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USD and RAWANG CHURCHES DF CHRIST IN BURMA

NORTH BURMA CHRISTIAN MISSION

"Where China, Tibet, Burma and India Meet"

(Formerly Yunnan-Tibetan Christian Mission)

Lisa Christian family at Muladi, eight children and


one grandchild.

"l will praise thee, O L,ord my God, with all my heart:


and I will glorify thy name for evermore." psalm sena

FIRST & SECOND 1961 NEWSLETTER


No. 26 & 27 News Series Beginning January, 1953 The J. Russell Morse Family
P. O. Potao

Kachin State, Burma

FORWORD

Due to unavoidable circumstances the Newsletters of the North Bur

ma Christian Mission have been long delayed during the past months. Lost mail, illness of the missionaries both on the field and in the U.S. A. and your editor as well, and the problem of "too few hours in the day" for all of us, have been contributing factors. Perhaps the great est obstacle for the 1961 Newsletters has been the constantly changing of conditions from day to day - news that was accurate one day was
obsolete the next.

We hesitated about using some of the material contained herein but letters asking many questions that will be answered with this material and the special request of the folks on the field that the material be used - even though late - has helped us to reach the decision, with the approval of the missionari es, to combine the First and Second
Newsletters of 1961.

IT HAPPENED IN 1960
JANUARY

Mr. Stanley Vincent, Rangoon representative of the British and Foreign Bible Society returned to Rangoon on January 7th, after hav ing spent the holiday season with the missionaries. He spoke once at the Christmas convention, and also at the regular services in the Muladi and Dukdang churches.

The preachers and elders school was held in Muladi with an at tendance of 140. Mrs. J. Russell Morse, Eugene and Robert did the teaching. Mrs. J. Russell Morse continued teaching English and Bible class es in the Christian Middle School, spending 4-5 hours a day.
FEBRUARY

Robert and Drema Esther received permission from the military officials to make a one-month trip to the eastern sector of the mission

field. They visited the mission station at Tiliwago where Robert and Betty had worked before mission activity was restricted to the Putao area. They also went to Kobudeh, where Dorothy Sterling had worked.
Both Robert and Drema were able to visit a number of churches, and
attended Easter Conventions in different areas.
AAARCH

Closing exercises forthe Primary Christian School and presentation of awards were held at Dukdang, followed by a feast for all students
and teachers.

Robert held a one-week school for church leaders in the Til iwago area. Drema Esther returned from the trip to Til iwago.

APRIL

This was the time of Easter Conventions. Permission was granted by the Army for Mr. and Mr?. J. Russell Morse and Eugene to attend a convention in the eastern part of the field at Tang-ga, April 1-3.
Upon return, Mrs. J. Russell Morse began a three month tour of the

churches in the Putao area. Robert returned from Tiliwago April 7th.
MAY

On the Field

Robert, Betty and the three boys went to Myitkyina for a week for medical and dental check-up, after which Robert, Stevie and Ro

bert Jr. returned to Dukdang, and Betty and Joni proceeded to Ran goon for add it ion a I treatment, Betty became very ill enroute and upon arrival had to go directly to the hospital.
Mrs. J. Russell Morse continued her tour of the churches in the
Putao area,

In the States

LaVerne and Lois, who were on furlough were busy with final packing, speaking dates and LaVerne was comp I et i ng his year cf graduate work at Cincinnati Bible Seminary. He was awarded his de

Rangoon June 2nd, after a couple brief stops enroute,


JUNE

gree at the Commencement on the morn ing of May 27th. They left by air that same afternoon for Tulsa, stayed overnight then on to Cal ifornia. They left the States Sunday night. May ^th, and arrived in

On the Field

after leaving the U.S.A. The new term was opened at the Putao Christian Middle School (at Muladi). Robert went to Rangoon for a week on business. Htlen taught English and Eugene taught Bible in
the Christian Middle School.
JULY

LaVerne and Lois arrived in Muladi on June 6th, ust one week

On the Field

Robert, Betty and Joni returned from Rangoon July 4th. Lois
taughtEnglish and LaVerne taught Bible in theChristian Middle School.

AUGUST

On the Field

Eugene, Helen and family and Mr. and Mrs. J. Russell Morse left Muladi for Myitkyina enroute to the U.S.A. One week was spent in obtaining necessary visas, after which they went on to Rangoon. The latter part of August LaVerne made a trip to Rangoon to see their
goods through customs.
SEPTEMBER

On the Field

Eugene, Helen and family left Rangoon September 7th, visiting in Hongkong, Japan and Hawaii enroute to the States. Mr. and Mrs. J. Russell Morse left Rangoon September 13th and visited with missionaries in Hongkong, the Philippines, Japan and Ha waii on their way to the States. LaVerne returned to Muladi September 15th, after caring for ur

gent business matters in Rangoon; received go<^s shipped from the


States and applied for renewal of residence visas for himself and Lois.
In the States

Eugene, Helen and^ family arrived in the U.S.A. on September 17th. Visited briefly with Eugene's living link church (First Christian) in Compton, California. Stopped overnight in Tulsa with relatives, arrived in Terre Haute, Indiana September 22nd and the three boys, David, Tommy and Ronnie entered school on September 24th.
OCTOBER

On the Field

LaVerne and Lois rejoiced in the safe arrival of Cynthia Marie, born October 2nd at Muladi. Cynthia is their third child, second
daughter.

The Preacher's Bible Seminary began at Dukdang October 3rd,


with Robert and LaVerne teaching.
In the States

Eugene and Helen and family settled in Terre Haute, the boys becoming adjusted to school, Eugene and Helen speaking for churches and rallies, renewing friendships in Helen's home church (Maplewood
Christian, her living link church). Mr. and Mrs. J. Russell Morse arrived in the U.S.A. October 20,

visited withand spokefor churchesin California; visited their daughter, Ruth Margaret and family (Mr. and Mrs. Frank Johnson) in Santa Bar-

bara, California, where they are with the LaMesa Christian Church.
NOVEMBER

On the Field

The preachers school in Dukdang continued with 150 students.


In the States

Mr. and Mrs. J. Russell Morse remained in California speaking for many churches. Eugene and Helen spoke for churches in the Indi
ana-Illinois area.
DECEMBER

On the Field
Bible School tor Preachers closed after 11 weeks of concentrated

study. Christmas Conventions were held throughout the mission area. In the Putao plains area attendance of more than 3,000 was reported.
In the States

This was a month of family get-togethers. Mr. and Mrs. J, Rus


sell Morse visited with their sisters and other rel ati ves in Tulsa and

Oklahoma City - also spoke for many churches in the area.


Helen was not able to travel in December but Eugene continued

to speak until just before Christmas. Helen's sisters and their families, her brother and wife and her parents were able to enjoy the Christmas season with them - cousins getting together for the first time. In try ing to sum up the activities of the year it is impossible to include many things that are a vital part of the mission work, still are
more or less a "continuous work" rather than taking place at given

times and places. This would include the vital medical work done by J. Russell Morse and Drema Esther - a work that is carried on day by day, having no set "vacation" from it. Teaching the children by the mothers (Helen, Betty and Lois) is another task that goes on constant ly. Much typing and mimeographing is necessary in preparing class
notes during the Bible Schools and also other teaching materials. Helen

and Lois have done the major part of this work as both have had train ing and experience in this phase of the work. Maintenance of build ings and equipment, done mostly by Eugene or under his supervision is another phase that is almostcontinuousas the buildings do not last very long, and the record-players are a vital part of Evangelism since the missionaries are restricted in their travel and cannot go out on ex tensive evangelistic trips as they used to do. Also, a vital phase of work is the conferring with preachers and church leaders from the var
ious churches - near and far and these conferences take much of the

missionaries' time but are very important for the nurture and develop
ment of the churches.

Ed. Note:

This article was written by Mr. Morse before

word had been received of the serious illness of Drema

Ester and her subsequent inability to carry on the medical


work.

SALUTING OUR ROPE-HOLDERS

By J. Russell Morse

After our fifth term of 7-1/2 years "Where China, Tibet, Burma and
India meet," Gertrude and I returned to our wonderful homeland USA

on October 20th. Enroute we had visited with missionaries in Bangkok, Manila, Hongkong, Osakoy Tokyo and Honolulu, that we might get better acquainted and "bear one another's burdens and so fulfill the
law of Christ."

Our Re-entry Permit for Burma expires on September 5th, 1961 but

due to urgent situations there we feel that we should try to begin our

ourney from Cal ifomia about mid-May. Purchase and shipping of

Mission equipment and supplies must nave our undistracted attention, so it seems we can hardly accept many invitationsto speak in churches
from now on.

The words of the Apostle Paul describes our situation now; "A great door andeffectual isopened unto me, and there are many adversaries." (I Cor. 16:9, also read Acts 19th Chapter.) TheGospel has continued amazingly fruitful among these most needyand worthwhile Lisu and Rawang and other tribespeople. "The harvest truly is plenteou,$, but
the laborers are few" (Matt. 9:37). With half the Mission staff now on furlough, and Robert and Betty Morse and their children due to leave North Burma about next July or August, we feel that we must arriv6 there for conferences and to get under the load before their
departure.

Our "Morse Code" names for Robert and Betty is "Bobetty," for

LaVeme and Lois is "Lola," and for Eugene and Helen is "Genelen." We urgently request special prayers in the transitional months ahead, for them and their 13 children, also for our foster daughter, Drema Esther, who is trying to carrv the med i cal ministry for sometimes as many as 100 patients daily auring my absence. Communist caused chaos in Laos is sure to have repercussions in Thai
land, perhaps also in Burma to a lesser extent.

So-called "peace" in ^rma is very uneasy and uncertain, also the

Robert has been working hard to complete the Rawang translation of the New Testament before returning to the States for fu rl ough. Be

"immerse," the printing will not be done by one of the Bible Societies, so it is likely to be more expensive. In the first edition, not less than 5,000 copies costing at least $1.50 each will be needed. May our Lord's faithful stewards arise to adopt this as a "service link." Con sider that these people have no other literature whatever to compete
with or to distract from our Christian literature.

cause of our giving the word "baptize" its true and proper meaning of

the strenous days that are ahead.

We ask your prayers for our physical and spiritual strength during

April 30, 1961


Our dear Christian Friends:

the happy meetings and short visits which we had with some of you and

As the time for our departure to Burma draws near, we remember

regret that we were unable to meet each of you. We were visiting and speaking in various churches and rallies from about the first of the year until the end of March. In April we have been visiting our home folk, speaking in churches of our home communities, and gradually making preparations for our long absence ahead. Physical check-ups and "repairs", plus eye and teeth "servicing" have been done. It all takes time. Then some supplies have also been purchased. In May we plan to be on the west coast In order to buy and pack our supplies and to visit with our relatives and friends out there. Then we hope to leave about the first of June. We were very happy to be able to take back with us a supply of the "Two Road Salvation Charts." These were stenciled and made by the women friends of West Side Church of Christ in Springfield, Illi nois, which has been my living link church for many years. In 1953 the women made about fifty of these charts upon request, and we took them to Burma. Our LIsu and Rawang ministers find them very helpful in their work of evangelizing. They made a special request for more charts when we came back to America this time, so we are so happy to be able to take sixty out with us. Friends, we want to say that we really believe thattheLord's re turn Is very near. When we think how the world conditions were in 1921, when we first went out to the mission field, and how they are now, we are amazed at how many of the prophecies of the Lord's re turn have been fulfilled during these years. The increase In know ledge, increase In divorce, the apostacy and lukewarmness of the church, the return of the Jews to Palestine, Israel's becoming a state, the evangelization of the world, and many more signs show us that truly His coming is near - He may come even In our generation. It Is surprising how many countries are being evangelized at the present time. And It Is urgent that this work be done quicklv before the doors are closed. Several countries are trying hara to close their doors to the missionaries, but I believe they will not be ableto do so If we pray

until God's purpose for that country has been accomplished.

Satan is trying so hard to stop tne spreading of the Gospel. On the mission field we truly realize that "we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the ru lers of darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness In high pla ces" And oh, how we need to "put on the whole armor of God, that we may be able to stand In the evil day." Leaders of the idol-worshlppers and other anti-Christ elements are trying hard to make it im possible for the missionaries to remain in Burma, but we are praying that God will keep His standards raised against these forces which op pose His church. Will you please pray with us that this may be so? During our past term, several times It seemed that the enemyforces

were about to take over Burma.

But God intervened and saved the

country from that fate. Many of you were informed of the emergency, and you prayed with us and with the thousands of Lisu and Rawang Christians that the enemy would be blocked or hindered. We are so happy and thankful that God answered those prayers. Upper Burma has beena refuge for thousands of Christians. Please pray with us that
it may continue to be a refuge. Also, in like manner, I think that all

Christians should be praying for our nation. God's arm is not short
ened. He will save us if we turn from our lukewarmness and seek His

face. P ease read II Chronicles 20:1-22 and Joel 2:12-21, brethren,

and let us obey His call to repentance and thank Him by faith for His
deliverance.

