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RATIONALE

This particular study on the post-Sendong assessment of the status of internally-displaced persons in six relocations sites in iligan city is designed to provide relevant data and information needed by development stakeholders in designing appropriate plans and formulating development interventions in addressing the priority needs of IDPs in the present relocation sites in Iligan City. This study is also conducted in order to identify, determine and showcase how the physical needs (land, shelter, water, waste disposal system, energy and infrastructure); socio-economic needs (livelihood, mobility, accessibility, source of income, health and security); and environmental needs (disaster risk management and environmental programs) of IDPS are being responded by stakeholders and the internally-displaced persons as beneficiaries of the different projects. This study also intends to propose recommendations that may provide relevant insights as to how to address the needs of IDPs, and what action plans are to be adopted and implemented in said relocation sites. The results of this study can also be used as objective tools for analysis and decision-making among stakeholders in the event that future development programs will be implemented in said resettlement sites. Formulation and preparation of survey tools, administration of survey instruments and other requirements of this study were made and conducted by the personnel of the Iligan Medical Center College and LIHUK, Inc., in partnership with the Partnership for Philippine Support Service Agency, Inc. The research team was composed of a panel of researchers, namely; Dr. Helen S. Tejero and Jose Dennis O. Mancia from the Research and Extension Program of the Iligan Medical Center College; Esmeralda R. Padagas, Arthur Homillano, Jr., Merie V. Zuero, Rufino N. Gonzada and Alice C. Servento from the Lig-ong Hiniusang Kusog, Inc. The urgency of coming up with a post-Sendong assessment report on the status of IDPs in the six resettlement sites has led the researchers to focus their attention on the different subjects in order to come with up appropriate data and information needed for development planning and determination of appropriate interventions. Thus, the idea of coming up with an assessment report was collectively presented and approved, and thereafter, research planning, including

assigning of individual tasks, were conducted. Particular and specific assignments were given to individual members of the research team to focus on particular research subjects.

INTRODUCTION
A tropical depression east of Mindanao entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) at 10:00 a.m. on December 15, 2011 and was named Sendong (international code name: Washi). At 4:00 p.m., December 15, 2011, Sendong intensified into a tropical storm as it moved closer to northeastern Mindanao. Public warning storm signal (PSWS) No. 1 was hoisted by PAGASA over Visayas and Mindanao. At 10:00p.m. on December 15, 2011, tropical storm Sendong maintained its strength as it increased its threat to northeastern Mindanao and eastern Visayas area. PSWS No. 2was raised over Visayas and Mindanao while PSWS No. 1 over some parts of Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao. At 4:00 a.m. on December 16, 2011, tropical storm Sendong has slowed down slightly as it continued to threaten northeastern Mindanao and eastern Visayas area. At 10:00 a.m. on December 16, 2011, tropical storm Sendong has slowed down slightly as it continued to threaten northeastern Mindanao and eastern Visayas area. PSWS No. 2 was raised over Visayas and Mindanao while PSWS No. 1 over Palawan, Cuyo Island, Visayas and Mindanao. At 4:00 p.m. on December 16, 2011, tropical storm Sendong made landfall in the vicinity of Hinatuan, Surigao del Sur. PSWS No. 2 was raised over Mindanao while PSWS No. 1 over Palawan, Visayas and Mindanao. At 10:00 p.m. on December 16, 2011, tropical storm Sendong maintained its strength and was now in the vicinity of Malaybalay City, Bukidnon. The location of the center as of 4:00 a.m. on December 17, 2011 was 20 km west northwest of Cagayan de Oro City at coordinates 8.4 N, 124.4 E. (NDRRMC, January 2010).

Fig. 1. Flood Susceptibility Map of Parts of Iligan City. (photo courtesy of DENR MGB 10)

Tropical Storm Sendong unleashed its fury, destroying with great damage the cities of Iligan and Cagayan de Oro, including other areas in Mindanao and the Visayas. The destruction caused by the flood, aggravated by thousand of logs carried downstream by the rampaging flood waters, did not only wrought havoc to properties and caused massive displacement to more than 20,000 families in more than 34 barangays, but also caused tremendous deaths of thousand of residents living along river communities in Mandulog.

