indices given in Sections A and B measure the relative change in Consumer Prices over time at each Centre and as such these cannot be used for comparison of costliness among the different Centres.

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1.
1.1.

PRICES AND PRICE INDICES


Industrial Workers Consumer Price Index

Table A.1.1.1. Labour Bureaus Series of All India Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers on base 2001=100 (Group-wise and General)

Index General I-A Food I-B Pan, Supari, Tobacco and Intoxicants II III IV V Fuel and Light Housing Clothing, Bedding and Footwear Miscellaneous

Linking Factor 4.63 4.58 6.16 4.77 6.18 3.22 4.55

April, 2013 226 245 240 222 246 177 191

May, 2013 228 248 242 223 246 178 190

Linking Factor: The All-India General Index as well as Group Indices for previous series on base: 1982=100 can be obtained by multiplying the current series indices by the respective Linking Factors.

Only those who dare to fail greatly can achieve greatly. -Robert F. Kenned

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Table A.1.1.2 Labour Bureaus Series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Sl. No State/Union Territory/ Centre Linking factor for General Index with previous base 1982=100 3 N 4.57 4.79 N 4.64 4.75 4.04 4.80 3.65 4.01 4.17 4.30 5.26 4.20 5.60 5.59 4.62 4.76 4.38 4.54 4.39 General Index Food Index

1 2 ANDHRA PRADESH 1 Godavarikhani 2 Guntur 3 Hyderabad 4 Vijayawada 5 Visakhapatnam 6 Warrangal ASSAM 7 Doom-Dooma 8 Tinsukia Guwahati 9 Labac-Silchar 10 Mariani-Jorhat 11 Rangapara-Tezpur BIHAR 12 Monghyr-Jamalpur CHANDIGARH 13 Chandigarh CHHATTISGARH 14 Bhilai DELHI 15 Delhi GOA 16 Goa GUJARAT 17 Ahmedabad 18 Bhavnagar 19 Rajkot 20 Surat 21 Vadodra

Apr., 2013 4 233 223 202 230 227 239 189 191 204 191 180 230 226 257 206 247 226 219 230 211 210

May, 2013 5 235 227 206 234 231 245 189 193 208 192 180 232 226 261 200 251 227 218 230 212 215

Apr., 2013 6 250 245 241 266 252 271 190 197 208 191 194 231 245 250 222 289 254 230 253 248 233

May, 2013 7 252 252 251 273 262 282 191 201 215 192 194 235 246 256 214 298 258 228 253 250 241

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Workers (Group-wise & General 2001=100) Pan. Supari, Tobacco and Intoxicants Index Apr., May, 2013 2013 8 9 188 296 246 294 228 222 228 212 258 235 166 266 238 250 220 186 362 183 254 298 272 191 296 246 290 228 225 206 212 249 232 166 266 245 253 220 186 362 183 254 310 291 Fuel & Light Index Apr., 2013 10 169 243 146 157 151 155 165 190 186 247 154 255 202 196 218 193 156 153 156 145 163 May, 2013 11 169 243 147 157 151 158 164 191 182 247 154 254 202 196 220 193 156 153 156 146 164 Housing Index Clothing, Bedding & Footwear Index Apr., 2013 14 191 180 147 209 209 170 175 188 183 162 235 186 197 156 192 209 171 188 158 153 129 May, 2013 15 194 180 147 220 213 170 175 188 183 162 235 186 199 156 192 209 171 188 158 153 134 Misc. Index

Apr., 2013 12 335 180 182 199 311 257 183 185 174 124 101 282 283 504 187 242 202 247 244 187 218

May, 2013 13 335 180 182 199 311 257 183 185 174 124 101 282 283 504 187 242 202 247 244 187 218

Apr., 2013 16 181 177 176 189 179 206 192 183 201 213 196 214 154 190 190 206 213 193 195 188 193

May, 2013 17 180 177 176 190 177 207 192 184 201 213 197 212 154 190 180 205 213 192 194 187 195

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table A.1.1.2. Contd. Sl. State/Union Territory / No Centre Linking factor for General Index with previous base 1982=100 3 General Index Food Index

1 HARYANA 22 Faridabad 23 Yamunanagar

Apr., 2013 4 219 230 201 199 220 272 243 253 249 257 236 239 239 236 239 221 246 230

May, 2013 5 219 227 205 195 219 272 246 253 253 258 237 241 245 239 243 222 251 231

Apr., 2013 6 238 251 216 203 218 271 220 243 229 231 271 277 262 258 277 255 270 246

May, 2013 7 246 251 221 199 217 262 228 244 236 235 274 280 274 263 284 259 279 247

4.79 4.34 4.53 5.62 N N 4.23 3.72 3.89 4.20 4.51 5.02 4.71 4.47 N 4.52 4.37 4.61

HIMACHAL PRADESH 24 Himachal Pradesh JAMMU & KASHMIR 25 Srinagar JHARKHAND 26 Bokaro 27 Giridih 28 Jamshedpur 29 Jharia 30 Kodarma 31 Ranchi-Hatia KARNATAKA 32 Bangalore 33 Belgaum 34 Hubli-Dharwar 35 Mercara 36 Mysore KERALA 37 Ernakulam 38 Mundakayam 39 Quilon

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Pan, Supari, Tobacco and Intoxicants Index Apr., May, 2013 2013 8 9 214 277 241 220 277 243

Fuel & Light Index Apr., 2013 10 174 183 203 May, 2013 11 188 191 217

Housing Index

Clothing, Bedding & Footwear Index Apr., 2013 14 168 188 199 May, 2013 15 168 188 211

Misc. Index

Apr., 2013 12 223 239 183

May, 2013 13 223 239 183

Apr., 2013 16 211 208 179

May, 2013 17 185 190 180

318 169 156 230 264 225 226 215 221 214 187 266 223 246 267

318 169 163 230 264 225 226 230 224 221 187 266 224 247 266

235 356 619 253 379 441 244 172 186 185 340 188 170 399 229

235 356 672 252 379 446 243 168 186 186 342 188 164 397 229

165 316 289 429 379 247 471 212 219 263 101 239 193 113 221

165 316 289 429 379 247 471 212 219 263 101 239 193 113 221

238 198 224 175 223 200 193 145 163 149 179 165 181 195 170

238 198 235 175 223 200 193 144 163 150 179 164 181 195 170

188 168 184 175 209 190 205 234 199 214 234 193 210 207 204

177 166 189 173 207 190 205 230 199 212 234 193 211 207 203

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Table A.1.1.2. Contd. Sl. State/Union Territory/ No Centre

Linking factor for General Index with previous base 1982=100 3 4.83 4.03 4.73 4.53 5.18 4.68 4.94 4.96 4.73 N 4.03 4.88 4.09 N 4.12 4.78 4.62 4.25 4.95 4.49

General Index Apr., 2013 4 231 234 218 225 229 256 235 230 233 233 237 234 238 222 217 230 231 225 210 213 May, 2013 5 233 237 220 228 231 264 242 232 234 235 241 237 236 219 216 229 230 224 218 216

Food Index Apr., 2013 6 242 251 251 248 245 259 243 261 243 229 249 289 256 247 247 264 263 243 240 245 May, 2013 7 246 254 254 254 248 277 257 266 246 233 255 297 254 241 247 260 261 241 257 252

1 40 Bhopal 41 Chhindwara 42 Indore 43 Jabalpur

MADHYA PRADESH

MAHARASHTRA 44 Mumbai 45 Nagpur 46 Nasik 47 Pune 48 Solapur ORISSA 49 Angul-Talcher 50 Rourkela PUDUCHERRY 51 Pondicherry PUNJAB 52 Amritsar 53 Jalandhar 54 Ludhiana RAJASTHAN 55 Ajmer 56 Bhilwara 57 Jaipur TAMIL NADU 58 Chennai 59 Coimbatore

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Pan, Supari, TobaccoMay, and Apr., Intoxicants Index 2013 2013 8 273 247 266 289 242 273 225 242 260 265 197 244 246 221 238 295 267 238 285 242 9 274 254 266 290 244 281 237 249 260 265 197 244 246 221 241 295 267 238 285 245

Fuel & Light Index Apr., May, 2013 2013 10 11 217 348 228 224 265 220 212 210 221 254 202 209 213 234 199 231 272 207 181 183 218 343 228 224 260 216 208 205 218 254 202 208 214 234 199 232 273 207 181 183

Housing Index Apr., May, 2013 2013 12 13 283 210 176 286 212 367 315 206 263 341 347 153 290 220 179 250 187 220 181 179 283 210 176 286 212 367 315 206 263 341 347 153 290 220 179 250 187 220 181 179

Clothing, Bedding & Apr., Footwear May, Index 2013 2013 14 15 155 134 151 124 186 179 171 204 191 185 194 168 184 180 209 182 160 180 165 164 155 156 151 124 186 179 174 210 191 185 194 168 184 180 209 183 160 180 165 166

Misc. Index Apr., May, 2013 2013 16 17 193 195 199 189 207 194 183 211 200 183 173 204 181 191 192 182 182 208 190 197 194 196 202 189 207 194 184 211 200 182 172 203 180 190 192 181 182 207 191 197

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table A.1.1.2. Concld. Sl. No State/Union Territory Centre Linking factor for General Index with previous base 1982=100 3 4.58 4.51 4.45 5.01 General Index Apr., 2013 4 220 212 213 229 May, 2013 5 226 218 217 230 Food Index Apr., 2013 6 237 249 237 262 May, 2013 7 250 261 245 265

1 60 Coonoor 61 Madurai 62 Salem

63 Tiruchirapally TRIPURA 64 Tripura UTTAR PRADESH 65 Agra 66 Ghaziabad 67 Kanpur 68 Lucknow 69 Varanasi WEST BENGAL 70 Asansol 71 Darjeeling 72 Durgapur 73 Haldia 74 Howrah 75 Jalpaiguri 76 Kolkata 77 Raniganj 78 Siliguri

4.17

184

190

186

194

4.36 4.78 4.50 N 4.96

233 228 228 220 223

235 223 230 219 221

236 253 240 248 247

240 237 245 241 241

4.37 3.80 5.13 5.64 5.42 3.96 5.12 4.02 N

247 211 255 226 212 212 214 207 208

248 211 256 228 213 212 218 211 208

238 229 228 223 237 224 237 231 235

239 229 231 228 239 224 243 236 235

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Pan, Supari, Tobacco and Intoxicants Index Apr., May, 2013 2013 8 9

Fuel & Light Index Apr., 2013 10 May, 2013 11

Housing Index

Clothing, Bedding & Footwear Index Apr., 2013 14 May, 2013 15

Misc. Index

Apr., 2013 12

May, 2013 13

Apr., 2013 16

May, 2013 17

240 265 304 264

245 292 304 265

201 174 178 179

201 173 178 179

290 147 148 254

290 147 148 254

154 169 158 152

156 177 158 152

181 194 195 180

181 193 195 179

270

286

243

243

121

121

156

156

185

185

252 232 240 228 217

260 232 243 246 217

221 198 205 197 226

215 200 208 204 229

357 258 334 296 283

357 258 334 296 283

176 200 188 177 159

178 200 188 183 159

173 185 169 154 170

176 185 169 157 169

227 172 233 269 278 228 267 164 152

227 172 235 271 278 228 267 169 152

384 277 236 195 250 279 227 238 253

384 277 236 216 251 279 233 247 253

377 107 599 291 198 104 188 189 103

377 107 599 291 198 104 188 189 103

192 185 192 154 176 173 201 172 156

192 185 192 154 176 173 201 172 156

182 177 184 155 153 183 172 155 170

181 177 184 156 153 183 173 158 170

N- New Centre in the New Series on base: 2001=100.

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Table A.1.1.3-Average Monthly Consumer Prices of Selected Articles for Industrial Workers, May, 2013
Sl. No 1 2 3 Article Unit

Godavri Guntur khani


4 5

Hydera Vijayawada Vishakha Warran patnam gal bad 6 7 8 9

1 2

Rice Wheat: a. Wheat Whole b. Wheat Atta

Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Litre Litre Litre Kg. Kg. Litre Litre Litre Kg. 100 gms. Kg. Kg. 100gms 40 Kg. 40 Kg. Litre 75gms. 225 gms..

23.98 25.50 26.25 75.75 84.30 57.80 120.50 320.00 162.00 30.00 17.60 9.00 37.89 29.00 200.00 15.00 15.19 9.56

36.53 36.00 69.00 130.00 40.00 34.00 16.10 7.60 36.46 41.00 15.00 15.75 11.70

28.58 28.61 23.50 29.58 71.67 85.43 59.93 93.20 49.98 32.66 15.93 7.83 35.00 47.83 32.27 15.00 15.50 12.90

37.56 30.00 71.00 75.75 104.93 440.00 110.00 40.00 34.00 273.00 16.50 15.00 37.36 43.50 42.50 400.00 15.00 12.30 13.95

34.99 26.99 40.50 82.00 88.85 126.47 68.00 440.00 95.00 39.00 34.00 191.10 15.85 10.13 40.71 44.80 42.25 240.00 15.00 15.75 14.06

27.42 29.18 39.30 74.70 82.85 56.70 104.08 410.00 40.00 16.60 8.60 36.35 41.75 200.00 15.00 12.45 13.50

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Jowar Arhar Dal Moong Dal Masur Dal Groundnut oil Mustard Oil Vanaspati Goat Meat/Mutton Fish Fresh Milk Dairy Milk Pure Ghee Onion Chillies Dry Sugar Gur Tea Leaf Fire Wood Soft Coke Kerosene Oil Toilet Soap Washing Soap

123.01 115.22

396.00 390.00

320.00 369.30

280.00 216.00

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Doom Dooma Tinsukia 10

Guwa hati 11

Labac Silchar 12

Mariani Jorhat 13

Rangapara Tezpur 14

Monghyr Jamalpur 15

Chandigarh Bhilai

16

17

13.92 5.05 66.67 88.33 65.00 100.00 90.67 273.33 140.00 33.33 20.83 10.67 19.50 60.00 16.00 113.34 16.00 12.60 25.20

22.33 27.58 80.00 89.00 58.00 110.00 100.00 300.00 165.00 40.00 20.00 16.25 23.40 22.00 160.00 15.00 11.54 24.37

12.38 4.61 66.20 80.30 77.70 117.00 350.00 162.50 41.50 25.00 14.80 14.00 62.50 22.00 150.00 15.00 12.60 15.00

13.28 4.90 71.75 84.00 71.00 108.75 98.50 280.00 260.00 36.00 20.00 12.00 22.75 21.00 150.00 15.00 12.60 13.23

12.83 4.47 82.00 72.00 120.00 290.00 177.50 35.00 20.00 12.00 15.50 50.00 30.00 120.00 16.00 12.60 13.23

25.07 15.35 18.40 79.20 87.20 57.40 92.82 75.00 320.00 124.00 35.00 325.00 13.60 25.00 36.80 40.00 33.20 320.00 460.00 16.47 15.75 13.23

29.33 22.00 75.00 80.00 67.83 95.00 66.67 320.00 110.00 32.00 33.00 305.00 26.67 26.33 37.33 44.00 32.80 14.75 16.50 8.33

20.84 21.44 22.00 # 70.00 80.00 56.00 152.06 78.44 67.00 300.00 100.00 36.00 # 310.00 16.00 12.00 31.74 40.00 33.60 240.00 # 14.95 15.00 10.47

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table A.1.1.3 Contd.