Mrs. Gertrude Morse


CRISES

If seemed that the year of 1961 was to be a time of testing and try ing for the missionaries at home and on the field. Not only those in Burma, but other fields have reported the many ways in which Satan has buffeted them and made it so very difficult to carry on His work. In February LaVerne wrote as he was enroute to Rangoon. He told of the problems caused by illness in the family, discipline problems in
the Christian Day School at Muladi and then went on to tell of what

cessful teachers' seminar: "The Christian Day Schools, we feel, can in turn, through God's strength, become the means of enabling the ap

had been accompiished in spite ofthese things. He told ofa very suc

Thus, we were thrilled when about 180 potential and present Christian
schoolteachers gathered at the teachers' seminar. The courses includ-

proximately fifteen thousand Usu and Rawang Christians of the Church es of Christ to send Burmese-speaking evangelists to the rest of Burma.

formerly Director of Education in Malaya, came as a guest lecturer for one week on the sub|ect 'How to teach English asa Foreign Language'.

ing. School Curriculum, and Teaching Bible in Christian Day Schools. Also, under the aid and sponsorship of the British Council in Rangoon (a B-itish Government organization), an English professor, Ivor Lewis,

^ such subjects as the Dynamics of Teaching, the Seven LawsofTeach-

All these subjects were very vital for all the teachers gathered, but

above all we taught that Christ and His Word are our supreme object ive. All the teachers, I believe, were helped greatly to be more ef
fective servants of the Lord Jesus Christ."

down-country due to Betty's serious illness. Esther had been spending the

one week. Then "night" came to us out here os our precious sister, Drema Esther, suffered a nervous breakdown, I was the only one of the family left on the field. As LaVerne mentioned, Robert and Betty were
week days at Dukdang caring for their boys and weekends at Muladi

should make a quick trip to Rangoon.' That "lull" lasted approximately

In March Lois wrote as follows: "tying up my letter with LaVerne's in which he said in his last paragraph, 'Since there seems to be a lull now in the troubles within the mission area, Lois and I decided that I

with the mission work here. Her little boy, Ah-pu, lived with us so
that 1could continue with his andMarcia's schooling At the time

of her breakdown, my days were spent at Dukdang by her bedside, my nights here with the children Despite heavy sedation, she had veritably no sleep for a week... .Especially with so many of the fam ily being, of necessity, away at this present time, the mission work had piled teriffically high. Esther was trying to do the work of the others in addition to her already-full schedule. About March 3^ she began having an unbearably painful carbuncle on her chin; and this
seems to have been the "straw that broke the camel's back." With ex

cruciating pain came sleeplessness, and then EVERYTHING became too


much Monday, Marcn 13, LaVerne was to return by air to Putao. His load would be heavy, true; but he would be backl... .About noon when the airplane was scheduled to a r r i v e It began to rain.... I just knew He would have mercy and send it. And despite the skies, the silver bird came floating towards the Putao landing strip. Oh, but it was wonderful to see my hubby again, and how the tears rolled down Esther's cheeks whenshe saw him." The wonderful way in which pray ers were answered has been included in Eugene's article on "Prayer". Needless to say, Lois and LaVerne were much in need of rest and medical attention. So as soon as Robert and Betty returned to the field and Drema Esther was able to make the trip, Lois and Marcia and Drema Esther and Sammy went to Rangoon. Betty kept little Cynthia and LaVerne kept Mark, and was to join the others in Rangoon a week la ter. Lois, Drema and the children arrived in Rangoon on April 17 and the next day as Lois was enroute to the S.D.A. hospital- a short walk from where they were staying, she stumbled and fell, breaking her arm at the elbow, also injuring a nerve so she suffered intense pain. In addition, it was necessary for her to have minor surgery. So when La Verne and Mark arrived in Rangoon they found Lois in the hospital.
Word Received Concerning Visas

lawyer friend they found tnat they did not need to take any formal action until after they had received the official notification from the government, which finally reached them on Mav 10th. This was the situation when LaVexne wrote: "The past twelveaays sincewe received
the telegram from Putao with advancewarning about the refusal of our visas have given us a "chance to catch our breath, as it were. We thank God that Lois has recovered considerably from the verge of a nervous breakdown. Also her operation was successful, and her broken arm is now out of its cast although far from being back in use... .For almost
two weeks we received no official word about the refusal of our visas.

ordered to Iea ve the country by April 30. After consultation with a

were not to be givenrenewal of their residence permits and were being

forming them that he had received word that they (LaVerne and Lois)

LaVerne and Lois received a cablegram from Robert (up-countrv) in

Lois was released from the hospital on April 28, and that evenjng

We almost wondered whether therefusal was really definite. Whatever the case, we thanked God for the opportunity to rest a bit in the in-

terlude, and to recover a b!tfrom the recent strains/ stresses andshocics.

Then today we received the I etter. We had been expecting it, and yet it was a shock to us. We surely did not come to Rangoon prepared to leave the country... .Even our precious baby Cynthia is still upcountry."

Lois and Marcia andMark returned to Muladi the last of May. LaVerne stayed on to work on the matter of their permits. Even though he hadappealed and had the approval (and support) of the officials and many friends of their area, on June 19, a telegram was received/ stat ing that their appeal had been denied and they would have to leave

their behalf continued and help came from many sources.


Explanation by J. Russell Morse

the country by July 10. Even though this seemed so final, prayers on

family and whether they, too, will have the same trouble. Mr. J.
Russell Morse wrote concerning this problem and also explainedwhy it is that LaVerne and Lois face this difficulty at present: "July 3, Ran
goon. There is much to write about.. ..but first I should write about

there have been many questions about the status of the rest of the

what has been the first concern to all of us for several months past the situation and prospects of the Morse missionaries In Burma. First, ourselves, - We have not met with any unusual obstacles yet, and
confidently that we can plan ana prepare to continue work as former ly becauseour re-entry permitas well as ouroriginal visa says"PERIOD OF RESIDENCE UNRESTRICTED". So faras we know, the only trouble our mission faces at present is concerning LaVerne and Lois' residence permit... .Originally, he had an "unrestricted period" permit like the rest of us, and when he went to the States to work for graduation ai Cincinnati Bible Seminary was promised (orally) by Controller of Im migration that he could have the same permit affer return even though

fri ends who have had much experience of the Government assure us

overstaying the one year life of the re-entry permit. He stayed two j
years, also married, and upon return found changes in immigration per3-year permits for both himself and Lois. These expired August 22, 1960 so since then they have been here on a temporary visa, awaiting the decision regarding a more permanent status." . Encouraging News

sonel and policy, so really was fortunate to be readmitted at all, with /

Mrs.-Gertrude Morse wrote from Rangoon on July 11th: "We had expected to go right on to Putao, but about 2 days after we arrived,
we received word about LaVerne and Lois' order to leave and also a

telegram saying they were coming to Rangoon. So we waited. They arrived on July 4. The next day Russell and LaVerne went to a con ference of three Kachin State Officials who spoke very encouragingly to them. Many, many Lisu and Rawang friends had sent in petitions.
First, 26 headmen sent In one with all of their signatures. Then 130 leaders sent a petition. Afterwards 2400 people signed a petition and

sent it In, and also several te I eg ra ms were sent. Then finally the churches gathered money to send five headmen to Myitkynia to peti
tion the Kachin Cabinet. Two of them came on to Rangoon. On the

following day Russell and LaVerne had an Interview with a high mili tary man of our area. He hod just talked to the top Immigration offi
cer who promised to give the permit since the Kachin State Officials

and the military officials ot our border and the people wanted him. So the permit is supposed to be in LaVerne's hands by tomorrowI Uu'y 12)

We surely do praise God for this and we do thank all the friends for
praying."

The final word we have was written by Lois, She gave the same
Information that Mrs. Gertrude Morse had written, then added, "It

seems that we definitely will be permitted to remain In the country at


least one more year." When we first received word of this trouble we sent out a special request for prayer to our rope-holders and all those who have been so faithful In prayer. We noted that twice before crises had been averted through prayer. How wonderfully He has answered prayer again and another victory has been won for Him I

"Spectators", Christian women and girls just watching


something. An unposed candid shot.

All funds except living link for various members of


the family should be sent to North Burma Christian

Mission, c/oMrs. Oscar L. Myers, 2024 N. 14th


Street, Terre Haute, Indiana.

PRAYER

By Eugene R, Morse As J have spoken for various congregations. Rallies, Youth groups, etc. during these months that our family has been in the States on fur lough, many times I have felt lead to speak concerning prayer - the need for it in our lives, the POWER of prayer, the consecration of the lives of thosewho are truly faithful in this ministry both here in the States and on the mission Held. We have all felt the need for deeper spiritual lives in the rapid-pace living that exists in the U.S.A. Many with whom we have talked have expressed the desire to increase their study and be more faithful intheir Bible reading and prayer life. Mo ther and Daddy, too, have stressed the need for prayer and have told of the many answers to prayer throughout their life on the mission field these past 40 years.
It is not coincidence that those on the field have also felt this need

during the months |ust past, as the powers of Satan have attacked in so many fronts in the lives of the missionaries both here and on the field. The letters from the field surely "speak for themselves" in this regard. One strong testimony of complete dependence on prayer and how wonderfully the Lord answered is shown in the fol I owing quote from Lois's letter during Drema Esther's critical illness. Esther had been unable to sleep only for very brief periods for about a week and

her condition was really very serious, and not responding to medicine

as they hoped, in te11 ing of her vigil by Esther's bedside Lois said. Minutes ticked slowly, slowly by. How I watched and prayed

till 2:00 a.m. and plead^ with the Lord to give Esther the precious gift of 8 hours ofsleep. Every time he stirred ^. I prayed the more

fervently that the Lord would have mercy and keep her in a deep sleep.
leard our united prayers and gave tsther not just 8 but 10 hours of

During those lonely hours I felt the pulling hands of the rest of the family back home. I was positive they had gotten my cable and were
praying even then, as I was. (How we were all praying! i I) The Lord

sleep." LaVerne, too, wrote of special prayer on behalf of Lois in her time

of suffering and how wondrously the Lord answered. He wrote, "On Saturday before the Monday I was to go to Rangoon, I went to the vil lage of Sarkhumdam, about 12 miles from Muladi, to speak at the Rawang Easter Convention which was being held there. When I reached Dukdang, a telegram was handed to me which said that on Tuesday -

the day after she went to Rangoon - Lois had broken her arm at the

elbowl... .At the convention I asked the 1,500 people who had gath ered to pray especially for Lois. On Sunday morning and again at about 2:00 p.m. the Christians at the convention had special prayer for Lois. When Mark and I reached Rangoon, we were met by Drema Esther and Imogene Williams, whotold us that Lois had gone to the hospital for minor surgery. Hospital visiting hours prevented me from seeing Lois until the next morning. Then she told me how very, very

much her broken arm had pained her. Evidently not only had the bone

(radius) been broken at the elbow, but also a nerve haa been hurt, so

that there was intense pain from Tuesday until Sunday. On Sunday morning, however, the pain had eased, and on Sunday afternoon the pain had gone away a! most altogether. I asked about what time on Sunday afternoon the pain had specially eased. She said about 2:00 p.m. That was just the time when up at the Sarhkumdam convention, about 1,500 people had had special prayer for Lois. We truly thank
God for His answering prayer."

Just recently one of our loved ones received a letter from Robert
in which he, too, sets forth the thoughts which we have been giving the people from time to time and presents a challenge to Christians for a deeper spiritual life. We quote from Robert's letter; "We sure ap
our behalf, and more, the sustained interest. I think that every mis sion should concentrate first on building up a rear-echelon of faithful

preciate the prayers which all of our "rope-holders" have offered on

prayer supporters, and then work out from there. In this day when our
spiritual warfare with the forces of evil practically has to be fought on the physical and mental level as well as the spiritual, prayer IS THE MOST ESSENTIAL THING. But that prayer support has to be more

than the form and the content. Those who pray must be developed

Just as pnysical strength can be displayed through flexing the muscles (which must havebeen developedthrough prior physical exercise), and mental strength reveals itself in the ability to maintain mental pres sure and concentration and stress, so man's makeup has a further sphere the spiritual spherewhich must be developed through spiritual exercise

enough spiritually that they recognize and can exert spiritual power.

and practice. I'm afraid that a lot of Christians who live a sheltered

existence have little need for this, and may not be aware of this sphere. Thus their prayers may notcarry spiritual power, but be mere ly on the physical (outward) and mental planes. At least that has been my own experience. And I can say that for prayer to bereally effect ive, it must be an exercise of the spirit as well as of the body and mind. Then a band of spiritual warriors would beable to go forth con quering all obstacles for Christ. To the extent that we are winning spiritual victories, we are exhibiting or giving evidence to the spirit ual power which Christ promised to all of us, but to which we have
so miserably failed to lay claim." "When I think of the REAL value and strength of prayer, and how absolutely essential and basic it Is to the carrying out of the Great Commission, all else seems very secondary and Insignificant - even the financing. 1suppose that is because when the spiritual forces are strong enough, they will automatically "trigger" the proper material

and physical responses. I do so wish that all of the Lord's workers resources, and yetsometimes don't seem to beaware of the correspond
ing spiritual capabilities and opportunities."
In these times when forces of evil threaten the United States as

could see and understand these things. We have so many talented and willing workers in our churches, who have all the physical and mental

well as the remote areas of the world, we pray that ourChristian breth

ren may be awakened to the needfor "spiritual exercise" in prayer and that we all may so live that when we pray, our thanks, our thoughts
and our petitions are completely within His Divine will.

Compton, California

July 25, 1961


Dear Christian friends:

Once again we have come to that time when we must say, "Our
furlough Is finished. It's time to be on our way back to the mission
field."

In retrospect, what has this furlough meant to us? Rest? Well, not exactly, for we have been too busy travelling, buyingand packing supplies, etc. to really say we had a rest. But it has been a change
from our way of life out In Burma. The thing we noti ce most is the

speed at which life is lived here In America. No wonder somany

people have ulcers and high blood pressure I These are two sicknesses which we rarely see on the mission field, for life is lived at a more leisurely pace, on the whole, without such rigid timetables.

Helen with youngest daughter, (Frances) Jeanette about


five months old.

church, and participating In the youth activities of that church. We were very happy that the two youngest boys. Tommy and Ronnie, made their decisions for Christ and were baptized. These past months have been a time of physical rehabilitation, also. We were thankful that we were here In America where good medical
care was available at the time our youngest little girl, Frances Jean-

children. It has also given them the privilege of being part of a local

and for this we have been truly grateful. It has been a time when our boys have had an opportunity to be in school with other American

This furlough has been a time ofvisiting with loved ones and friends,

nette was bom on Jan. 18, for there were some complications at the time of her birth which required skilled medical attention. We were equally thankful for the skilled care available to take care of Helen when she underwent major surgery In March including removal of the
gall-bladder.