Fig. 2. Thousands of logs carried downstream

Fig. 3. A house in

Bayug

Island

buried during Sendong.

by

soil

and

logs.

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) based in Iligan City recorded 1,232 individual deaths, of which 566 were still missing. In terms of damages, the same agency reported at least 7,911 houses were totally destroyed and 14,874 were partially destroyed. Most of these houses were located along riverbanks in Brgys. Mandulog, Upper and Lower Hinaplanon, Pugaan, Digkilaan, Tambacan, Santiago, Sta. Felomina, San Roque, Tubod, Abuno and Tipanoy. The same report has also estimated that 22,522 families were affected or roughly 101,337 individual population of the citys 322,821 total population were rendered homeless and are still dependent on relief goods and resettlement programs of international humanitarian organizations and by the local government. At present, there are 14 transitory (or temporary) shelters or bunkhouses that are being occupied by 560 families. On the other hand, as of January 2013, there are six permanent shelters that were established by the GMA Kapuso in Brgy. Mandulog; by the Gawad Kalinga and Habitat for Humanity in Brgy. Sta. Elena; by the Red Cross in Digkilaan; by the Deus est Caritas in Brgys. Upper Tominobo and Dalipuga; and by the Diocese of Iligan in Brgy. Luinab. The local government of Iligan has received from local, national and international humanitarian donors Php___ million of cash donations intended for Sendong victims and survivors. LOCATION AND ACCESSIBILITY Iligan City, once described as the Industrial City of the South is located approximately 89 kilometers southwest of Cagayan de Oro City, and lies along the eastern coast of the province of Lanao del Norte. Geographically, it lies within coordinates 8 13 36 North latitude and 124 14 30 East longitude and is bounded by Iligan Bay to the west, the Municipality of Lugait, Misamis Oriental to the north, the municipalities of Baloi, Linamon and Tagoloan, Lanao del Norte to the south and the provinces of Lanao del Sur and Bukidnon to the east. It boast a total land area of 81,337 hectares which is divided into 44 barangays. Iligan City is easily accessible by land and sea transportation.

Fig. 4. Aerial view of Iligan City Location map of Iligan City (Google)

Fig. 5.

The Integrated Bus and Jeepney Terminal (IBJT) caters trips to and from Cagayan de Oro City and various parts of Misamis Oriental, while the Southbound Bus and Jeepney Terminal caters trips to and from Dipolog City, Pagadian City, Ozamiz City, various parts of Lanao del Norte and Lanao del Sur, Including Cotabato and the rest of central Mindanao. The city has appropriate port facilities that enable it to cater to various passenger shipping lines to different destinations including Manila, Cebu, Bacolod, Ilo-ilo, Dumaguete and Ozamiz City. TOPOGRAPHY AND DRAINAGE Iligan City is characterized by a narrow coastal plain bordered to the south and east by hilly terrain representing the footslopes of the rugged mountain peaks farther inland. The coastal plain is relatively flat to gently rolling with elevations rarely exceeding 20 meters above sea level (masl). Towards the highlands, the terrain is rolling to moderately steep with slopes ranging from 5 to 15%. Farther inland, the high and rugged mountain ranges appear with elevations varying from 500 masl to more than 1,000 masl. About 63% of Iligan Citys 81,337 has. land area have slopes of over 30%. Only about 2% have slopes of 0 3%, 15% fall between 3-18% and the remaining 20% are within 18-30%. Iligan City is mainly drained by the Mandulog, Iligan-Pugaan and Agus Rivers, their numerous tributaries, some smaller water bodies and manmade creeks. These rivers drain their loads toward Iligan Bay. The two major river systems, the Mandulog and the Iligan-Pugaan, cut across the coastal plain and serve as the main regional outflow of the city. The Iligan-Pugaan River basin is approximately 250 km 2 wide. The

floodplain has about a 200-meter wide channel and an average depth of 5 m measured from the top of the alluvial terrace. In some cases, erosion and scouring of riverbanks occur.

