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11

STOJI^

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Ol'

ic^j,;

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^t,

Warminster, Bucks County, P ansylvania.

TO

Avmc'ir IS

addkd

1.11:

G ENEA L

(I

11

I'

A M

L V,

FEO>[ ITS FlUsi' SETTLEilKNT IN A3IEK1CA.

>^''

JiV

AV.

W.

II.

13

A VIS.

PRINTED riU V AT KLY

1S()7.

^11 H IMIWt

l ltl^

pr^***^ ** **

<WPWi JJ.I

II

rRErAV

!:

Tins

little

book was the

laljor of love.

Ten

years ago,

ly

accident, I fell

upon the chain of facts that has led to this

voliiinc of family history.

uicnt

pursued it for amusebut the interest increasing with tlie accumulation of

At

first

data, I

determined to throw

it

into

book form, believing

it

M'ould be a record of interest to the descendants of the family.

Although iny researches were attended with many


I

difficulties,

am

gratified

with the success of

my

labors.

As
all

a general

of the family gave tiling the descendants


tion

me

the informa-

they possessed of their respective branches,

without

Avhose assistance the


'J'lie

work could not have been accomplished.


were Mrittcn from the

portions of historical interest

most reliable public and private records, including the corSome respondence of actors in the events mentioned.
branches of the family ha\ ing disappeared from view, has
prevented the history being nuide as
full

as

was

desired.

AVith these introductory remai-ks this volume, the history of

one of the
is

fir^t t^ettlers

of J*ennsylvania and his descendants,

presented to the family.


AV.
IJoiflcatoi'it.
/*'.,

W.

H.

DAMS.

J >''', ihh'i-

1,

]S(;7.

COA^l'

Ol^^

AliMB.

The

coat of avin. to be hthoauthor has caused the family


inserted in this
it

eraphed and how fetter .hich explains


-vere

voU.me-accmnpan.ed by the was obtained from Ln^hmd.

of arms, taken to discover the coat Considerable pain, of the in possession of a n.ember which was finallv found trom which Kansas.' The wax impression, f-nnilv living in

the drawing

in the Klent.cal was made, was still wrapped Carohna, South sent from Charleston, letter in which it was As the than an hundred years ago to Warminster, more

letter is

written is left somewithout date the period when from " a seal of 1)rown what to conjecture. The impression nn several is found on the wax remaining ehrv^tal set'in gold" in 1 o. written one That attached to of Mr Hart's letters. distinct not is it of the seal, but ,K> doubt bore the impression ui letter the cnou-h to be relied upon. By comparing is lomid written about that period, there (mention with those and size quality of the color, such similaritv in penmanship, that the doubt little is very of the ink, there paper and color than later not from Charleston 'vix impression was sent written letter, The as 1757. 17GI, and probably as early a clear impreswhich to and vears later, by Mr. Hart a f\.w m the dift'er materially very sion of the seal is attached, e one the than date recent of a more
.

handwriting-,

and are

of arms which conveyed the iamily coat


is

to

I'cnn.yh.uua.

it explains interesting, becaii>e Tiic letter in question Ai,mr.'-a. rolir of n pnf^t nge rea-bo.l t.hr tb-t cnj.v of this

how

Copy

of the letter iu wliich the

wax

iniprt'.-?iuii

of the coat

of arms was sent from Charleston, South Carolina; to AVarininster


:

"Charleston, South Cakolixa.


"Dii. Bb.

"I hcrewithscnd you an impression


our Family's Coat of Arras.
I sent for
office,
it

of a Seal, on whicli
to

is engraved Loudon, and a Gentleman there


it

took

it

out of the heraldry


It

and sent

to

me on

a Seal of

brown

Chrj-stal set in Gold.

the Coat to

comes charged to me at two Guinics. I wrote for be likewise engrav'd ou a small Copper Plate, with my name
order to

under
yet

it,

in

make

Prints to put iu Books, &c.


it

but the Plate

is

not

come

to

Hand, and when


I

docs, whether

it

will be included in the


to

same Charge
could, I

cannot

tell.

have sent one Impression


Silas.
;

Father; and

if I

wou'd send one'to Br.


in

should like to see the Coat painted

on Canvas,

proper Coulours

but have laid out

Money enough

already

for a thing of so trifling a nature.

(Signed)

" O. Hart."

Jl

ISTO]{ Y
OF THE

H A. R T FAMILY
CHAPTER
I.

whose ancestors came and Stitji Irorii England at tlie close of the sixteenth century settled in Pennsvlvania, under the mild swav of its irreat
^^Tii-^^'^

of

tlio

most

roputalilelainilies,

founder, is that which bears the name of Hart, late of ^Varminster township, in the county of Bucks, Pennsylvania. The is described birth-place was Witney, in Oxfordshire. This place
a long town, Geography, published iu 1 80i), as, consisting of two streets, of which the ]>riucipal one is spaciIt is eight miles west, ous, with a church at tlie upper end. In the north-west of Oxford, and five miles from Bampton.
in Playfair's

"

blanket manufacture no less than one hundred and

lifty

looms

and three thousand people of all ages have been sometimes It is situated on the \yiiidrush that runs southemployed.
east to the Issis,

and contains 2,584 inhabitants." In that was Wichwood forest, once of great extent. neighborhood The first progenitor of this family who settled here was John Hart, son of Christopher and ^lary Hart, who was born
the 16th of Xovendter,
H!/>1.

Tlierc were four children.

yw'^"

"!

'

>

"w^j i*

"ji

' " - p' ^- f wyi-i


' ^

'

wn
'

'

i'm-i

"

'minv

i*..m-'.->

II

'

10

HISTORY OF THE HART F2LMILY.

three sons and one daufrliter.

Of

the two vounrrer brothers


is

but httle

is

known.

Ilobert, the elder,

said to

have had

the honor of Knighthood conferred upon liim at some period lie lived in cf his life, but it is not known for what reason.

London, where he married and had children, and probably


died there.

The younger

brother, Joseph, migrated to the

lie acquired island of Jamaica, where he went into business. but whether on the island great wealth and died unmarried The sister, i\Iary, accompanied or in England is not known. John to America. Nothing is known of the family before tliis time but what is already stated, except that they were They persons of note, education, and considerable wealth.
;

-w^ere

members

of the society of Friends.

William Penn contemplated founding his colony of Pennsylvania under the grant of territory from Charles the
fortune in the

When

Second, John Ilart resolved to accompany him, to seek his new world. At this time he was nearly thirty-

two years of age, and was already of such standing in the society as to have become a preacher of ability and influence.
In view of his emigration he, in conjunction with others, entered into a sealed a2;reement with Penn, on the 11th day of July, IGSl, to purchase lands of him, located in the

new

colony.
its

have not been able

to find

this

paper to

determine
styled

"

character, but in subsecjuent conveyances it is certain concessions and constitutions, signed, sealed

and executed between the said William Penn on the one part and John Hart and other purchasers of lands within the said

On the 11th day of October " William Penn of Worminghurst, in the county following, of Sussex, esquire, by a deed of bargain and sale, bargained and sold to John Hart, of Witney, in the county of Oxon, yeoman, for and in consideration of the sum of five shillings of lawful money of England, the full and just proportion and
province of the other part."

and quantity of one thousand acres of lands, situate, lying the following On in the province of Pennsylvania.'" being

.Hisroi.'v

or

THi: M.\r:i

kamii.v.

II

day Peiin cuiivcyed to John Hurt ami ]iis liuir.- the said tract of one thousand acics in fee, in eon>i<lerati(jn of the sum of
twentv pounds:
of him the
.-aid

"To

he holden

in free

and eoii,:non socan:e

AVilliam Penn, his heirs and a -igns, as of the Siirnorv of Windsor, vieldinir and pavinir therefore vearlv

unto the said A\'illiam Penn, liis lieirs and a-.-igns, the eliief and quit-rent of one shiHing tVjr every hundred aeres of the
said

one thou^and

acies, at
la-t
t\\<

forever."

These
in

and upon tlie tir.-<t day of Mart-h eonvevanees were siLrned, sealed
of Harl)t,
S[>ringett,
J's.

and delivered

the

presiMice
aiul

Swinton, ^lark Swaner,

Thomas Cox.
a;"r

As already mentioned, John Hart was


America by
his sister

im[>anied to

Murv.

Slu?

was

l)orn at 'A'itnev, the

1st of April, IGoS, and Wius seven and a half year- his junior. She died unmarrieil. He sailed with William Penn from the

Downs
her,

at the close

of .Vu^ust or the beirinnin:^' of !Sei>teni-

New Ca-tle on the 24th day of There were aijout one hundred passengers, mostly Quakers, and the greater part from Sussex, Penn's residence. The " Friends' vol.
1682, and landed at

October following.*

^liscellany,"

7, p.

100,

speaking of the arrival and settlement of these emigrants, " Bvberrv was ehietlv settled bv friend> who came in says;
in

the ships with Penn.

Among

th<tse

who

locate! themselves

in this townshi[ on the Poijuessing, aiu-iently called the Poctquessink, soon after their arrival, were .John Hart, from

Oxfordshire, Susannah, his wife, and several ehildren."


arrival with a wife

His His

and children

is

a mistake, for he

was not

married until the summer or

fall

of the next

vear.

Norr.. Thcri! l< some doubt wlietlior John Hart caiiic to America in the Welcome, as his This Ii>t, however, U not known to Is not found ou the published li:*! of ii;i.ciicer<. be accurate, and the nanie-< of himself and s-l.-ter m.iy have been otnitted. There is no doubt that he came over at the same liim-, if not earlier. It is possible that he came over a few month*. with Tlionias Holme in the sumin<r of lO^.', and pri-ce.lid the arrival of Pei

Dme

:;

the name.-' composing: the tirst irraiid jury in the Statp, for the court ,'ield at I'pl.md, September 12, 16S'2, 1 found that of John H.irU He may have remaineu .it Upland until

Among

after the arrival of

Penn.

He must have

settled in

Bybcrry by the close of the year,

for he

was chosen
D'"crab<',r,

of the A-'-euibly for riiiladelphia county, about the latter part of or the beginning,' of J.iininry. as he took hi" i at in that b,>dy nt its tlrst ^.'--ion.
a

member

12

HlhToRV

(VF TIJi:

HART

FA.MIf.V.

t';itlicr-in-law

and tamily very

likely

came over
;

in

the same
it

vessel, as thev

arrn ed about the same time

and

is

not

improbable that
\vite

John Hart became


residence in

ucc^iuiiiied

with his future

on the
took

jnisstige.

He

u[) his

Bybeny

townshi]), riiiladelphia

I do not know the exact tinu' he settled there, but county. have reason to believe it was immediately after his urrivaL Ot' the

one thousand acres

ot"

laiul

purchased of William Penn,

four hundred ami eiglity-foiu- were lo<-ated in this township, and about the same quantity in .W^^i'niinster township, Bucks

The land located in liyberry was laid off for John county. Hart by virtue of a warrant from Thonuis Holme, surveyor .general of the Province, dated September 1st, 1681, near a branch of the " Poetquessink creek." The tract was then It reputed to contain four hundred and eighty-one acres.
"svas

re-surveyed in 1701, in pursuance of a warrant from "William Penn, dated the 3d of May of that year, and found

to contain four hundred iind eighty-fom* acres ; of which forty acres were allowed in measure, and the three remaining acres, were confirmed to him by deed, bearing date the 30th of

May, 1703.

The
:

following are given as the meets and bounds'

of this tract, viz

Beginning at a gum tree l)y ye sd branch of Poetquessink creek, from thence by a line of marked trees, north twenty nine degrees west one hundred seventy two perches to a
white oak standing by ye sd branch
;

"

thence by ye several

courses thereof eighty four perches to a Spanish oak ; thence land, north thirty six degrees west, two by Benjamin hundred fifty perches to a post ; thence by a line of

marked
east,

trees of liichard Collet's land, north fifty four degrees one hundred and forty perches to ye line of Nathaniel Hatlon's land thence by ye sd line south thirty six decrees east four hundred forty six perches to a ma])le tree by ye sd
;

thence by ye several courses thereof two hundred ninety two and three quarter perches to the place of

Poetquessink creek

itis-nii:\

nr rm;
four

K.vin

r.v.Mir.v,

1.".

Ix'iziiiiiintr,
ari'l.

oiintalniii;^

liniuli'til

ainl

eiirlit'.

four acres of

riio followiti" collies (tf otlicial rc<'o|-(ls tell

tl.''

st(trv (f
iji

the

survey ami location of


iiiin>ter

tlie
:

lauil .lojm

Hart tm

In A\ ar-

tow

ii,-lii|',

1/

"

I'>v

virtue of a wai't tVoui vc rr"|'rietary


'.\\>t

a'.id

Cioveriior,

(lateij

ye ami Lav out unto

of ye

."jtli

M.- La-t, ])irecte<l

to lue, to

Survey
five

.Ino.

Hart four liuudrcil ami

ci;_'lity

acres of land in ye Town.-liip of \\'arniin.~ter, next to \\'illiani Biu'dev's, 1 do liereUv authorize tint' to survev ami lav out

unto him yo said ([uanlity of Latul in ye afore nientione<l if room after other \\'ar"ts according: to ye method of ]>lace. 1'o\vn>hi|is,ai>j'ointed hy ye l*roprietary and CJovernor and

make me
in

a true

Return

theieot"

wch

is

to

Keniain on Iiecord
1().S4.

my

othce.

rhila<lelphia, this

2oth of ye 7th imuith

(Signed)

"Thomas
"

Ildi.Mi;,

Surveyor

CJenl.

"To Thomas
*'

ffainnan.

Dei'tv Survev."

survevor ma<h' the follouini; return of the survey of the ahove tract of land, dated "The "Jnd of 3rd
deiiutv

The

mo. 17(10."
**,\.t

the request of

John Hart

certifye into the

Surveyor

(.lenlls

othce

second time That By virtue of the Propriett)r's

warrant, hearing date Hist of the ')th moth lt)84, aiul the Surveyor (Jenlls order dated the 2">th of the 7th moth next
folhAviiii^,
I

did Survev and lav out unto .Tolin Hart the lltli the ju>t (iuantity of four luuulri'il and within the Township of W'armin.-ter

of the Sth

moth H)S4

eighty then in the comity of IMiilailelphia, hut since called lUicks, Beginning at a ]>o>t hcing a corner of the repi.'"d land of .lolin ]'u^h, Thence hy the same north east three h: 'dred and

tive acres of T>;ind

twenty perches
A\'illiam
]'o-r.

to a p.>>t, Thence north wot hy :.ie land (>f Lawrence two hmulred ami forty three perches to a Thence south ea-~t hy a Street or Ivoad ahurring upoi\

14

insjoKV or

ini: ii.\i;r iw.mii.v.

the lands of Abel Noble aiul the Laud late William J5in;rlev's two hundred and forty three perches to the place of Ieginning.