But most of all, this has been a time of spiritual refreshing. It has

been our privilege to attend a number of missionary rallies, and to visit In a great many churches. We have received a great blessing from the fellowship, and from hearing the stirring and inspiring mes
sages of other ministers and missionaries. ' However, all during these months of change, refreshing, and reha

L
V

wang Christians, urging us to return quickly. One young man wrote,^^'^^


"When you are away, we are like children without their pfcirents*'.
One girl, who had worked for us wrote, "Do come back quickly. Every time I see your house my tears come out". Another letter said,

back to Burma. We have received numerous letters from Lisu and Ra-^^

bilitation, we have constantly had on our hearts the urgency ofgetting

),

"Please hurry back. I am thirsty to see you, more than being thirsty
In add Itl on, there have been the urgent appeals for a quick return

for water when travelling In the hot sun where there is no water." Lettters

like these pull at our heartstrings, and make us anxious to get back.

the missionaries has made It very difficult to carry on the work proper

from the other members of the family still on the field, illness among

ly, and yet progress has been made. There have oeen repeated crises Drema Esther's nervous breakdown; Lols's broken arm; the difficulty over LaVeme and Lols's stay permit; Betty's Illness and need of expert
medical attention. Because of all these things, those on the field are

extremely weary and In need of our help. Mr. and Mrs. J. Russell Morse arrived back In Burma on June 29, only 1(0-1/2 months after leaving the country. Our own family Is scheduled to leave by Pan
American Airways on August 4 from Los Angeles. As we return to Burma we have many hopes and plans. Our central aim or desire is to be In the Lord's will, and to be used by Him in the building up of the Christians already there In Burma as well as In the spreading of the Gospel to the new and hitherto unreached tribes In surrounding areas. There Is much to be done along the lines of evan gelism, teaching, and preparation and production of 1iterature. We hope to share In all these areas of work together with those already
on the field.

We want to take this opportunity to thank all those who have been
so good ro us and helped us In so many ways-our living link churches,

Maplewood Christian Church and Dean Avenue Christian Church In


Terre Haute, Indiana, the First Christian Church In Compton, Cali fornia and the Christian Church In Columbus, 111.;the many who have
received us In their homes; and all those others whom we cannot name

here, who have helped in various ways.

As we go on our way, we would ask your confinued prayer support, not only for ourselves, but for all the missionary personnel in Burma,
Burma are closed

for the Lisu and Rawang churches, and for ail those who have not yet heard, that they might be reached before the doors of opportunity in

Now we would prav, as did Paul, that you might "know the love of Christ, which passeth Knowledge, that ye might be filled with ail the
fullness of God." (Eph. 3:19)
In His service, Eugene and Helen Morse

AS WE GO TO PRESS word has just been received that Robert, Bet

ty and family will be leaving Rangoon August 7 to start their furlough.


No definite date for arrival in the U.S.A. was stated.

Word has also been received that LaVerne, Lois and family are
having a much needed vacation in India visiting the David Rees and Archie Fairbrother families at Shillong, Assam.
Mr. & Mrs. J. Russell have arrived back in Muladi.

Mr. & Mrs, Eugene Moree and family will be leaving the States on August 4th/ arriving in Rangoon August 12th.

Mdiled by Mrs. OSCAR L. MYERS


2024 N. I4fh St. Sec. 34.66 P. L
PAID

& R

Terre Houte, Indiona


For

U. S. POSTAGE

NORTH

BURMA

CHRISTIAN MISSION

Terre Haute, Ind.


PERMIT NO. 321

RETURN

POSTAGE GUARANTEED

HABROU) MflFABLAND MISSIOJ SERVICES

BCK 968
JOLIET, ILL.

NQRTII BIJRM CHRISTIAN MSSION

LISU and RAWANG CHURCHES of CHRIST

May, 1961
SPECIAL Dear Christian Friendss PRAYER REQUEST

This letter is to acquaint you with some special prayer needs which have arisen on the mission field in Burmao We -hope that you will share with us in this ministry by joining us in intercessoiy prayer concerning the several problems and situations which
confront us at the present time#

with problems concerning their health. Betty went to Rangoon in January for medical care, seeking diagnosis of the persisrtent trouble with her back# After some time ther

For some time, the members of the mission who are on the field have been troiibled

during Trtiich she was in and out of the hospital and undergoing various treatments, the doctors srtill had not agreed as to the cause of her difficulties. In March, Robert
joined her in Rangoon, and while there was working on arrangements Ibr the printing of Rawang Scripture portions and correcting proofs on these portions. During this same

time it was also necessary for LaVeme to make a tidp to Rangoon for reasons of busine^ ^
as well^as for medical check-up# This left t)nly Lois and Drema Bsth^r up on the mission field. With the added strain resulting from so many of the missionaries being

away (Mr. and Mrs# J# Russell Morse and Eugene &Helen are in the U9S, on furlough), ^

plus being ill herself, Drema Esther had a nervous breakdown and required a great deal

of care# With the extra load of caring for Drema Esther, as well as looking after the children and mission duties, Lois was physically and mentally echausted too, and in need of medical care herself# After the return of Robert and Betty, and LaVeme,and as soon as Drema Esther was able to travel, Lois and daughter Marcia, and Drgmia Esther and adopted son Sainmy flew to Rangoon on April 17 to have medical check-ups and a bit of vacation and rest. However, the day after arrival in Rangoon, Lois fell and broke

her right arm, which caused her intense pain. In addition, she found t^t she was in need of some minor surgeiy. So when LaVerne returned to Rangoon on April 2ii, with
son M^k, he found Lois still in the hospital# Their baby daughter, Cynthia, age
7 mo,, was up-country with Robert and Bettyo Just before LaVeme went to Rangoon, he attended the Easter convention, about which he wrote as follows: "On Saturday before the Monday I was to go to Rangoon, I

went to the village of Sarkhumdam, about 12 miles from Muladi, to speak at the Rawang
Easter convention which was being held there. When I reached Bukkang, a telegram was

handed to me which said that on Tuesday^ - the day after she went down to Rangoon -Lois

-hGld by people j^iding wicfe-meo I felt daaed

had broken her right arm at the elbowi ' I went on to the Convention late that evening, driving a tractor through the jungle in the darkness by the light of two flashlights-

the uailuiilllubj urie after aftbtfter,

pecially at a time when our entire mental resilience was low.

At the convention, I

asked the 1,^00 people who had gathered- to pray especially for Lois.

On Sunday in the

morning and again at about 2!00 p.mo the Christians at the convention had special pray

er for Lois# When Mark and I reached Rangoon, we were met by Drema Esther and ]jnogene Williams, who told us ths.t Lois had gone to the hospital to have a minor operation. Hospital visiting hours prevented me from seeing Lois uiitil the next morning. Then she told me how very, ve:.:y much her broken arm had pained her. Evidently not only had the bone (radius) been broken at the elbow, but also a nerve had been hurt, so that there was intense pain from Tuesday until Sunday# On Sunday morning, however, the pai: had eased, and on Sunday afternoon the pain had gone away almost altogether# I asked about what time on Sunday afternoon the pain had specially/ eased# She said about 2jOO p.ma That was just the time vihsn up at the Sarhlcumdam convention, about 1,500 people
had had special prayer for Lois, We truly thank Ood for His a^iswering prayer" Lois was released from the hospital on April 28, and that evening LaVeme and Lois

received a cablegram froia Robert informing them that he had received word that they (LaVeme and Lois) were not to be given renewal of their residence permit and were be

ing ordered to leave the country by April 30. After consultation with a lawyer friend, they found that they did not need to take any formal action until after they had re

ceived the official notification from the government, which finally reached them on '
This was the si-liuation when LaVerne wrote: _

May 10,

ing about the refusal of our visas have given us a chance to catch our breath, as it
its cast although atill far from being back in use

"The pat tiijitslve-dayii' s3.nce- we received^the^ "telegram-fronr PuLau wlth^Mvahee warn-*' ~

were. We thank^God that Lois has recovered considerably from the verge of nervous breakdown. Also, her operation was successful, and her broken right arm is now out of

We almost wondered whether the refusal was not really definite. Whatever the case, we
thanked God for the opportunity to rest a bit in the interlude, and to recover a bit
we received, forwarded from Putuo, the registered letter ffom the Burmese Ministry of i&nmigration notifying us that our request for eocbension of stay permits had been turne
We surely did not come to Rangoon prepared to leave the

For almost two weeks we received no official word about the refusal of our visas.

from the recent succession of strains, stresses, and shocks. Then today about noon,

down, and we were to be out of the country by April 30# We had been expecting it, and

may at least allvow us time to do that,

countiyl Our lifetime preparations for work have centered on the work upcountry. Our whole furlough's preparations and buying of supplies were for the work up-country. Even our precious little baby Cynthia is still up-country. Whatever the case, we sure ly need time to work things out. We pray, first of all, that the Burmese government
(Continued next pa^e)

yet it was a shock to us#

friend for advice. He advised me to go in p'er^ri to the Controller of Ijraiiigration,

"After receiving the notice of refusal, I went imediately to our Burmese lawyer^

to appeal our case for the Immediate future, explaining that we did not even receive
the letter until after the April 30 deadline. Then he advised us to make an appeal in order that we be allowed to continue working in Putao, which of course we are doing But if that appeal is not successful, a second possibility is to request permission to work in Rangoon, It may be that even though the Kachin State govenment is opposed
to our being given visas to work there, the central Burmese government may be more

amenable to granting us visas to work in Rangoon. There are many phases of the work which could be done from here, such as preparation of Christian literature, and per haps even advanced training of workers from among the Lisu and Rawang, and through
them the Gospel could be preached to areas of Burma which previously have been too remote from the Putao mission area to be readily reached. And, of course, there is unlimited work in evangelism to be done right here in the Rangoon area. A work here

in Rangoon, however, would cost considerably more in day-to-day expenditures (for example, housing) than an equivalent work up in the Putao area. Yet, I feel that the churches back in America in such a case would supply any extra needs "We surely feel confused about what to plan, what to do, what to thinki Sometimes

I c^ hardly sleep, thinking about the things to be done, problems to be solved. We

have found^speclal peace" and comfdrt7 though/^ ln~having prayer andr-Bible-reading to- gether whenever the problems seem just too great to surmount, and we know that God will smooth a path through the stonriy waters for us so that we can do His xd.llc Also He has promised that He will not suffer us to be tempted above what we are able to bear. How wa do thank God for all His wonderful promises." In addition to the situation described by LaVerne, another problem was presented
when a cablegram from Robert via LaVeme arrived on May 21. He says that new diffi
culties have arisen in the Pubao area because of the non-Christians in the Putao area

who have for a long time been anti-missionary and anti-Christian. Some intimation of this difficulty had been received before LaVerne had lexfc upcountry, for he had writ ten: "We received a letter from a non-Christian official, high in the Government, charging our mission work with disturbing the status quo of northern Kachin State, and maligning the mission work, saying that the native preachers trained by us did nci have sufficient education. The falsity of the charges made us very indignant, and yet we realized the damage that the official might do the mission in relations with the govinment." Robert's cable emphasized the seriousness of the situation, for he said

it may involve the entire family (four families), and asked for "concentrated prayer"
on the part of churches and individuals in the tJ.S, in order to overcome this attack
from hostile elements. . .

,existence_of the mission and the continuance of the work as a whole, Mr. anc^Mrsc Jo Russell Morse and Eugene & Helen and" family are preparing to return"io the field~as
quickly as possible. It seems that they should all try to huriy back, lest they later be prevented from returning to Burma, Itr. and Mrs. J. Russell are planning tentativei.ly to leave the U.S. by mid-June# Eugene and Helen and family are preparing to leave as soon as their children are out of school and final arrangements can be completed Many problems face these two families also Twice before there has been occasion to present special prayer requests to our Christian brethren here in the States, and in both instances there has been wonderful
response, and the difficulties and crises have been overcome. We would like here to

While these many problems arising on the Burma front, which threaten the very

quote from the prayer letter of 1956s "Since the days of the Apostles, those that have gone forth to carry the Gospel to the nations have had to face many trials, hard ships, temptations and persecutions. Whenever and wherever there is an eager seeking
after the truth as found in Jesus Christ, our Lord, the more evident becomes the op position of Satan, So it is, that the missionaries of the North Burma Christian Mis

victo]^ may be claimed as the promise of God^

sion turn to their friends of like precious faith for earnest,fervent & faithful pray er support. We believe that in times of emergency and crisis such as this, the Lord's people and workers not only have the privilege and right, but the duty of appealing tc fellow-Christians everywhere to unite with them in prayer, confident that a spiritual

days in a spiritual conflict, in which all the forces of Satan and his evil hordes are lined up hoping to crush out the light of Christianity, especially in the heart of the~vast, overpopulated continent of Asia." Therefore we would ask you to join us in special prayer concerning these matters! VISAS - Pray that the Lord will make it possible for LaVerne and Lois to remain in

We are surely engaged in these last

Burma by causing their application for revocation of refusal to be favorably considered 2o PRESSURES - Pray that the Lord will over-rule attempts by unfriendly and hostile
aries put out of the Putao area^ This could also result in persecution for the Lisu and Rawang Christians, especially the preachers and other leaders. < " Pray that .Betty, the Lord will restore to in health all those onronember the field who have oeen surrering -Lois and Drema Esther particular. Also those of
the mission here in the UoS. and ask tihat they too, might be strengthenedo

el^ents which are now bringing pressures to bear, in an effort to have all mission

be more ravoraoie ^o unristians. Also that Burma might be preserved as a place of re-

5* GOVEEiyENT OF BURMA - Pray that God will deal with the leaders and cause them to
for those w^ have fled there to escape from Communism.
" . * '"

^eadiast even in the face of opposition and persecution.