Sl. No 1 Article 2 Unit 3 Delhi 18 Goa Ahmedabad 19 20 Bhavnagar 21 22 23 Rajkot Surat

1 2

Rice Wheat: a. Wheat Whole b. Wheat Atta

Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Litre Litre Litre

14.38 7.71 13.99 73.36 85.53 60.76 142.50 110.00 68.43 329.19 124.38 35.43 32.00 298.09 19.66 29.50 35.20 38.50 32.25 531.25 14.96 13.13 13.00

23.39 21.52 24.95 35.42 77.42 87.50 61.53 170.00 147.42 85.03 367.67 207.22 39.00 38.00 315.00 20.47 22.17 34.52 44.28 25.33 386.68 # 15.63 15.75 25.20

30.27 21.94 24.83 # 71.58 77.32 60.80 118.71 98.92 64.61 300.00 # 38.40 38.00 310.00 20.35 21.60 35.96 48.70 31.20 282.50 # 14.00 15.00 10.47

31.04 20.10 25.33 # 72.80 78.53 56.67 134.07 # 74.00 200.00 100.00 35.00 42.00 320.01 20.00 21.33 34.56 36.33 30.40 160.00 # 14.45 15.75 22.81

29.70 20.56 25.00 # 75.00 75.00 # 150.00 109.20 71.76 340.00 160.00 36.00 34.00 289.60 19.17 18.00 36.38 45.00 30.00 200.00 # 14.21 15.00 9.75

32.73 22.76 25.40 32.84 71.88 78.60 60.00 131.95 109.20 70.32 315.00 150.00 42.00 38.00 315.00 15.48 20.16 35.33 44.24 32.00 246.66 # 14.05 15.00 22.50

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Jowar Arhar Dal Moong Dal Masur Dal Groundnut oil Mustard Oil Vanaspati Fish Fresh Milk Dairy Milk Pure Ghee Onion Chillies Dry Sugar Gur Tea Leaf Fire Wood Soft Coke Kerosene Oil Toilet Soap Washing Soap

Goat Meat/Mutton Kg. Kg. Litre Litre Litre Kg. 100 gms. Kg. Kg. 100gms 40 Kg. 40 Kg. Litre 75gms. 225 gms.

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Vadodara 24

Himachal Pradesh 25

Faridabad 26

Yamuna nagar 27

Srinagar 28

Bokaro 29

Giridih 30

Jamshedpur 31

29.71 21.27 26.00 20.00 62.67 78.67 52.00 117.39 # 80.00 340.00 140.00 38.00 36.00 315.00 20.00 21.00 34.57 48.00 31.20 320.00 # 14.32 15.00 19.80

18.87 15.55 13.91 75.41 77.51 58.84 150.80 112.79 67.86 262.43 172.00 30.44 35.00 298.21 17.60 25.64 21.98 36.71 34.32 225.00 14.46 15.75 11.51

30.00 17.92 18.98 76.90 79.10 60.60 80.08 65.00 288.00 119.25 43.20 29.00 289.60 20.80 20.00 32.25 37.80 32.50 360.00 14.00 14.32 10.35

32.50 17.81 19.84 70.00 83.40 60.00 82.26 60.20 270.50 98.00 35.00 34.00 300.00 19.50 20.00 33.52 34.00 32.00 320.00 13.90 16.50 10.80

16.50 19.24 78.73 66.60 111.07 78.07 325.33 157.33 27.00 274.51 23.00 27.00 13.50 35.20 162.33 356.00 17.00 15.00 9.00

23.76 18.00 20.25 65.00 78.00 46.00 110.00 85.00 340.00 120.00 30.00 30.00 310.00 13.75 16.00 36.25 40.00 37.60 480.00 350.00 15.14 15.75 14.07

24.15 25.00 22.00 70.00 76.25 58.00 102.00 78.00 350.00 140.00 32.00 316.75 18.00 22.00 39.00 38.00 39.20 257.50 247.50 14.49 15.75 22.50

22.12 18.85 21.85 71.70 82.25 52.00 152.00 92.10 76.80 332.50 115.50 35.00 32.00 330.00 17.20 24.00 36.80 38.65 33.00 200.00 440.00 14.06 15.75 13.23

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Table A.1.1.3 Contd.


Sl. No 1 Article Unit Jharia Kodarma 33 16.68 Ranchi Hatia 34 21.28 Bangalore Belgaum Hubli Dharwar 35 40.31 36 37.15 37 37.84 38 27.24 Mercara

32 23.94

1 2

Rice Wheat: a. Wheat Whole b. Wheat Atta

Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Litre Litre Litre Kg. Litre Litre Litre Kg. 100 gms. Kg. Kg. 100gms 40 Kg. 40 Kg. Litre 75gm 225 gms.

18.65 20.80 0.00 70.95 79.70 50.75 86.54 74.45 344.00 126.00 34.00 328.19 15.90 27.00 36.65 39.40 32.80 220.00 220.00 14.25 15.75 22.50

16.00 20.00 67.00 80.00 48.00 86.45 75.00 286.25 120.00 34.00 325.00 15.75 16.00 36.00 29.00 31.36 260.00 390.00 14.98 12.60 22.50

23.28 21.42 72.40 80.67 53.33 94.67 74.37 300.00 143.33 31.07 29.00 310.00 15.20 25.00 37.33 37.43 40.00 280.00 320.00 13.96 16.50 8.04

26.69 25.37 71.06 80.76 .84.69 74.29 376.88 132.83 27.27 24.00 294.00 17.54 11.60 37.03 51.25 30.75 203.52 16.10 15.75 13.50

24.28 0.00 26.50 71.63 70.50 55.25 97.29 78.75 340.00 157.50 42.00 28.00 304.00 16.15 15.00 32.43 38.25 30.00 232.00 16.00 15.75 13.73

26.27 0.00 24.88 75.00 72.38 58.00 92.08 65.03 345.00 100.00 45.00 29.00 304.00 15.75 18.50 33.89 41.38 22.50 250.00 15.70 15.75 7.51

21.81 35.75 76.75 81.40 113.75 93.88 345.00 161.88 27.00 22.44 8.00 39.47 40.00 25.00 160.00 16.78 17.50 13.50

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Jowar Arhar Dal Moong Dal Masur Dal


Groundnut oil

Mustard Oil Vanaspati Fish Fresh Milk Dairy Milk Pure Ghee Onion Chillies Dry Sugar Gur Tea Leaf Fire Wood Soft Coke Kerosene Oil Toilet Soap Washing Soap

10 Goat Meat/ Mutton Kg.

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Mysore 39

Ernakulam 40

Mundakayam 41

Quilon 42

Bhopal 43

Chhindwara 44

Indore 45

Jabalpur 46

Mumbai 47

41.37 28.59 29.50 75.25 80.38 60.75 135.00 65.00 340.00 60.00 30.00 27.00 304.00 42.50 10.00 35.05 51.00 30.00 220.00 15.80 15.75 16.20

27.65 13.45 36.00 77.40 76.50 400.00 144.00 35.50 35.00 345.00 60.80 8.68 34.10 47.90 27.00 96.00 16.00 17.25 14.40

34.18 20.46 31.11 67.38 82.21 61.13

27.60 6.36 25.00 70.50 73.10 116.00

32.75 16.88 19.00 # 80.00 84.00 54.00 160.00 110.00 65.00 320.00 200.00 45.00 38.00 320.00 19.33 15.00 33.67 40.00 35.20 291.00 # 15.51 16.50 24.30

24.00 17.52 20.00 # 66.00 71.00 50.00 168.50 100.00 85.00 280.00 100.00 30.00 32.00 307.70 17.50 14.50 34.50 31.80 35.20 240.00 # 16.46 15.75 9.00

24.19 24.82 20.25 # 72.00 81.88 60.00 145.00 90.00 63.44 340.00 150.00 34.00 36.00 320.00 12.13 15.00 32.34 40.00 35.20 240.00 # 15.19 15.00 23.40

21.74 20.56 20.00 # 64.20 81.60 52.60 152.00 101.50 70.00 284.00 126.00 44.00 34.00 322.18 16.18 15.00 36.60 32.80 32.59 182.00 # 14.86 15.75 25.20

33.09 25.12 # 33.37 79.39 85.16 61.78 140.19 99.87 100.03 352.75 533.00 50.84 29.00 315.00 19.11 20.29 38.68 56.23 36.36 # # 14.14 17.50 24.37

400.00 136.17 34.33

440.00 104.00 36.00 35.00

64.03 10.42 34.57 50.00 21.67 216.00 16.83 12.60 16.90

60.40 11.00 34.75 54.30 25.00 160.00 15.50 16.50 14.06

829

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table A.1.1.3 Contd.


Sl. No 1 Article 2 Unit 3 Nagpur 48 32.14 Nasik 49 26.47 Pune 50 37.50 Sholapur Angul- Rourkela Puducherry Talcher 51 27.28 52 21.72 53 26.92 54 40.82

1 2

Rice Wheat: a. Wheat Whole b. Wheat Atta

Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Litre Litre Litre Kg. Kg. Litre Litre Litre Kg. 100 gms. Kg. Kg. 100gms 40 Kg. 40 Kg. Litre 75gms 225 gms.

22.52 24.00 # 72.36 85.79 58.92 110.23 120.00 82.61 380.00 200.00 39.00 33.00 335.00 24.00 16.00 36.44 50.00 38.39 290.00 # 15.31 18.33 22.50

18.12 24.00 27.80 69.20 70.93 58.53 130.25 148.20 67.57 340.00 489.33 44.00 32.00 315.00 20.00 38.89 34.54 48.00 37.50 240.00 # 14.88 15.00 17.58

23.36 # 34.15 76.87 86.97 61.27 139.00 # 74.42 360.00 620.00 40.00 28.00 335.00 19.20 21.50 33.93 46.68 25.48 280.00 # 14.93 17.58 6.90

14.76 25.50 25.50 73.75 88.50 57.75 89.64 # 80.00 340.00 120.00 40.00 28.00 # 18.00 22.50 33.61 39.50 21.34

7.51 18.49 71.75 80.00 70.00 110.00 92.82 76.25 340.00 140.00 28.00 305.44 19.00 12.00 39.35 40.00 32.50

19.03 80.00 90.00 72.00 95.55 90.00 320.00 140.00 30.00 26.00 16.00 15.00 39.33 35.00 240.00 13.76 16.50 18.00

6.81 39.50 81.80 82.80 99.01 69.40 400.00 554.00 28.00 26.00 291.20 15.40 10.00 33.83 54.20 41.00 240.00 14.25 16.50 13.28

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Jowar Arhar Dal Moong Dal Masur Dal Groundnut oil Mustard Oil Vanaspati Goat Meat/Mutton Fish Fresh Milk Dairy Milk Pure Ghee Onion Chillies Dry Sugar Gur Tea Leaf Fire Wood Soft Coke Kerosene Oil Toilet Soap Washing Soap

280.00 240.00 # 15.20 15.75 25.20 220.00 14.21 15.75 22.50

830

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Amritsar Jalandhar Ludhiana Ajmer 55 56 57 58

Bhilwara 59

Jaipur 60

Chennai 61

Coimba- Coonoor tore 62 63

Madurai 64

23.84 19.23 75.00 80.00 70.00 105.00 60.64 300.00 200.00 35.00 300.00 15.60 25.00 35.72 32.00 320.00 14.65 13.50 11.25

24.00 12.72 18.77 70.00 82.00 65.00 105.00 65.00 310.00 155.00 35.00 33.00 300.00 15.00 25.00 37.00 34.80 280.00 14.90 13.13 9.00

24.00 20.00 _ 70.00 80.00 64.00 120.00 65.00 300.00 140.00 35.00 33.00 308.00 20.00 25.00 37.00 32.59 300.00 14.31 15.75 13.50

33.50 20.42 22.50 # 70.00 75.50 54.00 137.75 105.50 65.00 300.00 250.00 39.00 29.00 310.00 18.00 20.00 36.00 34.13 34.00 290.00 # 15.25 16.50 12.15

35.38 17.00 23.25 # 79.63 82.00 58.50 150.00 120.00 # 290.00 195.00 35.00 30.00 295.00 19.25 19.75 36.13 38.75 30.00 220.00 # 15.25 16.50 10.29

35.18 19.92 22.12 # 70.40 73.95 59.67 150.08 107.08 71.08 311.00 # 40.00 28.00 280.55 18.14 20.00 36.87 38.53 33.47 286.67 # 15.25 16.50 10.80

25.98 19.50 37.45 77.08 82.85 120.53 78.60 432.17 542.25 27.00 290.00 20.26 16.75 21.48 50.55 41.08 297.60 13.70 16.75 13.34

22.17 20.30 38.50 79.95 80.95 134.50 400.00 575.00 29.00 32.00 325.01 19.10 10.45 25.77 54.95 40.13 300.00 13.90 16.69 22.50

15.98 11.56 38.00 74.30 78.40 58.00 119.01 390.00 159.00 31.00 36.00 286.20 63.00 11.95 27.89 41.00 200.00 14.10 16.88 13.81

23.23 25.89 38.00 73.20 84.75 123.99 76.00 400.00 116.00 30.00 30.00 309.40 60.00 7.50 26.21 48.61 40.13 200.00 14.00 16.13 23.85

831

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table A.1.1.3 Concld.