Fig. 6. Mandulog River before sending Mandulog River after Sendong

Fig. 7.

During the dry season, the stream flow follows a narrow path on the riverbed. On days of extreme precipitation, the river usually overflows, causing flooding in the city. Mandulog River lies about 5 km north of the heart of Iligan City. It has an estimated area of more than 550 km2. The river flows in a westerly direction and empties its load into Iligan Bay. From the mouth up to approximately 3 kms inland, the river flows in a 100-m wide bed with a deeper channel. Mandulog River is susceptible to severe flooding and riverbank erosion. River discharge is greater than that of Iligan River. Based on aerial photographs taken on different years, Mandulog River continuously changes its course. In aerial photos taken in the 1950s, Mandulog River charted a northerly course as it drained into Iligan Bay. At present, and possibly since the late eighties, the river flows westerly into Bayug before it discharges in the same bay.

CLIMATE AND VEGETATION The climate in Iligan City belongs to Type III of the Modified Coronas Climate Classification of the Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA). It is characterized by a short dry period of one to three months, where rainfall is not very pronounced, relatively dry from November to April, and wet during the

rest of the year. Heavy rains usually occur in the months of January, February, June, September, and December. Annual average temperature is 27.4C. The predominant vegetative cover consists of coconut groves and banana plantations which are found in plateaus and other lowlands as well as in slopes and highlands. Heavy tropical forests are found in slopes of 30% and greater and these are mostly located inland. A few swampy areas covered with marsh grass are within the barangays of Del Carmen and Bagong Silang. Some fruit trees such as mango, durian, jackfruit and tropical hardwood like lauan, molave, apitong, etc., are scattered in cultivated areas in the hinterland barangays. AFFECTED BARANGAYS A team from the DENR MGB Region 10 conducted a rapid assessment of parts of some of the most affected barangays in Iligan City caused by tropical storm Sendong. The team assessed Barangay Santiago, all the puroks in Bayug Island in Barangay Hinaplanon and the four puroks in Barangay Sta. Filomena adjacent to Bayug Island. Barangays Hinaplanon and Sta. Filomena are connected through a spillway.

Fig. 8. Orchid Homes totally devastated by Sendong totally flooded in Brgy. Santiago

Fig. 9. Properties

According to the report, Barangay Santiago is composed of 21 puroks. It has a total land area of 110,419 has. with a population of about 8,124. (Profile of Barangay Santiago, 2008?) The entire Barangay Santiago was inundated on December 17, 2011 brought about by the effects of tropical storm Sendong. However, damages varied from purok to purok. The worst-hit puroks are those adjacent to the river mouth of Mandulog River (Puroks 7, 6, 13), as well as those adjacent to creeks and other

tributaries. These creeks are either active, intermittent, or dry river/creek bed. These puroks include 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8. The puroks which did not suffer massive damage include Puroks 1 (boundary with Brgy. Tibanga), 9, 10, 11, and 12. However, these puroks were also all flooded, with som portions in Purok 9 which happen to be vacant lots. Portions of Brgy. Santiago was a former mangrove area. Further, these were reportedly created out of garbage deposits. The Iligan City High School Annex in Purok 5B was inundated by 1.15m floods. This is about 85 meters from the coast. It is also adjacent to the dumpsite. Floodwaters in the badly-damaged Cabili Village Elementary School in Purok 3 reached 2 meters. The GK Village in Purok 4 experienced 2.5 m floods. The team also made and assessment in Puroks Duranta A, Duranta B, San Francisco and Ilang-Ilang in Brgy. Sta. Felomena. Floodwaters reached more than 4 meters within this vicinity. These puroks are situated atop a dry riverbed.