CHRICTIANS IN BURMA - Pray for all the Christians in Burma, that they may remain

Oo HIOBLE^ OF RETURN - Pray that the way may be kep open for the two families now
on ruriough ^o return to Busima#

(Concluded elsewhere in the paper)

NORTH BURMA CHRISTIAN MISSION

Lisu and Rg^agXhyf6lie&>Ql^ist

S PEC lA

PRAYER

REQUEST
,i|i itrrT^-'^

Dear Christian

This letter Is to acquaint you with some special prayer needs which have arisen on the mission field in Burma. We hope that you will share with us in this ministry by joining us in intercessory prayer concerning the several problems and situation^ which confront us at the present time.
For some time, the members of the mission who are on the field have been troubleid with prob'-

lems concerning their health. Betty went to Rangoon in January for medical care, seeking diagno
sis of the persist&nt trouble with her back. After some time there, during which she was in and out of the hospital and undergoing various treatments, the doctors still had not agreed as to the cause of her difficulties. In March, Robert joined her in Rangoon, and while there was working on arrangments for the printing of Rawang Scripture portions and correcting proofs on these portions. During this same time it was also necessary for LaVerne to make a trip to Rangoon for reasons of business as well as for medical check-up^ This left only Lois and Drema Esther up on the mission field. With the added strain resulting from so many of the missionaries being away (Mr. &Mrs. J. Russell Mcrse and Eugene &Helen are in the U.S. on furlough), plus being ill herself, Drema Esther had a ner vous breakdown and required a great deal of care. With the extra load of caring for Drema Esther, as well looking after the children and mission duties, Lois was physically and mentally exhausted too, and in need of medical care herself. After the return of Robert and Betty, and LaVerne, and as soon as Drema Esther was able to travel, Lois and daughter Marcia, and Drema Esther and adop

ted son Sammy flew to Rangoon on April 17 to have medical check-ups and a bit of vacation and rest. However, the day after arrival in Rangoon, Lois fell and broke her right arm, which caused

her intense pain. In addition, she found that she was in need of some minor surgery. So when LaVerne returned to Rangoon on April 24, with son Mark, he found Lois still in the hospital. Their baby daughter, Cynthia, age 7 mo., was up-country with Robert and Betty.
Just before LaVerne went to Rangoon, he attended the Easter convention, about which he wrote as follows: "On Saturday before the Monday I was to go to Rangoon, I went to the village

being held there. When I reached Dukdang, a telegram was handed to me which said that n Tues day - the day after she went down to Rangoon - Lois had broken her right arm at the elbow 1 I went on to the Convention late that evening, driving a tractor through the jungle in the darke:)ess by the another, especially at a time when our entire mental resilience was low. At the convention, I asked the 1,500 people who had gathered to pray especially for Lois. On Sunday in the morning ond again at about 2:00 p.m. the Christians at the convention had special prayer for Lois. When Mark and I reached Rangoon, we were met by Drema Esther and Imogene Williams, who told us that Lois had gone to the hospital to have a minor operation. Hospital visiting hours prevented me from seeing Lois until the next morning. Then she told me how very, very much her broken arm had pained her. Evidently not only had the bone (radius) been broken at the elbow, but also a nerve had been hurt, so that there was intense pain from Tuesday until Sunday. On Sunday morning, . however, the pain had eased, and on Sunday afternoon the pain had gone away almost altogether. I asked about what time on Sunday afternoon the pain had specially eased. She said about 2:00 . p.m. That was just the time when up at the Sarhkumdam convention, about 1,500 people had had special prayer for Lois. W truly thank God for His answering prayer." Lois was released from the hospital on April 28, and that evening LaVerne and Lois received a cablegram from Robert informing them that he had received word that they (LaVerne and Lois) were not to be given renewal of their residence permit and were being ordered to leave the country by April 30. After consultation with a lawyer friend, they found that they did not need to take any formal action until after they had received the official notification from the government, which fi nally reached them on May 10. This was the situation when LaVerne wrote;

of Sarkhumdam, about 12 miles from Mulodi, to speok at the Rawang ^>er convention which was

light of two flashlights held by people riding with me. I felt dazed by the calamities, one after

"The past twelve days since we received the telegram from Putao with advance warning about the refusal of our visas have given us a chance to catch our breath, as it were. V\fe thank God that Lois has recovered considerably from the verge of nervous breakdown. Also, her operation was successful, and her broken right arm is now out of its cas Ifalthough still far from being back
In use.

For almost two weeks we received no official word about the refusal of our visas. We almost

wondered whether the refusal was not really definite. Whatever the case, we thanked God for the opportunity to rest a bit in the interlude, and to recover a bit from the recent succession of strains, stresses, and shocks. Then today about noon, we received, forwarded from Putao, the registered letter from the Burmese Ministry of Immigration notifying us that our request fcr extension cf stay permits had been turned down, and we were to be out of the country by April 3D. We had been ex-

advice. He advised me to go in person tothe Controller of Immigration, to appedl our case for the immediate future, explaining that we did not even receive the letter until after the April 30 dead^ line. Then he advised gs to make an appeal'm order that we be allowed to continue working in Putao, which of course we are doing. But. ifthat appeal is not successful, a second possibility is to request pymission to work in Rangoon. It may be that even though the Kachin State government IS opposed to our being given visas to work there, the central Burmese government may be more amenable to granting us visas to work in Rangoon. There are many phases of the work which could be done from here, such as preparation of Christian literature, and perhaps even advanced training of workere from among the Lisu and Rjwang, and through them the Gospel could bt precichtd to areas of Burma which previously have been too remote fron(i.the Putao mission area to be readily reached. And, of course, there is unlimited work in evangelism to be done right here in the Ran goon area. Awork here in Rangoon, however, would cost considerably more in day-to-day expen diture (for example, housing) than an equivalent work up in the Putao area. Yet, I feel fhat the hardly sleep, thinking about the things to be done, problems to be solved. V\/e have found special peace and comfort, though, in having prayer and Bible reading together whenever the problems seem |ust too great to surmount, and we know that God will smooth a path through,the stormy waters tor us so that we can do His will. Also He has promised that He will not suffer us to be tempted above what we are able to bear. How we do thank God for all His wonderful promises."
the Putao area because of the non-Christians in the Putao area who have for a long time been ontimissionory and anti-Christian. Some intimation ofthis difficulty had been received before LoVerne had left up-country, for he hod written: "We received a letter from a non-Christian official, high
cablegram from Robert via LoVerne arrived on May 21. He says that new difficulties have arisen in churches back in Amcrica in such a case would supply any extra needs. "We surely feel confused about what to plan, what to do, what to think! Sometimes I can

country! Our lifetime preparations for work have centered on the work up-country. Our whole furlough's preparatiws and buying of supplies were for the work up-country. Even our precious little baby Cynthia is still up-country. Whatever the case, we surely need time to work things out. We pray, first of all, that the Burmese government may at least allow us time to do fhat. ^ "After receiving the notice of refusal, I went immediately to our Burmese lawyer friend for

P^cHng it, and yet it was a shock to us.

surely did not com to Rangoon prepared to leave the

In addition to the situation described by LaVerne, another problem was presented when a

sufficient education. The falsity of the charges made us very indignant, and yet we realized the damage that the official might do the mission in relations with the government." Robert's cable emphasized the seriousness of the situation, for he said it may involve the entire family (four fami
lies}, and asked for "concentrated prayer" on the part of churches and individuals in the U.S. in
order to overcome this attack from hosh'le elements.

itate, and maligning the mission work, saying that the native preachers drained by us did not have

m the Government, charging our mission work with disturbing the status quo of northern Kachin

of .he mission and the continuance of the work as a whole, Mr. and Mrs. J. Russell Morse and

While these many problemsaorfe orising on the Burma front, which threaten the very existence

tno. they snould a fry to hurry back, lest they later be prevented from returning to Burma. Mr. -nd Mrs. J. Russell are planning tentatively to leave the U.S. by mid-June. Eugene and Helen and family are preparing to leave as soon as their children ore out of school and final arranger,lenis
can be completed. Many problems face these two families also.

fcugene &Helen and family are preparing to return to the field just as quickly as possible. It seems
S^i.ien.s

brevhren here in the States, and in both instances there has been wonderful response, ond the diffi" ov3rcome. We would like here toquote from the prayer letter of
... ve hao to face many trials, hardships, temptations and persecutions. Whenever and wherever n-iftro is n eager seeking after the truth as found in Jesus Christ, our Lord, the more evident begone forth to carry the Gospel to the nations

Twice before there has been occasion to present special prayer requests to our Christian

<'Alf ?', for earnest, the missionaries of the Nsrthpnjyer Burma support. Christian Mission fhIr friends of li<e precious faith fervent and faithful
We believe that in times of emergency and crisis such as this, the Lord's people ond workers

ur-tri^rll" ^ privilege and right, but the duty of appealing to fellow-Christians evtrvwhere to
|.iid his evil hordes ore lined up hoping to crush out the light of Christianity, especially in the
heart of the vast, overpopulated continent of Asia." VI^S /' P "Y

I fh a tin a spiritual victory may in bewhich cloimed the promise or God. are surelv engaged in these last days a spiritual conflict, all as the forccs of Satan
me

Therefore we would ask you to join with us in special prayer concerning these mattersI.

Ra>nF!iat the Lord will make it possible for LaVerne and Lois to remain in Burmo by causina
their application for revocation of refusal to be favoro biy considered.

po) th -t
P:vTv ?

PRESS'JRES

pressj-es to bsar, in an cffoii to have oJ r,/isfionan"es pot o-jt of ih : i i.'vjo area.


(ovBr)

Lord will over-rule attemots by unfriendly and host-le elemsnt^ v4i;ch are now

This could also result In persecuHon for th^ L?su and Rawanc; Christians, especially the
preachers and other leaders.
3. HEALTH

Pray that the Lord will rsstoie to health all those on the f;eld who have been suffering -Lois,

Betty, and Diema Esther in particular. Also remember those of the mission here in the U.S. and ask that they, too, might be strengthened for the tasks ahead.

4.
5.

CHRISTIANS IN BU^A
sition and persecution.

Pray for all the ChristTans in Burma, that they may remain steadfast even in the face of oppo

GOVERNMENT OF BURMA

IVay thot (3od will deal with the leaders and cause them to he more favorably Jo Christians.

Also that Burma might be preserved as a placc of refuge for those who hovt fled there to es'
cape from Communism.
6. PROBLEMS OF RETURN

Pray that the way may be kept open for the two families now on furlough to return to Burma,
7.

Tray that in all things we may be in the will of the Lord, that all of us may be able to soy,
"Thy will be done" and mean it. Pray that we may know the Lord's will in these matters, and that He will guide in all things.

THE LORD'S WILL

"

The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man ovaileth much." James 5:16
1 Thessalonians 5;I7

"Pray without ceasing."

GOT ANY RIVERS YOU THINK ARE UNCROSSABLE? GOT ANY MOUNTAINS YOU CAN'T TUNNEL THROUGH? GOD SPECIALIZES IN THINGS THOUGHT IMPOSSIBLE. HE DOES THE THINGS NO ONE ELSE CAN DO.

Yours in His service.


The Morse families

.J
V 1

'."j b--v
. ... . ..5 (I . 1
. ' i'..'., ^ -.

ri-iA.

fU*.

USD and RAWANG CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN EDEMA


NORTH BURMA CHRISTIAN MISSION

"Where China, Tibet, Burma and India Meet"

(Formerly Yunnan-Tibetan Christian Mission)

iJ.
Mr. and Mrs, J. Russell Morse, May 1961

40 YEARS IN THE MASTER'S SERVICE


on the Tibeto - Burman border

THIRD

1961

NEWSLETTER

No. 28 News Series Beginning January, 1953

The J. Russell Morse Family


P. O. Putau

Kachin State, Burma

THE CALL

"And he saith unto them, "Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men. And they straightway left their nets and followed Him." Matt. 4:19, 20 Thus the call came to Peter and Andrew. It comes to each person In a peculior and personal way. It came to Justin Russell Morse, missionary In China and Burma, again and again, beginning with the prayers and teachings
of his beloved mother, Ruth Morse. This is the story of the fulfillment of that call.

From his early boyhood baptism to his student days in Phillips University Russell talked of being a missionary - a missionary doctor, and he made the friendship of several Tulsa, Oklahoma physicians who lent himbooksand some times took him on visiting tours. Later he was to study Oriental diseases in
Los Angeles, at the Bible Institute of Los Angeles School of Medicine. His later study in this field and his fine library of medical books enabled
him to do an effective work in his mission clinics.

Undoubtedly it was his great ad


miration for Dr. Albert L. Shelton, who was on furlough from his mission at Batang, SIkang, Chinese Tibet, and who was visiting his parents in Enid, Oklahoma, while Russell was

a student at Phillips University that


led him to volunteer for Christian work In that field.

It came about this way. Dr. Shelton was addressing a group of students at Phillips University who were especially Interested In mis
sions. Speaking with his usual pow er, Dr. Shelton paused and then hurled the challenge, "Have we in this audience a young husband and wife willing to work with me in the task of opening Tibet for Christ? God calls you - will you be fishers
of men?" Russell turned to look at

Gertrude, his bride of a few months,

and found her turning to him. They


smiled at each other, clasped hands,

Dr. Albert L. Shelton

and listened with anew interest.