"Pr Tho. f fain nan, Suv'r." (Signed) I'enn instructed the connnissioners to allot the purchasers
their shares of land according to the catalogue,

made

out no

England, and to lay out a town. who man purchased five thousand acres was to have Every in the town which sj;ave John Hart acres hundred one
doubt, before they
left
;

twenty acres in town


find

lots.

He

located his town lots in one

of the liberties of Philadelphia, but I have not been able to Had they any trace of them in the Recorder's office.
until this

been held

time thev would have been a fortune to

the descendants.

eighty-nine acres, purchased at the time, as

These quantities make up nine hundred probably the exact number of acres he
I

have not been able

to trace a

greater rpiantity. Among the family papers

is

found the following receipt for


:

money,

paid for quitrent to the Proprietary, viz

"Reed

ye 23d of

2mo 1G94

of

John Hart,

fifty shillings,

money of Pensilvania in full for tenn years quittrent due ye first day of the first month La>t j)ast for four hundred acres
being part of his Land Lying in byberry township, in the

county of Philadelphia.
pr. P)I:n'.jami\ CiiA.Mni:i;s. (Signed) not long been landed when he took steps to Toward the close of organize civil societv in the colonv.

Penn

liad

1682 he divided the province into three counties, PhiladelHe appointed .-^herifis and other phia, Piucks and Chester. and magistrates and otficers to conduct the public business
;

issued writs for the election of


asseniblv.

members

of the council and

John Hart was

elected a niendjcr of the assemblv


his seat at the first

from the county of Philadelphia, and took

^J'he (council met the tenth of March, session of that body. 1683, the assembly two days afterward. His name is attached to the first chortcr r>f r!o\-ernmeiit, ditted \\\ rhil:idrlj.lii;i, the

HlSfoKV UK

nil. llAUr

lAMH.V,

I.

2d of Fcbrnary, 1G.S3, whicli William Peiiii _ He wus also a nictnbor in lOSi; ! colonist-.
to tell h\v
^Ir.

irited
I

t"

tiif

am
le

unable

long after Hart devoted

tli;it

time he
t<>

.>-erved in

ti

^sembly.
built

liim-eU"

agrleultiire.

eomt'crtiible lii>u-e for the tinie.> near the baid< ":


I*o<jue>>ing,

le

beautiful
bu.-ine.->

and gave

tlie

time

n<'t
ti>

devoted to

['..;ili('

vv the niini.-tratii>n nf rcliL'ion,

im]>rttvinLr hi- c-tate,

lie

had not been hmir

in

the

new world

before

lie

selected a

About tins period partner to share his joys and his sorrows. there settled in Byberry, in the vicinity of Mr. Hart, a which came over with Penn. re[iutabl(' family, name(l Ku>h,
William and Aurelia Ivu-h had
three ilaughters wife in the summer or
;

.-i.\

children, three sons

and

and John Hart took one of the


fall

latter to

of

l(is.'>.

He

married their dauirhof those of


historv of

ter .Susannah.

William and Aurelia Rush were the ancesti


that

rs
'he

name who have bi'eome


the
in

distinirui>hetl in

John, Pennsylvania. mande<l a troop ot' hor,-e


the
.Sth

father of Willi:

Ru>h,
'.

eom-

I'romwell's ar
at

After the

war he married Susannah Lucaof June,


in l()(Ji>,
wit'e

Harton,
|

Oxtbrd.-hire,
.'iples

KM^.
and
in

He

end.ract'd the

of the

(Quakers

Ki.Si

with his

and children.

he emigrated In Kii'l he
in
1()!>7

i'ennsylvania
'1
"

his

whole

family became Keithians, and the Ba[.ti.-ts. He died in l(i'J^).


fell t(j

most

them joined
1

His sw

and wat(di
accounts of
-h

the possession of Hr. .lames Ru-h. T the number of children ^^'illiam and Aurelia

had born
three sons
'

them is conflicting. and three daughters;


to

with seven children;


in
Kl'.K.),

gives a sectjiul that they cai: while still a third that


'

One statement

America
:is
;iir,

death,

sons and three daughters would irive three children to be born in America

he

left .-even

which
second

ir

rjie

account be correct.
years when they came
cliildien

As they had been marrici


to

rhirty-tbur
all their,

America,

it

is

probable that

were

lorn in KTiirlan*!.

)i\

uiST(^i;v

or

11

r.

ii

Airr

iamiiv.
fcconls, that

tiiid nil

enti'v in the IJvberrv (^uakei'

iiicctiii;^,'

"at
'J'his

a niHiithly nu'ctiiiu;* the 30tli


]\Iarv

of 1st

lUDiitli,
ot'

IGDO, John
"
niarriaijo.

Hart and

Searv declared

entry cont'usod

me at

fir.<t
it

tlieir iiiteutioii
I)ut
I

became

entirely satisfied

upon

fiu'ther in(|uiry tliut

tliis sketcli.

Our

does not refer to the subject of John Hart severed his connection with the

societv of Friends in IGUl, and ^vas at that time a Keithian

preacher, and his name would not be found in the records of the monthly meeting for the purpose of marriage. In his
last

and testament he made a bequest to his widow If other Susannah," the name of the wife married in 1G83. evidence is wantinir it is found in the fact, which I afterwards
will

"

discovered,
livshed

that the John Hart, whose marriage was pubwith JMary Seary, was a brick-layer, of Philadelphia. So far as I was able to ascertain, he was in no manner con-

nected witli the Harts of Witney. have already seen that John Hart occupied a prominent place in politics in organizing the government of the colony.

We

He was no less distinguished in

the church.

He

at

once took

a leading position among the society of Friends, and was The first meeting of probably their foremost preacher.
Friends, in Byberry, for religious worship was without doubt It was afterward changed to the house held at his house.

of Giles Knight, but the monthly meeting held on the 1st of the 4th month, 1G.S5: "Ordered, that the meeting which
of late hath been kept at Giles Knight's be removed to the house of John Hart." At the quarterly meeting held in " It was then and Philadelphia, on the 5tli month, lG8/i,

and concluded that there be establi^died a first day meeting of Friends at Tookany and Poetqucssink, and that the two make one monthly meeting, men and women, for orderini; the affairs of the church." The monthlv meetiufr was ordered to alternate between Sarah Searv's at Oxford and .lohn Hart's house.
there
ai>;reed

\
1I1ST<1;V ol

TUi;

M.T lAMII.V,

i;

'Plu' I'ltlldw
Xll(^tiIl;_^
is

<

ill;:;

rrtitic:itt\
:

is>ur<l

l\v

tlu-

I5vl>i'ny

immtlily
Fulls of

jiri'servcd

"To
"

I'Vieiuls

of ye mmitlily meeting
<>t"

a1i>ut

tlic

l)fl:i\v:iro,

in

ye county

I>urks.
I-*liza

\Viiere;is,

James Morris and

l>nsly,

.'no

fnnncrly

belonged to our n'ieetin<;, did on the seventh month ajipcarat i>ur monthly nicetinir and declure their intentions of marriairo,

ami thev did produce

ecrtiticates .jind

testimcnv suflicient to

deliheration and in(|uiry ^^atisty us of their clearjiess, and atter M'c did permit tliem to proceed to accompli.-h their marria:j;e. ])ut so yt they have heen from us ah.-ent, we are informed yt

thev

lielon<r to

your

jneetin<r,

and nuw

tliev

desired a cer-

titicatc

from

us.
tr

" These are

certify that tlius far they liave j-rocccdcd,


anytliini; aijainst

ami

Ave

have not
in

ym

to ohstruct

ym

to

your

order to ye aci-omplisliing their marriage. At meeting our moiithlv mectiuir jit. J(hn ]lart"s Jion.n J\)et(picsiu
<-reck, in

ve county of riiiladeliihia, ve

I'ji

it"

ye

4tli

mo.

ICS}.

(Signed)

"JctJix IIaut,

" GiLKs Knight,


"RiciiAiM)
'l'()\y.\sr.M> ^v others."'
i>f
t(*

I'lom a minute of ihe monthly meeting held the "JSth flu- oth month, lliSo, it aj'peaJ's tliat A\'alter l-'orrest ga\'e
the
]"'riends

ten acj-es of ]an<l neai' I'ocjUessiidc c-rcek tor a

hui-ying grouml. and

John Hart,

Jo.>e['h

I''i>lier,

Sanmel

Ellis

and

(liles

ifccl

Km'ght were appointed to ha\'e it surveyed, and a was maile t<> them in tJ'u.-t for the use of the l''rit'nil>.

Jt is

not

location

is

known that tluy now unknoxvii.


IdS;',, ;uid

e\i r

occupied

tins

grojind and the


the >ociet\

])Ui'i;d>

were madv on .John Hart's


had
left
thi'\'

land as eaily as \\er(> continueil

after he

then.".
in

Among
this
lot.

othei's,

William and Aurelia


;,n

Jiush were hui-ied


attt-rward, .lolm
luciv

in

ITSC,

hui: Ired
tlii--

years

Hart's graiid-M>n ln'tpieatlicil


ut"

lot ot'
foj-

one
the

to
>

tlu-

township

liyheijy

as a

hurial

place

18
inliabitaiits,
nieetiii<j;

iiisTOKY

or

Tin:

haut family,
tradition that a Friends'
flat

forever.

"Wc have a
Ixiilt

house was

on
tlic

tlic

lauds about a lu'iulrcd the southern }>art

yards
of

iu>rtli

of the forks of
It

l*o(|uessiid< in

file

township".

stood on the western side of the road


to the Bristol

leadinir

from John Hart's house

turnpike at

tlio

Ked

Jjion,

and a mile from the

river Delaware.

The

burial
this

ground
liigher

have referred to above was a httle north of

on

goimd.

Among
I

the

names of

families l)uried tliere

beside that of Rush,

find those

of Hart and Collett of

Bvberrv, and Growden and Enirlish of ]ensalem. In order to prevent distress among the Quakers that miglit arise fi'om disease, dcatli, or other causes, in 1G82 John Tlart

and Henry

Waddy

"vvere

appointed for the upper end of tho

county of l'hiladel[>hia, in conjunction with Thomas Bowman and Henry Lewis fi)r the city and the lower end, to visit
the poor and sick and administer what they sliould consider proper, at the expense of the montldy meeting.

IILSTOKY

UI" TJIi;

HAKT

lA.MJI.V.

10

CH A PTKK

1.

'%D;^fHK nuMitlily iiK-t'tinu-s Mcre tVoijUciitlv licld at tlif Ikmisc A '^>S. "f .lolin Hart in the years KJS.",, 'S4, "S."} aiid'SC.
'new meeting house" was erected near Takony
aljiuit

the

suninier of KlSl!, tor at the monthly meeting lield there tlie (jth of the<Sth month, Jolm II;u1 and Sanniel Prills Mere ap[>ointed
to collect money at the me.'ting ''for defraying of charges, and .Vt a monthly mei'ting ]; '1 at his house use of the poor.'' ' the iM of the 12th month, 1()S4, Joseph Iv jlish reipiested

a certificate
l^ucks,

in

order to take Jane


Il.ii't

Condj
to

ye county of
:nd sign
it,

and John

was ordered

writ

in

behalf of ye meeting." On the 24th of the Dth month, ICSo, ''Rohert TJresmal, of Southam[)ton, and Mary ^\'elll>er, of John Hart's family,"
at a monthly meeting at Oxford. He was clerk of the monthly meeting as late as 1()S7, ami no doubt i-ontlmuMl this otHce with that of minister until the Keith schism

were married

separated him from the society. In February, 1(188, the German Quakers at their meeting at (Jcrmantown ado['ted a (hn-laration on the >ubject ot'
slaverv
ti^

the

monthly meeting held

at

Kichard
:

^\'orrel^s.

On it John Hart made the following report "At our monthly meeting at Dublin ve oOth 2d
"e having

mo.

()SS,

ins]>ected ye matter above mentii'ii' 1. and consid dered of it, we tind it si> weiuhtv that we tliiid'C it is not

20
o.Npodioiit tor
it
nj>

iiiisTfiPvV (IF Tiir: fiAf:i' i-.\Mi(,ii'.

to iiicHldle witli

it //('/<,

l)ut

do rutluT

corrtrfiif
ol'

to ye t'oiisidoratiou of vc (luartcrlv meeting:

vc tenor

it

heiiii!,*

rebitcd to
Lolialt"

_vu truth.

"On
.Toliu

of ye luoutldv

meetiii:;-.

'' Joiix Haut." (Signed) Hart, as a nicniher and minister of the society of

Friends, was .active and useful until a])out


"vvheu the unfortunate

the year

1(51)1,

asunder.

He

schism of Ueorire Keith rent the society was })rohahly the ahlest and most influential

amouir them, and his loss was severely felt. He took' sides witU Keith, and next to him was the most important
rnend)eP of the

man

new

organization.

George Keith was a native of Aberdeen, Scotland, aiul a preacher of great note and in^uence among the Quakers.

He was

horn

in 1G38,

and was a fellow student

at the uni-

After taking liis degree of A. versity with Ih'shop Burnett. M. he left tlie Kirk of Scotland and joined tlie Quakers. He

came

to

in East Jersey.

America some time before William Penn, and settled He was surveyor general of that province,

and resided at Freehold, in Monmouth county. In 1687 he ran the division line between East and West Jersey. In
in Philadelphia,

1689 the Quakers established the first public grannuar school and Keith was called from Jersey to take
it.

charge of

<L)0 per annum, with H liouse foF his family to live in, and also the proflts of the school for one year. He was a man of al)ility and learning,

He

received a salary of

and

for

several years

had been eminent


rej)resented as a

as

a writer and

j)reacher.

PFi)on theological subjects he was an able and


is

acute reasoner, but


disposition
Lis attacks

man

of overbearing

and "brittle temper," and nud<ing war on any

.Vt the time he vommenced thing like christian juoderation. the of Erieiuls he was residing ht upon society in of the school. He accused some of Philadel]>hia charge

the

Friends of preaching false doctrine.

He

desired

tu

ehan;re material) v the oruaniziition and creed of the society

lllsiMi;^

(11

III.

II

\i;i

\Mll.V

LM

lis

the

iiilrniliictioii dl" lu'w :irtirlc>


iirj_'('(l

lit"

tli.-ciplii,.

juniit:

lliciii.

Mr
Ill'

:ilr-<>

tliciii

to

aili'j't
liis

;i

writfrii

con'
a-

on
<1

ot'

taitli.

was

\iulriit
>iili.-(

in

iir;_'iiii;

views, an<l
<>t'

all

\vln

wmiM

nut

rilx; ti> liis

(Inctrini'

liciii^'

-tates.
~

He
cuiiliail

((ininu'iictij
(-i(K'l"aIU'

liis

airitatiiin
^\llitll

alniuf

l<i'."'.

and

liad
!ti!l|

a
lie

j'arty

favni-cd

lti>

views.