Fig. 10. Floodmark (red arrow) in Purok Ilang-ilang, Brgy. Sta, Felomena was measured at 4.25 m. (Photos courtesy of MGB10)

Fig. 11. One of the school buildings in Brgy. Santiago destroyed by Sendong. Flood height reached 2.6 m (marked with red arrow)

In Brgy. Hinaplanon, the DENR MGB team assessed Puroks 1 to 9, all in Bayug Island. This island is in the junction of Mandulog River and Bayug Creek. Scouring is evident along the riverbank. The entire Bayug Island was heavily inundated, from 1.5 meters (Purok 5, near the coast) to 3 meters (Purok 7). The old map shows what is now known as the river mouth of Mandulog River was formerly only a creek known as Bayug Creek. However, the former northern segment of Mandulog River has since become heavily silted and is what is known today as Bayug Creek. This

heavy sedimentation has resulted in the change of the course of the Mandulog River.

ROLES OF STAKEHOLDERS IN ADDRESSING THE NEEDS FOR SHELTER Confronted with the serious challenge to immediately respond the need of providing relief and relocation for flood victims, the Local Inter-Agency Committee (LIAC), whose membership include the LGU; the different United Nations agencies; international humanitarian organizations; Office of the Civil Defense; national government agencies; and local nongovernment organizations, was organized by virtue of Executive Order No. ___ signed and approved by Mayor Lawrence Lluch Cruz in ___ 2011. The Local Inter-Agency Committee (LIAC) is tasked with drawing up appropriate plans and crafting policies for the development of the resettlement sites as viable, self-sustaining communities through participatory engagement of all stakeholders. The LIAC will ensure that housing units in the LGU and other resettlement sites are awarded to qualified beneficiaries. LIAC is also tasked to confirm qualified beneficiaries identified by the Beneficiaries Selection, Arbitration and Awards Committee of other forms of shelter assistance. The LIAC has the following four Sub-Committees, namely; the Beneficiary Selection, Arbitration and Awards Committee; Social Preparation Committee; Site Selection Committee; Relocation and Transfer Committee.

Fig.12. A once thriving community totally washed out church, gymnasiums has become and devastated by Typhoon Sendong. centers for Sendong survivors.

Fig. 13. School building, Immediate evacuation

In general, the duties and responsibilities of the LIAC is to serve as the over-all coordinating body for the entire disposition process of the resettlement sites of the LGU; formulate and adopt the necessary rules and guidelines for land acquisition and for the selection of beneficiaries; come up with a schematic work plan that will expedite the disposition of the property to the beneficiaries; approve the masterlist of the qualified beneficiaries; identify resources and develop systems and procedures for resource mobilization and project implementation; decide on all issues and concerns affecting the implementation of the project; solicit the participation and expertise of other public and private sector organizations, including international organizations, for the effective implementation of theproject.

Fig. 14. LIAC meeting discussing the status of IDPs in the Lawrence Cruz signing MOA with relocation sites in Iligan City (Photo courtesy of HRO) of Habitat for Humanity (Photo of HRO)

Fig. 15. Mayor representatives courtesy

1. The Local Government Unit (LGU) The LIAC also defines the roles and responsibilities of member-agencies. As such, the Local Government of Iligan City shall serve as Chair of the LIAC; convene the LIAC to a meeting as often as necessary for the purpose of planning, coordinating, assessing and monitoring the activities in the resettlement sites; monitor the activities of the various memberagencies and organizations under the LIAC relative to the implementation of the disposition of the LGU resettlement sites to qualified beneficiaries; call on any national government department or agency for assistance whenever necessary; assist in the formulation of the guidelines for the disposition of the subject property and in the selection of beneficiaries; oversee the implementation of the disposition process of the housing units; coordinate with the various concerned government agencies, bureaus and instrumentalities, including private sector organizations; conduct the necessary surveys: boundary, structural, subdivision, topographic as needed for planning and design of the sites; approve all Plans of the Resettlement Site Development Plans as prepared by the Technical team of the LGU; secure all necessary permits and clearances for project implementation; keep track of the progress of project implementation in the resettlement sites and prescribed corrective measures to the concerned agencies if necessary; accept the Project

upon completion and provide the necessary maintenance and repair of the project. 2. The National Housing Authority (NHA) The National Housing Authority shall serve as the Vice-Chair of the LIAC; assist in the formulation of the guidelines for the disposition of the housing units and in the selection of beneficiaries; undertake social preparation activities in coordination with the concerned government agencies as well as with the POs in the resettlement sites; assist in the validation of Master List in close coordination with the DSWD, LGU of Iligan City, PCUP, NGO and the concerned IDP representatives/POs. 3. The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) shall facilitate the issuance of Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC) and GIR and monitor compliance with the conditions stipulated in the said ECC; review and verify LGU-submitted relocation, topographic and subdivision surveys of the resettlement sites, including computation of the technical description based on applicable land use and approved subdivision scheme; facilitate the verification and approval of subdivision survey of the area; facilitate the approval of the boundary and subdivision plan and technical descriptions.