Sl. No 1 Article 2 Unit 3 Salem 65 26.32 Tiruchira Tripura pally 66 21.68 67 15.49 Agra 68 Ghaziabad Kanpur 69 70 Lucknow 71

1 2

Rice Wheat: a. Wheat Whole b. Wheat Atta

Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Litre Litre Litre

23.74 15.21 18.40 72.40 78.72 60.00 70.07 65.00 269.60 150.00 36.00 35.00 320.00 16.00 24.40 34.87 38.00 34.80 280.00 14.92 13.13

28.00 6.64 18.64 72.00 75.00 60.00 80.00 65.00 320.00 120.00 40.00 37.36 330.00 20.00 24.00 34.60 35.00 32.80 320.00 15.25 15.00

31.33 12.51 18.87 70.88 85.00 55.93 79.21 61.90 320.00 124.08 38.00 30.00 302.66 16.58 15.46 34.51 39.80 33.26 355.50 520.00 15.63 15.00

27.98 14.39 20.00 75.00 80.30 59.00 95.00 65.00 340.00 160.00 38.00 36.32 324.00 18.00 24.00 36.42 39.70 32.80 314.00 15.15 15.75 24.75

19.01 34.00 70.05 77.50 106.34 380.00 544.00 30.00 27.00 58.20 10.07 15.16 40.50 144.00 14.00 16.50

22.87 37.00 70.50 72.50 60.00 108.60 400.00 61.88 32.00 30.00 290.00 19.50 8.95 20.93 62.38 41.50 160.00 13.90 17.25

11.63 80.40 76.80

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Jowar Arhar Dal Moong Dal Masur Dal Groundnut oil Mustard Oil Vanaspati Fish Fresh Milk Dairy Milk Pure Ghee Onion Chillies Dry Sugar Gur Tea Leaf Fire Wood Soft Coke Kerosene Oil Toilet Soap

96.60 405.00 154.50 33.40 20.10 20.20 20.56 52.10 19.20 122.00 14.68 12.60

Goat Meat/Mutton Kg. Kg. Litre Litre Litre Kg.


100 gms

Kg. Kg.
100gms 40 Kg. 40 Kg.

Litre 75gms

15.00 14.33 25.20 11.25 10.13 24 Washing Soap 225gms. 14.18 # Items do not feature in index basket of respective centres. Notes 1. The prices are average prices based on individual quotations obtained from selected outlets in a given centre and are not comparable between centres as they relate to different varieties of varying specifications.

832

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Varanasi Asansol Darjee- Durgaling pur 72 28.91 15.83 18.00 72.00 84.00 54.80 83.36 65.00 280.00 150.00 41.20 40.00 319.69 14.88 20.00 36.08 39.52 31.20 400.00 560.00 15.68 15.75 25.20 73 28.09 8.93 19.15 80.00 103.75 70.00 99.65 90.00 360.00 195.00 30.00 26.00 343.90 19.69 16.00 36.92 42.00 30.00 74 18.31 13.36 2.23 80.00 90.00 65.00 95.55 72.00 300.00 160.00 25.00 303.18 22.50 12.00 33.64 40.00 22.00 75 26.89 6.73 15.62 76.00 76.00 83.72 85.38

Haldia 76 29.93 6.86 16.08 78.67 76.00 131.33 89.48 -

Howrah Jalpai guri 77 26.93 6.75 16.89 80.00 100.00 75.33 95.40 90.00 383.33 200.00 30.00 26.00 350.00 20.00 15.00 37.84 45.00 32.80 260.00 480.00 25.42 16.50 20.45 78 19.45 11.62 2.86 81.38 80.88 77.63 98.28 86.50

Kolkata Raniganj 79 27.37 6.74 18.33 80.00 75.00 98.74 91.00 18.57 78.00 75.00 86.45 90.00 80 29.92

Siliguri 81 16.74 11.34 4.73 80.00 90.00 75.00 100.10 93.33

112.50 117.50

104.50 100.00

340.00 380.00 250.00 200.00 30.00 19.00 20.00 22.00 38.00 40.00 30.00 30.00 26.00 18.83 24.00 38.00 44.00 32.80

375.00 402.00 320.00 386.67 195.00 200.00 200.00 180.00 32.00 16.85 12.00 38.01 42.50 32.00 15.15 16.67 22.50 30.00 26.00 20.30 15.80 37.86 45.40 31.68 28.00 20.00 16.00 38.00 38.00 32.80 33.00 24.83 15.00 32.32 45.00 28.00

393.68 472.11

343.90 289.60

190.00 433.33 380.00 620.00 14.95 16.50 22.50 15.39 12.60 22.50

180.00 200.00 420.00 480.00 15.00 15.75 18.00 16.00 16.50 18.76

167.50 242.00 143.33 240.00 477.00 150.00 24.60 16.50 18.00 15.30 16.50 19.80 14.72 9.44 18.76

2. Besides these articles, retail prices of a large number of articles (including House Rent) being paid by working class families and utilized in the compilation of CPI Nos. (on base: 2001=100) for industrial workers are not being published due to resource constraint. 3. The price data of the remaining articles for any particular centre can be made available to the users on their specific demand.

833

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

1.2.Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural and Rural Labourers Table A.1.2.1 (a) Labour Bureaus Series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural Sl. No. State Linking factor for General Index a 3 4.84 b 6.22 5.34 * * 5.98 5.81 6.56 6.04 5.85 * * 6.05 c 6.15 5.67 * 6.60 5.73 General Index Apr., 2013 4 758 686 640 718 784 557 689 775 698 691 764 650 713 645 772 773 722 592 681 663 May, 2013 5 771 692 629 726 788 560 694 792 708 699 773 658 725 657 775 776 733 597 684 682 Food Index Apr., 2013 6 761 678 600 744 822 580 721 793 699 679 787 554 703 605 794 759 664 590 681 612 May, 2013 7 779 685 584 752 825 582 726 815 713 686 798 561 721 617 793 760 676 591 684 635

1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

2 Andhra Pradesh Assam Bihar Gujarat Haryana Himachal Pradesh Jammu & Kashmir Karnataka Kerala Madhya Pradesh Maharashtra Manipur Meghalaya Orissa Punjab Rajasthan Tamil Nadu Tripura Uttar Pradesh West Bengal

711 719 695 704 All-India 5.89 a = The indices for a given month of old base (1960-61) can be obtained by multiplying the index number of new base (1986-87) of that month by the relevant linking factors which are applicable to Agricultural Labourers only.

834

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Labourers (Group-wise and General) (Base: 1986-87=100) Pan, Supari, Tobacco & Intoxicants Index Apr., 2013 8 987 928 752 1019 747 858 1028 1054 1138 986 906 1031 820 1011 910 1117 1184 878 863 805 971 May, 2013 9 1007 923 753 1035 762 863 1095 1074 1133 1008 926 1045 818 1033 949 1143 1221 916 871 801 987 Fuel & Light Index Clothing, Bedding & Footwear Index Apr., 2013 12 718 691 781 566 718 479 659 705 662 677 620 663 749 778 587 655 673 630 673 932 695 May, 2013 13 723 693 785 573 721 483 663 708 672 677 626 674 729 781 596 664 680 630 679 936 700 Miscellaneous Index

Apr., 2013 10 773 694 885 556 1000 342 423 586 639 803 823 1428 710 895 1132 1003 834 449 781 890 800

May, 2013 11 757 698 889 578 998 355 423 594 645 811 828 1439 714 903 1137 1003 841 451 779 893 804

Apr., 2013 14 691 564 658 673 564 622 699 759 616 587 655 589 680 575 601 711 831 567 576 751 670

May, 2013 15 697 570 658 674 567 623 699 767 618 602 662 596 680 592 606 713 831 585 581 753 675

b & c = To obtain linking factors for Assam and Punjab, please consult article in February, 1996 issue of the Indian Labour Journal. * = Indices compiled and published for the first time w.e.f. November, 1995.

835

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table A.1.2.1 (b) Labour Bureaus Series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Rural Sl. No State General Index Food Index Pan, Supari, Tobacco & Intoxicants Index Apr., May, 2013 2013 7 8 994 1013 925 755 1004 773 959 1102 1058 1138 977 909 1029 831 1002 898 1093 1200 880 864 809 979 918 756 1019 787 965 1184 1077 1132 1000 931 1043 829 1023 935 1119 1236 917 872 805 994

1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

2 Andhra Pradesh Assam Bihar Gujarat Haryana Himachal Pradesh Jammu & Kashmir Karnataka Kerala Madhya Pradesh Maharashtra Manipur Meghalaya Orissa Punjab Rajasthan Tamil Nadu Tripura Uttar Pradesh West Bengal All India

Apr., 2013 3 757 690 643 715 779 587 687 772 697 699 759 652 708 646 763 760 716 589 681 669 711

May, 2013 4 769 696 633 723 781 592 692 789 707 709 768 660 720 658 768 764 727 592 684 689 720

Apr., 2013 5 762 687 597 746 825 608 717 787 695 678 781 554 700 605 792 749 672 581 684 614 697

May, 2013 6 780 693 582 753 827 612 721 808 708 687 791 562 717 618 793 751 686 583 687 638 706

836

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Labourers (Group wise and General) (Base: 1986-87=100) Fuel & Light Index Clothing, Bedding & Footwear Index Apr., 2013 11 713 701 790 584 689 543 660 683 675 743 670 673 662 774 643 676 629 629 698 872 701 May, 2013 12 716 703 799 590 693 546 664 687 684 751 678 684 657 777 657 688 635 629 701 887 708 Miscellaneous Index

Apr., 2013 9 767 687 888 557 1002 354 420 589 637 801 817 1432 709 893 1121 999 828 446 784 920 798

May, 2013 10 752 692 892 579 1000 365 421 597 643 809 822 1442 713 901 1126 999 835 449 782 923 801

Apr., 2013 13 693 559 661 670 561 604 680 794 631 599 654 577 680 575 600 680 754 572 546 764 666

May, 2013 14 698 565 661 672 564 611 680 801 633 614 659 584 680 592 605 684 754 582 551 766 670

837

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table A.1.2.2 (a) - State-wise monthly consumer prices of selected articles of Agricultural

Sl. No. 1 1. 2.

Item 2 Rice Wheat: (a) Wheat whole (b) Wheat Atta

Unit 3 Kg.

Andhra Pradesh 4 15.45

Assam 5 20.00

Bihar 6 14.43

Gujarat 7 16.08

Kg. Kg. Kg.

21.52

22.37 -

12.59 17.51 -

5.02 21.66 -

3. 4.

Jowar Bajra: (a) Bajra whole (b) Bajra Atta

Kg. Kg.

18.81 -

16.93 16.56

5.

Maize: (a) Maize whole (b) Maize Atta Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Litre Litre Kg. Kg. Litre Kg. 100Gms Kg. Kg. Kg. 100Gms 40 Kg. Litre 25.73 67.31 104.42 361.81 120.29 33.00 16.56 9.68 20.99 19.58 44.33 37.90 131.84 15.00 68.67 110.34 292.18 234.21 37.68 25.64 16.72 12.14 21.82 50.06 19.10 121.77 16.58 12.62 69.49 92.58 300.12 133.72 28.80 15.13 10.39 9.59 36.30 35.23 25.95 200.31 16.72 14.42 18.55 64.56 137.94 272.55 76.50 36.97 16.46 12.20 17.73 30.33 40.83 21.74 70.52 14.39

6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

Ragi Arhar Dal Groundnut Oil Mustard Oil Goat Meat/Mutton Fish Fresh Milk Onion Chillies Dry Potato Sugar Gur Tea Leaf Firewood Kerosene Oil

838

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Labourers for the month of May, 2013 (Base: 1986-87=100)

Haryana 8 24.79

Himachal Pradesh 9 19.10

Jammu & Kashmir 10 22.37

Karnataka Kerala 11 11.65 12 21.41

Madhya Pradesh 13 17.86

17.75 -

8.06 -

19.67 -

25.51 20.53

4.17 30.35 -

15.06 18.32 15.79

16.92

20.25 75.24 79.79 291.94 90.00 35.39 16.82 13.66 15.79 31.19 36.03 21.51 222.40 14.09

15.50 72.00 111.32 248.89 144.00 30.78 16.56 14.22 14.22 13.50 36.56 29.00 N.A. 14.55

17.02 110.13 280.72 159.29 26.84 22.37 19.72 17.05 17.46 37.17 32.27 146.00 14.46

17.98 71.73 100.30 321.91 227.02 26.91 18.54 9.96 21.66 21.38 42.16 28.78 92.66 16.35

67.78 406.08 54.54 34.03 49.50 9.42 24.85 30.39 49.78 24.76 131.28 16.08

14.06 70.40 138.38 86.38 282.64 119.71 28.33 13.23 10.55 14.61 21.73 33.83 19.39 144.16 15.62

839

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table A.1.2.2 (a) concld. Sl. No. 1 1. 2. Item 2 Rice Wheat: (a) Wheat whole (b) Wheat Atta 3. 4. Jowar Bajra: (a) Bajra whole (b) Bajra Atta 5. Maize: (a) Maize whole (b) Maize Atta 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Ragi Arhar Dal Groundnut Oil Mustard Oil Goat Meat/Mutton Fish Fresh Milk Onion Chillies Dry Potato Sugar Gur Tea Leaf Firewood Kerosene Oil Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Litre Litre Kg. Kg. Litre Kg. 100 gm. Kg. Kg. Kg. 100 gm. 40. Kg. Litre 322.06 159.87 36.01 14.11 10.11 18.40 25.36 20.86 21.15 156.32 15.42 69.89 128.53 82.25 111.63 160.56 38.67 26.78 15.33 17.33 38.22 18.67 240.00 15.89 76.75 98.00 169.44 36.11 30.56 15.33 14.44 21.56 23.13 139.44 32.22 16.97 70.33 85.53 99.21 290.71 123.83 21.90 17.08 10.34 12.08 27.51 39.45 27.88 121.71 15.81 Kg. Kg. 17.51 Kg. Kg. Kg. 17.99 9.69 23.33 17.98 Unit 3 Kg. Maharashtra 14 13.14 Manipur 15 13.85 Meghalaya 16 17.14 Orissa 17 15.88

- = Items do not feature in the Index Basket. N.A. = Not Available.

840

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Punjab 18 26.17

Rajasthan 19 28.28

Tamil Nadu 20 6.96

Tripura 21 15.77

Uttar Pradesh 22 14.16

West Bengal 23 21.53

14.15 17.62 -

11.24 19.01 19.82

34.08 20.26

23.00 -

8.29 16.05 15.24

13.10 -

14.87

20.76

13.55

21.39 102.12 279.23 33.89 14.98 14.30 12.83 35.61 36.63 20.02 244.49 15.23

14.55 73.59 133.36 86.80 291.96 31.99 14.39 9.96 15.49 25.82 36.59 20.18 181.26 15.19

22.09 74.69 105.22 395.22 114.87 25.36 32.20 9.24 25.83 13.55 48.52 40.71 160.11 14.01

109.44 387.78 163.33 30.00 22.78 16.44 15.22 13.50 47.88 16.00 125.56 15.25

14.27 69.82 80.59 286.59 116.40 31.00 15.00 11.99 12.11 19.03 34.59 27.11 222.95 15.51

71.29 92.54 341.48 126.91 25.13 17.76 12.64 9.70 31.50 37.61 18.90 179.89 16.38

Note:- The prices are average prices based on individual quotations obtained from the selected outlets of the sample villages of a given State and are not comparable with each other due to their varying specifications. Besides, the prices of all the items utilised in compilation of C.P.I. Numbers for Agricultural Labourers are not being published due to resource constraints.