They had found their life work, for

Dr. Shelton accepted them and guided them In thelrpreparations. They studied further at Butler University, where they were ordained and commissioned as missionaries of the Christian Church^ In his diary, J. Russell Morse wrote of embarking with Dr. and Mrs. Shelton for the Chinese-Tibetan border as fol
lows:

"The Diary as It Is, of J. Russell Morse, Ambassador of Christ to the


Tibetans." II Corinthians 5:18-20

August 7, 1921, Sunday, the Lord's Day, Seattle, Washington, U.S.A. "Tonight I am curled up in o Pullman upper berth, in the train which at 11:45 will bear us away to Vancouver, from where we leave for Tibet. There is a strange feeling of solemnity and yearning. Satan tries us so, and there

are so many new and strange problems. But there is blessed comfort in Christ's

promise, "Go.. .and I am with you always, even unto the end of the world,"
Somehow we shall get there all right, and He will be faithful and true in the

futureas in the post. Precious Jesus, we cl ing to Thee, and to Thy cross, for without the cross there is no crown and no honor to Thy name. We thank you for the testings, for 'tribulation worketh patience', and in our cross-bearings

suppose. Mother, Uncle Robert and I went to the C hr Ist i o n Church, Rev. Irwin, pastor, this morning. All of us talked, and they invited me to preach
new and strange. Be with us, dear Lord." August 8, Monday, Vancouver, B.C., Canada

ledge so limited, that we must trust you. So we simply say. Thy will be done, through Christ, - Amen. Our last day In the United States for eight years, I

we come into ever deeper fellowship with Thee. Dear Lord, we are but little children in all this great experience. Our reach Is so short and our know

am almost anxious about our boggage going through customs office, oli is so 'Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for Thou are with me.' Truly He has been with us through the United States, today In Canada our first in any foreign land. We were a bit apprehensive about how our baggage would pass the customs officials, but so far everything has been O.K. They didn't search anything, because we are trans-Pacific passengers. I just re-checked everything to the ship, except our hand luggage. We are also thankful for securing such good rooms at the St. Regis hotel. We are on the 4th floor, the Duncans on the fifth, and Sheltons on the second. We did not know until getting up time this morning
that the Sheltons were in the same Pullman with us. How relieved we felt to

tonight, but I had to arrange tickets, baggage, etc., much to my regret. I

new and strange experiences of today. Yesterday was our lastdayinthe

be with such genial and experienced friends. They have been a constant help to us. Both act young, and are always merry. There have been aggravating
circumstances too, we paid for two passports, when we might have gone on

one. And we hod to have these visaed today by the British (each $2), French (each $5), Chinese (each $2), and Japanese (each $2.50) consuls, so we can go ashore at Hongkong, Haiphong, Shanghai, and Japan (at Yokohama, Kobe and Nagasaki). A visa is just a kind of stamp and the writing of some data,
simply a ticket of admission on the passport. It seems...."
By I.oul>e Mone WiJfiam (stjfer of J. Rusiall Morss)

Mrs. Ruth Morse (holding 4 mos. old Eugene) bidding farewell to Russell and Gertrude on the boat just before soiling time.

Russell and Gertrude had met the challenge and embarked - perhaps fear

fully, - on the great unknown, - a step of faith such as few In this day of in
creased knowledge are coiled on to make. But God does not let matters rest thus. And even as the twelve disciples hod to weather crisis after crisis, end
be tested anew, so there came a time of crisis for Russell and Gertrude not

long after they arrived on the mission field with their baby son, Eugene. Forty years later Russell told of his second great call as c fisher of men. "The dreadful news of the death of Dr. Shelton come as a crushing blow. (He had been accidentally shot by bandits. They were woiting to ambush a Tibetan caravan and would not have shot the doctor had they known his Ident ity.) We burled him beside the grave of young Dr. Loftls there on the Batang
hillside. I felt a great despair, a complete unfitness to goon without the

guidance of Dr. Shelton's leadership. Yet, before the day was done, my mind was filled with the conviction that Gertrudeand I must carry on. It was
an hour of de clsion. We could go home without blame, or we could meet the

problems of a new frontier mission field.


"I looked up at the towering Himalayas, menacing barrier to the fulfill ment of Dr. Shelton's dream for the evangelization of Tibet. I said to myself, 'Little man, you are weak In your own strength, but under God's guidance you can go wherever He leads.' (Meanwhile Gertrude In prayer at home had felt thesame firmnessof faith and purpose.) This was our moment of complete consecration. This was our complete acceptance of the Master's CALL.

"The way has not been easy but the harvest has been beyond any human
calculation as we count In humble gratitude the myriad souls redeemea through God's love. We give all praise to Him."

FORTY YEARS OF PIONEERING, "Where China, Tibet, and Burma Meet"

It was In Dr. Shelton's book, "Pioneering in Tibet", thgt he put forth the coll: "Come on, young men, end let's help to make the last nation on earth a part of the Kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ" . Answering that coll, J. Russell Morse, with hiswife, Gertrude, and 4-month-oldson, Eugene, sailed with Dr. Shelton from San Francisco in August, 1921. Forty years have passed since then - years filled with service to the Lord, and it seems fitting now to take a backward look, to see "what God hath wrought", using these human instruments, in the establishing of his church Jn
Asia.

In 1921, travel through the i n t e r i or of China Into Tibet was a slow and

tedious progress, by boat, rail, and by mule or horseback. There were nu merous delays; waiting for supplies to catch up; waiting while supplies were purchased; waiting while horse caravans were arranged. There were discom forts and inconveniences, both while travelling, and when stopping in dirty, smelly, crowded, insect-infested Chinese inns. And at the end of the line, conditions were still primitive, although it was possible to have a fairly com
fortable place to live, which couldbe made homelike.

Excerpts from letters of those days will give some idea of what was faced. J. Russell Morse described the trip by steamer to Japan, then to Shanghai and Hongkong. Of the following part of the journey he wrote, "From Hong kong we took a small, rough and rolling coast-wise steamer to Haiphong, French Indo-China. This was only a 3-day trip, for which we were thankful. The heat was sultry and dangerously penetrating, but fortunately we had bought pith helmets in Hongkong. How relieved we were to set our feet upon the 'terra firma' of Haiphong and to rest our feverish heads in the shade of

banana trees, with an abundanceof tropical fruits for appetizers!" They were unexpectedly delayed in Haiphong because of washed-out sections in the rail road line on the way to Yunnan-fu. At last they were able to start on the next stage of their long journey toward the interior of China via the Yunnan railway. "Tne little French trains are altogether an oddity, an interest and an abomination. Our train travelled only by day, for which we were thankful. It stopped about six or eight o'clock in the evening at a little village. There you at once hired coolies to carry all your baggage to a nearby 'hotel', mean while keeping close watch on everything lest a suitcase or so should adopt

legs and run away. In the hotel you are so hungry, dirty and tired that you do not mind the inconveniences and you are soon faraway indreamland. At five o'clock the next morning you must be up and getting ready to board the

train. In construction, though not in operation, this railway is said to be one

of the most wonderful in the world, built as it is through almost continuous

mountains. In two dayswe passed through more than one hundred and seventy tunnels. We were able to take only our suitcases as we had to walk around six or eight large landslides and washouts. The 3rd and 4th class cars in these trains are not much better than our American cattle cars - in fact, horses, cattle and pigs are taken right into the same cars with the natives. After three days of travel on the railway, we arrived at Yunnan-fu, at the begin ning of the cool season." There they found it necessary to wait for five weeks, while their baggage-delayed because of further landslides blocking the rail way - caught up with them. The long-awaited freight finally arrived, was repacked, and at last all was ready for the overland caravan, withthe arriv al of the transport and riding mules and the "joudza" or chair for Mrs. Morse and Eugene. The first nine days of the trip were through bandit-infested country, and extremely dangerous. On Nov. 29, 1921, Mr. Morse wrote, "This is the 30th

day sinceweleft Yunnan-fu (later known as Kunming), and we are very tired,
but well. Eugene has two lower teeth in front, and their coming didn't make him at all fretful. Yesterday morning we crossed the first high pass, 12,000 ft. high, which separated the Yangtze and Mekong drainage basins. There was considerable snow and ice, but not enough to bother. At dinner we ate ourfirst tsamba and butter-tea with the Tibetans" . The remainder of the jour

ney was the most dangerous, so far as possibility of accident or injury was
concerned, for it was along a shelf of the mountains above the great and

dangerous Mekong river, between tremendous snow mountains, many of them between 20,000 and 25,000 feet high. The way could scarcely be dignified by the name of "road"; "pack-trail" would be more appropriate. They ar rived in Batang on'December 23, 1921, after 55 days of gruelling overland
travel - four months after leaving the U.S.A. Of living conditions in Batang, we learn somewhat in a letter from Mrs. J. Russell (Gertrude) Morse. "Our house is a mud house. The roof also is a

flat mud surface. The inside is whitewashed and looks very well. Of course
the house is roughly made compared to American houses. We have windows with nine small window panes of about 9 x 12 inches. We also have screens. All these things were imported. Our furniture is made by the native carpen ters who do real well. Most of our groceries are brought from Hongkong, about 2000 miles from here. They are carried bymen oranimalsfrom Yunnanfu which is 1200 miles from here. We burn candles for light. Our water is carried from the riverabout six blocks away by women who carry it in wooden buckets on their backs. All drinking water has to be boiled. We can buy meat some of the time. We can also buy a dirty brown sugar which has to be pounded and sifted. Our salt is also very dirty and has to be refined by boil
ing it many times."

good work. He was our guide and friend on the long journey out here. In constant touch with our Lord, and with years of experience, he brought us safely to this great harvest field. We surely could not have gotten to Etatang without his instrumentality. And again and again the hardness was taken from what would otherwise have been hardships, because of his joyous faith and

r^ver-fmling^ ^ ^

Just three months after theirarrlvol In Tibet, that great pioneer, Dr. Shelton, was killed by Tibetan bandits. Mr. Morse wrote, "Yes, it was a shock to us, too, when 'the great blow' fell, piercing the very heart of the mission, which In truth the doctor was. He was our joy, our constant inspiration, God's own loved angel to guide us on the long road from the homeland to the

hinterland. Dr. Shelton was the genius of the mission, the leader in every

orwornen, as well as vjsitinp In^the


concerning the women's work. She

men's work, teachlngclassesofgirls

dividuals helped, and closed with the statement: "A few clothes,
shoes, COFFINS, and other Inci-

dentals make up the remainder of

the expense account "

In the summer of 1925, Mr. & Mrs. Morse, with their two sons ~
Eugene, age 4, and Robert

fields, building up up merit fields, continually continually building merit with mechanical prayer prayer instruments
drum, bell, bell, rosary and prayer wheel. drum,

Beggar Beggar pilgrim pilgrim gleaning gleaning in in the the barley barley

Tibeton Tibetan Buddhist Buddhist

(born April 8, 1923 in Batang), age 2- had the rather rare experience of a trip into Tibet. Mrs, Morse describes the trip. "This last summer our family all went foro month's vacation Into Tibet, A very rich and influential Tibet an merchant Invited us to visit him. We accepted the Invitation, and on September 21, we started out on horsebackcarrying the children In the saddle with us. We camped out In our little tent most of the time, except while at

the home of our host. He has a very pretty Tibetan home, and the country was

and we got a broader view of our work. We were also able to give out many

extremely beautiful, with grassy mountains and meadows, as well os pines. We were invited to visit the commander of the province and heardthe bagpipes play. Tibetan soldiers march to bagpipe music. We were also invited to the Governor's housefor a few days. We saw much of the customs of the Tibetans,

to listen to theGospel than the Batang lamas are. The trip did us much good,
both spiritually ana physically. We returned with new courage to our task, and after five weeks of camp life, it seemed good to be in our little home
again

tracts and Gospel portions, and had a number of opportunities to speak with people about the Christian religion. We found the lamas much more willing

Dear to their hearts as was this work among the Tibetans in Batang, It be came clear to them after a time, that they must leave that work under the or

ganized mission board, for itwas no longerdedicated to the task of evangelism

and reaching the unreached for Christ. After much heart-searching and prayer for guidance, confident that it was the Lord's will for them, they left Batang on September 27, 1926, trusting in the Lord alone to provide their
needs, as they had no assurance of support from any source. But so great was the burdenof the lost on their hearts that they felt they must step out on faith into anew work, which would be more nearlyaccording to the New Testament

pattern. But after only a short time before it was possible really to get set
tled into a new mission station and work, political conditions became so un settled that the American consul ordered all Americans out of the area. With usual travel routes cut off by bandits and fighting, it was necessary for them to make the long trip across the mountains, through jungles, over territory

never travelled by white people, into Burma and civilization and the oppor tunity to return to the U.S. for a much-needed furlough. Of the trip through
the jungles, Mrs. Morse writes: "We started from China on our long journey on May 23rd. We were just about four days from our new station when we received the letter from the Consul ordering all foreigners to evacuate China by the safest and shortest route. We were simply overwhelmed, for Mr. Morse had just been on a long four month's journey to Hongkong for dental care and to buy supplies for our new station. He was so tired out (riding on horses or mules day after day Is

not easy), and the road overwhich he had come was closed on account of the
robbers (really fiends). We had to find a new route, so we chose the one out through Burma. No white families had ever gone over that road before. Two white men had travelled over It during the dry season, but It was just the be

ginning of the rainy season, and the monsoon rainy season of the tropics is
terrible. But there seemed nothing else to do, so we packed a few things and

left. It took us seventy days through the jungles to get to the head of the railway. Mr. Morse had to walk 48 of those days, and I walked 15 of them.
The children were carried In bas

kets. It rained and poured nearly


every day. Wewaded through mua, water, and snow. Much of the way
there was no road, only a tiny path,
and sometimes not even this. We

crossed three great rivers on bam boo rope cables, three more rivers by means of a dug-out log. We climbed high passes, one being ov er 15,000 feet. We had wet feet most of the first 48 days, and many
times our clothes were wet. But the

Lord brought us safely through. We had several sick spells during our

long journey, but not until we had


arrived at the English road In Bur ma and could be carried, and then
the Lord healed. We reached the

railway at Myitkyina (Burma) and


then went on to Rangoon through

Mandalay. We arrived Home No


vember 8, 1927. We intend to go
back as soon as China becomes set
Eugene, age 4 and Robert, age 2

tled enough."