Iti

eausec] a j'ennaneiit

(li\i>iiin in tlie s,iclctv.

Mr. Halt tnok an early interest


\ie\\,>i>t"

in

tlie

[iiMiiiutiMn

ot"

the

Kiitli,

ami was one

ot"

ln">

ali'est

a'!\iieates.

He

eanieil with

the i^Teater ]iati ot" lii> eoniit i-tioiis in the His j>roviiice, inehiiliiiij: the t"ann"lies of JJush and ('oHett.
liini
is

name
ot'

I'ouinl attaelied to se'\ era'

airainst tlie (..hiakers, inchidiiiL: a

important doeumi'nt ^t
also

'pei-s jndili.-lied
i

''an aeeomit
e forty-eiirht.
r

their chri.-tian t'aith."

lie

was

one
tV'r

or

-'

who [-i^ned and |iuMi>lied He and his t'lieiids appear


ISvherrv,
t"or

tlie

reasons

"

sepai'atioii.

to

have

heeii
ot"

in
th*

majority
ectinir
^.

in

thev retained

iMjs^essioii

after

the

se['aration.

His

eoiir>e

ean only he
t'rojii

lim-d on
'

the

irround that he changed


l"or

hi.- \iew.->

hoUf
^^aii;

eon\ ietions,
in leaxin^'

lieliad notliiiig

<>t"

wurdly nature to
in

an

idd and p'owerf'nl (jriranization,


CDMisideration

whiili he enjoyed muel

and

re>}'eet,

ni'posed to

the

eontri)llini.,^

to join one that was new and lie iutlnenee ot" the Province,
t'ollow
it

may

]ia\e l>elieved that


it

he eoidd
f^een that

Keith

anil
tiiat

>till l>e

I'riend, hut

will

he

was a step

t^eparated

liim forever t"roni the

t"ait]i

of

liis fatliers.

The hreach
(>u:d<ers in

heeanie
that
at

so

wide

hetween
(.if

Keith and

the

](!!_',

a mei-ting
tlie JOtli

the ministers of the

society, lield at Philadelphia

of Apiil in that year, a

declaration was
liis

drawn up and

prt)nuili:atetl, in

wl/'h he
'

an(l

followei\s

were disowned.

This declaration waPurlin^ton

conHi'iiie<l
(_

at a ireneial

vearlv meeting', lu'hl at

7tli

of

April,
full

lli'.i;),

when
ill

the charges aL:ain>t liim were ainl t"ourti'en iianuvs.

t'orth in

and

sij^ned

hy two hundred
the

C)n the

'2lA uf, \prilj

same year,

ten

v['

the

leadiiii;-

Quakcrt^

22

msToKV OF

Tin;

ii.\i;r

fa.mii.vT

letter to

of Loiulon, one of avIkhu avus AVilliam Peiin, addressed a John Hart and utliL'r kadiiiL!; Keitliians, in wliieli " nuicli tliev irave to tliose \\lui had iroiu* otl' with KcMtli,

brotherly advice," and proposed they siiould have an appointed meeting to heeome recunciUMl to tlii'ir l)rL'thi\'n. The Phila-

delphia (piarterly meeting took the some course, hut it had no effect in calling the erring hretliren hack to tlic told, The
Conciliation having no effect, the yearly meetini:; of London, the highest ecck'siastical auth(n-itv

breach Avas past healing.


in

known

the

against him

in 1()!)4.

Quaker organization, unanimously declared Thus he was [>ut out of the pale of the
nothing intimidated, pursued his course.
a larire
iiart

meeting.

J?ut Keith,

He

carried off with

him

of the society,

includiiii:;

many

His pretenpersons of great influence and standing. sions were so plausable, and urged with such ability aiul

eloquence, that he gained the ascendency in sixteen meetings out of thirtv-two which were connected with the yearly

meetings for Pennsylvania and Proud's History of Pennsylvania princi})al persons who adhered

Xew
it is

In a note to Jersey. " stated Some of the


:

to Keith,

and were

men

of

rank, character and reputation in these provinces, and divers of them great preachers and much followed, were Thomas
35udd,

George Hutchinson, Robert Turner, Francis Pawle,


Ileade,
v'cc."

John Hart, Charles


Keith
estal)lished

meetings

in

and

his followers called themsebes,

various places in the province, " christian (Quakers and

A fierce feud now took {)lace between the 2)arties, and the war was maintained by books and pamphlets filled with rancor and bitterness. Those who did not follow the new leader were denounced as apostates. Keith appealed to
Friends."

London against the Quakers in J'cnnand appeared befn'e that body in person to urge his sylvania, His petition was rejected and their former denial of cause.
the yearly meeting in
liim
in

was confirmed.
sermons
an<l

This onlv increased his bitterness, and


writin<rs he

liis

was more severe

airainst

the

IIISToKV nr

rili;

||

\l;i

lAMH.V,

2;;

Qimkcis
j'liitu'il
I

tli.iii

l>(t<ic.

Scinii after
;

lie

went
li\

to

l->iii,'l:in<l

Ik*
n't

tlic
III,

l'.|ii--<*i'|i.il

clmiili
u-;
\

\va> iMiIaiiiiil

tlic
t'-r

lii.-li(ij

.Mild,

ami
ai'il

(ifliciafi'il

icar

in
:uiil

that citv

.^mhu- tiiiic.

Ir attci'w

caiiu' to
;ui<l
I'

Annrica,
\i<-iiiity.

I'l'rai-licil

'lout
little

vcar

in

riiila'lclplila

tin-

He met
t''>niii'r

\vi;

t';i\<ir,

;ui'l

Mciiis to

lia\

cut ifclv

lot

l)i>

jh .|,iilaiitv.

He
in

iffurnL'il to l!ni:lanil
Sii--c.\,
lie saiil
(^^ii;il<('f
:

aifalii ariil t"(i]<; (har:_'r


lii.-

of
[r

;i

lieiirlico
.-tatctl
I

wlicif

lie

iirrac]u'<l until

dciitli.
I

i.-

that

on

liis

dratli lu'd
I

"

^^i.-ll
it

liad

dicil

wlim

was a
with

tor

tlirn

ain

sure

wouM

lia\c liccii well

JllV ^oul.*'

Tin'
\\hicli

iT^-'iU'ral

charL^^c

he

lia>e(l his

hv made against the Quak(M's, ainl on se['aration from them, was that thev had
ori:L:inal profes.-ions.
l>_v

departed iVom their


anil 'i'homas I'udd

\t

one;
;

time Keith
ot"

were indicted

the irraiid

irv

I'liila-

defaming; Samuel .Tennin|^'s, a jM' delj'hia found iruilty, ami tined ') each, hut the sentei
lor

1'

ineial

jud^e,

was never

enforced
In

at^aiur-t

them.

Keitli, who ijipear not to h;i\e Iieeii ^afisiied with his teachinL:;s, a|>]>lied to the I'ennel(!!l.">

some of the followers of


church
tor

]':iek

r>a]'tist

lia|iti.-m

and ailmis>ion into

tin?

ahout receivin:^ them, when John Watts, John Katon, Sannu'l Jones and Richard
i-hiirch.

'Jhei'e

were some

scruiiles

Laton wrote

to I'Jias Iveacli of

London

for his ad\ii'e

how

to

act in the matter.


1<I!'7.

in an.-wer, dateil the l>t of the Sth niontli,

he ad\i(a'd them

not

to

liaptisc'

i-ouimuiiion, hecaUM', he
to

alleu'cs,

and admit them into "the Keithians ai'c oppnsed


;l:o\

chiistians

taking

[>ai"t

in

ci\il

I'rnnu'nt

and

takiui:;

<.atli<.''

After iveith Went to MuLrhmd hi- t'ollnwers he'd to^i'ther as

an

oi-L:ani/.;itiou

oid\'

>i\

.i-undci'

aid the mendicr<

seven years, when thev joine(l dther <leni iminarioiis.


oi'
1

split
'I'he

LM'cat

majority ot'tlicm unite


:

with the

l?aj>ti-ts

.i'mI

l^pisco-

palians
l.'i'A' r

some went

liuli'iu,

the I'apti-t chuich at IV; :epack, in a)id others to All Saint>' church iicar I'Vaiiklo

24
fan].
l''i-()iu
t(
:i

HrsTOKv OF
tlu>
tirst

11 ir.

iiAur iamilv.

,<cj>:ir;itl()ii

Joliii

ll;ii't

:iii|>i':irs

ti>

li;i\'(^

])ro;i('lu'(]

sdcietv
in

ot'

Kt'itliiiins wliicli

met

at the liouse of

.lolin

Swit't,

S(iiitli;uii[>toii,

IJiu-ks cuuiity.

also preached at the

same time
Iji

to

those M'ho met

lie probably in tlie old

Quaker meeting- house

JJyberrv, as the Keithians retained

lie end)raced tho possession of the house for some time. in of and the of baj)tisiu the oi'dnance IGDT, principles Baptises
M'as adniiiiistcrod to hini

and the

s<^)ciety

tliat
t]ie

by one "Jliomus Ivutter. In 17(J2 he hyd been ^vorshi})ping at the house of

John Swift joined

Pennepack

J'aptist church.

The John

Swift here spoken of is probably the same to Mhom William Penii granted 500 acres of land befoi'e leaving J'higland. Ho
Avent off with Keith, and
called to the ministry in the

became a Baptist preacher, ile was summer of 1702, and although


assistant, for

never ordained preached at Philadelphia as an about nine years. lie was re-baptised in 1704.

lie

became

offended at the Ilev. Abel Morgan in 1711, and thenceforth He was called to account in 1724, neglected the meeting.

and exconnnunicated in 17/50. John Watts, the })astor at Pennepack, died in August, This circumstance led John Hart and his little society 1702. The \vorshi})ping at John Swift's to unite with that church. church records of that invited the "
called

say Society they people Keithians, practicing Believers Ba[)tism, and meeting once h\ a week at the house of John Swift, in Southampton
in the county of Bucks, having John Ilai't for their minister," to unite with them and have but one nieetiuix.

township,

They
since

appeal- to have
1()*J7,

changed

theii-

views alxtut the Keithians

when they

refused to receive

of

J'jlias

John
lie

Ilart

Keach, of London. was now a[>pointtMl


in

them on the advice The in\itatIon was accepted.


his death.
Ili-

assistant miiiistiM- at
otlice until

and continued was


in full

the sacred

Pennepack, In 1708

communit)n with the

Baptists.

was never

ordained, but was esteemed a good preadu-r, and considi'red u pious and exemplary christian. 'J'lie lii'.-t ]>erson he bajitised

in>no:v n\ nir
^^'-

ii

M;r i\mii.v

2r,

Martha
^

l)<>\\riL's. in

17<il\

I|,- \\;i- ;i,,;,t,.

n, Id^

by Samufl .Tom- ami K\aii M^rjiM.


t>>

I'ntil
-

pastoral .lolm
at

Swit't rrm>>vc(l
'

riiila^lrlphia tlio nuTfinix

\'.

..ntimif'l
1

i-;

Ik'U-o t'verv
t">

tliirl

Snii.lay
<>t"

ii;

tlif :ii"nfli

it

\va- tlicii

reinovi-.l
<M.iinty.

tln> li')ii-<^

PcttT

'liainl-frliiic
iii"iit:,tli*

riiila-k'lj'Iiia

^Ir.
In-

Hart

\va~

a-.-i>t'il

>cvcral
in

lii-

j.a-t.iral
*>t'

h;t;ts

'J'l'.niuas

(iritliflu

\\1m>

.-uiiJiU'r
<lc:.:li
ot'

ITi'.'J

roinoved to Xi'w

("a.-tU'

county.
to

At the

Mr. I[art

the flmrcl) i:a\o a call


their
.-t'ttlc'l

^^ illi;un

Kiucr-ly. wlio bccaiiic

iiiini>tvr.
]-aj>ti>t

The

S)utliani['to!i

clmi-ch

hal

its

oriiiin

in

the

.Vt'ter it mc'otinj^ of Koithians hcM at John Switt's house. Mas renioveil t" John Chamherline's it \v?.> (li-contirnicil tor

time,
for

in

1721. on the <leath of Samuel Jones, their


a ministei*.

i>a-t<^r,

Mant of
and

^Vhen

(JeorL'e Iv-.ton
iie'l

wa~ calle4 as
st

j'a>tor at rennep;'ck, the


line's

afterv..arJ rcniovecl to the

meeting wa- re-": hou-oi-(l:;;-

Chamher-

.""John Mon-ji, in

Josej'h Eaton, mi iiomery, }>rej<-heil f<r the ><icicty.


S<:>utham{'ton.
luiil

ehlcr of ^[ont'7."'."the .society


'

.Vl"

iirown so

much
John
at

that

it

\vorshi|> in.

Morri.-

was neeessaiy* lmvc a lot for


preaching'

erect a house to
'e

huiMini; anJ
iro^iiel

irrave-var<].
lie

"in order

tljat tlie

"he

miirht
i>ne

Continued

St>uthanijtti'n."*

lie at'r'.ward

gave
lot

iiundred and. twelve acres for


Jliis

a parsona.^i'i'-

The

given at

tist

the sjime on which the }>re-ent S luthanij'titii F>a[>chui'ch stands. J>>lin Hart's sr>u ,I<'sej>h also joined tlu'

time

is

rennepack

]>a['ti-r cliiu-ch,

and was

ha[>ti>ed

hy Jo-eph Wood,

Septemher
and Mary
In

21>t,

7".'>.

The
I'V

joined; .Jo-iah Iwijiti-ed


haj'ti.-ed

chihlren .-nli-ejuent1v Mr. ^\'ood. Pecemher I (Uh, 17K',


otliLr

June l.-t. 1714. John Hart \va-; one of three a}'j">;nted hy the iV-nnej'ack chuiTii "to i-ou-ult among them-i -.es ahout the J'e>t method tor the carrying on of the yearly ::ieeting, an<I
ov
Xath.-iiiiel .Tenkins,
17(''.'

i-egulating things he'iuiging to the di-cij'liue

an^',

u-overnment"'

of the Congregation- and

cjiui'ches of

New

C'a-tle, I'eiinejKick,

'I

>

ii

m.j ' '

W iiW O

"

'

2(J

iiisroKv OF Tin: iiai;t i'a.mh.v.

niul

]'';ist

Jorsey.