841

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table A.1.2.2 (b) - State-wise monthly consumer prices of selected articles of Rural Labourers Sl. No. 1 1. 2. Rice Wheat: (a) Wheat whole (b) Wheat Atta 3. 4. Jowar Bajra: (a) Bajra whole (b) Bajra Atta 5. Maize: (a) Maize whole (b) Maize Atta 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Ragi Arhar Dal Groundnut Oil Mustard Oil Goat Meat/Mutton Fish Fresh Milk Onion Chillies Dry Potato Sugar Gur Tea Leaf Firewood Kerosene Oil Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Litre Litre Kg. Kg. Litre Kg. 25.71 67.41 104.33 361.94 120.43 32.69 16.57 68.38 12.63 69.52 14.42 18.61 64.58 137.98 100.95 20.25 75.31 80.05 291.84 90.00 35.44 16.80 13.66 15.77 31.30 36.07 21.51 222.40 14.09 15.50 72.00 111.32 248.89 144.00 30.78 16.56 14.22 14.22 13.50 36.56 29.00 N.A. 14.55 Kg. Kg. 18.83 16.85 16.45 16.63 Kg. Kg. Kg. 21.52 22.35 12.59 17.48 5.04 21.52 17.76 8.78 Item 2 Unit 3 Kg. Andhra Pradesh 4 15.43 Assam Bihar 5 20.28 6 14.45 Gujarat Haryana Himachal Pradesh 7 8 9 16.21 24.78 20.37

110.31 92.57

290.26 301.65 273.02 235.14 133.42 76.64 37.69 25.54 17.12 12.20 21.86 51.00 19.05 28.78 15.12 10.39 9.63 36.34 35.22 25.97 36.98 16.46 12.19 17.71 30.18 40.85 21.66

100Gms 9.67 21.02 Kg. Kg. Kg. 20.79 44.50

100gms. 37.74 40. Kg. 131.89 Litre 15.00

120.54 201.77 70.15 16.54 16.72 14.38

842

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

for the month of May, 2013 (Base: 1986-87=100) Jammu & Karnataka Kashmir 10 21.28 11 12.40 Kerala Madhya Pradesh 12 21.38 13 17.77 Maharashtra 14 13.80 Manipur 15 13.82 Meghalaya 16 17.23 Orissa 17 15.89 Punjab 18 26.17

19.61 -

25.55 20.53

4.15 30.19

14.98 18.32 15.75

10.33

23.33 -

18.02 -

14.15 17.62 -

17.87

17.63

16.81 109.79 282.22 159.29 26.70 22.75 19.25 16.95 17.63 37.00 31.13 143.83 14.90

17.90 71.76 100.19 322.92 228.88 26.89 18.54 9.98 21.66 21.97 42.10 28.76 92.81 16.36 403.86 54.59 34.06 49.48 9.42 24.79 30.77 49.80 24.92 131.25 16.07 68.33

14.06 70.03 138.62 86.68 282.60 119.75 28.42 13.23 10.54 14.62 21.59 33.81 19.41 143.96 15.62 323.02 160.95 36.65 14.14 10.03 18.40 26.13 20.88 21.24 156.12 15.28 70.03 128.40

82.25 111.63 160.56 38.67 26.78 15.33 17.33 38.22 18.67 240.00 15.89

76.75 98.00 169.44 36.11 30.56 15.33 14.44 21.56 23.13 139.44 32.22

16.99 70.51 85.46 99.33 292.27 123.84 21.90 17.08 10.32 12.09 27.33 39.48 27.86 122.27 15.80

21.39 101.25 280.07 33.77 14.98 14.30 12.82 35.66 36.66 20.01 245.71 15.18

- = Items do not feature in the Index Basket. N.A.= Not available

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table A.1.2.2 (b)-Concld. Sl. No. 1 1. 2. Item 2 Rice Wheat: (a) Wheat whole (b) Wheat Atta 3. 4. Jowar Bajra: (a) Bajra whole (b) Bajra Atta 5. Maize: ( a ) Maize whole (b) Maize Atta 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Ragi Arhar Dal Groundnut Oil Mustard Oil Goat Meat/Mutton Fish Fresh Milk Onion Chillies Dry Potato Sugar Gur Tea Leaf Firewood Kerosene Oil Kg. Kg. Kg. Kg. Litre Litre Kg. Kg. Litre Kg. 100gm. Kg. Kg. Kg. 100 gm. 40. Kg. Litre 14.40 75.43 134.26 87.49 290.60 31.99 14.34 9.99 15.67 27.44 36.57 20.18 180.45 15.19 22.06 74.69 106.13 396.51 115.03 25.25 32.38 9.22 25.86 13.68 49.00 40.65 159.93 14.01 109.44 387.78 163.33 30.00 22.78 16.44 15.22 13.50 47.88 16.00 125.56 15.25 14.26 69.82 80.65 286.33 115.55 31.12 15.07 11.95 12.22 18.28 34.54 26.94 224.20 15.49 71.71 92.51 341.99 126.67 25.20 17.73 12.65 9.72 31.84 37.60 18.93 181.07 16.36 Kg. Kg. 15.02 20.76 13.53 Kg. Kg. Kg. 11.62 19.00 19.82 34.21 19.95 23.00 8.73 15.97 15.22 13.35 Unit 3 Kg. Rajasthan 19 29.10 Tamil Nadu 20 7.53 Tripura 21 15.59 Uttar Pradesh 22 14.21 West Bengal 23 21.54

Note:-The prices are average prices based on individual quotations obtained from the selected outlets of the sample villages of a given State and are not comparable with each other due to their varying specifications. Besides, the prices of all the items utilized in compilation of C.P.I. Numbers. for Rural Labourers are not being published due to resource constraints.

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

2.

WAGES AND EARNINGS

Table A.2.1 (a) - Average Daily Wage Rates for Agricultural Occupations in Rural India during May, 2013 (By States and Sex). ( in Rupees) Sowing Children 5 Men 6 201.67 152.50 179.75 136.33 228.29 251.67 291.50 186.80 505.10 135.22 198.18 @ @ 128.00 @ 210.00 227.78 158.89 168.28 168.21 190.31 Women 7 169.33 @ 155.09 117.22 @ @ 124.40 @ 107.00 110.00 @ @ @ 188.89 147.50 162.89 150.20 Children 8 @ @ @ 98.67

Sl. No

States Men

Ploughing Women 4 @ @ 118.00 @ @ 119.72

1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

2 Andhra Pradesh Assam Bihar Gujarat Haryana Himachal Pradesh Jammu & Kashmir Karnataka Kerala Madhya Pradesh Maharashtra Manipur Meghalaya Orissa Punjab Rajasthan Tamil Nadu Tripura Uttar Pradesh West Bengal All India

3 239.76 167.98 188.58 159.83 306.00 293.33 406.98 223.00 582.37 140.19 221.38 231.11 @ 163.33 @ 261.00 349.91 158.89 160.36 228.04 223.07

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table A.2.1 (a) Contd. Sl. No States Men 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 2 Andhra Pradesh Assam Bihar Gujarat Haryana Himachal Pradesh Jammu & Kashmir Karnataka Kerala Madhya Pradesh Maharashtra Manipur Meghalaya Orissa Punjab Rajasthan Tamil Nadu Tripura Uttar Pradesh West Bengal All India 9 @ 128.06 148.65 121.07 228.29 @ 278.00 173.27 @ 127.08 177.50 210.00 157.14 128.57 @ 238.57 158.89 170.10 174.41 167.85 Weeding Women 10 162.70 @ 137.93 115.00 @ @ 120.31 327.02 104.09 111.43 @ 114.29 113.33 210.00 143.82 149.76 171.38 148.09 Children 11 @ @ @ @ @ @ @ 101.79 Men 12 @ 134.29 Transplantng Women 13 160.95 @ Children 14 @ @ @ 111.33

160.49 141.30 110.00 106.00 221.14 221.14 244.38 -

192.89 125.50 @ 146.67 @ @ @ 118.00 @ @ @ 158.89 315.85 @ @ @ @ @ @ 148.76 -

175.94 136.33 167.78 160.33 175.40 158.70

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Harvesting Men 15 227.11 167.22 158.62 127.40 240.60 253.75 249.44 186.00 380.00 140.00 191.90 216.00 @ 168.33 272.78 265.45 220.13 158.89 172.50 185.80 189.99 Women 16 149.36 153.57 144.24 116.88 238.67 @ 124.44 311.78 122.80 125.52 200.00 @ @ @ 247.73 146.53 151.57 174.88 157.00 Children 17 @ @ @ @ 133.00 @ 125.14 Men 18 210.00 @ 149.92 127.19 221.14 @ 184.00 123.33 191.67 216.00 @ @ @ 178.48 158.89 144.06 171.03 165.41

Winnowing Women 19 @ @ 129.38 122.50 @ 127.14 @ 104.64 134.17 @ @ @ 133.75 129.69 150.38 134.05 Children 20 @ @ @ Men 21

Threshing Women 22 @ @ 124.23 142.50 @ 117.14 @ 125.00 103.50 @ @ 215.00 116.00 134.17 166.29 145.22 Children 23 @ @ @

184.29 @ 153.50 137.31 228.29 @ 168.13 @ 135.20 195.00 @ 163.33 289.00 219.50 150.56 155.79 187.37 178.03

- = Indicates that the particular category of workers, i.e. men/women/children were not engaged in that operation either because of their non-availability; or the activity connected with the occupation was not undertaken in the State; or the activity was out of season in the State, etc.

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Sl. No 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Table A.2.1 (a) Concld. States Men 2 Andhra Pradesh Assam Bihar Gujarat Haryana Himachal Pradesh Jammu & Kashmir Karnataka Kerala Madhya Pradesh Maharashtra Manipur Meghalaya Orissa Punjab Rajasthan Tamil Nadu Tripura Uttar Pradesh West Bengal All India 24 @ @ 145.91 226.80 @ 147.50 @ 137.78 @ 153.33 @ @ @ 157.81

Picking* Women 25 150.92 @ 142.27 @ @ 98.57 @ 110.42 @ @ @ @ 134.53 Children 26 @ @ @ 116.00 Men 27 140.95 @ 102.47 126.67 @ 168.00 82.66 136.49 202.50 @ 102.56 162.50 @ @ 116.44

Herdsman Women 28 @ @ @ 71.44 108.33 @ @ 85.35 Children 29 @ @ 73.33 57.86 118.75 @ 75.33 71.81

* = Picking includes picking of cotton bolls/seed pods, jute stalks and tea leaves etc. @ = Number of quotations are less than five.

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Well digging Men 30 @ @ 190.26 184.00 @ 208.00 640.83 144.65 255.00 @ 201.67 @ 316.88 313.44 @ 265.65 255.33 Women 31 @ @ @ @ 120.95 179.29 @ 141.71 Children 32 Men 33 @ 140.83 @ @ 182.50 112.00 @ @ @ 233.57 143.13 173.40

Cane crushing Women 34 @ @ @ @ @ @ 116.00 Children 35 -

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

A.2.1. (b) Average Daily Wage Rates for Non-agricultural Occupations in Rural India during Sl No States Men 1 2 3 240.38 258.15 245.38 245.88 336.58 373.33 383.81 241.36 604.76 166.34 244.89 277.78 214.44 256.25 395.27 339.21 426.72 211.25 283.05 219.77 278.10 Carpenter Women Children 4 5 @ @ Blacksmith Men Women Children 6 190.81 225.18 205.42 193.00 243.89 331.43 358.18 190.42 477.78 149.55 220.98 230.00 205.00 145.45 @ 265.00 304.81 150.00 247.29 159.49 212.20 7 8 @ @ @ Men 9 133.65 176.67 142.50 @ 218.29 @ 146.14 @ 115.04 160.38 221.25 144.29 122.86 200.00 191.67 150.00 168.42 140.57 151.73 Cobbler Women Children 10 11 -

1 Andhra Pradesh 2 Assam 3 Bihar 4 Gujarat 5 Haryana 6 Himachal Pradesh 7 Jammu&Kashmir 8 Karnataka 9 Kerala 10 Madhya Pradesh 11 Maharashtra 12 Manipur 13 Meghalaya 14 Orissa 15 Punjab 16 Rajasthan 17 Tamil Nadu 18 Tripura 19 Uttar Pradesh 20 West Bengal All India -

= Indicates that the particular category of workers, i.e. men/ women /children were not engaged in that operation either because of their non-availability; or the activity connected with the occupation was not undertaken in the State; or the activity was out of season in the State, etc.

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

May, 2013 (By States and Sex) ( in Rupees) Mason Men 12 296.09 269.26 281.97 316.25 350.75 367.78 380.71 252.67 595.00 214.04 307.69 302.50 236.67 275.67 401.93 424.05 455.59 211.25 327.75 243.00 309.41 Women 13 Children 14 Men 15 237.04 258.33 177.47 161.88 305.92 @ @ 187.98 545.00 171.06 229.46 318.89 204.55 309.17 269.12 359.71 211.25 194.23 234.18 223.44 Tractor driver Women 16 Children 17 -

@ = Number of quotations are less than five.

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table A.2.1 (b) Concld. Sl No States ( in Rupees) Sweeper Men 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 2 Andhra Pradesh Assam Bihar Gujarat Haryana Himachal Pradesh Jammu & Kashmir Karnataka Kerala Madhya Pradesh Maharashtra Manipur Meghalaya Orissa Punjab Rajasthan Tamil Nadu Tripura Uttar Pradesh West Bengal All India 18 @ @ 110.00 @ 216.00 123.33 109.21 170.00 @ @ @ @ 153.29 @ 130.64 Women 19 @ @ @ 195.60 75.71 @ 94.64 @ @ @ @ @ 121.93 110.54 Children 20 @ @ @ Men 21 178.40 169.44 160.00 118.80 252.42 230.00 303.00 139.51 487.89 106.23 147.21 174.44 150.00 156.24 259.00 237.62 238.60 158.89 173.70 158.68 180.86 Unskilled labourers ( Unspecified) Women 22 124.80 141.92 131.83 110.59 234.33 254.00 95.06 341.50 93.28 102.73 160.00 101.67 141.41 @ 214.00 181.58 145.40 142.02 137.77 Children 23 86.39 100.00 @ @ 65.60 103.75 @ @ @ 110.00 98.67 90.18

Note:- The average daily wage rates at all-India level are derived by dividing the sum total of wages by number of quotations of all the states taken together.