4. The Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) The Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) shall provide funds and undertake the land development in accordance with the approved plan of all LGU and other identified resettlement sites; ensure the completion of the tasks given within the timeline in coordination with the Project Management Team overseeing the development of the projects. 5. The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) shall provide assistance on the conduct of social preparation activities such as dialogues, consultations, etc.; assist in the conduct of master list validation in coordination with NHA, LGU of Iligan City, PCUP, concerned NGOs and IDPs/POs; assist in the formulation of the guidelines for the

disposition of the housing units and in selection of beneficiaries; provide other programs and projects for the benefit of the IDPs/Pos.

6. The Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council (HUDCC) The Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council (HUDCC) shall assist in the formulation of the guidelines for the disposition of the housing units in the LGU resettlement sites and in the selection of beneficiaries in coordination with the concerned agencies, NGOs and IDPs/POs; monitor the implementation of the projects.

7. The Presidential Commission for the Urban Poor (PCUP) The Presidential Commission for the Urban Poor (PCUP) shall provide assistance on the conduct of social preparation activities such as dialogues, consultations, etc.; assist in the conduct of master list validation in coordination with DSWD, NHA, LGU of Iligan City, concerned Barangay LGU, concerned NGOs and IDPs/POs; assist in the formulation of the guidelines for the disposition of the subject property and in selection of beneficiaries; accredit urban poor organizations operating in the Resettlement sites; facilitate the process of representation of the IDPs/POs and in the LIAC. 8 . Representatives of the IDPs, Peoples Organizations (PO), and NGOs/Civil Society

Representatives of the IDPs, Peoples Organizations (PO), and NGOs/Civil Society shall participate in the formulation of the guidelines for the disposition of the housing units and in the selection of the beneficiaries; participate in the conduct of community relations, social preparation and information dissemination activities including the drawing up of the development plan; participate in the decision-making process over matters involving the protection and promotion of their legitimate collective interest; participate and ensure the smooth transfer of the beneficiaries to the resettlement site, and apply for accreditation with PCUP and registration with HLURB. Status of Shelter Needs of IDPs The Beneficiary Selection, Arbitration and Awards Committee (BSAAC) of the LIAC came up in September 11, 2012 a status report regarding the shelter needs of IDPs mostly affected by Sendong. Table 1. shows the total number of IDPs needing permanent shelters; the number of IDPs processed by BSAAC; and the number of qualified and disqualified IDPs after series of assessment and selection activities.
TOTAL NO. OF IDPs NEEDING PERMANENT SHELTERS NUMBER OF IDPs PROCESSED BY BSAAC NUMBER OF DISQUALIFIED IDPs NUMBER OF QUALIFIED IDPs 7,911 2,113 262 1,851

Table 1. Number of shelters needs of IDPs (Source: BSAAC Evaluation report, as of January 2013)

The BSAAC also reported the areas and the total shelter requirements of IDPs whose houses were totally and partially damaged, and those which were flooded. Table 2 describe these information as follows.

AREAS DANGER ZONES (totally, partially flooded) NON-DANGER ZONES (totally damaged) TOTAL

TOTAL SHELTER REQUIREMENT 5,841 2,070 7,911

Table 2. Status of shelter requirements of IDPs in areas identified as danger and non-danger zones needing shelter requirement. Source : BSAAC Evaluation Report, January 2013.