In 171

"J

lie w;i> ag'alii ;ip[i;)iiite(l

one of a

conuiiitti-e
(.U'lpliia.

to arraiii^i* a ilitliculty

in

tlie

rlnirclies at IMiila-

It i> ih^t

known

at

Byherrv
until

to A\'arniin^^ter,

what time John Hart removed tVoin in Bucks counlv, where lie li\e(l
Ihick,
is

his death.

A\'ilHam

in

his

county, savs that his

Kar Marks"
K)!).").

as

name an owner of

mentioned

histoiy in the

of JUieks
''

liook of

cattli' in this c()unt_v

as early as

had itrohahly not i-emoved at that time, hut mav liave owni'd aiul kept cattle on his plantation in \\'arminster. ile was in liylterry in lliDi*, for in that year lie and Thomas I'udil ludilishcd an "essay on thesuhject of oaths;*' who were " i'Viends' 'i'lie the first author:- in the
lie

township,

says

lu' sol

his jtlantation in

Hyherry

in

170.";

uiid

Miscellany" he had
joine<l

])rohal)ly
Jiai>tists.

removed
1

to

W'arnnnsrer
Sth

hetore
his

he

the
until

do not think he
(

cliani;'ed

residence

aliout

]()I*S.

)n

tht>

of Aui^nist

1()!)7

he

conveyed

Thomas S3veuty-two acres The i)tli of Octoher Kush, in consideration of ten pouiuls. of the same year he sohl one hundred and one acri's in tluit
in

l)yherry to

James

]iu>h, son of

town.-]ii[>

Aiulrew Uaid^son.
heini;-

(.)iio
foi'

acre of this was excepted


a

pnhllc hurial giound, assigned of said forewr. It had heeii township, granted the poor This is the conveved and laid oat thirteen ]>eiches s![uare.
sale,

from the

same

lot

that

his

grt^it-granilson,

John
17.S().

JIart,
I

(U-eded

to

l>vherrv

to\vnshi|>,

May

the

^iOtli,

huve

seen a

plot of a sur\('y nuirked *'Andi'(>w I'anksou, '2'2') acres," Mdiich is endoi'.-e a- heing part oi" '*,Iiihn Hart's kind." .\o
I

douht
tract.

tlie

one hundred and one


lie

acrt.'>

wen^ eiid)raced

iu

this

I'rohahly the part


it.
1

sold to

dames

Iiush had the


'^'^IIIT^^

homestead on
a<''o.

i.->ited

'Idle

house

is

an old one.

the [ilace a few years ( )n the date!


letters

X
f?

stone

at tlie east

end are the


d<Milit,

and
hy

tigures, ^i^

'J'he 1k)US(;

was, no

ei'ccted

Tlioiiias

V OT

liiishj

S(.in

of him wlio jaircha^ed

the property '-___1_!:__

.
,

'

vm

'j

'

,im>^>,' *

'i

.*" ''

'

"' "

'

"-'"'''^X'

llisi(.)i;v

or nil:
flic

ii.vi;i

r.wiii.v.

'_'<

fr<piu

Mr.

II;irt.

In

IsJT

.>;imi<'

t'anii

\\a-

mwikmI

l.y

IVaiicls

lii;_M':ili:im.

Tlio A\'armin>ti'r

jmrclia^c

lay

Iirtwcoii

v..

yt

anImtli

iiow
si<Ii's

known
ot'tlio
Jt is

,i>

tlio Sfivi't

and I'nVtol

j-mfl-, an<l

wa-

road that
cut

rnn.> a'-rc-s
ci'al

tVmn the
tarin-.

latter i-nai
huinc.-'^.

.Inlin-villr.
1

now

into sc\ nj>


to Sun. to

The

dc-ccndcil

tVoni

tatlici"

Thonia- Hart, son ot'.Jojiureha-eil


it_v

'.ii,

he

die<l, in
of"
it,

IS.'IS, it
Ilai't,

wa- >old and


hrothor
ot'

t!ie

inul when widow and

heirs
sol(|

John
Mhich
It
1

the dceea~ed.
it

who ha\e
pa~.-ed out

>inec
ot' tluj

wa-; the tir>t

time

had e\er
L.

t'aniilv.

is

now owned hv Thouia^^'a:n!in^ter


is

\\'vnkoM;i.
five

As

Avell a<

atn ahle to
in

determine the matter the


in

hundred

aero tract
j>ers(ins,

viz

T>.

the

haml:-

ot"

the t'olhiwing

Thoina-

A\yid<oop

l"-">2

acres,

!Mai'ijarct TwininL::

2
1
1

Charles Kirk

>
)

Isaac IL-ihensack

->

^lakini: in
I

all

4'^11^

U'-rcs.

helieve the o]-i^inal sur\ey only called tor


eiL:hty-ti^^' acres.
Ilai't

tijui'

hunilred

and

John
lier,

died

at his

nsidence

in ^^'arnlinster in

Septem-

171-!, in

.*^n.-annali,
tVoiii

the sixty-third year ot" his au'e. Ilis widow, died at l*oet^|uessink the L'7th ot" Fehruary, 17i'-"),
it

which

would he interred that

after his death

she

rcturni-d to Bvherrv, to

spend the reniaiiuler of her da\"s with


h't"t

her

own

kindivd.
A\ill

in his

Mr. Hart

his

widow

lit"ieen

|>o',;;ds in silver
',is[iosed
1

money
]

an<l all his [>(M>onal

|>ro[erty

not

hi'j'ire

of.

le

conlirmed

unto his >on John the two hund;tr,.

acres on

whiidi he li\ed in ^\'armin>ter (the hoiiie.-teail

i-rohaldv'),

and which he had


lie
let't

t'ornu'rly ci.>n\'eycil to
acre-;

him hy

'Ivcd of

i^iff.

two

hundi'cil

to

hi-

son

Thoma^

with

the

28

iiisToRV uF Tnr. riAiu r/.Mir.v.

imin'oveiiKMits, wliicli
articles
ot' aj:;reeuieiit,

lie

1i;h1

;iu-r(i'(l

t()

convey
1711,

to Tiim

T)\'
irf^

dated Marcli
M'esf

Stli,

Thi? tract

described a>
five

tlie

"south

end of a

tract laid out for

about

hundred

a.-res
done.-^'

to .lohn

reputed John
lately

Hart, an<l jniiun^- to ye lands on the ye south east side and the land

called Land's called


Itandall's

land land

land

on ye n(n-th east end, and ye on the north west side, and


lie

Noble's land on ye south -west end."'


fTosiah

be(]ueathed

t(^

the

two

lots
silver

in Phihiddjihia.

]\Iary

got

"lifteeii

]K)unds cui'rent

money

ot"

the

above said ])iovince

(Pennsylvania), and one feather bed and bedding', and one mare aiul two colts, all bay." John Hart was the residuary lerratee of the estate "here and elsewhere.'^

We liave

no record of his place of

l>urial,

but inasmuch as

he was preaching at Pennepack at the time of his death no doubt he was buried there.* Xo ton>b stone marks his last
His last words were, "Now I know to a resting place. In Proud's demonstratiori that Christ died to save me."
history of Pennsylvania 3Ir. Hart
is

described as a

man

of

"rank, He had
ants, if

charjicter

and

i-e[nitation,"

and a "great preacher."


in 1714, a short

live children.

Joseph died
in

time

before his father, and ]Marv

1721.
n(jt

.fosiah, or his descend-

he had any,

ha\e

been able to

trace.

The

]'ennepa(d<: clnu'cli records state

"that on the 12th of August,

1715, a letter of disnussion was granted to .losiah Hart for Cokahansay, upon his going to li\'e there." This is the last

we know

of hinr.

have made

dilii-'ent

search for

the

descendants of Josiah Hart, but have not been able to disIt is not kn(;wn that he was married. There cover them.
is ijreat

nncertaintv as to the location of the

"Cokahansav"

J have not i-vviv the name mentioned anyof that j)eriod. Avhcre (utside the Penneiack churdi i-ccord, nor ha\e the 1 do not antiquarians T have consulted any knowledge of it.

Since tho abovo wa." written


.^fi-.

have read a small

in-.,

voluiui;

by Kcv. Morgan Rlwards,

KliicU stattf- that

Uart

vsa-' biirifil at rc!ii:ci).ali,

iiiMMfa ur
think,

nil:

ii

via iamii.v

'^11

li<>\\c\t'r, tlu'ii-

i.-

iiiiuli

tlnilit

tli:it

it

i~

iilt-nt!"'

tl

with
i>

('<>liiiiis(.v,

('(iiii1k'i1;iiii1
I

i-tuiiitv,

Niw

.Icr-cy.

'llu'
it.

ViTtT
1'
ii

thi' uiilv iKiiiif


j-ettlt'il

\v.\\v iiu't

with

tliat is at all likf

rists

in that \i(iiiity n-

i-arly a- lliS;'.. :m<l thi-

rliui-'

was
tir>t
t'i<>k

constitutnl

in
in

IC'.'i'.

Mr.

Kiach.

iiiiiii>ti.T

at

rcniu^'ark,

wont

tliorc

l<".>s anil

haj'ti-cil

thri-i'

prr-'-ns.
.I<>-iali

The
Hart

nieotiniT
]n"s

Imnso was

hnilt in 1711.
in

WiuMi

"k'ttor" tluTL-

171''.
(.-hurch

.Mr.

Tiinorhy

I'r<'<>k>

wa> the
<e\"eral

ministev.

A- thf cM
ii'>

ix-roi-ils

wire burne'l
l"r<>m

vears

air".

int"'>nnatii'n
.T...-.cph

ean he ohtaine'l
t)

that s<iu)ve.
in 1711',

P.v the (leeJ


it

ct'

Hart and wile

James Knsh

A\ armiuster api'ears that .T>>iah Hart dwue*! real e>tate in are ai\d his The eUle>t tleseeutlants, S"n, .Ti>hn, town.-hip.

the only oflspriniT of Joltii Hart, senior, .Tosej'h married Sarah Stout, Ajn-il 2<1.
iiothin:; further of liim.

whom
171."i.

oau traee.
I

hnt

know
rtrol>-

As he

ilieil

the next vear,


alive at

ahly

lie

let't

no

issue.

Thomas was

the

<'.eatli

of

his father,

who contirmed

to liim in his will twr>

i.-.ndred
;nber,
let
;

acres of land, in A\'arminster.


1711>. liimself an-l wite,

l)n the lltli of

l^t.

Esther Hart, con\eyed


It

this

to

.lames Iiush,
of

I'f

Kyhcrry township.
.Ir.,

was bounded

lands
-.

John Hart,

James

Carrell,

Thomas

Da'ii

and

.losiah

Hart, and was part of the oriirinal purehase "f tive Inindred aeres from \\"illiam Tenn. This is the last reeord
I

have of him or
is

his family, e.xt-ept that in

17ol his name,

with others,
im'nster.

He

attaehed to a jK^ition tV'r a n^ad in ^^'armust have moved out o{ the eounty shortly

afterward, and died away, for there is ut> reeord vt' liis It is not family to he t'onnd in the eounty utlii-es.
that he hail ehildren.
^inlrle.

him or

known
-l:ed

The

dauirhter,

Marv, no doubt.

30

jiisioKv ur Tin; iiai;t FA.Mir.v.

CHAPTER

rir,

7/r^-rOIIX IIAirr, eldest son of


JS^iS

.Tuliu

and Susannah Hart


born
at his

mentioned

in tlie

preceding

clia[ters, M'as

father's residence, in Byberry, Phihidelphia county, the 16th

Of him we know much less than of his father. of Julv, 1684. He does not appear to have occupied so important a place in
public estimation, although he held several posts of honor

and

responsibility.

He

no doubt removed to Warminster

with his father

seventeenth, or the beginof the Pie followed the course of eighteenth, century. ning his father in matters of reli^'ion and in the Keith dilhcultv

at the close of the

became a Baptist, but he did not unite with the chui'ch until some years afterward. He wa-^ baptised at Pennepack the He loth of November, 1706, by the Rev. Evan ^Icngan. did not marrv nntil after the faniilv had reinovt'd to "War,

minster.

On

the

'iotli

of Nuvenil)er, 170S, he was nnited to

Eleanor, daughter of Silas and Hester Crispin, and granddautrhter of Thonuis Holme, the surveyor <reneral of Wilhani

Penn.

She was born

at

l')vberrv the
at

1687, and was also baptised

11th of Se])tember, Pennepack, by Rev. Abel

Morgan, the 6lh of Xovember, 1714. Her family came to Pennsylvania about the same time as the Hart's, and they She had two own l)rothers lived nei;fhbors several vears.

and four

sisters,

besides several half brothers and sisters bv

the father's side.

Her

sister

^Mary nuirried ThfMuas Eortis.

iiiNiuiiv

III-

Tin; n AIM r.\M!i.v.

ni
iii<it

]\vr

fiitlier

in

a'l

lia'l

i-lcvcii

cliililrni.
tlic

It

kiiouu
iiiarliis

\vhftlu-r Jnlin
ria^i',
aiiil

Halt

rc-idi-'l at

li'-tur-ti-atl

at'rcr

\i\>

until

tlit-

dcatli

'*'

Iii.-

tatlicr.
tin;

nr

tuok
iis

v\<
';

rrsidfiwo

cl.-rw litTi'

Imt jiniliaMv

t'liiiicr,

lived

tliorc atk'r hi- tatlicr ilicd.

Tlu'

Crir-i'in
oi'iirin.

tamily

i>

niio (t'tlic oldr-t in tintlic

State avl
Cfi.-j-in,

*>i'

Kiiillish

illiani,

t'atluT

dl'

Sila.-

was was

the

tir.-t

>ur\(.'_vitr

ixcnnal apjMiintcd
tlie ve.->el

liv JV-nn,

Imt
lie

In-

never

readied Pennsvhania, adriven


t>>

in

wliidi

.-ailed

the ^^'e-t lndii'>. wliere he


also ser\ed in

ilie<l.

He

under CroiinvelK ami


Widiain
estate
in
ct"

the

t'leet

u a- a eaptaiii <>t' admiral Sir


In

I'eiin in the attat-k t-n .laiiiaiea

and
t::ive
of'

IIi>['ani'ila.

rec'irniti'Mi

his >erviee>
(

('ruinwi'll

him
the

t'nrteited

[ri'land.

'n

the

authority

Lirandxin
i<{
nr'

of

AN'i'liaiii

Crispin,

it

i> .-aid

he

inai'ried tho dauirhter


.-i,-ter

a iiier-

(diant I'lim.

ot"

Kotterdanu

\\\u>

was

of the wite
ut'

admiral
r'.ie

'rhiuiia- Ihtlme, the ;_n-andlather


II;. rt,

lOleanor.

wife
as

it'.lnhn

wa>
in

a['[iinted

to ^ue(e^d \\ illiani
It i^ a\--o

('.-.-[liii
tl;
-

suive\or general
a niid>hi} J'eim. in

ot'

renn>vlvania.

said

he was

man

the I)rlti>h iia\v. and >erved nude:- admiral

The \\'e>t Indies.