Looking back we can see the providential leading of the Lord in taking the Morse family out through Burma, because the contacts made atthattime In 1927 bore fruit 15 to 20 years later when themission work moved into Bur
ma.

The house where Robert was born.

SECOND TERM ON THE MISSION FIELD

After not quite two years furlough in the U.S.A. / Mr. &Mrs. Morse, with sons Eugene, Robert, LaVerne (born Jan. 4, 1929), again set out for the mis sion field in China. They reached Yunnan-fu in late November, and spent some time there in preparing for the remainder of the trip. In a letter dated July 8, 1930, Mr. Morse wrote: "We left Yunnan-fu (Kunming) on Decem

Chi (pronounce it "Yay Jir") on May 1. The month's Illness of our 1-year-old
many prospects already that the Lord will abundantly reward our labors, helps us realize the thanksgiving of the Children of Israel when they entered the
as we trust in Him and go forward."

very trying caravan journey, then finally got moved to our new station at Yea

ber 26, arrived at Wei HsI (pronounce it "Way She") on January 26, after a
Russell LaVerne has been our chief cause of delay. Being here at last, with

Promised Land. There are "giants in the land", but the Lord who opened the

way through the Red Sea and the Wilderness will continue to give us victory

There were times when they became discouraged, as they seemed to see little progress. But in October, 19X, Mr. Morse wrote of their schedule, which seemed to be quite full. "It seems we don't get very much done each dav, but we a Iway s 11 st
our tasks, plan the day's worK and then keep steadily at it from earlv morn

Because of lack of proper living quarters, Mr. Morse had to spend con siderable time at first in overseeing the preparation of a home for his family.

Chi (May-September, including the 3 hot months, with a very enervating hu midity), Ialmost gasp in grateful surprise at what has been accomplished. Truly God uses the weak things of this world to conquer the strong, when
Gospel - in our own home, on the street corners, at the city gate, under trees

ing till late at night. But as I review the 5 months since we arrived in Yea

those weak things but 'continue steadfastly'. The preaching of the Gospel has been our main emphasis from the very first. With no chapel, and our

home far from finished, we have nevertheless gone everywhere preaching the

in the villages, and in the homes of the people. We now average more than

services are held In the large brick-floored living room downstairs - which

been continued. As well as teaching the unconverted, these services keep our forces united and strong in the work. Most of our Yea Chi preaching

two services daily. The daily morning preaching and prayer services have

altogether we have in Yea Chi ELEVEN services each week. As regularly as


the weather will allow, we have weekly services in four villages of the val
ley, and also in four mountain villages.

we divided the people up and had separate meetings. Now we have Women's Service on Tuesday afternoons. Children's Serviceon Thursday afternoons, and

must be our chapel until we get a more suitable place. The Sunday morning preaching services Inthat room grew so that they habitually overflowed, then

Mrs. Morse was kept busy with teaching the two boys in the mornings. Afternoons were taken up with women's work, house to house visitation, or
village work.

Mr. Clifford Fu and Mr. Eugene T'an. Mr. Fu was In the Tibetan work, and Mr. T'an pastored the Chinese church and helped with the Christian school, as well as with literature. It was about this time, too that the first openings came among the Lisu people. Two Lisu Christians from further south joined with the Morses and helped In the initial evangelization among the Lisu in the
area near Yea Chi. Of these Lisu people Mr. Morse wrote: "Lisu tribesmen

During this time, two Chinese pastors and their families joined in the work -

Enroute for

visit to

Tibet.

the Tibetans have. However poor they may be, they don't know how to beg, and they never come asking for medicine without bringing a little something to offer for It. Although their fare is pitifully poor, I have never made a trip

are very poor. These Lisu have gotten ahold of all our hearts just as truly as

inhabited this region long before the Chinese invaded it, and their language is akin to that of their Tibetan neighbors in many ways. They are not priestridden like Tibetans. They live In log cabins roofed with rough clapboards weighted down with stones to keep the wind from blowing them away. They

the music comes from II Then when 1play the portable phonograph they are often so astounded that they just have to laugh right out. The Lisu people

from the surrounding mountains frequently come into our home to see where

into their mountain villages without being provided with whatever eatables

they could give. There are many thousands of Lisu families..all unevangelized in our region. I have had time to learn only a few sentences of their language, so want to take a whole month living in one of their villages and
learning to talk with them."

It was also during this time, February, 1931, that there was a severe epi demic of influenza. LaVerne was very ill for about two weeks. There were many deaths also, including theMorse's landlord and one of his servants. The
widowed mother of Anzie and Drema alsodied and left these two small daugh

ters, for whom the Morses cared. (They later proved such a blessing in the Lord's work. Anzie Ruth, after many years of working with the Morses, Dittemoresand Dorothy Sterling Was stricken with typhus in December, 1949, and
went Home to the Lord on December 23rd. Drema Esther is still in the mission

work, carrying on medical work a 1ongside J. Russell Morse, helping with


teaching, translation and general mission work.) In a later letter Mr. Morse

mentioned that they had taken still another native child into their home, in
addition to the two Tibetan girls. "This is a bright Lisu boy about 14 years old, named Pu-Hsi", he wrote. "We wanted him to attend our Mission school

and prepare to become an evangelist. His father is one of our Lisu teachers, and this boy has been a Christian for about three years." (Now some 30 years later, this Lisu boy is one of the most faithful of the Lisu preachers, and is
known as Daniel.)

With the opening up of work among the Lisu people, another problem pre sented itself more acutely - that of several languages needing to be learned.
In one newsletter Mr. Morse wrote, "Four languages are used in our region Tibetan, Lisu, Chinese and Nashi. In July we assigned the Fu family to spe

are OPEN to the Gospel, most of our converts have been won among them, and these new converts MUST be well taught and trained), and Mr. T'an on the Nashi and Chinese. I study the Lisu language whenever I can, and do not find it difficult to learn but my time is so crowded with med! cal work, correspondence and executive matters, that my progress is slow just now, and I must work through interpreters." Mr. Morse made numerous trips into the Lisu villages, sometimes taking Eugene and Robert, sometimes the whole fam ily, most times going with native helpers and interpreters. He described one
such trip as follows; "We went for a week of evangelism at Kang Pu and the Lisu community across the Mekong river west of there, where Mr. Fu and our two Lisu teach

cialize on Tibetan work, myself on the Lisu (absolutely necessary, for they

ers had previously done quite a bit of work, and where some had been perse

cuted for repenting. The first night out we preached at Kang Pu, then four

nights among the Lisu with one of our Yea Cni helpers as interpreter. This interpreter had been working for us some months past as general "roustabout", but had not yet accepted Christ, Well, as he interpreted for four nights the message of God, sin, salvation, and the new man, a change was made in his heart. On the last day of our stay, when we baptized the last Lisu convert,

he stepped down into the cold water and told Mr. Fu, 'Now I must submit to Christ too,' 1tell you there is something compelling in the actual sight of Christian baptism, when people in the face ofpersecution and ridicule under go this pattern of death, burial, and resurrection to walk in newness of life. As for the Lisu converts, the teachers had told us there were about twenty ready for baptism, but when the meeting was over, we found the number in creased to THIRTY (besides the interpreter) whowere ready to obey God rath er than man. Incidentally, I found that I had fallen completely in love with

these simple, straightforward, desperately

needy mountain people. One of those bop-

tlzea was the TIBETAN wife of a Lisu con

vert, and wefound that several could speak the Tibetan languagefluently. (This Tibet
an woman, named A-mo, is now living in Muladi village with her husband, and is still a faithful Christian.) There were other preaching trips among the Lisu, and other baptismal services. Mr. Morsewrote concerning one such trip to To-

balo village. "The high point of the trip

to Tobalo was the baptismal service on Fri day morning. Each night we had conduct ed an "after-meeting", at which the can

didates for baptism were given special


teaching and asked questions to make sure

of their faith and repentance being genu


ine. The chancesare that all are in earnest

for there hasbeen much underhanded perse cution and threatenings of what would be

done to all who become'foreign subjects'. I personally have not baptized any of the

A-mo, Tibetan woman living in Muladi.

now

tism to his disciples, and the Apostle Paul also left this mostly to other lead
moved on to other fields."

converts, lest it might seem to give some warrant for the epithet of 'receiving FOREIGNER'S BAPTISM'. Since Jesus evidently committed the work of bap

self-governing, and self-propagating long after the Foreign Missionary has


During the next few years, the work in Yea Chi continued with encourag

We are hereto build NATIVE churches of Christ, that can be self-supporting,


ing results. But the greatest harvest was reaped among the Lisu people. Mr.

ers ofthe church (I Cor. 1:14-17), I have good precedent In doing the same.

Morse wrote, "No question about it, these people are MOST FRUITFUL soil

for the Gospel, and will well reward our faithful sowing and cultivating,

TIME has not come there yet. While waiting and working for the opening of Inner Tibet, we can meanwhile be building churches of Christ among the Lisu
and other border tribes."

much sooner than any other people of our region. Of course we love the Ti betans as much as ever, and our work Is also with them, but the HARVEST

ween valley, and even across the national boundary into the Ahkyang valley
Christians, who individually took the responsibility of spreading the Good
News to their unsaved friends and relatives.

By 1933 the Gospel had spread from the Mekong valley, across the Sal-

in Burma. This was the outgrowth of the enthusiasm and seal of the Lisu

The Yea Chi work suffered a severe blow when, In 1934, Mr. T'an, the

Chinese principal of theirschool was poisoned by jealous associates and died.

Batang and came southward to Yea Chi and for a time worked with theMorses, then moved northward to Atuntze, among the Tibetans. That same year the
started home onfurlough, delaying in Hongkong for the birth of their daugh
ter, Ruth Margaret, on February 1935.

It was also in 1934 that Dr. and Mrs. N. H. Bareleft theU.C.M.S. work at

Vernon Newlands, too, joined the work. At the end of 1934, the Morses

continued growth, especially In the Lisu work, to which more and more time was being devoted. The two older sons, Eugene and Robert, were now old

Return tothe mission field was In 1937, this time accompanied by two new recruits - Harold Taylor and Isabel Maxey. The following year, 1938, saw

enough to take an active part in the evangelistic and teaching work. In the late fail of 1938 and continuing info 1939, there occured a spontaneous spir
itual awakening or revival among the Lisu churches. There was an intense conviction of sin among the Christians, and they publicly confessed, with weeping, to many v/rongs or sins. There was a tremendous burden of prayer for the non-Christians round about them. The church was purged or cleansed of many things concerning which the missionaries had preached many times without any visible effect. For example, all drinking was stopped; Christians no longer smoked; no longer did they sell their daughters In marriage - in fact, many girls were redeemed, whose parents had promised them to non-Christians and had already taken payment, -the price being repaid to the non-Christian family. It was a thrilling time, spiritually, and many souls were turned to the Lord. Village after village begged for teaching, and urged the mission
aries to come and live among them.
THE FLOOD AT TOBALO

During this same time there was much political trouble in and around Yea Chi, because of a bad feud between the Yea Chi King and the Tibetans on the border. The Tibetans made frequent plundering raids down toward Yea

Chi, and there was much fighting. Finally, because of these conditions and because of the urgent calls from the Lisu people, the Morse family moved

from Yea Chi to Tobalo, In Lisu country. As far back as 1931, Mr. Morse

hadforeseen the openingof the Lisu fiela, and had purchased a piece of land, a small island with an area roughly the equivalent of half a city block, and

Flash floods wash out roads and bridges, so a washed out tree substitutes for bridge instead. All of this would be a raging torrent at flood time.

had built a small cabin there.

It was here that a new mission station was es-

tabl Ished. From here it was possible to reach out and min ister to an even

larger area of Lisuland. Across the mountain pass. In the Sal ween valley,
there were several congregations begging for the missionaries to move over there, and to bold schools. In September of 1940, Mr. Morse and son, Rob-

Left; Eugene

(Inset)

and

Helen

Morse with children, (left to right) David 12 holding Jeanette 9 mos.,

Donnie 9, Tommy lOVi, Margaret 4, Marilyn 2.

nd

Bett-

2,

Stev

>y Dremc

Below: Drema Esther Morse

with son, Sammy (Ah-Pu)

Above:

LaVerne

and

leis

Morse with Marcia 6, Mark IVi, and Cynthia 1 yr

Right: Frank and Ruth Morse


Johnson, Minister La Mesa

Christian Church, Santa Bar

II

bara, Calif., with children,


Russell 6, Kathy 5, Karen 4, Phillip 2''2 and Deborah 2

ert, made a iong trip south to Tali, on the Burma Road, for medical care and

thot Robert might have his eyes checked, as they had been bothering him so much he could not study. Eugene made on evangelistic trip to the Salween valley, planning to be away a month to six weeks. This left Mrs. Morse,
with LaVerne and Ruth Margaret and Anzie (the older of the two Tibetan or

about the experience as follows: "About 1:X a.m. I awoke suddenly from a
dream and heard the rushing and roaring of the flood waters by my bedroom window, and I knew the dam above the compound had broken. I quickly
LIsu boy, then Anzieand I went up the garden path to see how the walls were

phan girls) at the Tobalo mission station. On Saturday, October 19, 1940, Mrs. Morse made a teaching trip to a place one day's walk away, which had urgently asked for help. She retu rn ed on Monday. Saturday night heavy rain began to fall and it rained steadily until early Wednesday morning<, On Tuesday night, the 22nd, Mrs. Morse was s udd en Iy awakened. She wrote

dressed, called Anzie and LaVeme, lit the lantern and went out to see how everything was. The pig pen had gone. I calkd the Tibetan woman and our

standing. Lo and behold, the west end of the island had already been swept

each minute bringing it nearer! We returned to the house to pray. After a


iong prayer service, 1went downstairs to see how everything was. The water

away I The river was a mad torrent, a raging flood was coming down on us,

had risen and was several inches deep in the yard. We went back to pray.