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

3. Table A.3.1

INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES

Sector/Sphere-wise Number of Disputes, Workers involved and Mandays Lost due to Industrial Disputes during January to May, 2013 (P) Public Sector Number of Private Sector Number of Total Number of Dis- Workers putes Involved 8 9 Mandays Lost 10

Sphere/ Item

Dis- Workers Mandays Dis- Workers Mandays putes Involved Lost putes Involved Lost 1 (i) 2 Central Sphere Strikes Lockouts Strikes & Lockouts (Total-i) (ii) 20 20 86705 86705 286619 286619 1 1 5047 5047 10094 10094 3 4 5 6 7

21 21

91752 91752

296713 296713

State Sphere Strikes Lockouts 3 1 4 107811 180 107991 162825 360 163185 28 9 37 11244 1998 13242 292221 103313 395534 31 10 41 119055 2178 121233 455046 103673 558719

Strikes & Lockouts (Total-ii) Grand Total (Total-i+ ii)

24

194696

449804

38

18289

405628

62

212985

855432

(P) = Provisional and based on the returns /clarifications received in the Bureau till 28 th June, 2013 - = Nil

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table A.3.2- Industrial Disputes (All Strikes and Lockouts) during January to May, 2013 (P) State/Union Territory Number of Disputes Workers Mandays Lost Involved 1 2 3 4 Andhra Pradesh 4 1416 103056 Arunachal Pradesh .. .. .. Assam Bihar 1 227 5902 Chhattisgarh .. .. .. Goa 2 579 9554 Gujarat 8 9212 22358 Haryana Himachal Pradesh .. .. .. Jammu & Kashmir .. .. .. Jharkhand .. .. .. Karnataka 14 63159 121779 Kerala 14 2756 77546 Madhya Pradesh Maharashtra .. .. .. Manipur .. .. .. Meghalaya Mizoram Nagaland Orissa .. .. .. Punjab 4 108201 228405 Rajasthan 7 1540 160960 Sikkim Tamil Nadu 3 3620 65062 Tripura Uttarakhand .. .. .. Uttar Pradesh .. .. .. West Bengal 5 22275 60810 A & N Islands Chandigarh Dadra & Nagar Haveli Delhi .. .. .. Daman & Diu Lakshadweep .. .. .. Puducherry All India 62 212985 855432 (P) = Provisional and based on the returns /clarifications received in the Bureau till 28th June, 2013 = Nil .. = Not reported

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

SECTION B SERIAL STATISTICS

NOTE

1 Prices and Price Indices


1.1. Industrial Workers Consumer Price Index B.1.1.1. All-India Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers The All India Consumer Price Index Numbers (General and Food) on base 1982=100 were being published since their first release with effect from October, 1988 index replacing the old series on base: 1960=100. The Labour Bureau has released the new series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers on base: 2001=100 with the index of January, 2006 which has replaced the previous series on base: 1982=100. The indices for the old base (1960=100) series can be derived by multiplying the 1982 series indices by the Linking Factors, which are 4.93 for the general index and 4.98 for the food index. Similarly, the indices for 1982 series can be derived by multiplying the 2001 series indices by the Linking factors, which are 4.63 and 4.58 for General and Food group respectively. The Annual Average (Calendar year 1990 to 2011 as well as Financial year 1990-91 to 2010-2011) and monthly All India Index Numbers (General& Food) from May, 2012 to May, 2013 have been presented in Table B.1.1.1. B.1.1.2. Labour Bureaus Series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers Serial Statistics in respect of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers on base 1982=100 and new series on base: 2001=100 (General Index only) for 78 centres are set out in Table B.1.1.2. 1.2 Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural Labourers B.1.2.1 (a) and (b). All-India Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural and Rural Labourers (Base: 1986-87=100) Serial statistics relating to the All-India Consumer Price Index Numbers (General and Food) for Agricultural and Rural Labourers on base 1986-87=100 separately for Agricultural Years from 1995-96 to 2010-11, Financial Years from 1995-96 to 2011-12 and Calendar Years from 1995 to 2011, alongwith month-wise indices and 12-monthly moving averages from May, 2012 to May, 2013 are presented in Tables B.1.2.1 (a) and (b) respectively B.1.2.2 (a) and (b) Labour Bureaus Series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural Labourers and Rural Labourers on Base: 1986-87=100 Serial statistics in respect of Consumer Price Index Numbers (General Index) for Agricultural Labourers and Rural Labourers (Base: 1986-87=100) for 20 States are given in Tables B.1.2.2 (a) and (b) respectively.

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

1.3. Urban Non-Manual Employees Consumer Price Index / Consumer Price Index for Urban and Rural Areas B.1.3. Consumer Price Index Numbers for Urban Non-Manual Employees (Base:1984-85=100) and Consumer Price Index for Urban and Rural Areas on base: 2010=100 Consumer Price Index for Urban Non-Manual Employees on base: 1984-85=100 were compiled and published by the Central Statistical Organisation (CSO), New Delhi. The Price collection for CPI (UNME) was discontinued with effect from April, 2008. As decided by the National Statistical Commission, linked all-India CPI (UNME) numbers for the year 2008 to 2010 are given in Serial Statistics. The Central Statistics Office (CSO) releases Consumer Price Indices (CPI) on base 2010=100 for all-India and States/UTs separately for rural, urban and combined every month with effect from January, 2011. Consumer Price Index for Urban and Rural areas for the period May, 2012 to May, 2013 have been presented in Table B.1.3. 1.4. Wholesale Price Index B.1.4. All India Index Numbers of Wholesale prices (Base: 2004-05=100) The current series of Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices in India on base 2004-05=100 was released w.e.f. September, 2010 by replacing the earlier series. These Index Numbers are compiled and published by the Office of the Economic Adviser, Ministry of Commerce & Industry, Govt. of India, New Delhi. The indices for the period 1991 to 2011 (Annual Averages) and May, 2012 to May, 2013 (Monthly Figures) are set out in Table B.1.4. 2. Wages and Earnings B.2.1. Earnings(Basic Wage and Dearness Allowance) of the Lowest-paid Workers/Operatives in Cotton Textile Mills The information concerning earnings of cotton producing Centres/States received from the State Governments, Employers Associations and Individual Units is presented in Table B.2.1. The earnings of workers include minimum basic wage and dearness Allowance by whatever name called. The dearness allowance is linked to the Working Class Consumer Price Index Numbers of different Centres and varies from month to month according to the variation in the index. 3. Industrial Disputes B.3.1. Industrial Disputes (All Strikes and Lockouts) Industrial Disputes Statistics for the Years 2006 to 2013 are presented in Table B.3.1

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1. PRICES AND PRICE INDICES 1.1 Industrial Workers Consumer Price Index Table B.1.1.1 All India Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers (General & Food) Year/ Month Annual Average Indices for Twelve monthly Financial year moving average Year General of General Index Index 1991-92 1992-93 1993-94 1994-95 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-2000 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06* 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 198 200 201 203 204 206 208 209 211 213 215 217 219 219 240 258 284 313 342 366 414 428 444 463 482 500 520 540 125 133 145 163 180 195

Calendar Year General Food Index Index 212 237 252 278 306 334 358 405 424 441 458 477 496 514 536 123 131 142 157 176 192 206 208 212 214 215 217 218 219 221 223 224 226 228 222 251 265 296 331 359 380 437 444 452 462 474 490 504 520 122 134 149 169 190 204 219 222 227 230 232 233 235 235 235 238 240 245 248

Food Index 230 254 272 304 337 369 388 445 446 453 466 477 495 506 526 126 136 153 176 194 206

I- Base 1982=100 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 II- Base 2001=100 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 2013 Jan Feb Mar Apr May

*The Financial year average is based on 9 months from April, 2005 to Dec., 2005

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table B.1.1.2- Labour Bureaus Series of Consumer Price Index Numbers of Industrial Workers (General Index)
Year/ month Base Year L. Factor Godavari khani Guntur Hyderabad Vijaya wada Vishakhapattanam * Warrangal DoomDooma Tinsukia 1960= 100 4.05 8 195 216 233 255 281 309 320 362 386 389 384 398 416 430 450

1960= 100 1960= 100 5.60 5.23 *

1
I- Base-1982=100

3
208 239 256 281 305 332 356 394 414 431 438 473 504 510 523

4
203 227 237 258 283 308 331 377 395 419 438 468 496 512 532

6
210 238 249 264 293 319 343 388 410 436 444 469 484 501 525

7
202 237 243 274 300 324 344 399 415 440 464 501 526 530 555

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
2005

II. Base 2001=100 Linking Factor with previous base: 1982=100 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov. Dec 2013 Jan Feb Mar Apr May qq

* 125 135 150 169 193 200 213 221 221 221 222 222 223 224 233 235 237 233 235

4.57 120 126 139 161 181 194 204 206 206 205 206 210 215 217 219 218 223 223 227

4.79 116 123 135 152 165 174 186 189 192 192 193 195 197 198 199 200 200 202 206

* 119 126 137 161 180 188 202 202 211 214 214 216 222 222 223 229 228 230 234

4.64 119 126 135 153 173 192 209 213 216 218 218 220 223 223 223 226 225 227 231

4.75 123 133 149 172 199 204 216 221 225 227 229 230 233 234 239 239 238 239 245

4.04 116 125 133 147 160 170 179 180 184 185 187 190 194 189 191 191 191 189 189

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Guwa hati * 9 208 235 252 280 312 341 357 405 436 460 471 480 496 516 531

Labac Silchar 1960= 100 3.96 10 193 217 233 251 274 295 312 345 375 370 372 374 383 411 415

Mariani Jorhat 1960= 100 3.95 11 205 229 244 264 296 324 339 389 416 418 411 411 432 441 449

Rangapara Tezpur 1960= 100 4.29 12 209 230 246 266 295 323 340 390 412 408 419 417 427 433 439

Monghyr Jamalpur 1960= 100 5.29 13 212 234 242 267 288 316 331 379 415 416 416 435 459 479 511

Chandigarh

Bhilai

* 14 216 236 252 271 294 315 345 401 447 460 488 514 526 560 615

1966= 100 3.49 15 196 214 229 250 272 302 323 361 373 390 407 413 439 459 480

4.80 115 120 128 143 156 168 183 185 189 187 188 190 193 192 193 190 191 191 193

3.65 121 130 143 155 178 186 195 196 200 201 201 205 209 206 204 204 205 204 208

4.01 116 127 133 147 158 171 184 184 186 186 188 192 193 192 190 189 187 191 192

4.17 114 126 131 144 154 163 166 170 175 175 178 181 181 179 179 179 178 180 180

4.30 126 134 145 162 182 199 209 213 215 217 219 225 224 222 222 229 230 230 232

5.26 125 131 140 155 175 197 212 212 217 218 221 220 219 219 225 224 225 226 226

4.20 121 132 145 162 180 206 237 239 246 249 250 250 250 250 251 251 251 257 261

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table B.1.1.2 Contd.


Year/ month Base Year L. Factor

Delhi

Goa

Ahmedabad

Bhavnagar 1960= 100 4.99

Rajkot

Surat

Vadodra

1960= 100 1966= 100 1960= 100 4.97 3.40 4.78

1 I- Base-1982=100 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 II. Base 2001=100 Linking Factor with previous base: 1982=100 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov. Dec 2013 Jan Feb Mar Apr May

16 218 247 272 299 327 346 380 447 480 514 529 550 570 598 648

17 223 257 285 310 339 373 416 451 482 520 555 577 592 614 634

18 218 241 250 279 303 333 357 399 422 441 460 476 488 507 519

19 220 244 259 294 318 350 373 425 447 466 483 492 504 523 537

20 215 237 246 276 296 332 350 393 409 430 433 447 457 465 496

21 229 252 260 292 320 356 373 417 432 446 474 484 490 490 505

22 218 240 252 278 303 332 350 385 405 430 453 467 470 485 500

5.60 122 128 137 147 163 176 189 188 194 195 197 198 198 199 200 202 204 206 200

5.59 121 130 144 164 188 203 216 219 227 231 230 227 227 229 237 241 244 247 251

4.62 120 129 138 151 171 186 205 205 208 212 214 213 214 215 220 222 222 226 227

4.76 119 129 135 147 174 189 204 205 208 210 211 211 211 213 213 214 217 219 218

4.38 118 126 132 146 174 193 214 215 218 221 222 225 224 225 227 227 229 230 230

4.54 118 127 134 146 162 174 191 192 195 197 199 199 199 199 207 207 207 211 212

4.39 120 127 133 147 167 180 197 198 200 203 203 203 205 205 208 209 210 210 215

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Faridabad

Yamunanagar
1960= 100

Himachal Pradesh 1965= 100 3.75

Srinagar 1960= 100 5.47 26 202 231 252 271 303 321 347 414 471 480 520 547 574 599 632

Bokaro

Giridih

Jamshedpur
1960= 100

23 201 224 244 268 295 326 359 426 435 443 469 480 499 532 550

5.53 24 201 218 235 259 292 315 335 378 392 412 428 443 462 486 521

25 205 226 244 268 292 314 340 386 407 430 447 454 466 488 510

27

28

4.68 29 204 226 239 260 280 321 340 385 397 405 419 431 456 479 508

4.79 122 130 145 160 182 194 205 205 213 213 212 213 214 210 212 216 218 219 219

4.34 127 133 145 162 183 197 212 213 216 218 221 222 225 224 225 226 228 230 227

4.53 120 126 135 147 161 172 185 186 192 195 195 195 196 196 198 199 199 201 205

5.62 118 125 134 155 159 172 189 192 194 194 193 195 196 194 194 198 197 199 195

* 121 130 142 158 168 192 207 210 212 217 216 217 217 217 217 219 219 220 219

* 134 146 156 177 204 232 247 148 252 261 258 259 260 262 262 263 264 272 272

4.23 126 132 142 157 182 213 228 232 237 237 237 239 239 237 239 241 242 243 246

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table B.1.1.2 Contd.