At the time Peiin ajU'ointcd him


livingL*;')<1

sur\'e\or ti'eneral he
sailed

wa-

at

^\'atLlford,

Ireland.

He

from the J)own.- the


tho

of Ajirih l(v^L\
.-oiis

He

hroutrht

with him to .\mei-ica hi> two


a'.-o Sila.C'ri.-[iin,

and two daughters, and


ottice.

.-on

of his

ix-deees.-or in

l-'our

year- after their arrival


Ih'.-ter,
(

voun^

Crir-[>in

married the <laii^hter

which marriage eame I'lleauor Hail. Silas to(.k u[< oOO aeri's of land on the I'onnei'aek, while 'ri.-|iin Holme located a much larger tract on hoth >iiles ot" the ,-ame
iVoiii

creek.

Thomas Holme
ainl

U'ft

no ma'e

i.->ne,

hoth hi> soncoii-in


ot'

dviii;^

in his lit'etime.
I'ciin,

J-]!(.'anor ('ri.-[i;n

was the

of William

run.- in

of the j^rcat f Hinder ihe \eiiis of her dc-cendant-.*

the

Mood

I'eiin-ylvania

Mr. Hart was a

man

of wealth

fo;-

the times, and occupied

Wi-jtcof? Ili-torv

.)ri'h:i.idi'!i>lr.:i.

L_

^jicorrcspoiulini;-

inSTORV OK Tin: IIAUT IWMII.V.


of
inriiiciico

j(.>iti<)n

one of the two justices i-eturned for sherift" of the as earlv as 172(5 and wa.s afterward returned in the county A ears 17^51, Jiut he was not commis';')2, '33, '3.3 and '37. sioned until 1738, and afterward in 1739, '43, '44, '4/5, '48,
;

He was

among

hid fellow citizens.

and

'iO.

He was
1741,

October,
still

commissioned coroner on the 12th of and again in 1742. He was repeatedly

appointed and comnu'ssioned justice of the peace, and was on the list in 1757, liaving been commissioned the last time the 9th of June, 1752. The record states that John

Hart was sworn, but that he was "old and impaired by At the same time AVilliam Rodman refused to apo{>lexy."
give the oath and was "attirmed."

Mr. Hart being an active christian ^vas foremost in all matters of religion iii his The 16th of Februueighljorhood. ary, 1746, a i)ortion of the members belonging to

Pennepack

Baptist church asked permission to establish a separate church. '^ They say, your brethren and sisters, in church fellow-

We

ship and conimission, living at and about Southampton, the county of Jkicks, liaving always labored under great dithculties

by reason of tiui remoteness of our habitations from you, and having signified our desire to be separated from you (not from any dislike or want of love to any of you) but that we

may

be constituted a church distinct from you."


l)o

that a regular dismissal nuiy

done accordingly,
following.

in

cluircli

They pray granted them, which was meeting, the 5th of April

The petitioners were princijially from tlie upper end of Southampton, the lower end of Warminster, and the
in

dedicating themselves to the service of the Ahnighty, the Srh ..f This Nvas the April of (hat year.
first

neighboring settlements their church covenant,

Northampton.

They

pui)Iished

regular orgam'zatlon toward establishing what


l>apti:-t chun-Ii.
i'"ifrv->i\-

is

now

Southampton

names were

si(--ned

to this iaper, and it is seldom that any religious societv is started under the patnmage and dii-ectii.ii of llie sniiic nund>er

UISTuliV UF

Till:

UAi:i FAMILY.

33

of pions and estimable people. Among the names attached to it we find those of John Ilu-t, and Eleanor his wifj., his
sons Joseph and Oliver, and his daughter-in-law Elizabeth, wife of his son Joseph, all of wh)iii bjcaine uiumbers at Southampton. He was a pillar of the church to the day of He was clerk for many years, and was charged his death.

with the duty of providing for the Lord's table. Among the the loth of jlay, proceedings of a monthly meeting, held "John Hart finding 1762, is found the following entry:

himself unable to attend meeting, and incapable to make th3 hands of his proper entries in the church book, now by the
son Joseph Hart returned sd book to be disposed of as they and also his account of collections and disshall think lit
;

term of fifteen years past truly stated, for and desires also to be discharged of any which being further care of providing for the Lord's table him dismiss church considered the according to his a2;reed-to book to sd. request, and committed the care of the church
bursements
for the

their approbation,

Joseph Hart." His infirmities compelled hira to give up the active duties The last entry in the church book of church clerk in 1759. made by him is on the 14th of A[)ril, and from that time
16th of Januaiy, 1762, there is no record of any His successor stvles him " Oar old stated church meetins. Deacon and clerk." The estimation in which he was held
until the

hty his brethren for his piety

and virtue may be judged from was chosen the first deacon of Southampton He was elected before the church, the ISth of May, 1746.
the
fiict

that he

separation took place, the new church being virtually organizad before the members received their dismission from Penuepack.
In the church

book

is

of

Mav
:

17th, 1746.

found the following entry, of the date "Also it was then ordered, that John

Hart keep the deed for the Meeting House Lott and Plantaand that Stephen Wntts keep the defeaznnce." His tion
o

34

HlsrOUV
is

01"

THE

HAliT I'AMILV.

name

found to a petition for a road in Wanninstcr,

in

1731,

with those of

many
is

Jolm Hart
from the

other inhabitants of the township. spoken of as being interpreter of a message

chiefs of the Clierokees to the

Dchiware Indians, on
tlie

the 20th of June, IToS, which wa^ laid before

governor

and councih

It is

not

known whether ho was


tlie

of cur sketch, although lie may other family of this name known in

the subject have been, as there was no

county at that time.

On

the west end of


is

minster

old Hart family mansion in Wara date stone of the following shape and inscription:
tlie

The

initials

stand for

John and Eleanor Hart, and he


he was then
in active life
;

undoubtedly

built the house, as

but his grandson John Hart, son of Josej)!!, in a letter to his brother Joseph, written in 17S5, says that it was built by
his father instead of his grandfather. John Hart lived there until his death, and it is not likely that the son rebuilt the

family mansion in the lifetime of the father. Joseph's wife's name was Elizabeth, and the mitials stand for either party.
'

John

Plart died

at

his residence in

Warminster, the 22d

of March, 1703, in the eightieth year of his age, and was buried in the grave yard at Southampton Baptist church.

He
His

was gathered
will is

to his fathers full of years

and rich

in grace.

loth of the previous January, and was witnessed by Daniel Longstreth, Thomas Handeck, and Thomas Gritiith, his neighbors. The families of Longstreth

dated the

and

Griflith are well

but that of Handeck

known in the history of the is unknown to tlie author.


Gibbs,
the

county,
It

was

proved before Richard

deputy register of the

HISTOKY or
county, the sonal ctTcct?
Tlionias
'Jth
is

Till.

HAHT

FAMir.V.

3o

of AjtH, 17<J.'5, TUo invcntnry ot" Li? perdated the 2Uth of ^larch, and was taken by
Ritdiard \\'ahon, an<l a[iiouu""il to
tlie

Duncan and
10.

tlie

sum

of

i)i>.l<,i.

Afrer

]ayniont of his debt

nd five
to his

sliilHngs to each of his other children,


'ousin

and

six

poi;-. Is

Susannah

Ifu.-h,

he

left all his real

and per- -nal


(.>f

estate

to .Ji)>epli, hi> then eldest living son, \vhnrn


si>le

he a[i['>inted his
the twij
to

cxecutur.

It

is

known
liiiu

that he died [iCL-sessed


his father,

hundred acres given


his son Joseph.
his father,

by

which descenrled
which

In

adilition,

Jo-eph, before the death

of
his

became

seized of the

two hundred

:;

-s

grandfather, in his will, luul contirnu'<l t<t his ir. This i> the same tract of Uvn hundr.'d acres

''e
..it

Thomas.

Thomas
acres

Hart and wife conveved


Iiim f )ur huuilrcd
n\'

to Janic- liii>li in 17!

This ixave
-tive
.:un
-

the four

hundred and

ei_

of the origin;d purclia.-e in \\'arniin>tei', from \ There was no tiner land in I'ucdvs county than it remains so r.ntil this day. John Hart's wife

Penn.

tract,
I

and

the 29tli

of October, llo-i, in the


lie

sixtv-eiii'lith

\ear

(jf ht.^- .i^o.


'.

Thev
marked

side

by

side in the old chnr(di yard, the spot

ing

by

]lain

marlile tond) stones.

The deceased had


his

ten children, six of

whom

to the grave, leaving his sons ,]i:sj})h, Silas

preceded him and Oliver, and

The eklest son, daughter Edith, living at his death. John, born Septeml)er 10, ITU'J, went to ^'irginia, where lie
was
killed the 11th of
aii-e,

of his

June, 1743, in the thirty-tburth year bv the accidental dischar^-e of his jrun in his own
died nnmairied.

hand.-.

He

Susannah, the eldest daughter and second child, was born


the 2(ith, 1711. On the 31st of 3Iarch, 1731, she intermariied with Joim Price, but lived onlv two vears afterAj'ril

ward, and died TJarch 30th,


son, born
]\Iarch 3il,
173.1'.
hi.^
I

173)3.

She had one

child, a

to trace this

son aiul

have taken considerab'." pains descendants, but have not litcn able
relial>i]ity.

to

do

.-io

with any degree. of

For

this

purpose

36

HISXOKY OF THE IlAia FAMILY.

have carefullv examined


out avail.

tlie reconls of the county, but withPrice is a very numerous one iu of family the husband of Susannah Hart doubt no a:iJ Bucks countv,

The
it.

belonged
that time.

to

Her

1760, but I
Price, of

know

son, Jose^'h I'riee, was ahvc in April, nothino- of him with any certainty after

In the register's ofhee 1 find a record of a Joseph Plumsttad township, who died in the fall of 1797. Ilis wit'e's name was Ann, and he left daughters, Ann, Eleanor and Jane also a son Abraham, who was not twentyone years of ivzfi in 1804. Eleanor was a family name anion"*
;

I have every reason to beheve that the Joseph the Harts. Price here mentioned was the son of Susannah Hart, and his

children her grandchildren. "William died in infancy.

Lucretia

intermarried

with

Wilham

Gilbert, October loth, 1741,

and had three sons.

Upon

his

death

she

1752, and had intermarried with


Seth,

married John Thonuis, March oth, two sons and two daughters. Edith
Isaac

Hough,

the sixth son,

die(r~at nine years

September 29th, 1748. of age and the


;

youuirest dauiihter died while yet an infant.

This leaves us

trace.

three sons and two daughters, with their descendants, to Lucretia died the 15th of December, 17G0. Eleanor

Hart, the wife of John Hart,


April, 1750,

made

a will, dated the 10th of

by

which, after leaving a shiUing to


slie

each one

of her children,

est in the estate of

bequeathed to her husband all her interher grandfather, Thomas Holme, "What
I

this

amounted

to,

or whether anything was recovered,

have

not been able to learn.

Joseph Hart was the eldest of the four children living at He was the fourth child, and was the death of their father.
born
1715,
at the family

"

mansion, in AA'arminster, September


the-

1st,

He

arrived at considerable distinction, and bv his

character and services reflected credit on

family name.

\t the death of his father he tuok charge of the homestead,

and aisuined the position that then belonged

to the

Lead of

HISTOKY
a taiiiily.
T'laiitini;
liis

CfF Tlir

H AHT FAMH.V.

37
lii.s

lie

followcil
a

in the
u,-efnl

tVnjt,-tep>
lite,

of

ancc.-ters in
ac<-<>iiMt

and

lerulinir

Tliere

is

no

of

boyhood and vouth, but prosiunc thev

were inainlv

parsed on his father's phmtation, when not lec-eivin^' lii- echication at such schools as the countrv afinrded at that dav.

He was married
twenty-tive, daughter of
to

the 0th
liis

of October,

]7I',

at

the a_e of

cou>in

KHzalieth

CoHet.

She

\\as

John and Marv Collet, and was iMirn in I'yht'rry, the 14tliof3Iav. 1714. She was irranddauLrhtrr of .T(.rcniiah Ci'llet, who came to Ajiierica ^\ith \\'il]iain I'rnn, and \\as
niend'cr of the council
itcd
in

Deeentber,
his

!<!>>;').

3Ir.

Hart

jM'of-

by the teachings of
]')aj'ti.-t

himself with the

pious parents, an<I early united lb- was bapti.-ed at Southchurch.

2'.>th of amj'ton. by >biy, I 740. the his His before wife wa> marriage. sj)ring bapri.-ed at The i-ecoril their reiinepack, the oth of Augu>t, IT'\^.
"

the reverend Jenkins Jones, the

mairiage in the church book specifies that they were then both church niendiers," He was an active and useful innvh

mendier
in
it.

as long as

he

lived,

and

a*'

various times helil offices

It will

be remembered that

when

his father

oecame

toci

intirm longer to discharge the duties uf clerk his mantle descended to his wctrthy son, who wa- appointed to the ittice.

He was
]

tirst

elected trustee in

!Se[iteud)er,

17(J;).

He was
:

also treasurer

and deacon,

Dow?i
if

to the

time of the American

devolution

lie

was seldom,

ever, ab.-ent

from the board

but for several year.- after that period he was too much occujiied with public duties, to be a regular attendant at the
meetings.
J'ajitist

He was
lie

fretiuently a

messenger

to tlie rhila<leli'hia

from Southampton, and \\\H>n several was deputed to write the annual letter to that He Mas almti>t always on c(immittees to confer with body. brothers and bisters, to induce them to return to the erring and was often fold, de}>uted to arrange ilitlieulties between members. He looked at'ter the poor and comforted the
assoeiati(jn

occasions

utilieted.

ll'

u dii'Orderlv minister

was

to

be

tried, ecdonel

,i

'^ftr-^'

mm

ji

>i

>''

-I

1^1

38

HISTOKV OF Tin: IIAKT lAMlI.V.

Hart was ap}>ointed to conduct the trial on the part of the Such was the part he a(,-te(l in the case of the reverchurch. end
^Ir. Kelly,

who

fell

from grace, and was brought to


1771.

trial

before the church the ll'th of Juh'

himself and wife are attached to the letter

Ihe names of the 5G members

of Southampton addressed to the l*enne])ack Baptist church, asking to be dismissed that they nn'ght form a new church, Thev also si<rned the new church covenant. I find an entrv
in the church book, that
for a deacon,''
in 174G,

when he "was
he declined the

called to be
office

on

trial

"for reasons

best

known

to himself."

He was

not excused.