The mighty, turbulent Mekong and the hair raising narrow trail along which
all must travel.

worked. The water was raging at both doorsteps. Great logs and boulders

were made of mud bricks.) We kept on working, praying constantly as we

pig grass into the cracks. But the tiny holes soon became larger. (The walls

vvall of the store room was leaking, so I called the children and they stuffed

Again I went downstairs to see how the walls were standing. The west

each of us and four blankets. As it was getting light, I went upstairs to get
Ruth. I looked out of the window and saw that the waters north of the house

only the dawn would come! I got together a partial change of clothes for

were being carried by the door. The waves dashed into the door cracks. If

were turning in a different direction. I quickly dressed Ruth, we took the

clothes bundles and started downstairs. As I stepped out of the north door where there had been a great raging flood a few minutes before, I thought of Moses. Surely the Lord had prepared a way before us and was tenderly car ing for us. As we went fromthe house, the east part, from.which I had taken and made a dam across its regular bed, so it came onto our island and swept
away our house from Its rock foundation. The Lord kept the house until He

Ruth fell away into the flood waters. A field had fallen down into the river

prepared a way of escape - a path through the waters. How I do praise Him
for all His goodness to His children.

"All day the river kept washing awaythe fields onthe mountain sides and
the log cabins of our neighbors. The northwest corner of our house was left. In this corner we had stored our grain bins and canned fruits. A lot of the jars fell and were broken, but about 50 were left. Also in this corner was

some sugar and lard. Downstairs, on top of the grain bins were stored our
steamer trunks In which most of our best clothes and a few winter clothes were

packed. How we do thank God for sparing our lives and for this provision for
our needs.

"Now not even the outline of our island is left. Besides our house, there

were eight of our log cabins destroyed - seven completely swept away, and one crushed. Only one was left. I had this moved up on the mountain side. Then all of the grainand remaining stores were put into the cabin. I worked
at this for over a week. Then Eugene returned - I had sent a runner after

him. He had been away for a month. After a couple days of work we came

A single strand twisted bamboo rope-bridge crossing fakes a lot of courage and daring, but is the only woy to cross the tur bulent Mekong and Solween

rivers in summer.

over her to Isabel's home in Kang Pu. It is good to be in a house again.


"Here at Kang Pu we had a few boxes stored - mostly old stuff. We are

picking out some clothes and trying to geta set of clothes for everyone. Mrs. Lewer (a denominational missionary to the south) sent up a runner with some
clothes and some milk, for which I am certainly thankful. We found we had two old double cots, one Chinese mattress, some odd pillows, three comfort
ers, and some old clothes left here. One blanket and three comforters and

two quilts were dug out of the mud and we had these washed. All of these.

together with what Mrs. Lewer sent will make enough bedding for the winter. Among the things that went down the river were our cook stove, kitchen utensils/ organ/ radio, typewriter, all of our medicines, all accounts and account
books, LIsu books and Bibles, several horse loads of tea and salt (used as

money In this country), our petromax lantern used in the church for light,
workingequipment which we have collected in the 20 yearsofservice in God's work. The boys will miss the accordions most, as they used them most of all among the Lisu people. LaVerne's school books are gone, too. Still we can only look up and thank God for sparing our lives." Isabel Maxey also wrote of the flood in a letter to J. Russell and Robert In Tali, dated Oct. 30. "There is only one way to begin such a letter as this must be and that is to say; 'Praise God from whom all blessings flow,' But for His mercy and grace 1might now have to say that Gertrude and the chil dren were gone, rather than just to say that Tobalo - house, chapel, garden and orchard - is gone; washed down the Mekong river, and that by just a hair's breadth, a miraculous provision of God's, they escaped going too. I

know fhat you are now gratefully thanking God for this, and girding your
heart to hear the details. But first, let me tell you, no man ever had a love

lier, braver and more saintly wife or no son a more devoted, consecrated mo ther than you have. A lesser woman would never have met the situation so wisely and trustingly. She is a sp Ir i t ua I pillar." She described the flood,
much as Mrs. Morse did in her letter. Concerning the situation afterward

she wrote, "By comparing notes, Gertrude and I believe we together have

just enough bedding, beds and sheets and blankets to go around, if we wash sheets and pillow cases on a sunny day so they can get dry in time for that
night again. Of course, my winter clothes ana bedding were at Tobalo and
went too, so we'll all have a part in an amount of hardship this winter. But

your being in Tobalo will enable us to get some necessities, and I believe we
can hold out for about six months. The biggest problem Is shoes and stockings.
Neither Gertrude nor LaVerne have shoes. She has some strap slippers, but

they are too uncomfortable to wearlong at a time. LaVerne has not one shoe
or stocking. I've some he can wear till you come. Ruth Is here, and I'm fix ing her some clothes and trying to get ready for an enlarged family (a joy I cannot begin to express). As to future plans we all await your decision.

\k

Russell

with

great

Tibetan

eagle

he

shot

down out oF the

sky with his rifle


which was as so a useful

point
tact

of
with

con
the

gun loving Ti-

"Please do not grieve unduly,

great joy. And so the lovely valley


we, ana others with us, called a Garden of Eden Is gone. The love

for that would only give the devH

ly bed of white chrysanthemums you


made for Gertrude was breath-tak-

ing In beauty. But oh, the beauty


of Heaven will reward the loss.

Personally, I'm happy to have shar ed in the loss of mere things - even though they were my very nicest furlough clothes, souvenirs etc, j But I have nothing to lose to com

pare to your supply of medicines, books, photos, garden, the accord


ions, your radio etc With what the

Lord has left here, Ishall sohappily

try to furnish a place where we can all work and be together."

The Move To The Salween Valley


Withina fewweeks, even though Mr. Morse had not yet come back
from Tali, the decision was made to

move over into the Salween valley in answer to the many, many urgent
calls from the churches there. Mrs.
A 12,000 ft. pass over the Hump in
the China-Burma border area, which

Morse and the children, and Isabel

had to be crossed every year when


members of the family went from one portion of the field to another.

Maxey reached the Salween valley on December 21, 1940, after a very
strenuous trip over a snow-covered mountain pass. Mrs. Morse wrote:

"We have decided to go to the Salween Valley for the winter, where there are about 2,000 Christians who need Bible teaching. Isabel is with us, of
course. We will be cut off from mail for about four months, but we feel it is

exceedingly important that we go. There were about 400 Christians waiting
to receive us at the Christmas Conference. Each invited us to locate at their

village. We have been having plenty of opportunities to teach the Bible to

Kass from the Mekong valley into the Salween. Just one day after his arrival,

hungry hearts." Mr. Morse arrived in the Salween valley on January 8, 1941, having been met by Eugene and many Lisu porters to carry loads across the

eavy snows blocked the poss until the following spring. At once the missionaries were plunged into the task of holding schools for the Christian workers - preachers, teachers, elders and deacons etc. The

people were hungry for the Gospel preaching, and Christian leodershtp.
Easter, 1941, a convention was held, with an attendance of 1200. Mr. Morse

estimated the number of Christians at that time - including those in Upper Burma as well - to be around 3,500 - 4,000, with 30 congregations.

was war with the Japanese, and they never knew when the Japanese might

In May, 1941, Mrs. Morse, with Ruth Margaret, LaVerne, Drema Esther, Eugene and Isabel Maxey started down to Tali in spite of the fact that there

health generally, besides needing dental work done, as did Eugene. LaVerne and Ruth Margaret were to remain in school in Tali, with Drema Esther to
'look after' them. Mrs. Morse wrote that she had eleven cavities filled and

come further northward. Isabel was on her way home; Mrs. Morse was in poor

Eugene had sixteen fillings and one tooth pulled.

Rescue Work Planned

that they did not even hear about it for several weeks. During this time the
work continued to grow, and constant demands were being presented for lit

Pearl Harbor was bombed on December 7, but the Morses were so isolated

erature which could not be supplied, as Bibles and other books had all gone down in the flood. What few books they had were distributed very carefully and prayerfully. At last it seemed that the three sons - Eugene 20, Robert 18, and La Verne 12- should go on an evangelistic trip across to the Burma side of the work, perhaps holding some short-term schools. Once across into Burma,

they found their meager supply of books exhausted at the first congregation

visited. Then came a summons from the British official at Ft. Hertz (now

known as Putao), requesting them to come to his office. On arrival, they found Ft. Hertz a militaryoutpost with an emergency airstrip, evacuating people, and the Japanese forces only 40 miles away I The military officers

the three boys had just come - known as the Hump - and offered to fly them over to the military headquarters in Assam to pass on this information. They
were askedfor recommendations concerning a ground search and rescue organ

were much interested in the information concerning the area through which

some mu<;h-needed supplies. In addition, the Army made available to them


derful was the fact that all these supplies were air-dropped (by parachute) right at the mission station in the Salween valley.

boys to Calcutta, where they were able to get the Bible and other literature printed, forwhich they had so long been praying. They also were able to buy
more supplies which tney could not otherwise have obtained. Even more won

ization, and submitted a plan which was accepted. The army then flew the

Meanwhile LaVeme stayed on in India and went to school there, later re turning to the States where he continued his education until 1949. Eugene and Robert helped with the organization of the search and rescue network throughout the area, and also served as guides and interpreters at var ious times. Yet they were able at the same time to continue preaching and

J. Russell Morse and family and Mrs. Ruth Morse taken during T936-37 furlough.

teaching In the mission work. After the war was over, they learned that their
induction notices had come to the American Consulate In Kunming, had been referred to the Air Transport Command, with which the boys were working, and then cancelled, for they were considered more valuable In a civilian ca

pacity where they were. Also, at the end of the war, letters of commenda

tion were received from General H.H. Arnold, and General George, thank ing them for their work.
Work Grows - New Missionaries Arrive - Morses Start Home

the way from America to within ten days travel of the mission field. It was
almost unbellevablethatln just three months from the timeshe flew from New York, she and all her baggage (air-dropped by the Army) were on the mission
field, even though It was winter-time.

In 1944, still during the war, when usually civilians were not being al lowed to travel, the Lord opened the way for Miss Dorothy Sterling to fly all

During the winter of 1945-46, Robert made an eight-month's trip Into the

Ahkyang valley In North Burma, where hevisited congregations, heldschools,


and saw the beginnings of work among the Rawang tribes. It was at that time that he first began to learn their language, and to make plans for some day
working out a written script for It.

Isabel Maxey Dittemore returned to the mission field'with her husband. Warren, and baby daughter, Janet, In early January, 1946= After ten years of continuous service, the Morses started home on a well earned furlough In July, 1946, leaving the DIttemores and Dorothy Sterling to shepherd the more than 6,000 Christians. Before they left Kunming they received the heart-

work, all reached Kunming during late 1946. Mr. Morse stayed on in Kun
Esther. FURLOUGH AND RETURN TO THE FIELD

breaking news oithe untimely deathof Warren Dittemore on August 5th. They considered returning to the fi eld immediately, but felt that for the sake of future usefulness in the Lordls work theyshould go on to the U.S. as planned. Mr. and Mrs. David Rees, and Miss Jane Kinnett, new recruits to the Lisu

ming to assist them, while the rest of the family proceeded to the States. He joined the family in May, 1947, accompanied bytheir foster-daughter, Drema

Two years on furlough from 1947-49 effected great changes in the future

potential of the mission work. While Russell and Gertrude visited the church es and presented the work, Eugene and Robert found time to go to Cincinnati Bible Seminary for a semester, and helpcompose and print a newand enlarged
Lisu hymnal in co-operation with Lisuland workers of the China Inland Mis sion. Several new recruits were also obtained; Miss Imogene Williams, Miss Lora Banks, and the new brides of the two elder sons, - Eugene's wife Helen Myers Morse, and Robert's wife Betty Meriwether Morse. J. Russell and Gertrude Morse, their daughter, Ruth Margaret, and foster daughter, Drema Esther, started back to the mission field in August, 1948, and when all the younger generation joined them in Kunming, China at the start of 1949, it was already a time of emergency and crisis. The Communists were in the midst of their big campaign to take over all of China, and most mission fields were closing down as hundreds of missionaries were being evacu
ated.

Robert and Betty proceeded first to the Lisuland field back in the hinter land "where China, Tibet, and Burma meet", and had a few months in which to work, along with Isabel Dittemore and Janet, David and Lois Rees, Jane

Kinnett and Dorothy Sterling and Anzie Ruth Morse. To get there they had to charter a plane and hop over large areas of Communist-held territory and
land on a strip of alpine meadow at the base of a 20,000 ft. snow mountain.

Soon Eugene and Helen followed, but were turned back by the Communists

who seized control of the area at that very time. After being held by the Communists, during which time many mission supplies were confiscated, they
were permitted to return to Kunming. Russell and Gertrude carried on the work in Kunming as long as possible, while Imogene and Lora were engaged mainly in language study until the time came when it was imperative that all
missionaries leave.

The work in Kunming, which had been very slow and unresponsive for several years, now began to open up, and not only was the one congregation growing, but a second congregation was started, and several national pastors were in training. After many years of discouragement, it seemed impossible to leave just at a time when the work was becoming established and growing.

When Mrs. J. Russell Morse and Drema Esther, and Eugene, Helen and baby

David flew out to Hong Kong, just before the Communist take-over in Kun ming in late November 1949, J. Russell stayed behind to help native churches as long as he could. He had planned to come out on the next plane, but the Communist turn-over took place so quickly that there was no "next plane" . Thus he remained in Kunming, where he was able to carry on work until his arrest and imprisonment in March, 1951. Meanwhile LaVerne, who had been studying in Minnesota Bible College, had come out as a missionary to China in June, 1949. In an effort to reach Lisuland work before the mission fields were completely cut off, he went to-

gether with Mel Byersonalong roundabout journey which took them


Into southeastern Tibet and from

and Lisuland. There they found

there down into the Salween valley

that Robert and Betty ana all the other missionaries had already evac uated into Burma across the Hump,
after six months under Chinese Com

munists, and so they followed into

Burma in May, 1950. LaVerne and Mel Byersalso had some interesting
and exciting adventures before thev all arrived safely back together with
the other missionaries in north Bur-

uir
Mrs. Gertrude Morse, Anzie Rulh, Drema Esther and Ruth Margaret about
1939.