Year/ month Base Year L. Factor Jharia Kodarma Ranchi Hatia Bangalore 1960= 100 Belgaum Hubli Dharwar

1960= 100 1960= 100

4.63
30

1 I- Base-1982=100 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 II. Base 2001=100 Linking. Factor with previous base: 1982=100 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov. Dec 2013 Jan Feb Mar Apr May

5.43 31 192 215 228 248 265 290 310 359 379 368 373 388 402 426 471

* 32 214 233 247 269 292 320 340 402 414 418 426 433 438 470 497

5.66 33 204 230 248 272 305 331 361 391 405 425 438 452 476 501 533

* 34 218 243 256 285 327 353 380 423 457 473 486 514 535 563 588

* 35 215 246 259 280 314 337 362 409 430 434 451 471 494 520 544

198 218 226 244 262 286 301 353 363 363 365 374 393 414 442

3.72 126 136 146 161 180 198 220 220 224 227 231 235 239 237 247 253 251 253 253

3.89 132 140 149 169 190 215 231 233 238 242 245 249 249 247 250 249 247 249 253

4.20 125 133 148 170 199 220 228 229 239 241 248 249 249 249 252 257 257 257 258

4.51 125 136 150 167 181 194 212 218 220 219 211 220 220 219 223 226 233 236 237

5.02 125 133 144 162 179 200 219 211 215 210 221 215 220 222 225 232 228 239 241

4.71 123 132 147 164 182 200 215 217 223 224 224 220 224 234 234 237 236 239 245

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Mercara

Mysore

Ernakulam Mundakayam Quilon Aluva


1960= 100 1960= 100

Bhopal
1960= 100

Chhindwara Indore
1966= 100 1960= 100

* 36 229 243 269 304 339 375 418 444 458 457 458 474 491 495

37

5.19 38 220 243 273 311 348 371 404 423 442 458 478 490 515 542

4.67 39 230 249 278 314 355 384 419 443 453 451 469 489 500 514

* 40 227 252 288 325 362 391 395 428 449 457 486 522 533 546

5.46 41 248 268 291 312 351 377 436 444 451 488
510

2.59 42 241 263 284 314 344 359 403 419 420 429 437 448 460 474

5.18 43 250 267 292 315 344 356 406 425 445 470
488

525 537 561

511 521 537

4.47 114 121 135 154 172 188 201 209 211 215 216 218 219 221 223 226 230 236 239

* 123 130 142 160 174 187 206 204 209 203 204 206 213 218 221 225 226 239 243

4.52 125 131 142 153 167 185 196 199 202 202 203 204 205 212 215 218 218 221 222

4.37 124 130 145 159 174 191 211 212 216 217 220 221 224 231 235 238 243 246 251

4.61 126 129 143 154 172 195 200 203 207 206 208 209 213 221 222 224 230 230 231

4.83 127 135 145 161 185 205 217 218 223 229 228 228 227 225 225 226 228 231 233

4.03 127 137 150 162 177 195 209 211 215 221 229 228 227 231 231 236 236 234 237

4.73 122 131 140 152 168 181 197 197 202 206 206 208 209 207 210 212 213 218 220

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table B.1.1.2 Contd.


Year/ month Base Year L. Factor I- Base-1982=100

Jabalpur
1949= 100

Mumbai

Nagpur

Nasik

Pune

Solapur
1960= 100

Angul Talcher

1960= 100 1960= 100

6.41 44 232 254 272 301 315 339 356 409 435 446 458 468 488 508 540

5.12 45 226 255 273 306 339 363 400 453 468 505 528 558 583 604 611

4.99 46 223 253 268 292 314 342 370 427 438 461 483 495 503 524 554

47 228 255 270 296 322 353 377 423 432 465 498 514 532 554 576

* 48 217 253 266 296 330 359 388 448 466 493 516 528 554 574 589

5.03 49 224 260 264 289 327 357 371 431 450 467 471 486 501 529 539

50

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 II. Base 2001=100 Linking. Factor with previous base: 1982=100 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov. Dec 2013 Jan Feb Mar Apr May

4.53 128 135 148 159 184 198 206 209 218 219 220 220 220 219 220 221 224 225 228

5.18 126 134 144 159 174 192 208 212 214 216 219 221 222 223 224 226 228 229 231

4.68 130 140 151 174 203 220 236 239 244 247 249 249 247 246 250 254 254 256 264

4.94 124 130 139 157 181 204 216 218 223 228 233 233 235 234 234 234 234 235 242

4.96 127 136 146 162 181 200 214 214 218 219 222 224 224 225 227 228 227 230 232

4.73 123 139 149 160 179 199 215 214 215 218 218 222 225 223 222 225 231 233 234

* 120 128 143 160 181 200 217 220 224 227 228 230 229 229 232 234 233 233 235

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table B.1.1.2 contd. Rourkela 1966= 100 3.59 51 194 216 232 254 275 303 341 390 396 406 407 416 432 453 473 Pondicherry Amritsar
1960= 100

Jalandhar

Ludhiana

Ajmer
1960= 100

Bhilwara
1966=100

Jaipur
1960= 100

* 52 229 256 279 313 344 387 428 464 467 477 482 510 543 556 580

5.19 53 204 220 238 261 278 298 314 369 379 388 403 418 431 452 492

54

* 55 207 219 237 262 285 301 320 374 381 396 413 431 441 469 504

5.01 56 217 243 253 280 305 332 357 392 411 433 452 472 487 510 537

3.20 57 215 240 253 290 310 333 350 393 420 439 460 474 488 505 532

5.17
58

210 228 245 269 291 321 346 387 390 403 423 442 452 467 495

4.03 124 137 149 166 186 204 216 222 223 230 230 232 233 230 229 233 233 237 241

4.88 123 130 146 163 173 184 201 212 214 213 216 216 218 220 220 225 226 234 237

4.09 130 139 149 163 190 208 225 227 229 232 235 235 235 232 234 233 235 238 236

* 126 131 141 155 174 190 203 201 206 207 209 211 211 213 212 217 218 222 219

4.12 129 134 146 160 175 188 202 199 204 212 212 214 213 212 215 216 216 217 216

4.78 122 129 138 152 175 191 215 213 218 222 221 221 222 221 224 224 227 230 229

4.62 125 133 144 158 176 192 217 213 218 221 219 221 221 222 224 224 228 231 230

4.25 127 134 145 159 179 192 212 213 217 221 222 222 221 222 226 227 227 225 224

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table B.1.1.2 Contd.


Year/ month Base Year L. Factor I- Base-1982=100

Chennai Coimbatore Coonoor


1960= 100 1960= 100

Madurai 1960= 100 5.27 62 209 240 256 281 318 346 366 401 423 440 446 459 482 496 509

Salem * 63 198 223 241 287 322 348 364 394 414 432 443 464 483 482 481

5.05 59 208 238 258 287 330 356 382 425 446 475 487 513 533 549 565

5.35 60 197 228 245 272 303 330 354 383 402 432 441 472 495 500 508

1960= 100 4.80 61 217 245 262 291 325 348 377 404 414 433 445 473 497 501 511

Tiruchirapally * 64 215 240 259 295 330 364 406 435 463 481 488 533 568 544 579

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 II. Base 2001=100 Linking. Factor with previous base 1982=100 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 2013 Jan Feb Mar Apr May

4.95 118 124 135 149 161 171 192 197 200 201 202 200 203 206 209 211 209 210 218

4.49 119 127 137 151 166 176 188 189 192 196 198 202 207 209 212 208 210 213 216

4.58 115 122 134 148 168 182 204 203 207 208 209 208 211 212 214 215 215 220 226

4.51 116 121 134 147 162 174 194 199 200 199 200 203 207 209 211 211 211 212 218

4.45 114 122 134 151 163 172 191 193 193 192 193 197 201 200 200 202 209 213 217

5.01 119 126 141 156 174 184 204 207 213 214 213 216 221 218 220 226 231 229 230

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Tripura
1961= 100

Agra

Ghaziabad

Kanpur 1960= 100 4.69 68 222 243 256 278 307 328 351 411 428 428 447 459 471 489 520

Lucknow

Varanasi

Asansol

Darjeeling

4.37 65 217 239 257 273 301 321 337 383 409 416 424 435 568 460 468

* 66 210 229 239 262 289 313 334 384 398 403 418 435 438 480 514

* 67 216 237 247 266 295 321 347 406 440 448 467 475 493 519 555

69

1960= 100 1960= 100 1960= 100 5.12 4.77 4.55 72 70 71 234 255 268 289 312 347 371 450 473 466 477 486 504 531 571 206 223 238 260 284 307 322 381 400 412 431 456 472 491 509 199 218 232 255 271 292 304 355 384 382 393 399 423 431 440

4.17 115 123 131 144 156 167 173 175 175 178 181 185 187 185 185 182 182 184 190

4.36 128 136 146 168 193 208 216 216 217 222 227 227 228 225 230 229 230 233 235

4.78 125 132 142 159 182 198 207 205 208 211 215 218 221 218 218 220 222 228 223

4.50 125 132 141 158 183 200 210 209 211 216 222 221 221 221 222 225 226 228 230

* 121 129 144 163 185 195 200 198 203 208 209 209 208 212 212 217 217 220 219

4.96 122 131 142 160 183 194 203 205 209 212 216 214 215 217 218 219 221 223 221

4.37 124 138 151 171 195 211 226 226 230 231 239 241 242 243 243 246 244 247 248

3.80 120 130 142 153 170 184 192 192 193 195 200 203 204 204 204 205 204 211 211

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table B.1.1.2 Concld.


Year/ Base Year month L. Factor

Durgapur * 73 221 242 262 286 312 346 368 430 443 472 509 553 564 581 592

Haldia * 74 228 248 268 288 328 359 385 433 464 481 533 582 590 608 624

Howrah Jalpaiguri Kolkata Raniganj 1960= 100 1960= 100 1960= 100 1960= 4.12 4.16 4.74 4.40 100 75 76 77 78 230 253 271 293 323 346 364 439 482 499 519 542 556 587 620 199 221 232 252 280 299 312 379 399 400 407 417 421 440 452 218 238 257 280 312 340 359 416 437 451 492 530 541 565 587 201 218 229 249 274 298 314 357 373 380 399 416 426 450 471

Siliguri 79

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 II. Base 2001=100 Linking. Factor with previous base 1982=100 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 2013 Jan Feb Mar Apr May

I- Base-1982=100

5.13 121 130 140 155 178 193 207 207 225 224 226 228 230 230 248 247 252 255 256

5.64 116 124 131 144 161 185 208 211 216 217 217 219 219 219 223 223 224 226 228

5.42 121 130 139 154 171 183 197 202 201 203 206 207 207 205 205 207 206 212 213

3.96 117 125 136 150 167 179 189 190 192 193 200 204 205 201 205 205 206 212 212

5.12 121 132 142 156 172 185 197 200 202 202 205 207 210 209 208 209 210 214 218

4.02 124 132 140 156 169 180 193 195 199 199 201 203 204 203 203 203 204 207 211

* 124 135 144 156 173 187 195 195 200 201 201 207 208 207 207 203 207 208 208

* No Linking Factor as these centres were not covered in any of the earlier series Linking Factor - Figures on previous base : 1982=100 and 1960=100 (General Index) can be obtained by multiplying the index numbers of new base: 2001=100 by the respective linking factors given against each centre and rounding off the result to the nearest whole number.

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

1.2 Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural and Rural Labourers Table B.1.2.1 (a)-Year-wise All India Average Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural Labourers ( General & Food on Base:1986-87=100 ) Year/ Annual Average Indices for Month Agricultural Twelve Financial Year Calendar Year Year Monthly moving average of General General Food General Food Year General Food Index Index Index Index Index Index Index 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1995-96 240 @ 242 @ 237 239 1995 239$ 242$ @@ @@ 1996-97 260 264 256 260 1996 249 253 1997-98 269 269 264 264 1997 262 262 1998-99 299 305 293 299 1998 287 293 1999-2000 309 314 306 312 1999 304 310 2000-2001 304 299 305 303 2000 307 307 2001-2002 311 304 309 302 2001 307 300 2002-2003 323 316 318 312 2002 315 308 2003-2004 332 326 331 325 2003 328 322 2004-2005 342 335 340 333 2004 337 331 2005-2006 358 351 353 345 2005 348 341 2006-2007 388 384 380 376 2006 372 366 2007-2008 417 416 409 406 2007 402 400 2008-2009 462 464 450 452 2008 439 440 2009-2010 530 540 513 522 2009 494 500 2010-2011 577 582 564 572 2010 553 562 2011-2012 622 610 611 602 2011 602 598 2012-2013 672 658 2012 652 638 2011-2012 May 638 621 618 June 646 630 622 2012-2013 July 656 643 627 August 666 654 631 September 673 663 636 October 680 668 641 November 685 672 647 December 688 674 652 January 694 679 659 February 700 686 665 March 704 689 672 April 711 695 678 May 719 704 685 Note: -(i) Agricultural Year ( July to June ). (ii) Financial Year ( April to March ). (iii) New series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural Labourers on Base: 1986-87=100 released w.e.f. November, 1995. To obtain indices on Base : 196061=100, the index figures need to be multiplied by the linking factor as below :General Index 5.89 Food Index 6.38 @ = Average based on 8 months i.e. Nov., 95 to June, 96 only. @@ = Average based on 5 months i.e. Nov., 95 to March, 96 only $ = Average based on 2 months i.e. Nov., 95 and Dec., 95 only. 869

Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table B.1.2.1 ( b)-Year-wise All India Average Consumer Price Index Numbers or Rural Labourers ( General & Food on Base:1986-87=100 ) Year/ Annual Average Indices for Month Agricultural Twelve Financial Year Calendar Year Year Monthly moving average of General General Food General Food Year General Food Index Index Index Index Index Index Index 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1995-96 240@ 242@ 238 240 1995 239$ 242$ @@ @@ 1996-97 260 264 256 260 1996 250 253 1997-98 270 270 266 265 1997 263 263 1998-99 299 305 294 300 1998 288 293 1999-2000 310 313 307 311 1999 305 310 2000-2001 306 300 307 303 2000 308 307 2001-2002 313 305 311 303 2001 309 302 2002-2003 325 317 321 312 2002 318 309 2003-2004 335 327 333 326 2003 331 323 2004-2005 344 335 342 333 2004 340 332 2005-2006 360 352 355 346 2005 351 341 2006-2007 389 384 382 376 2006 373 366 2007-2008 418 416 409 406 2007 403 399 2008-2009 462 463 451 452 2008 440 440 2009-2010 529 541 513 523 2009 494 500 2010-2011 577 582 564 573 2010 552 563 2011-2012 623 611 611 603 2011 602 599 2012-2013 673 660 2012 654 640 2011-2012 May 640 624 619 June 648 632 623 2012-2013 July 658 645 628 August 667 656 632 September 675 665 638 October 681 671 643 November 686 674 648 December 689 677 654 January 695 681 660 February 701 687 667 March 705 691 673 April 711 697 680 May 720 706 686 Note: -(i) Agricultural Year ( July to June ). (ii) Financial Year (April to March). (iii) New series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Rural Labourers on Base: 198687=100 was introduced for the first time w.e.f. November, 1995. @ = Average based on 8 months i.e. Nov., 95 to June, 96 only. @@ = Average based on 5 months i.e. Nov., 95 to March, 96 only $ = Average based on 2 months i.e. Nov., 95 and Dec., 95 only.