On

the lOlh

of Septeinber of that year it is recorded, "Josej)!! Hart's reasons for desiring to be excused from the office of deacon were desired, but upon refusing to give them to the church,

Joshua Potts and Robert Parsons were appointed a conmiitteo them in private, who reported that his reasons were weighty, but not sufficient to excuse him, and he was thereto hear

upon ordained deacon." Mr. Hart entered into public

life as early as 1749. In that year governor Hamilton, proprietary governor under

Thomas and Kichard Penn, commissioned him


Bucks
and
in

sheritf of

cou' tv.

in 1751.

He was re-coramissioncd in 1750, and airain He was appointed justice of the peace in 1747
;

17(M he was commissioned

justice of the Quarter Ses-

and Common Pleas. A\'liile sheriff, in 1750, governor Hamilton required him to report the number of mills in the
sions

county for
that

slitting or rolling iron.

In his report he states,

"

after inquiiw

by me nuide through
rollini!;
tilt

my bailiwick,
of iron, or

I find

no

mills or enii;ines for slittinir or


to

T)latin2:

forji'e

work

with, a

haunuer or

furnat-e for makiny- of

Btecl

which were erected within the county of Bucks aforesaid on the twenty-^""" rth day of June last, or at any time since,

to

turn of mind, and throughout his life gave encourag<^ment to learning and the disseDn'nation of

my knowledge." He had a literary

iiKsTuiiv
\\

OF

iiii; riAin-

ka.mii.v

:39

useful kno\vlcdge.

He was one

of the founder- of the I.'niou

Library
the

at Ilatborouu-h, ^lontiroinerv

eountv.

'

)\v

one of

tlie

nio.<t tiouri>liin<2: institutii:n>

of

tht*

kind

in

iC

State.

On

10th of July, 1~')'k Jutepli I [art, reverend reverend Joshua Potts and John Lukens met
Billet,"

:rles
:

tlie

Ueattv, " Crooked


a
library,

now

Ilatborougli, to pro[>ose

a pla'

tor

which was agreed upon and adopted.


eiven, invitinir
to
all

Pu'lic notice was


in the

i^ersons

who

felt

an intere-^
at
t:..'
.'.:

sclieine

meet on the 2d of Auijust foUowinir,

house of Da\id
the

Kees, at that place.

3Iany persons met

time and

place appointed, who approved the plan, si_ tion and bv-laws, and became member,-.

-^d

the constituon'irinal

These

T..j ~rst meeting for papers are in ^Ir. Hart's handwriting. the election of directors was held tlie 1st . of Xovember
followinr.

was chosen a director, ar board for several years, and was a mem" He waa->mpany to the day of hisdeath.
lie
in

-erved in the
of the library resident of the
.early
iire,

board of directors
in 17 GO,
it

17G0 and

"Gl.

At

t).

meetiuir

was ordered that Joseph Hart.

set

bound

Smullct's historv of En:zland, in 7 volumes, and also newlv

bound Quarles' Emblems, Blackman on liedemption, and other books, which had been damaged on shipboard, and he was also directed to get printed small tickets with the name
of the library, and
pi'oper.'* to put

such other devices as he shall think

upon the books. At the yearly meeting in 17G1 he was directed to tender the thanks of the societv to
fur a gift of books, to

Joseph Galloway,
returned
a

which

^Mr.

very polite

answer,

dated,

Xev.-town,

Galloway Bucks

cuuntv, ilareh 14th.

I find

amon:^ the records of the library


:

rhe following books, \vhieh !Mr. Hart took ou", viz

Pope,

Smolkt's History, Civil Law, Natural History,


Tattler, Cato's Letters, Shakespear,

:'elle

Letters,

Hume's L

\y

Lock on
Logic. of the

the L'.'iderstandin::,

Lock on Government, and

"\Vatts'

These were

interspersetl with the best light

litt-r;irure

<{

-iU

Hl^-TOnv

>jT

TIIK liAirr FA.MILV.

day.

taste

His choice of books indicates a refined and ailtivated and a sound understanding. 'Mv. Hart liad an early taste tor military matters, and was

second to none in patnotic devotion to the counny. I find him in commission in 1747. In that rear he "oras ch"?sen
ensign of captain Henry Kroesen's company of ''Associators of Bucks county," in the re:::iment commanded bv coLr.el

Alexandoi Gray den.


in 1755, the

After the defeat of general Bradd-Dck, assembly oi' Pennsylvania passed an act for the "better ordering and regulating"' the militia of the province,

Afterward, in 1756.

under which law the governor commissioned him a captain. when the militia of Pennsylvania were

embodied for the defence of the province, he was again commissioned captain of a Bucks county company. These
connnissions, with
familv.

many

others, are

still

in possession of the

>7

le

id

ig

of

id
e.

lie

of

5ll.>.Tf>l;V

ul

Uli;

Jl

\i;j-

lANMl

V.

41

',!(

rilAi'TKi; IV

most viiliuiblo public services of Jc^epli Hart werf7f^,*(nr^ those rendereil iliiring the Revolut: 'nary contest. In ji^-t this irrcat struir^le he e;)rlv took the side )l't!ie colonies nirainst
tlie

encroachments

oi'

the

Bi'iti.-h

crown,
the
<-

r'.vl

ri.-kel

reputa-

tion, ]u-operty,

and even

lite itself, in

i-e.

His standing
>st

gave him great intluonce, and he was p;man in the county of J}nck> in mouhy!:.
j

vihlv the t')reia


[nihlic upini'in
lie

and
was
to

sustaining his country.

second to no
'

m?n
it

in tlu*

In point of ze:d and tideUty State. He wa- am-juir the

tirst

gather up the ^t]ength of the ccdony bcf -re the contest broke
out. an<l

when

became evident there would be

a rupture with

the mother ci:)untrv.


I
'

He

attend-'jd a I'ld'lic meetip.Lr

held at

Newtown, the yth of July. 1774, toaj'iioint a committee to I'epresent Bucks county "at a meeting (f the several comI

niittces of the rt\-pective counties of IVnn-ylvunia, to

be hell

at riiiladclphia, the

member

'.(f

^aiij

of July in>tant.'' He was ap[> lintc'l conunittee whic-h, l>e-i(le himself consisted
l.'>th
:

of

John Kidd, Joseph Ivirkbride, James Walhi'-e, H.-nry The Xcw\\'vnkoop, Samuel Foulk, and J(.'hn \\"ilkinson. town meeting adopted the t'ollowing resolutii'>n "Resolved: That the inhabitants of this county hare the pame oinnu:n of the dangerous tendency of the claims of the
:

vt'

British I'arliamcnt to m:d;e laws binding on the inhabitants the colonies iu al! cases whatsoever without tiieir cuu.-c;)t,

4-_'

iilsi()l;v <( Kii; Ii.\(:t lA.\ilf.\'.

Hs other of our fellow

recommended

American subjects have." The mcetnig' a general congress, to be composed of delegate.^

from all the provinces. The convention met in Carpenter's hnU in Philadelphia, and continued in session several days. On the 10th of July Mr. Hart was appointed member of a
committ^je to draw and present to the assembly a resolution recomnnending tliat a "congress of deputies from the sevei-al colonies be immediately assembled to consult together."
,

1|

In pursuance of a recommendation of the continental congress, an election was held at Newtown, the loth of

,/
'I

committee of safety for the county December, most prominen*- citizens were the of Bucks. of Twenty The comnnttee met chosen, of which Mr. Hart was one.
1774, to elect a

and was oroanized


cliosen chafrman,

tlie

16th of Jarumry,

177-3,

when he was
.

and John Chapman c^erk. A committee of correspondence was appointed, at the head of which was ]\Ir. Hart, who was clothed with power to fall the connnittee
of safety together whenever, in his opinion, the state of public
affairs

'

might require

it.

This committee collected 2.32. 19. 18,

to relieve the people

paid

into

"of the town of Boston," which was He was a the hands of John and Samuel Adams.

member

of every important sub-committee and most generOn the Sth of ]\lay he was appointed a ally chairm.an. delegate to a provincial convention if it should be deemed

necessary to

call

one together.

complaint was made to the committee of safety of persons speaking in contemptuous and disrespectful terms of the cause of .Vmerica, and the (;onti-

About

this time frequent

r.ental congress.

wa resolved to take notice of them, and Mr. Hart was appointed to examine into such cases. John
It

Laeey, afterward a brigadier general in the niih"ti;i, preferred charges against one Tiiomas Smith, of Upjter ^lakctield He was brought before the committee, and after township.
a
full

investigation of his case


haviii<r

"Proof

been made

reported as follows: hv inc()iitestible evidence that


it

insTuKV or Tin:
J,

iiai.t

iamiiv.

43

'Ilionias iSniitli, ot
I
'
'

l.j'pcr

MakefieM. had

iitterod expressions

'That the moa-urc? of congress already en>laved America, and dnc more damage than all the aets the parliament ever intendfl to lay upon us, that the whitle was nothing but a S('hemo of a parcel of hot-headed
to tlio following purp<.rr,
vi/.:
}ia<l

rre.-^hyterian-,
t

and that he believed the dfvil wathe taking

at

the bot-

tola

(.>f

the

whole, that

scandalous thin^r a

up arms was the most man could be iruiltv of, and niore heinou-^

than an hundrrd of the grossest otiences against the moral


,

law.

i.<i;r.,

cVrc.'"

'J'homus kSmith was an


cans, and

The committee enemv ti> the

re.-olv.jd

that

the

said

riirht-

of

Bi-iti.^h

Ameri-

h
j;
4

all persons were rec<>mmeniled to break off all of kind dealings w ith him until he shoultl make proper satisfajtiou to the comnu'ttee for his miscomluct. In December,

177.3,

Mr. Hart was again elected a


tor the eMsuinix vear,

member

of the committee

I
t

of

sat'etv

and was made chairman of

the.

main committee and of

that on correspondence.

The

committee of safety was l)oth the legislative and executive authority of the county, and was again Ci>m[o-ed of the m<;tst
sub.-tantial

and

intiuential 2:entlemen in

it.

The Declaration

of Independence left the peo[*le almost witln'ut civil government, and for the time being the county committees supplied
the entire machinery of political an<l municipal organization. In the sju'ing of 177G the peo[>le of Pennsylvania agitated the question of e-tablishing a new government. They liad confidence in the assemblv, which until that time had

lost

centred in

itself the sup'remc power of the province. In May the committee of Philade'phia addressed a letter to each of the county committees, re<|ue.-ting them to appoint delegates,

to

meet

in IMiiladelphia

on the l^th of .Tune, to consider the

mode

of electing uicmbers of a provincial Convention, to be held at such time and place as might be agreed upon. The measure was aj'proved by the committee of Bucks, which

chose a- delegates Joseph Hart, John Kidd, James Wallace, The (ouvention Ib'urv A\'ynkoop. I'cnj.-imin Si'Ilt'i- and

44

nisTOuv or ihi; iiaut


in

iA.Mif.\.

met

Carpenter's Imll at

tlu'

time fixed upon.

Colonel

Thomas 3IcKean was chosen


president.
u-as

In

this

president, and Jo'Ci^h Hart vice Hcconference he to(jk a leading part.


tlie

twice chairman in committee of


to

whole

was on the
house the

committee

determine the nnndjcr of members of which


;

the convention should consist

and reported

to the

resolution prescribini:; the qualitication of vuters and the form Tiie latter M-as in tlie folof test oath to be administered.
lowino; words, to wit
:

"I, A. B., do declare that I do not lu)ld myself bound to bear allegiance to George the Third, king of Great Britain, ifcc, and that I will not, bv anv means, directlv or indirectlv,
oj)pose the establishment of a free

government

in this pro-

vince bv the convention

now

to

be chosen, nor the measures

adopted by congress against the tyranny attempted to be established in these colonies bv the court of Great Britain."

The

report was unanimously adopted. State government was agreeif upoir


fixed fur holdinir

The formation

of a

and the 8th of July


deley;ates to a
j

was the time

an election for

convention, which was to assemble in Philadelphia the 15th ^.Ir. Hart was one of the of the same month. judges that

held the election in Bucks county. On the 4tli of June the continentcil congress resolved to establish a fiying camp of ten thousand men in the middle
colonics, and Pennsylvania was called upon to furnish six thousand as her quota of that number. They were to serve nntil the first of December, unless sooner discharged, and

('

were

to be paid

and subsisted in the same manner as conti-

nental troops.
hall took

The convention

or conference at Carpenter's

measures

to assist in raising the troops

apportioned
\\

to Pennsylvania,

and the associators of the

ditferent counties

were calleil u]^on to fill up their ranks. A connnittee, of which 3Ir. Hart was a member, was appointed to devise ways and means to raise the 4,oU0 ti'oops which the province still
lacked of su}>plying
its

quota, and

fit

them

to take the field.

iiisrc'i;\

w
(it'

iiii;

ii.m:i

famii.v.

4.'i

i The
.four

comiiiilti't.'>

of snt'cty weio autliu'-l/iMl

t.
'

a[t|iiiiiit
>

the

ottic'tTS.

The

iiniiihcr
'1

mm

a'l<itt'il
<it'

to

I'u'

county was
iu-o

huuilic'L

lie

n'Milutioiis

the
l>iit

con:
th

on

tlie

.fcuhiect \v(.re ift't'iTfil to


adjoui'ni'il

the a.cniblv,

xlv liavin^r

without taking any action nj>i>n th ence nia'le an eH'ort to caiiy into etlei-t the wi-,

the eonter-

ot"<'ongre.-s.

Tliis

body a-ljourned the


tin:;

'2')lh ot"

June.
ot'

In
o:

liately
I'.ucks

upon

the ailioununent
/licit] a
tiehl.

eonmiittee

sat'etv

eonntv

meeting to ha>ten the Thi> was the Idtli of


rcr-olution.

r|uota of the ..-unty into the


-Tuly,
vi/.
:

found the t'ollowing


[,.
'

ami

<n

"".ir

minute^

is

"Ivesi.ilved

That the committee

will
'.

rheir

utmost

endeavuiirs that the resolve of the late


fur

\*ri.>\
(:

d cont'erence,
is

emho'lying 4"0 of the


into

as.-ociators

county be
following

immediately put gentlemen he appointed othcers. being the [


to this ct:>nnty, viz:
l''olwell,

execution,

and

th

rhe

Joseph
first

rtion allotted
iptains,

Hart, colonel:

John

William lioberts, William Hart,


lieutenants,

an<l

John .lamison:

Johu

dentine Opi>, Xroesen, Henrv


L'cnnis 3Iiddle-

iKirrah,

Hugh

L-mg, Philip Trumbowi-i, and

second lieutenants, ^Vbialiam HulJois. James Shaw, Jacob Drake, Samuel Deane, ami John Irvine: ensigns,

worth

?dcKi>sack, William Hiries, Jose['h Hart, Stutf'el Keller, ami John Mi-Cammoii: adjutant, John Johnson: surgeon, Joseph

Fentun,

jr.