The same BSSAC report also identified the danger and non-danger zones where totally, partially damaged and flooded houses were located. In the areas covering the non-danger zones, 2,070 houses were totally damaged; 3,597 houses were partially damaged, and 9409 were flooded, with a total number of 15,076 houses affected . On the other hand, in areas classified as danger zones, 2,377 houses were totally damaged; 2,289 were partially damaged and 1,125 were flooded, with a total of 5,841 number of houses affected. To sum up, there were about 15,076 houses which were flooded; 5,841 houses both

partially and totally damaged, with a total of 20,917 houses totally affected by Typhoon Sendong. In January 2013, the LIAC submitted a Relocation Project Updates based on on-site accomplishments of housing project being undertaken in all relocation sites. However, for purposes of this particular study, only six (6) relocation sites are included in the assessment.

A Resettlement Action Plan for Transitory IDPs now sheltered in various transitory shelters was also drawn up by the LIAC for planning considerations.
TRANSITORY CENTER 1. Luinab Gym 1 LOCATION Luinab NO. OF OCCUPA NTS 30 PLACES OF TRANSFER Bayanihan Village, Sta. Elena Bay Vista Village, Dalipuga Bay Vista Village, Dalipuga Bayanihan Village, Sta. Elena Upper Hinaplanon Village Bayanihan Village, Sta. Elena Upper Hinaplanon Village Iligan Bay Vista Village, Dalipuga Bayanihan Village, Sta. Elena Bay Vista Village, Dalipuga GMA Kapuso Village, Phase 1 & 2, Mandulog GMA Kapuso Village, Phase 1 & 2, Mandulog Bayanihan Village, Sta. Elena Bay Vista Village, Dalipuga Caritas Village, Upper Tominobo Bayanihan Village, Sta. Elena DATE OF TRANSFE R Jan-March 2013 Jan-March 2013 Jan-March 2013 Jan-March 2013 Jan-March 2013 Jan-March 2013 Jan-March 2013 Jan-March 2013 Jan-March 2013 Jan-March 2013 Jan-March 2013

2. RASFI 3. ATI Building

Luinab Upper Hinaplanon Upper Hinaplanon Tambo Pala-o

27 30

4. ATI Bunkhouse

40

5. IBJT Tent 6. Dy Property

28 109

7. Mandulog IOM 8. Mandulog CRS 9. Sta. Elena Bunkhouse 10. Upper Tominobo Bunkhouse 11. Bagong Silang IOM

Mandulog Mandulog Sta. Elena

25 63 27

Upper Tominobo Bagong Silang

43 59

40 12. Bagong Silang CRS Bagong Silang 24 13. San Roque CRS San Roque

14. MSU-IIT Coop

Upper Hinaplanon

40

Bay Vista Village, Dalipuga Bayanihan Village, Sta. Elena Bay Vista Village, Dalipuga Bayanihan Village, Sta. Elena Bay Vista Village, Dalipuga Bayanihan Village, Sta. Elena Bay Vista Village, Dalipuga Upper Hinaplanon Village

Jan-March 2013 Jan-March 2013 Jan-March 2013

Jan-March Upper 29 Bayanihan Village, Sta. 2013 Hinaplanon Elena Table 4. List showing transitory centers; location; no. of occupants; places of transfer and date of transfer as reported by the Housing and Resettlement Office (HRO). 15. Upper Hinaplanon

A Relocation Project Monitoring Updates


NAME OF PROJECT ARE A (has .) 3 15.9 CLASSI FICATION OffSite OffSite OffSite OffNO. OF PROJEC TED UNITS 320 1,712 NO. OF HOUSES COMPLET ONGOIN ED G 513 320 861 TOT AL STATUS

1. Red Cross Village, Brgy. Digkilaan 2. Bayanihan Village, Brgy. Sta. Elena 3. Deus caritas Village, Brgy. Upper Tominobo 4. Deus Caritas EstVillage,

320 1,37 4 173

400

32

141

JV Red Cross, 320 units occupied JV GK, Habitat, PICE 674 units occupied JV Diocese,124 units occupied JV Diocese, 280 units

280

280

280

Brgy. Upper Luinab 5. GMA Kapuso Village, Brgy. Mandulog 6. Deus Caritas Village Brgy. Dalipuga TOTAL