FIFTEEN MONTHS IN A COMMUNIST PRISON Excerpts

I wasn't afraid. For a I most thirty years I had Iabored for the Lord in Southwestern Asia, and I felt that I knew the people there. But I didn't know
Communism.

On December 7, 1949, on the last Lutheran Mission plane, Mrs. Morse

flew to Hong Kong. The parting was hard, but we hoped it would be for only
a few weeks. The heads of several other missions in the city were staying on as I was doingbecause it had been reported that all missions that closed their work would not be allowed to reopen. We had hoped that the approach ing stormwouldsoon be over, and that everything would settle back to peace ful and normal conditions and that the mission work could go on. But this hope was vain. The communists took over Yunnan Province on Dec. 9, 1949, just two days after Mrs. Morse had gone to Hong Kong. Nationalist planes began to bomb Kunming. At our mission home on the outskirts of the city I was able to provide a refuge for many vi cti ms of the warfare. I had a good supply of medical materials and thus was able to minister to many poor people who could not get to the Kunming hospitals. The Christians were treated fairly well for a time, and for several months the churches were not molested- I do not know why. But after the communists announced war in Korea, changes reached even to us. Their suspicion and hatred of all Americans became pronounced. The persecution of Christians
now began. The churches were ordered to sever all connections with foreign mission

aries, who were being increasingly ostracized and restricted in theiractivities. Because of a changed attitude of the provincial government toward all foreigners, most of the few remaining missionaries, and those in other pursuits there, applied for permission to leave. Some applications were granted. Others, including mine, were refused. On March 22, 1951, I was standing on the front porch of our mission home in Kunming, when the place was suddenly surrounded by men in plain clothes - perhaps sixteen of them-who announced themselves as having been sent by the communist government. They brought from under their garments American-made Thompson sub-machine guns. Some of them drew pistols, and oth ers had bayonets fixed on the points of their rifles.

As I was being marched away, with those guns and bayonets pointing at

me, my heart turned in a feeling of human helplessness to the Lord who never had failed me; who, despite my own weakness, my often poor judgment, had
been faithful to overrule whatever evils had threatened. I turned to Him and

said, "Lord, enable me, as a Christian, to go through whatever may be ahead.


Give me wisdom. Lord, because this is a situation such as I've never faced

before. And I pray You-for Your glory - to enable me to be an overcomer." The trials of that 15-month period which began with my arrest were not great because of the awful physical things they did to me, as much as because of the spiritual and mental torture that threatened to drive me mad. About eight o'clock on that first night, guards came to my door and mo tioned for me to come out. Between two soldiers, and handcuffed, I was marched away, after having a hood placed over my head. Small slits in the hood made it possible for me to see a little bit. I was taken before a tribunal of four men. As I stood before them, guards with drawn pistols and sub-machine guns stood on each side of me. After long hours of grilling for information, during all of which I was at my wit's end, one of the men said, "Give me a rope! He's just a big bully1 We'll give him a taste of what It's like."

shock were such that the perspiration poured out of my body. While refusing to make a false confession, I tried, throughout four long hours, to explain
what my work actual Iy was and what I had been doing. They didn't want explanations. They simply wanted to force me to confess to the charges they made so they coula use my confessions for their purposes of propaganda. After about six hours of torture and questioning, I went back to my little room. I realized there was no one to help me - except God, I sang the song that I was to sing hundreds of times in that place, "Jesus, Lover of My Soul":
"Other refuge have I none;

They took my hands and twisted them behind my back until I thought that my arms might be wrenched out of their sockets. The pain and the nervous

Hangs my helpless soul on Thee;


Leave, O leave me not alone.

Still support and comfort me. All my trust on Thee is stayed. All my help from Thee I bring. Cover my defenseless head With the shadow of Thy wing." Those words became my daily prayer in that prison. The next night was the same thing:torture again. After about three hours,

during which my arms were tied behind my back, one of the leaders at the

front of the group said, "Soften him up; he's just a gangster! People have

accused him of tnese things, and still he won't confess."

my ears and nose and from some places on my face where skin was knocked off. I rocked to and fro under those blows. Finally, after I had refused to
confess to charges that were not true, they said, "We're going to crack your
head".

Then two big bullies started to beat me on the head. Soon blood ran from

a chance to write the history of your mission and work of the thirty years you have spent in China - all your connections at any time; and if this is satis

The next night I was saying a prayer in my heart when I began to talk. I've forgotten what I said, but finally one man motionedto the others and they went into another room. I could hear their high, angry voices but couldn't understand anything they said except this: "Well, if we kill him, then he is of no more use to us. If we keep him here, ultimately he may tell us some things that will be of use." They came back and said to me, "We'll give you

factory, your life will be spared." Months passed. I wrote and wrote. Five hundredpages. The only history of our missionary work in West China, Tibet, and Burma that has ever been written. After it was presented and they had discussed it among themselves, I was again called before the tribunal and asked, "Why did you write all this stuff? It's no use to us at all 1 You haven't told us a thing about the Ameri

old mother woulcf still be alive for a last reunion should I later be releasea,
wondering whether I'd ever see my wife and chi Idren again, and battling against the fiery darts of the evil one in remorse and self-pity and frustration. The verses from God's Word that I had learned as a child were my resource
again and again. The torture continued. Of some af the things I underwent I dare not tell, even to my own family. Then there were experiences so fantastic that if I shouldtell of them in public, I doubt that what I shouldsay would be believed.

can spy system, the FBI, and what they're trying to do here in China." I was taken Lack to my cell. During the days that followed I paced up and down, wondering whether my

VividlyI recall many times during the fifteen months of imprisonment that

great chains were fastened to my feet- chains weighing fifty pounds or more. And sometimes I was handcuffed, often with my hands behind my back, and left to spend the night thus shackled. Only after begging was I released so I could attend to those things that normally required the use pf my hands. I remember that in my frustration I turned even to thesimplest things in my cell in orderto divert my mind from the unpleasant situation. I thought about the sparrows, for every time I saw them outside my window, the words of Je sus would come to me, "Fear not. Ye are of more valuethan many sparrows." And I'd answer, "Lord, I'm so weak I My faith is so small 1 Increase my faith!
Enable me to trust in your promises. Lord."

There were periods when, day after day , {prepared to die. That was after I had heard that my wholis family had been accused of being spies. The reason given for the accusation was thatduring the second world war they had
stayed on the mission field on the border of Tibet and Burma - an area of no

strategic importance at alii Yes, I prepared to die. And I followed a pro

cedure that I feel sure was followed by thousands ofChristians ofthe early

New Testament Church. I remembered tnat they had been admonished to "for sake not the assembling of themselves". Also, in regard to the Lord's Supper, they had been told, "This do...in remembrance of me." They partook of these emblems of the Lord's broken body and shed blood - as they themselves faced death, they partook of them, remembering that He had been scourged by Roman soldiers, a crown of thorns had been pressed down upon His head.
He had carried the cross upon which He soon was to be nailed - to die there. And Jesus had said, "A servant is not greater than his lord." He had said also not to fear men who are able to kill the body, but who, after that, are
able to do no more.

. water, which I had saved from mv meals. And each day I prepared myself for that death which I thought might come any hour. And I knew, too, that unthinkable tortures might precede my death. Those in charge of the prison constantly, day and night, were doing terrible things to others. For example,
the carcass of a pig.

Daily, for months, I partook of those emblems, using steamed bread and

in many cases, before killing their victims, they poured scalding water on them and scraped the hair from their heads as a butcher scrapes bristles from

I don't know what happened in my thinking one time when I attempted to

escape, and actually did get out of my room. But the communists never knew

that I not only left the room, but got down to the prison wall - to the place
where I believed I could get through. I thought at that time that I'd rather

guard, who was down the corridor, found out that I had left it. And once back in my room, I shut the window that I'd secretly opened.
On June 2, 1952, two guards came to my cell and took me over to the military tribunal. There a paper was read to me, saying that I was to be de ported by way of Canton and Hong Kong, because I was "too dangerous a person" to be permitted to remain in their country. On June 20, after a sixteen-day trip, we reached the "bamboo curtain" border, which is a little over an hour's journey from Hong Kong. Here the guards and Chinese customs officers examined my belonginmand took about one hundred of my U.S. dollars, leaving me with $1.70 with which to get to Hong Kong. Then I crossed "No Man's Land", which is about150 yerds wide. What a relief as I passed beyond the barbed-wire fences I "You don't need to be afraid anv more," the British immigration officer

rebuked for my lack of faith in God. I crept back into my room before the

be shot trying to get away than to die by the terrible means which they used in killing hundreds of other people. But down there by that prison wall I felt

egg sandwiches and another bottle of cold soft drink.

told me, and gave me a drink of cola "pop". A French priest gave me four

In Hong Kong, I got in touch with our friend, Howard Phillips, by tele phone, and asked him about my family, for the communists had tried to make me believe they had all been captured and perhaps killed. wife and LaVerne arrived here in Hong Kong, and they have been inquiring every place for you. Stay where you are, and I'll come and take you to
them."

"Why, man, none of them is in prison," he said. "Justsix days ago your

He came, and we started to the place where my wife and son were staying. On the way Howard said to me, "Mrs. Morse thinks you still may be in Kun
ming, and seeing you suddenly might be quite a shock to her. I'd better go
in first."

We arrived at the place and Howard climbed the stairs. I, with my rub
bery legs, weakened during fifteen months of inaction and of sickness toward the last, climbed slowly after him. I heard him knock on the door and tell Mrs. Morse who he was. Soon I reached the tdp of the stairs. Then the door opened. And there stood Peter I (See Acts 12:5-17). The church had been praying for him. But my wife, unlike those Christians of Peter's day, did not believe she was seeing a ghost. The hug and kiss I gave her kept her from entertaining any such idea. When I arrived in Hong Kong, Mrs. Morse and LaVerne had |ust returned

from an expedition in the hope of gathering information about me. They had been in Hong Kong |ustsix days, and because they had learned nothing about my wherabouts, they had made plans to leave for the United States on June
ly, just one day before I arrived. However, they had been delayed by some
business matters. Later, Mrs. Morse said, "Praise the Lordl He ordered our

going and our delay 1" Toward the closeof my imprisonment, my living-link congregation- Inglewood Christian Church, Inglewood, California, - hod held a 24-hour-a-day, week-long prayer meeting. And that meeting, I learned later, ended the
same dav I was notified that I was to be released. Also, I have learned that many otner people had fasted and prayed for me.

God answers prayer. God enabi es us to endure. Man may fail. Jesus
never fails. Let us trust in Him and go forward.
THE AMAZING MORSES

(Editorial, Lookout October 1, 1961, used by permission)


In our opinion the most colorful and interesting missionary work of our generation is being done by the amazing Morse family in the Isolated regions of North Burma. Every account from the missionary families of thisfieldadds to our amazement at the courage, and the consecration of these intrepid

The MorsesMr. and Mrs. J. Russell Morse and their three sons, Eugene, Robert, and LaVerne, and their familiesalong with their co-workers have proved that pioneering for Christ today requires the same kind of adventurous living that characterized pioneering In any past generation. But underneath all the interesting adventure is a deep, spiritual purpose: to bring Christ to the Orient. Their only objective is to try to reach the tribes of those mount ainous regions, to win the members of those tribes to Christ, to strengthen
them in their faith, and to help them to remain true to their Lord in the midst
of heart-crushing difficulties. Eternity alone will tell of the tremendous contribution that has been made
has been felt.

Christian workers.

by theMorse family toward thecivilization and Christlanization of every part

of the Orient where their teachings have been received and their Influence

WORD FROM THE MORSES

"We arrived at the Putao air port about 2:00 pm July 17. Robert, Esther
and the children were there to meet us. But also there were around six hun

dred Lisu and Rawang Christians there. And while Russell and I were shaking

hands with the long line of two or three deep/ the young people were singing hymns. It brought tears to my eyes to see how very happy the people werec Esther said the pilot end crew did not know what to think of such a reception for two old people. "We stayed all night at Robert's the first night and visited with them. The second evening we came over hereto Muladi because the church had prepared
a feast for us Robert and the children came also. It was so nice to see all

the old friends. We spoke a little at that time and then on the first Sunday Russell and I spoke at the morning services. The Muladi church usually has
around four to six hundred. There was a large crowd. At the close of the service, at the suggestion of one of the elders, the whole congregation stood

and prayed, giving thanks for answered prayer for LaVerne's permit and our safe return. This Is being done again and again. At prayer meeting the house is quite full also - about four hundred. Praise God for His love and help," Eugene, Helen and family returned to Muladi September 7th. Helen wrote of the arrival, " It was raining pretty hard when we left Rangoon and the first half hour or so was pretty rough flying. When we got up here, the pilot cir cled Muladisort of let the folks know we were comi ngl (It was on un scheduled flight.) The village sure looked pretty from the air! "At the air field, a group of Bible School students and the Christian Day School students (about 500) were all on hand to meet us, and even sang a
welcome to us. It was sure a thrill to be back. LaVerne met us with the

tractor, so we had a nice leisurely (bumpy) trip to Muladi. It was so good to

see Mother and Daddy, Lois, and Drema again.


"The children are all so glad to be back. We've been able almost to see
the tensions of travel relax.. BE LOOKING FOR a continuation of "FORTY YEARS IN THE MASTER'S SERVICE " in our first 1962 Newsletter.

Mailed bv Mrs. OSCAR L. MYERS


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bringhurst, ind.