(piartermaster, Alexander Benstead."'


Avas not without

The conference

good

results.

It

gave

birth to the convention of the f^illowing July, whicdi formeil the tirst constitutit.n of renn>ylvania, e.-tabli-hed popular

government in the State, ami superceded the revolutionary assembly ami c(_immittees of >aft'ty.
yiv.

Hart was not

satisfied

with

diiiiiir

.-ervice
I

in

conveninto the

tions and committees, but his patrioti>m carrie


field.

him
>:

AVe

tind

him

1776, in
I"

command

in the army as early as of a reiximent of ]Uud<s

t!

summer
Titv

of

militia,

scrviuLT in

New

Jcr-CN".

The committee

of saicrv, uf which

4(5

'\

iiiaiDKV or Tin;

haut

iamii.v.

lie

was

cliainnaii, took aetiDU

at

au early day

to raise troops

to

sliock of w ar, wliich they saw was inevitable. On the 8th of ]\lav, 1775, thev inissed a resohition reconimendin''

meet the

the people of the tu\vnshii)S to form themselves into military companies, and several were raised in dillerent jjarts of the

county.
liouse of

On

the 20th of Julv the othcers

met

at

the puhlic

John Bogart,
colonel
:

to elect field otHcers.

Joseph Hart

was elected
officers

of the

second battalion.

The
;

other

were

Eobert Shewed, lieutenant colonel


major
;

James
;

3IcMasters,

first

Gilbert

Kodman, second major

Joseph Shaw, standard bearer, and William Thompson, Colonel Hart made return of the election to the adj\itant.
safety, the 24th of Ai^il, 177(;, which they the speaker of the assembly, in order that he might receive his commission. He appointed the re\erend

committee of
to

certitied

Robert Keith chaplain to his battalion. On the 19th of July the continental congress passed a resolution earnestly recommending the convention of Pennsylvain'a to hasten the

march of the militia into Xew Jersey. The convention, by resolution of the lOrh of Auirust, established a flvino- camp
of her militia in that State, to serve until the 1st of January, ])ut colonel Hart did not wait nnless sooner discharired.
fur the authorities to urge

him

to take the held. at the

He had
regiment

already marched
of congress.

to the

new camp

head of

his

before the State convention had taken action on the resolution

was encam[)ed at Anibuy. 1 make the following extracts from the journal of captain Benjamin Loxly, who commanded a company of artillery at the same camp:

He

f
|
.

the

"Saturday 10th, (August, 1770,) at 10 a. m. we paraded men captain Stiles joined us, and marched duwn near
; ;

colonel Miles' house

there

took the right of the Bucks

county battalion, comnumded by colonel Hart; formed the circle, and William liradford, junr., brigade major, by order of general Roberdeau, read the address from general "Washinirton."'

insT<)i;v <>r

riii;

iiAr:i

r.wiir.v,

47
.\iiiru~t Intli.

'

Hi:
:

vii-or.\i:Ti-.i:s,

Amiiov,
;

'ravole,

Mil]!iii

(.(iintfi>igii,

w.-ii-

tirld

otlifcr

t'"i-

to-

morrow,

t'oloiK'l
'2i\

Hart."
tlio

On
?on,

tlic

of Scptombir, at

rtMnic.-t

of

irfiicral iJii-kcii-

coloiU'l

Hart

adiirt'-sril

Irttrr
tliriti

to

tin*

[V'liiisyhaiiia
lie
lia<l

c-oinmitteo

of

.-afftv,

inforMiiiiu'

tliat

Ix-eu

informed
county,
at

tliat tliree coiiipaiiies

of

tin- tliiril liattalioii

of I'lieks

Commanded I'V colonel Ki<-!dine, did "march forward in detence of their country.
"'

not intend to
^\^ tind

liome, on the Sth of I\'c-end)er


in

meet the conimittee--acli\e


"Wa^hinicton,

j'roliaMy on forwarding; mm to

him

leave, to

reinforce
l>y

who

\\a- beini; drivt-n


(

from the Jer.-eys

the

'n that day he wri>te the committee, victorious T5riti>h army. ]w in gettinj;- the militia into the the had ditticulty stating

field,

and expressing

ure::t fear that the

ranks of the hattalion

M'ould not be very fuU.


at
in

Xo
will

camp, and he >ays

'-it

provision wa< made fir the men he impo>>i])le tor them to lie

the open air without tents or cover.'' greater part of the mihtia comju-sing the flying camp liad returned hy the heginning of Decemlier. hut the battalion

The

of colonel Hart was


l:?th

in

the ficM

some days

longer.

On
his

the

of that month,

gemral

A\ a^hington,

finm

head

quarters, at Trenton
that he

falls,

writes to Iri^adier general Kwiiiir,

had ordere(l

a part of eolonel Iiarl's battalion to join


at thi-

his brii:ade.

Kwinu'

time was stationed on the west

(bank of the Delaware, with ordiTs to guard the river froni pposite liordentow n t<j ^ ardley's ^.li'ls, and t( act in con-

unction with cohjiiel Cadwallader,


lis

who was

statione(l

with

regiment near Ihistoh

On

the

17th of l>ecember the

Penn>ylvania committee of safety auth(U-ized general ^^'a^hington to caU out the militia of the ecninties of Bucks and
*

In pursuXortham['ton, to ninforce the c(>ntinental army. s authorit\' the a mmander-in-chief addressed the
'

lonowin:: letter to colonel Ilart, on the l!lth:


I

"Sli;: Tile hoiiorable committee of <afctv of the State* of

4>!

niSTOUV or

'riii: ii

aht kamh.y.

Pcnnsvlvciniu having 1)V a re^olvo, passed the 17th day of thi> instant, Decendfer, authorized me to call forth the militia of
the county of Bucks, to the assistance of the continental army nnder my command, I hereby require you immediately to
issue orders to the ciiptains of
officers

and privates of
this

their

your regiment to summon the companies to meet on the 28th

day of

instant, at

the usual place for their joining in

arms and accoutrements in good order, and when so met march immediately to the citv of Philadelunder the command of major phia, and there put yourselves are further required to make an and you general Putnam, exact return of the names and places of abode of such officers and privates as refuse to aj^pear with their arms and accoutrements, at the time and place ajipointed, that they may be dealt with as the resolve above referred to directs.
battalion,
^vitll

their

"Given nnder my hand,


December, 1776.

at head-quarters, this

19th day of

The head-quarters
were
in

(Signed) of the

"George
continental

"Wasiiingtox."

Bucks county.

army at this time At the time of meeting but a small

number

On

of the battalion repaired to the place of rendezvous. the tI9th colonel Hart made report to Washington of the
refused or neglected to march to Philadelphia Tlieir names and residence are iriven

number who
in the

airreeablv to his orders.

American Archives, and the number of delinquents shows extraordinary lukewarmness in the cause. Of the

company

that

belona'ed

to

refused to march, and of the Plumstead

Warwick township fortv-nine company there were

I have no means of telling how sixty-seveh delinquents. lonir colonel Ilart and his battalion remained on duty in

Philadelphia, but it is ju'obable they were discharged the last of December or the bci>-innin2^ of Januarv. On his return to

the coimty he immediately resumed his duties with the committee. On the 19th of February he Mas appointed on committee with Henrv A^'vnkooi) ami T?ich;ii-d Gibb^,
a

to

TllSTnl.'V

111"

iiii;

ii

M;

IXMlLV,

4{i

stnirt-li t1ie

liitu.-e

it'

f.-anc

IIitk>,
;iii<l

>>\'

New town,
tliel'e.

'iiti'

clerk of

tUv

foiirt

of r)iick< cDMiitv.
rerdl-il- tln'V
Ikiiiiiiiical

:mtli<>ri/.c,l to
tiinl

take
?Jl'.

pij.<>e.ssi*)U

of

all

]illlilie

iiil;/lit

Ifieks

Win
Tii

f;iHHH<e<l

to

tn

the

can-e of the
e<iiiiiiiitt<,'e

eololiie.-.

their re[)ly on

thi- l'lM

iii.-tiint,

the

>tate that tliev

"
roj>aire(l

to

tlic

house' of I^aae Iliek>,

at

Xeutown, ami

!reeeive<l

from

Mi's.

Ilieks

all

the liouso, iUid

de[)osite(l tlie

the pa[iers .-<he alle:,^e<l to he in same in the piililie- ofHee," and

that they 'MiH\e ordered the mai^^i/j'ne to he removed.'' of 1777 the continental armv Durinjji: the winter and .-"['ring

was in great need of llaid-:ets to }'re\ eiit the men sutlering from cold, and the Pennsylvani-u committee of .-afety apiiointed I'onimissioneis in the respective counties to collect them from
the people.

They
for

wer< to he appi'ai.-ed
Jo.-epli

and [mid

t'^v.

Tlie

commissioners

Rucks were
apj'ointe(l

Hart, James

IJrne/.ett,

and .John

(iill,

who

collect blankets.

Colonel

one pei>on in each to\\n-hi[> to The Hart wa- made ti-easurer. county
tiiem
(

niunher of blankets

c<illected in the

\\as \\a-

about three
I"!

hundred,

hiuI

the

amount paid

foi'

17^,1 2.'

I.

The account was at'tei'uard au<life(l bv leorue A\'ood and John T.acev, jr., and foiuid to I'e correct, with a liahiiice of 72.17.0 in the hand> of the trea>!irer, which was pri'perly
aec(junted
'Jhe blankets were apprai.-ed the Hrst day of of August Thomas Jenks, jr., who owned 1st the !Muy. a fulling mill near Newtown, received of <-aptain Larrance two hundred blankets, and on the 2."m1 (vf Septend)er the same
for.

On

Thomas Jenks

;i(d<nowledged
in

to

ha\(>
tbr

received

of

James

scouring, tentering, and drying 2()0 blankets belougini;- to the State of Pennsylvania."' On the 2.')d of Se[itend>er, Daniel Kose, Asst. (J.

Benezett "twenty pountls,

full,

M.

(r.,

acknowledges

to

fertile use of the continental


sent

have receivinl tifty-three blankets, army under genei'al U'a.-hington,

^littiin.

by Thomas Yardley, .at the reconunendatiou of general These must have lieen over and above the general
ii\

collections, for the\- are not included

the nund'cr reportcij

//

^'iO

lirSTOUV

OF THE

IIAiri"

FAMILV.

bv the committee.

Thomas

Y;irdlev coutrihuted one bhuihef,


for
it.

Lower

^Makefiehl,

and was paid 1.15

In

all,

that

township only lurnislied nine blankets for the continental

army, probably
cause.

tiie

contributions of persons friendly to the

In the

summer

of 1777 colonel Ilart was elected a

member

of the supreme executive council of Pennsylvania, for Bucks He county, and took his seat in that body the 2d of July.

served in that capacity until the middle of October, 1779, when not beina; airain a candidate for re-election, o-eneral

John Lacey was

He was
the

elected to leprcsent the county in his place. appointed lieutenant of Bucks county in the spring

or early in the

State

further

summer

of 1780, by the executive council of evidence of the confidence that body

The exact time of reposed in his integrity and patriotism. his appointment is not known, but he was in the discharge of the duties as early as June.

UlSTOl:\ or IIIL llAkl K.V.MU.V.

:,i

CU A

I'TE a V

^X the "JDth
^t^A
autliori/.ed

if

June,

so(in after Ju^ejili ITart

wa^ aiipninteJ
council

lieutenant

of Bucks

eounly,

tlie

executive

him

to arrest a
pei'.-on

woman hv

the

name

of Tnmhle:-ton,

described as a

can cause," to seize


found
lier
in

of "general (Hsatt'ection to the .Vnieriall letters and |a[>ers that niii,dit be


if

lier

house, and
council

there be sutHcient cause to take

examination. The order was "William vice The otHce of ]\b)ore, president.'' signed colonel Hart made him the chief 'nn'Iitarv authoi-itv of the
bftbre
the
tor

county, and his duties were arduous to one so nnich advanced in years. In the sumnu'r of ITSd he was active in ju'eparini:;
the militia of the county to reint'orce the eonnnander-iu-ehiet", Tn 17S2 he was directed to should he reijuire their ser\ices. order out fifty nulitiamen to guard the CLumty jail at Xew-

town,

})ut
it

protect

whether to prevent the eseape from an a--auit of the po[>uIace


ith,

ot'

is Tiot

prisoners or to kni)wn. The

order was complied w

but

when

the

men

arrived and foinul

no arrangements

ma

le for l<.dging

and
to

t'eeiling

them they were


Colonel

much

dissatisfied

and threatened

return home.

Hart prevailed on them to remain, and "billeted" them on the town on his own eredit, although he hail no authoritv to

do so or
\

to assunu' the resoou.-ibilitv.

'J'he

countv comnu's-

sioners refused to direct the treasurer to pay the e\j>euse, and lu' was obliged to present the bill to the executixe couucd,
\\hieh no di.ul.r oi'lercd
it

to

be

j^aid.

.)L'

r[isT([;\

oi-

ifit;

irAf;r r'.wrir.r,

Soon
tutinir a

after his election to the cxocutivo coniK'il of the StiTttr

in tlie suniuier of

1777,

tlie

"eoiuicil of safety

"

assonihly passed an act constiin lien of the old l)oard. Theoffice,

members

of the exeentive eonneil were eontimied in


iiu-re.'ised

and the nnmKn' was

by the addition of seyeral

1'he change took place, I belieye, jn'ominent persons to it. the loth of October, and it Ayas in tliis 1ody that colonel

Hart
also

seryetl
ii'irister

the

balance of his

term of

office.

lie

was

connty of Bncks, rts there was no' to Hisprohibition holding two offices at the same time. commission is dated ilarch 21st, 1777, ai\d was issued by
of the
the execntiye council.