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table B.1.2.2.(a)-State-wsie Labour Bureaus Series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural Labourers ( General Index on Base: 1986-87=100 ) Agricultural Year/Month Linking factor 1 1995-96 @ 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2011-2012 May June 2012-2013 July August September October November December January February March April May Andhra Assam Bihar Pradesh 4.84 b 6.22 2 3 4 243 244 223 268 259 250 282 281 252 309 311 285 318 323 300 317 322 282 328 320 290 342 330 299 347 343 311 357 347 324 371 362 347 401 388 384 430 417 411 484 451 446 552 520 500 603 580 532 668 622 552 682 689 693 697 703 710 718 725 734 749 752 758 771 648 652 665 670 674 681 682 681 688 691 688 686 692 564 574 587 595 603 609 611 610 619 627 634 640 629 Gujarat Haryana 5.34 5 241 254 270 297 310 314 320 332 339 350 369 403 424 459 538 583 627 646 652 661 669 676 677 683 683 691 698 707 718 726 * 6 235 265 278 306 312 313 322 329 341 359 376 403 447 498 588 642 690 711 721 730 743 757 756 759 763 765 773 775 784 788 Himachal Jammu & Karnataka Pradesh Kashmir * 5.98 5.81 7 8 9 220 226 251 240 252 266 256 269 276 283 303 306 294 323 316 292 326 302 298 331 309 308 344 325 321 345 341 325 348 340 343 359 341 367 392 367 376 413 406 406 453 458 455 524 535 484 568 595 513 608 665 531 530 538 546 555 556 559 556 554 556 555 557 560 627 628 639 645 654 660 665 669 676 682 688 689 694 691 696 702 706 713 725 739 746 758 765 767 775 792

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table B.1.2.2.(a)-Concld. Kerala Madhya Agricultural Pradesh Year/Month Linking factor 1 6.56 10 6.04 11

Maharashtra 5.85 12

Manipur * 13

Meghalaya * 14

Orissa 6.05 15 236 254 262 289 316 304 300 298 314 320 334 365 400 438 495 538 562 577 590 600 610 612 620 625 626 632 636 638 645 657

1995-96 @ 259 237 248 244 252 1996-97 281 261 256 252 264 1997-98 292 273 266 268 282 1998-99 305 300 291 292 321 1999-2000 312 313 304 312 338 2000-2001 321 310 303 316 346 2001-2002 321 310 306 304 351 2002-2003 330 318 321 300 343 2003-2004 342 318 335 308 350 2004-2005 351 330 350 310 360 2005-2006 356 352 368 328 382 2006-2007 374 388 402 337 410 2007-2008 403 412 432 367 439 2008-2009 454 459 475 407 484 2009-2010 496 525 562 455 540 2010-2011 562 569 619 527 576 601 691 594 633 2011-2012 615 2011-2012 609 May 630 709 613 658 610 June 636 715 618 664 2012-2013 618 July 648 730 625 672 624 August 662 745 628 683 630 September 668 749 629 698 640 October 675 756 631 704 652 November 673 763 633 708 661 December 676 768 632 709 670 January 679 759 634 711 676 February 684 761 642 713 686 March 688 763 644 715 698 April 691 764 650 713 708 May 699 773 658 725 Note:- Agricultural Year ( July to June ) @ = Average based on 8 months i.e. from November, 1995 to June, 1996 only.

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Punjab c 16 244 263 278 306 314 316 326 331 343 355 380 417 448 501 586 624 685 710 713

Rajasthan 6.15 17 238 261 268 290 310 311 309 325 323 346 377 413 439 490 573 608 668 688 692

Tamil Nadu 5.67 18 246 261 264 291 302 299 311 344 349 347 355 371 403 455 514 565 605 627 635

Tripura * 19 220 240 263 312 331 324 322 325 326 337 351 383 407 433 466 514 548 562 565

Uttar Pradesh 6.60 20 232 264 268 298 307 301 312 323 331 343 371 408 433 469 535 566 595 609 621

West Bengal 5.73 21 230 247 259 308 303 292 303 305 321 333 342 365 395 432 504 561 592 600 612

571 638 625 726 701 638 572 653 636 739 717 644 581 672 641 743 728 653 590 674 647 749 734 662 589 671 651 752 739 666 588 667 652 749 746 681 587 671 660 755 758 686 583 676 658 760 765 696 591 677 658 765 768 709 592 681 663 772 773 722 597 684 682 775 776 733 * = Indices for the State compiled and published for the first time w.e.f. November, 1995. b & c = To obtain linking factors for Assam and Punjab on Base 1986-87=100, please consult article published in February, 1996 issue of the Indian Labour Journal.

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table B.1.2.2 (b).-State-wise Labour Bureaus Series of Consumer Price Index Numbers for Rural Labourers ( General Index Base: 1986-87=100 ) Agricultural Year/Month 1 1995-96 @ 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2011-2012 May June 2012-2013 July August September October November December January February March April May Andhra Assam Bihar Pradesh_ 2 244 269 282 309 318 318 328 343 348 357 371 401 429 482 550 599 665 680 687 692 696 702 709 717 724 733 747 751 757 769 3 243 258 278 310 321 321 320 330 344 348 364 390 419 454 524 583 625 651 654 667 673 677 685 687 685 693 695 692 690 696 4 223 250 254 287 302 284 292 301 313 326 348 384 412 447 500 532 555 567 577 590 598 606 612 614 612 622 630 637 643 633 Gujarat Haryana 5 241 254 270 298 311 315 322 333 341 351 371 403 425 460 538 583 626 646 652 660 668 675 676 681 682 690 697 706 715 723 6 237 266 279 306 312 314 323 330 342 361 378 404 445 495 583 638 685 706 715 724 736 750 750 753 757 759 768 769 779 781 Himachal Pradesh 7 221 240 258 284 295 294 304 314 326 331 350 377 388 420 474 503 535 552 553 561 571 577 580 586 582 578 581 582 587 592 Jammu & Kashmir 8 225 250 266 297 316 319 324 337 340 344 359 393 413 451 521 564 602 619 620 632 638 649 655 660 666 674 681 687 687 692 Karnataka 9 250 266 276 306 316 304 311 326 341 340 341 367 407 459 534 594 665 691 695 701 704 712 723 736 744 754 763 765 772 789

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Kerala 10 260 284 294 306 314 324 324 332 343 352 359 378 404 456 502 566 604 613 615 622 628 634 644 655 664 673 679 689 697 707

Madhya Pradesh 11 239 262 274 300 314 313 314 323 324 336 358 392 415 463 532 576 622 639 645 657 670 676 684 682 687 689 693 696 699 709

Maharashtra 12 247 256 266 291 303 303 307 321 336 350 368 400 428 470 557 613 683 703 708 722 738 743 750 757 762 754 756 758 759 768

Manipur 13 245 253 268 293 312 317 304 301 309 311 328 338 368 407 456 529 596 614 619 626 629 630 632 634 633 636 644 646 652 660

Meghalaya 14 250 263 281 319 336 343 348 340 349 358 379 408 436 481 535 572 629 654 659 667 678 692 698 702 702 706 707 710 708 720

Orissa 15 236 254 262 289 315 304 300 299 314 320 335 366 400 439 496 538 563 579 591 601 611 612 621 626 627 632 636 639 646 658

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table B.1.2.2 (b) - Concld. Agricultural Year/Month 1 1995-96 @ 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2011-2012 May June 2012-2013 July August September October November December January February March April May Punjab 16 247 265 281 309 317 320 330 336 347 359 384 419 449 501 585 622 681 707 709 722 733 736 742 745 743 748 753 757 763 768 Rajasthan 17 239 262 270 292 310 312 311 326 323 345 375 412 438 486 567 600 661 683 687 696 712 723 727 733 738 749 755 758 760 764 Tamil Nadu 18 244 260 265 290 301 299 311 343 348 348 355 370 402 452 509 559 603 625 634 637 643 652 661 664 678 683 693 704 716 727 Tripura 19 219 237 261 308 328 318 316 318 318 329 344 373 399 429 462 512 547 559 562 570 572 581 591 591 589 587 581 587 589 592 Uttar Pradesh 20 231 262 267 297 307 303 316 326 335 346 372 409 434 469 532 563 597 612 623 640 654 671 673 670 666 671 675 676 681 684 West Bengal 21 232 248 260 309 304 293 305 308 324 336 346 368 398 435 506 564 597 608 619 632 642 647 654 658 659 666 665 664 669 689

Note: Agricultural Year ( July to June ) @ = Average based on 8 months i.e. from November, 1995 to June, 1996 only.

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

1.3. Urban Non-Manual Employees Consumer Price Index Table B.1.3. All India Consumer Price Index Numbers for Urban Non-Manual Employees (Base: 1984-85=100) General Index 1 2 1990 156 1991 177 1992 199 1993 212 1994 231 1995 254 1996 276 1997 297 1998 330 1999 348 2000 366 2001 386 2002 402 2003 416 2004 432 2005 451 2006 478 2007 509 2008 548 2009 612 2010 687 Consumer Price Index for Rural and Urban Areas on base: 2010=100* Year/Month Rural Urban General Index General Index 2012 May 119.1 117.1 June 120.5 118.5 July 122.6 119.9 August 124.3 121.1 September 125.6 121.9 October 126.6 122.6 November 126.9 123.4 December 126.8 124 2013 January 127.3 124.9 February 128.1 125.8 March 128.3 126.5 April 128.7 127.4 May 129.8 128.4 * New series of CPI has been introduced w.e.f. Jan., 2011. Source: Central Statistical Organisation, New Delhi. Year/Month

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

1.4. Wholesale Price Index Table B.1.4 Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices in India Year/ Month All Commodities All 3 210.0 233.2 245.3 273.7 301.4 320.7 335.5 371.9 388.1 161.5 167.0 171.7 180.0 187.5 191.3 203.4 220.8 243.0 264.0 175.9 197.1 215.0 215.0 219.1 221.8 221.6 219.4 221.1 219.9 223.6 224.4 223.6 228.0 229.3 I. Primary Articles Food Non-Food Articles Articles 4 5 230.3 266.8 281.8 303.6 331.1 362.7 384.3 431.8 454.3 170.0 174.3 178.6 181.0 185.1 192.4 205.6 220.0 234.6 264.0 174.6 190.4 206.1 209.4 212.4 211.8 213.1 212.7 213.8 211.2 214.7 215.4 214.3 219.8 223.1 221.8 231.6 238.5 285.5 322.1 327.0 335.1 368.2 378.9 144.6 152.6 158.6 182.4 190.7 180.2 182.6 206.1 234.4 237.2 155.9 183.1 198.8 194.1 199.7 207.4 203.2 198.8 201.4 203.5 206.9 206.8 206.9 209.7 208.5 Minerals 6 112.1 115.5 128.5 141.6 151.5 156.4 160.9 163.7 168.8 110.2 118.4 119.4 118.3 223.8 298.6 397.4 430.1 616.4 605.9 244.0 299.2 344.4 326.6 336.5 356.6 352.2 339.8 344.7 347.0 353.6 357.8 357.4 355.0 346.5 II. Fuel Power Light and Lubricants 7 193.3 219.3 254.3 278.3 284.1 311.2 355.8 380.7 403.0 196.0 224.8 234.9 250.6 273.5 300.8 322.2 322.9 354.5 334.3 144.2 163.3 178.9 181.1 179.5 181.7 188.5 189.8 188.7 190.4 193.4 195.5 195.9 194.6 192

1 2 I Base 1981-1982=100 1991 201.4 1992 224.7 1993 242.1 1994 267.4 1995 292.4 1996 309.0 1997 325.6 1998 348.2 1999 360.3 II Base 1993-94=100 2000 152.8 2001 160.7 2002 164.7 2003 173.4 2004 184.9 2005 193.7 2006 203.0 2007 212.8 2008 232.2 2009 237.0 III Base: 2004-05 = 100 2010 140.1 2011 153.4 2012May 163.9 June 164.7 July 165.8 Aug 167.3 Sept. 168.8 Oct. 168.5 Nov. 168.8 Dec. 168.8 2013 Jan. 170.3 170.9 Feb 170.6 Mar 171.5 Apr 171.6 May

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

III Manufactured Products All Food Products Beverages Tobacco & Tobacco Products 10 258.1 288.7 302.4 332.4 367.9 387.3 430.7 471.5 501.4 177.1 190.7 202.7 205.0 212.8 223.8 238.6 262.9 287.5 305.5 143.1 159.4 170.7 171.3 171.8 174.9 176.0 177.2 176.9 177.1 178.4 178.5 178.1 181.2 181.9 Textiles Wood & Wood Products 12 159.5 273.8 366.3 414.6 438.3 445.5 474.8 598.2 622.3 185.1 172.5 178.8 179.2 179.5 187.5 204.7 215.5 229.3 236.8 147.5 157.7 166.5 167.8 170.9 171.2 171.0 171.2 172.9 173.5 173.9 173.4 173.5 174.0 174.3 Paper & Paper Products 13 251.1 301.0 324.5 330.8 362.3 377.4 371.6 382.7 395.1 159.5 174.1 172.9 173.8 173.7 177.1 188.0 193.6 200.3 204.3 123.1 130.8 134.2 134.5 134.7 135.6 136.3 136.5 137.0 137.7 139.4 139.4 140.0 140.0 140.7 Leather & leather Products 14 234.9 227.4 240.1 256.7 274.7 280.6 287.1 296.8 312.2 151.8 144.0 131.0 142.3 152.4 166.0 162.0 166.2 167.2 166.7 127.6 128.3 132.8 133.0 135.1 135.1 134.5 134.3 133.1 135.1 134.5 134.1 134.3 135.1 136.1 Rubber & Plastic Products 15 167.9 183.3 189.2 195.3 228.3 242.5 245.5 247.4 245.5 125.3 125.8 130.6 134.4 135.1 137.4 145.4 156.0 165.4 168.6 123.2 132.9 135.8 135.9 136.7 137.2 137.7 137.7 137.8 138.6 139.2 139.3 139.4 139.5 139.7

8 198.1 220.8 238.0 261.7 288.8 301.9 314.2 328.7 336.6 140.2 144.2 146.6 154.0 164.3 170.6 176.3 185.5 201.2 205.9 128.1 137.5 144.6 145.3 146.1 147.2 148.0 147.9 148.0 148.0 148.5 148.6 148.4 148.7 149.1

9 201.1 221.1 240.1 264.4 278.4 289.5 316.4 340.0 344.8 147.2 144.9 150.8 163.0 173.5 176.2 180.7 186.9 205.2 233.6 140.9 149.1 156.9 157.6 160.8 164.9 167.3 166.7 166.6 166.7 166.6 166.7 164.9 165.8 167.1

11 183.4 198.4 212.7 246.9 287.9 303.0 307.8 318.6 321.2 118.6 120.5 120.0 128.3 137.5 129.7 131.6 132.2 135.8 143.3 115.3 128.8 129.9 130.2 130.0 130.7 131.8 131.8 132.2 132.5 132.2 132.8 132.7 133.6 135.0