Site 3 OffSite OffSite 200 60 60 120

Occupied JV GMA Kapuso, 60 units occupied Diocese, 25 units occupied

3 37.9

25 2,973

605

25 1,678

25

2,29 1,483 units occupied 2 Table 3. A comparative report on Relocation Project Monitoring Updates submitted by LIAC to LGU. (Source: LIAC)

STATUS OF IDPs IN SIX (6) RESETTLEMENT SITES Specific Location and Geography
NAME OF RELOCATION SITES 1. Red Cross Village, Brgy. 2. Bayanihan Village, Brgy. 3. Deus Caritas Village, Brgy. 4. Deus Caritas Village, Brgy. 5. GMA Kapuso Village, Brgy. 6. Deus Caritas Village, Brgy. GEOGRAPHICAL AND PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS LOCATION ELEVATI SLOPE SOIL CLIMATE ON TYPE (masl) (original) 10-15 Type3 Digkilaan, degrees Corona Sandy Iligan City + classificatio loam 50m Sta. Elena, Iligan City Upper Tominobo, Iligan City Luinab, Iligan City Mandulog, Iligan City Dalipuga, Iligan City

+20m

10-15 degrees 30-40 degrees 15-20 degrees 10-15 degrees 40-45 degrees

+100m

+100m

+50m

+ 200m

Table 5. Estimated calculation of geographical and of resettlement sites based on actual ocular surveys.

n Type3 Corona Clay loam classificatio n Type3 Corona Clay loam classificatio n Type3 Corona Limestone classificatio n Type3 Boulders, Corona sand/grave classificatio l n Type3 Corona Limestone classificatio n physical characteristics

Geo-Hazard Vulnerability and Risk, and Security Risks Assessment


NAME OF RELOCATION SITES GEOHAZARD VULNERABILITY RISK ASSESSMENT
FLOO D LANDSL IDE EARTHQU AKE

SECURITY RISK ASSESSMENT


ARMED CONFLI CT ANTISOCIAL ACTIVITY TRIBAL CONFLI CT LOW TO MEDIUM

1. Red Cross Village, Brgy. Digkilaan, Iligan City 2. Bayanihan Village, Brgy. Sta. Elena, Iligan City 3. Deus Caritas Village, Brgy. Upper Tominobo, Iligan City 4. Deus Caritas Village, Brgy. Luinab, Iligan City 5. GMA Kapuso Village, Brgy. Mandulog, Iligan City 6. Deus Caritas Village, Brgy. Dalipuga, Iligan City

HIGH HIGH LOW

MEDIUM LOW HIGH

LOW LOW TO MEDIUM MEDIUM

LOW LOW LOW

MEDIUM LOW LOW

LOW LOW

LOW HIGH LOW

LOW MEDIUM HIGH

LOW LOW HIGH

LOW MEDIU M LOW

LOW MEDIUM LOW

LOW
MEDIUM TO HIGH

LOW

Table 6. A table showing the geohazard vulnerability and hazards status, and security risk assessment of IDPs In the six resettlement sites in Iligan City .

Land use Allocation


NAME OF RELOCATION SITES 1. Red Cross Village, Brgy. Digkilaan, Iligan City 2. Bayanihan Village, Brgy. Sta. Elena, Iligan City 3. Deus Caritas Village, Brgy. Upper Tominobo, Iligan City 4. Deus Caritas Village, Brgy.

LAND USE ALLOCATION


AREA (HAS.) AVE. LOT AREA PER HOUSING UNIT FLOOR AREA OPEN SPACE EASEMENT AND ROAD NETWORKS

3 15.9 8

sq. mtrs. sq. mtrs. sq. mtrs.

mtrs. mtrs. mtrs

sq. mtrs.

mtrs

Luinab, Iligan City 5. GMA Kapuso Village, Brgy. Mandulog, Iligan City 6. Deus Caritas Village, Brgy. Dalipuga, Iligan City

3 3

sq. mtrs. sq. mtrs.

mtrs Mtrs.