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Indian Labour Journal, August 2013

Table B.1.4 Concld. Year/ Month III Manufactured Products Chemicals & Non-metallic Basic Metals Machinery & Transport Chemical Mineral Alloys & Metal Machine tools Equipment and Products Products Products parts 1 16 17 18 19 20 I Base 1981-82=100 1991 162.4 208.7 231.8 200.4 197.1 1992 186.7 229.4 250.9 226.8 215.5 1993 204.8 248.3 270.8 235.8 222.1 1994 225.1 270.9 293.1 254.6 234.4 1995 246.7 305.4 324.4 280.2 250.5 1996 257.3 331.0 337.4 292.0 263.4 1997 267.3 341.3 346.6 299.4 272.7 1998 277.1 351.0 352.4 303.0 283.1 1999 289.9 369.0 357.6 307.6 295.4 II Base 1993-94=100 2000 161.9 128.4 139.1 120.2 141.1 2001 168.4 145.6 140.9 128.5 146.5 2002 172.0 142.6 143.2 130.0 147.9 2003 176.9 146.7 160.1 132.0 147.0 2004 180.1 154.9 195.5 137.7 152.1 2005 186.9 167.1 218.8 146.1 159.0 2006 192.5 186.4 225.0 152.7 161.8 2007 201.3 204.8 244.6 164.9 164.9 2008 218.2 215.5 285.5 173.4 174.4 2009 224.9 221.9 257.4 172.7 175.6 III Base: 2004-05 = 100 2010 122.1 143.6 137.3 120.3 119.4 2011 132.1 150.3 152.3 124.2 123.6 2012 May 141.4 159.9 166.3 127.0 127.3 June 141.9 161.3 166.8 127.7 128.2 July 142.6 162.8 166.6 128.2 128.8 Aug 143.4 164.5 166.5 128.3 129.1 Sept. 144.0 164.5 167.1 128.4 129.9 Oct. 144.2 164.0 166.6 128.6 130.3 Nov. 144.1 163.1 166.5 128.8 130.8 Dec. 144.5 162.4 165.4 128.9 131.2 2013 Jan. 145.6 164.8 165.3 129.3 131.4 145.8 165.6 165.1 129.3 132.0 Feb 145.5 167.7 164.8 129.5 132.3 Mar 145.8 166.6 164.3 129.6 132.4 Apr 146.1 164.8 163.8 130.1 132.1 May Note : Linking factor for deriving the General Indices on base: 1981-82=100 to Base 1993-94 is 2.478 and from base 1993-94=100 to base 2004-05 is for All commodities = 1.873, Primary article =1.881, Fuel & Power = 2.802, Manufactured products = 1.663 Source: Office of the Economic Adviser, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, New Delhi.

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2. WAGES AND EARNINGS Table B.2.1 Earnings (Basic Wage, Dearness Allowances) of the Lowest Paid Workers/ Operatives in Cotton Textile Mills for the month of May, 2013. Year/ Ahmedabad Bangalore Vadodara Mumbai Coimbatore Month & Chennai 1 2 3 4 5 6 1985 793.15 876.48 766.00 874.54 934.21 1990 1147.88 1379.74 1118.89 1313.78 1507.45 1995 1825.00 2397.19 1792.94 2237.85 2740.68 1996 1996.05 2591.10 1963.43 2389.95 2953.13 1997 2155.88 2840.36 2122.65 2622.11 3178.79 1998 2348.78 3073.17 2314.56 2958.08 3523.80 1999 2543.10 3199.73 2507.78 3084.01 3732.75 2000 2646.28 3353.44 2610.72 3294.36 3954.97 2001 2751.31 3451.66 2715.14 3455.99 4062.23 2002 2849.90 3567.03 2799.20 3642.14 4287.30 2003 2930.80 3749.72 2891.41 3811.69 4438.76 2004 3019.05 3944.89 2981.75 3941.44 4583.10 2005 3100.05 4191.63 3062.36 3996.49 4726.11 2006 3273.76 4447.32 3235.24 4227.16 4859.40 2007 3539.73 4821.78 3490.90 4472.78 5137.83 2008 3767.74 5275.10 3726.69 4799.79 5559.81 2009 4076.37 5903.63 4034.08 5267.03 6164.64 2010 4623.52 6431.40 4579.07 5782.10 6648.95 2011 5054.33 6880.72 5007.73 6369.27 7065.77 2012 5554.74 7469.64 5505.81 7023.55 8065.37 2012 May 5514.42 7457.76 5465.42 6951.47 7895.30 June 5541.37 7565.33 5492.34 6951.47 7978.60 July 5622.20 7529.06 5573.11 7084.54 8186.85 Aug. 5622.20 7671.66 5573.11 7151.08 8311.80 Sept. 5703.03 7494.03 5653.88 7217.62 8353.45 Oct. 5812.03 7529.06 5761.57 7317.42 8395.10 Nov. 5865.92 7671.66 5815.42 7383.96 8311.80 Dec. 5838.98 7850.53 5788.49 7417.23 8436.75 2013 Jan. 5865.92 7814.26 5815.42 7450.49 8561.70 Feb. 5892.87 7956.86 5842.34 7483.76 8686.65 Mar. 6027.59 8064.43 5976.95 7550.30 8769.60 Apr. 6082.70 8135.73 6030.80 7616.84 8686.65 May 6082.70 8420.93 6030.80 7650.11 8728.30 N.B.- Yearly figures indicate average of twelve calendar months and the monthly figures relate to a standard month of 26 days.

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Table B.2.1 concld. Year/ Delhi Month 1 7 1985 734.12 1990 1070.33 1995 1739.63 1996 1831.84 1997 2013.39 1998 2307.43 1999 2524.99 2000 2693.26 2001 2775.73 2002 2881.49 2003 2981.47 2004 3113.99 2005 3350.68 2006 3544.08 2007 * 2008 * 2009 * 2010 * 2011 * 2012 * * 2012 May * June * July * Aug. * Sept * Oct. * Nov. * Dec. * 2013 Jan. * Feb. * Mar. * Apr. * May

Indore 8 755.14 1143.01 1810.43 1970.78 2061.69 2256.09 2466.82 2540.94 2675.21 2792.85 2912.04 2986.63 3057.48 3255.16 3474.05 3676.41 3939.07 4418.29 4748.82 5189.95 5044.39 5044.39 5247.66 5247.66 5247.66 5458.79 5458.79 5458.79 5546.99 5546.99 5546.99 5644.02 5644.02

Kanpur 9 824.70 1232.60 1949.70 2078.29 2243.55 2553.60 2743.61 2750.02 2839.01 2931.94 2995.84 3112.39 3279.56 3592.54 3833.84 4062.10 4487.57 5238.85 5731.94 6104.54 5976.96 6090.36 6062.01 6118.71 6261.81 6403.56 6431.91 6403.56 6403.56 6403.56 6431.91 6518.31 6546.66

Nagpur 10 658.96 956.25 1520.00 1638.04 1794.01 1988.73 2140.61 2195.02 2322.34 2383.55 2422.82 2496.74 2637.64 2338.85 3097.41 3318.05 3726.56 4391.43 4800.80 5212.98 5098.46 5134.99 5185.58 5251.15 5324.22 5404.78 5476.91 5513.44 5513.44 5491.90 5499.39 5549.98 5608.99

Solapur 11 723.32 1045.37 1744.67 1889.84 1981.08 2249.74 2399.14 2474.53 2489.57 2572.85 2636.12 2789.17 2841.65 2239.55 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Kolkata 12 814.33 1195.16 1887.30 2099.53 2229.42 2452.04 2728.51 2796.11 2964.03 3292.82 3347.73 3478.77 3599.75 3797.02 4097.84 4420.66 4775.49 5362.25 5755.50 6134.40 5938.98 5938.98 5938.98 6286.02 6286.02 6286.02 6454.29 6454.29 6454.29 6633.07 6633.07 6633.07 6643.58

New series on Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers on base 2001=100 has been introduced w.e.f. the index of January 2006. Centre linking factor on base 2001=100 is: Ahmedabad (4.62), Bangalore (4.51), Vadodara (4.39), Mumbai (5.18), Coimbatore / Chennai (4.95), Delhi(5.60), Indore(4.73),Kanpur(4.50), Nagpur (4.68), Sholapur (4.73) and Kolkata (5.12) * Earning of Delhi and Sholapur Centres have been discontinued due to closure of Textile Mills. Source: Monthly returns received from the selected centres.

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3. INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES Table B.3.1- Industrial Disputes (All Strikes and Lockouts) during the period 2006 to 2013 Year Disputes 1 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011(P) 2012(P) 2013(P) (Jan. to May) 2 430 389 421 345 371 388 275 62 Number of Workers Involved 3 1810348 724574 1579298 1867204 1074473 734503 1223908 212985 Mandays Lost (000 ) 4 20324 27167 17433 17622 23131 14332 3174 855

(P) = Provisional and based on the returns /clarifications received in the Bureau till 28th June, 2013

The art of being wise is the art of knowing what to overlook. -William James

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Priced publications of the Labour Bureau 1. ANNUAL SURVEY OF INDUSTRIES 2008-09 (VOL. I) Statistics on Employment and Labour Cost Symbol: PDLB.649 (Vol.I) 120-2011 (DSK-II) Price : Rs. 210.00

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4. REPORT ON THE SURVEY ON SOCIO ECONOMIC CONDITIONS OF LICENSED RAILWAY PORTERS AT FIVE SELECTED CENTRES, 2004 The report contains data on demographic particulars, earnings, expenditure, assets, consumption habits, indebtedness, health, availability of welfare facilities and industrial relations etc. in respect of Licensed Railway Porters working at the five selected centres. The data would be of immense use to the authorities entrusted with the task of ameliorating the lot of these workers. Symbol: PDLB 508 (E) Price : Rs. 65.00 250-2004(DSK-II) 5. RURAL LABOUR ENQUIRY REPORT ON WAGES & EARNINGS OF RURAL LABOUR HOUSEHOLDS 2004-2005

The report contains data on Wages & Earnings of Rural labour Households collected by the national Sample Survey Organisation during its 61 st round (2004-2005) of survey. It gives information on Wages & Earnings of Rural as well as Agricultural labour Households by States and Categories of Households, in the country, for various agricultural occupations. The data is of immense use to the planners, researchers and policy framers. Symbol: PDLB - 638 250-2010 (DSK-II) 6. Price : Rs. 105.00

RURAL LABOUR ENQUIRY REPORT ON GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF RURAL LABOUR HOUSEHOLDS 2004-2005

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9. RURAL LABOUR ENQUIRY REPORT ON EMPLOYMENT & UNEMPLOYMENT OF RURAL LABOUR HOUSEHOLDS - 2004-2005 The report presents analysis of data on employment & unemployment of rural labour households on the basis of the results of data collected by National Sample Survey Organisation during its 61st round (2004-05) of survey. This report has been brought out in two volumes. Vol.I presents the main findings whereas Vol.-II contains appendices in which detailed data have been presented. The data is of immense use to the planners, researchers and policy framers. Symbol: PDLB 631 Price (per set) : Rs. 525.00 250-2008 (DSK-II) 10. CONSUMER PRICE INDEX NUMBERS FOR AGRICULTURAL AND RURAL LABOURERS 1986-87=100) Annual Report- 2010-2011 ( Agricultural Year) This publication, 14th in the series, contains detailed information on Consumer price Index Numbers for Agricultural and Rural Labourers ( Base: 1986-87=100) for the period July, 2010 to June, 2011. These index numbers, and especially the CPI (AL), play an important role in fixing/revising the minimum wages of agricultural workers Symbol: PDL 558 Price: Rs. 70.00 150-2011 (DSK-II) 11. CONSUMER PRICE INDEX NUMBERS ( For Industrial Workers) 2001=100 Annual Report- 2011 The publication presents serial statistics on Consumer Price Index Number for Industrial Workers with Base: 2001=100 for 78 industrial centres and also for all India. It also contains major group-wise (food, pan, supari, tobacco and intoxicants, fuel and light, housing, clothing, bedding and footwear and miscellaneous) and subgroups wise indices alongwith Linking Factors for conversion of the index to old base (1982=100) Symbol: PDL 559 Price: Rs. 210.00 300-2011 (DSK-II) 12. WAGE RATES IN RURAL INDIA 2011-2012 (Agricultural Year) The publication, 15th in the series, contains daily wage rate data in respect of 11 Agricultural and 7 Non-Agricultural Occupations for the period July, 2011 to June, 2012. The data on wage rates play an important role in the calculation of State/National Income, drawing up and implementation of wage policy as well as in fixation/revision of support prices of agricultural crops. Symbol: PDLB 660 Price: Rs.90.00 200-2012 (DSK-II) 13. NINTH DIGEST OF INDIAN LABOUR RESEARCH 2010 The publication present an annotated bibliography of research studies undertaken by various Universities, Government Departmentsn (Central/State), Social Research Institutes, Employers and Workers organizations and individual researchers in the field of labour and labour related issues. Symbol: PDLB 644 100-2010 (DSK-II) Price : Rs. 109.00

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14. TRADE UNION IN INDIA 2008 Trade Unions in India is abiennial publication. It presents information in respect of Workers and Employers Unions, on Resigtered Trade Unions submitting returns by their sex-wise embership. Besides, it also present data of income and expenditure of Workers as well as Employers Unions. Price : Rs. 71.00 Symbol: PDLB -655 150-2011(DSK)

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17. REPORT ON EMPLOYMENT-UNEMPLOYMENT SURVEY 2009-10 The present Employment-Unemployment survey is the first such Household survey undertaken by the Bureau at the National level. The survey was undertaken across 28 States and UTs of the country.The report offers an assessment of the employment-unemployment situation experienced by the economy over the years, defines the various concepts and terminologies used in the survey, provides a range of demographic particulars of the population and significantly provides various labour force estimates at state and overall level which have enormous relevance.

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18. INDIAN LABOUR YEAR BOOK 2009 and 2010 The Indian Labour Year Book provides , in a compact volume, a general description of various topics, alongwith the latest available data in the field of labour such as Employment, Wages, Levels of Living and Consumer Price Index Numbers, Industrial Relation, Welfare, Housing, Health, Labour Legislation, Labour Administration etc., alongwith relevant supporting statistics and synopsis of Labour Bureau Publications.

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INDIAN BOOK EXCHANGE Registration No. G 3/DL(N)-04/0008/2003-05

Printed by the Printing Unit of Labour Bureau, Shimla Editor I.S.Negi, Labour Bureau, Shimla and published by Controller of Publications, Government of India, Civil Lines, Delhi-110054

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