At no time did he permit


with eacb other.

his ciyil

and military duties


tilled so

to interfere

In addition

to these official positions in the

continuously for seyeral years,

State aiul county which. he iiis fellow citizens of

Warminster tovynship, meanwhile, honored him with places of j)ubllc tru^t. In 17S2 he and Samuel Smith were elected to represent I'Hcks county in the board of censors, a body
whose duty it was to in'^uive whether the constitution had been yiolated, try impeachments, and recommend the repeal of injurious laws. On the 7th of June, 17S4, he was appointed one of the judges of the court of Common Pleas
and Quarter Sessions of the county, which was the last office he occupied, and which he held until his death. Altliongh colonel Hart was such an actiye patriot he was
not
that

much

disturbed

l)y

the

prowling bands of depredators

roamed about the country. In oidy one case did lie lose stock, in 1782, when some horses were stolen from liim by
two notorious characters, George Sinclair and Caleb Paul.
Fortunately the slioek of war was not

much

felt in

his neiirh-

damace done bv of the The battle of the Crooked foraging parties enemy. Billet, in 1778, was partly fought on iiis ])l;uitation, when the British troops committed some excesses on his premises.
sutler l)eyond the

borhood, and he did not

There

is

tradition

that

the

tn^opcrs

yisite<l

the

fimiflv

iiisr'i;v

<'!

ifir.

n.\i;i

r.\Mi[.\,

i}'S

niansioM aiul nxle


]iriti>Ii
liii'l

tlaii"

liniscs

into tlif kitclicii.


aii'i

Attrr the
the
lariror
hi.s

nccu['ii'(l

I'liilatk'li'liia

)Vfrriiii

of the >urr(>\iinnii;4 cinuitiy, part activitv niiuht ih'aw \\\>'<u him the

hv
iiuli:^'

.as

t'ciirt'iil
<>{'

lest

ation
at

the eiieiiiv

-particiilarlv
not do
J)i-.

the

t<>i-ifs;
hi-^

ami he rr-hrd

one time to

hrother Sila-;, in \'irLrinia, hut he did soml hi> family to it. lie owiu^d the mill j'roj.rrty now heloniriiig to

William
in

lallowclj,

in

Moreland

townr-hii',
lii.s

^Montgomery

ctMinty,

home being In arms collected in that the always year the that anil neighhoring townships were hid under the tloor
177S. Imt never re>ide(l there;
in

^^'armin>te^.

of the mill, and a few soldiers stationed there to guard tliem. During the Kevolutionaiy w:u' colouid Hart carried on an
extensive corre.-pondence with proit:;:ient characters in all branches of the public service, as wei' - those in civil station.

Frequent letters pa-sed between bin; and k^ilas the former a di>tingui:

his bi-others ()!iver


I'.aptist

divine,
in

at

Charle.-ton,

South Caiolina, and the


(

eountv,

A'iii-inia.

living Augu>ta )ne of his nio>t fif oueiit and interestiuir


1

.rter

lain in the
at the

corresjiondents was the revereml \\'iUiam A'aiiilom, a c]ia^>main aiany under \\'a>l!ington. He was minister

Southampton Bapti>t churcb when the war broke

out,

the sacred div-k to serve bis country in the ticld. I have not been alle to learn much of 3lr. \'anHorn and his
left

but

family.

He Mas

the son
at

of the reverend
in

A'anllorn,

minister

Penne[>ack

174o

and

Peter Peterson

probably

He was marrii'd the 1st of I)eceml)er, there at a later perii^l. 1772, to f.a.vinia Pudd, daughter i>f Thonias and .Tamiina
}iudd, of

Northampton, pMU'liiigton coimty, \\'est Jer>ey, by the reverend Sannud Jones, then [>a>tor at Penne[KH-k. It is iu)t known at what timi^ he ceased to be at Southpastor
amiiton, but he was there in 17S;), whie'i
child was born.
likely

vear his vounirest

He probably

let't

there in 178'), and most

gi\en hin\ b\-

went a\vay because of the inadequacy of the sup[>ort [ am led to this belief from hi-; conirrcLration.

54

iiisTuia

ui"

Tin;

haut

iamii.v.

n paragrupli in a letter fruin 3Ir. (JUnlt Hart to liis l^rotliei" Joseph, written from Hopewell, New Jersey, the 18th of Ill speaking of ^Ir. ^'anIIorn leaving SouthApril, 17b'3.

ampton, he says

"I am

little

sorrv that Mr. YanllDrn should be obliijed

to leave Southamj^ton for the want of a living. From the I should have I have formed of that man, opinion thought

the church and conirrci^ation would have strained every nerve rather than part with him.
supplied."

Perhaps they

will not hastily

be

Under date

of July 13th,

1778, 3Ir. A'anllorn wrote to

colonel Hart from a place he designates as " N. Y. Government, Kahiejate," giving an account of the manner the 4th of

He says July was celebrated that year by the army. "On ye 4th instant our troops announced our independence
:

I)V

a feu-de-iov.

On

ve south elevated and beautiful bank of

Rariton the troops with green boughs in their hats were His Excellencv's o-uard on ve riirht, paraded in two lines. next 13 pieces of artillery, tlien ten or 12 brigades, with a piece of artillery on ye right and in ye centre of each, com-

posed the

first line

extending a very considerable distance

the rear line consistino- of about half as

numv

brigades,

disposed in ye same order, about 150 yards distant, formed the dis])Osition of the whole arm v. His Excellencv bavins:

viewed ye whole, and given ye orders returned to his quarters on the other side of ve river, oitposite ve riirht \\[n- of ve front line, which were on an eminence commanding a prospect of ye whole, and having ascended to a balcony on ye house, and ve signal beinii; o'iven 13 cannon were fired then followed a running discharge of cannon and musquetry from the rir>;ht to left, and continued from ve rear to ve riii'ht of ve The whole was performed same, and then a general huzza. three times, and the troops })rought off without an accident."
;

His brother Silas wrote him under date of February 23d, 1778: "Tho' T have lain as it Mere dormant when our

iiis'n>i;v

or

tiii;

HAi;r iwMir.v.

/ir

countrv

hiitli

]>vcu in sucli <li-trc->, I

cannot but revere

vi>ii,

niv dear brother, tor the

ai-ti\e part voii

have taken
usct'iil

a:nl >till

good oM and have the ot' *\vell don<^ and i'aitha['j>robatlon good age, ful servant, enter tliou unto tlie joy of the r>Mr(l,' is and shall
in a

in. That you may h>n^ he eontinueil a persist to a bleeiling cDuntry, may leave thi-^ worM

meniher

be the hearty prayer of thy loving brother." His l)i-(ther )liver writing to eolontd Ilai't from Charleston, under date of Mareh 24th, 177S, on the subject of his activity
(

in the eause of the country, says:

"

am

i;Iad that

vou stiU

take an active part in the American cause, ami hope vou will never give up while you are able to serve your country.

The

situation of affairs in vour State nnist be alarmirK'-

and

policy of Britain, in the present controversy, would disirrace the most barbcrous nation; and the conduct
att'ecting.

The

of the British

army

in
in

America

will

remain

in

indelible
is

characters of blood
niijust

future generations.

Their cause

and

their

measures diabolical.

For

mv own

part

camiot trace the ravages of theii" ai'my 'withour horror and 1 hope, however, that your projiertv hatli riot indignation.
fallen

into

theii'

uidiallowe<l

hands.

J*ut

would much

rather

sacrifice

my

all

than that America shoidd be en-

>Iave.l.*'

Colonel Hai-t h:id

now run

his life of acti\ity

He
at

dieil

at

his

residence in ^Varminster, the

and usefulness. 2.">th dav of

February, 1788, ami was buried in the family bui-viuir irroun<l His wife had died on the 19th of the same Southampton.
at

month, and was buried stone which marks their


following:

the

same
o\'

place.
is

On

the tond)

last

i-esting place

inscribed the
es'piire,

"Here
al-o

lie

the icmains

Joseph Hart,

who departed
72
years;

this lite

the

the 2oth day of l-'ebruary, 1788, age<I remains of Elizabeth, his wife, who

February, 17SS, aged 74 years. In their deaths they M'ere not much divided. His long aiul \useful life was alm'.>st wholly dev.,ited to the public service of

departeil this lite the lOtli of

r)Ci

iiisTOKY

(IF

Tin:

II

Airr

family.

liis

couutry: wliik" the


virtue."
all

li\i'S

of

liDtli

were omincut

for j'iety

jiiul

In
useful

and

respects colonel Jose[>h Hart was one of tlie most ]ironiiiieiit citizens in eastern Pennsylvania duriuir

His descendants have the trying period of tlie Revolution. cause to be proud of the reputation he has left behind him,
for usefulness

and

piety.

From

the fact that

all his

contem-

poraries have long since gone to the grave it is impossible to learn many of the personal characteristics of this upright
citizen.

few years

ao;o

]\[r.

Safetv ]\[a<rhee,

who

died at

.,_the age of nearly one hundred years, and who was acquainted M-ith colonel Ilart toward the close of his life, detailed to the

writer the following recollection of

him

active through and was considered an able masristrate. For a number of vears he was so much in engaged public aftairs that he employed an overseer to manage his plantation, which was unusual in that day. AMien he rode out he always went armed. He furnished a large quantity of provisions to the army, and held a great
I

"

knew

colonel Joseph Hart.

He was

the Revolution from the be<i:inninr

number

of certificates whi(rh were finally paid after some ditlieulty. During the war a portion of the army was at one
^^'hile thei-e I went up and saw two men whipped on one accasion for robbing hen roosts. Colonel Hart was greatly respected and had their confidence. He was a business by everybody man. He was a ii'ood-lookinir man, of medium heiuht and well formo<l. T was with him in his last illness, and on his

time encamped upon his plantatioFi.


to see the troops;

.\

death-bed he was cheerful.


M'ell,

AVhen he died

went

to

Hope;

New

Jersey, to

inform his brother Oliver of his death

who came

over to the funeral, and T think preached the He was consermon, though I am not certain about that.
sidered a pretty stern character.
I

alwavs understood that

Ids decisions as a magistrate stood the test

and were considered

very correct.

He was

considered a jrood faiiuer. and hit

insToi;v OF Tin;

ii

akt iwmii.v.

,'^7

farm

\\^> in

\vas tlie

good ordtraml custom to htvc "ut

vci-y [rn(lii(tl\(.'.
li(|iinj-

At that time
Imttle

it

tu tlu- gup.-ts at a
tli'

t'liiu/ral.

"When
funeral

tliev arrived snjnc

om- was ro-ady with


t<

and

jjlasscs to irive
I

them

.-nnictJiini;

driidc.

At cuh>nol Hart's
people as

carrl^-d the lii|Ui>r

round and

treati'd tlie

they arrived.'' Joseph Hart

}ial

>i\

cliildreii, all

s^ns,

nameil William,

John,
17()(',

JSihu-i,

Josi;ili, Ji>eph,

and

Joseph liaving died


at
tJie

in iniaiicy.

.lo.-cph the seeoli'l, thi' tir.^t A\'illiajn, the eldest, died in

aire ot" nineteen,

and uiuuarried.

John died
and Juse['h

two years liefore Jd- ta-ther, leaving Silas. Josiah living at tlie tijne oi'his death.

John, the .^oeond son ot" colonel Josejih Hart, \\as horn at He attained to Warminster, the 21tth of Xovendier, IT-i.'i. foine loeal proinint-nce. He }>aed lu's youth, to manhood, iit the homestead, ^u-^sistin^j; in the kdjor on his tatliei-'s
plantation, and

attended such schools as the country then


P'.nnli.-Ji

atforded,

where he acouired an ordinarv


ot"

education.

On

the l-3th

8eptemlier, 17(i7,

he

\\a.-

nlarri(^l to

Rebecca

Kees, (laui:hter of I)a\idand


Billet,

^tlai-^aret

Iiee<, of the Crooked

She was ^loiitgoincry county. horn the 21st of August, 174(5. Stjou after his mai-riago he removed to near (tld Chester, in what is now I^elawarf, hut
Hatl)or(tngli,

now

then Chester county, wlu-re he owned a


on milliuir Inisiness

mill,

and cairied

several

vtcii-s.

^\'hen the troubles with

CJreat Britain took place he espoused the (;ui>e of the colonies with great warmtli. "^lliat eoiuitry was tilled with tories, and

on account

ot"]iis

known

wiii^- j>rineiples

he received so much

persecution that he was obliged to leave his mi'l and return to Bucks, 1 do jiot know at what time thi> took place, but
it

was, no

(h.iubt,

sonietinu'
ot"

in

1777:

t"or

his

wife ilied

t'lie

Warmin>ter, whieh must have occurred after they had removed l"rom Chester county. Jlis fnuilv undoubteillv took took up their residence at his
tliat

ihh of November

ycaa-, at

father's house

ft.ir

a time.

He

neve;- re-married.

He

s]>ent

V,

;')S

iiiSTouv

oi"

I'm: i[ai;t iw.Mir.v.

the balance of

liis

]ite

in

Bucks county.

lie was deputy

IFc touk an aftive ptu't in recorder of the county of itidepcndencc duriiiji; jiolitics, and was a zea'ous snpj^orter
in 177'.>.
tlu^ rovolutit)nary struLrii;le. Jle was appointed in of fill tlie the to trcasuixT 1779, county spring vacancy of Henry Wynkoop, Mliom tlu^ leg'islature had elected a

the wliole of

niernl)cr of congress.

He

notified the conunissioners of his

accejitance at their meeting Aj)ril 2d.


juet at

(Jn

the 20th they

William Bennett's,

in

luickinirliam,

now

Riii:hter's

tavern, Ccntreville,

when

3Ir.

Hart gave bond


liis

in four

Inmdrcd

pounds were William Bennett and Thomas Folwell. approved the same day. Tie was still county treasurer in In April of tluit year he addressed a letter to the 1781.
President of

for tlie faithful discharge of

duties.

The securities The bond was

tlie State, to inquire wdiethcr lie should pay the a a for each recruit dollar enlisted. On sergeants piece they

the 10th of 3Iav he wrote President Reed,


for the

<rivin<r his

reasons

want of success
ISth of July

in

On

the

lie
ti>

recruiting men for the army. received a letter from Timothy

3[atlack requiring

him

make

provision for certain recruits

which captain Claypole was authori^.ed to enlist. The 22d of October, 17<S1, while Mr. Hart was treasurer of Bucks county, he was robbed of a considerable amount of
This event created great commotion at the public money. The county-seat was then at Newtown, where the time.
office

was kept, and where Mr. Hart resided. The perpetrators of this ontrage were notorions cluu-acters of the county,
and declared outlaws. The active Ned Connard, Robert Steel, Georire two AVoodwards, one named Paul, Aaron and ]\[oses
tories

some of them known

men were
Burns,

said to

be

Doan, and Jesse and Solomon Yickers. Other persons \\ho were not present, but assisted in laying the plans for accomIt took plisliing the robbery, received part of the money. ])ef)re the at^enqit was made, place on a 31on(lay night. Moses Doan rode tlirough the village to see if the situation

iiisiuKv or

iiii:

II

M;r

;ii.v.

'>!

^vn> favi>r:il>le

aiiil

to call

on an accompli. -i'.

'J'licv caiiic

into

town
Hart,

alxiiit

ton o'clock
livc(l

iiiul

surroiiinlcil tlic <]\\c!Iiii^ of

Mr.

who

in

tlic^

lioii-c

torncrly ouneil ainl occnpieil


liclicvc still ])cloni:> to liis
.-ciitlncl

bv

.Vbraliani iJoiul, an<l

which wo

laiiiily.

Jcsso Vickers -was


ot"

]laccil

at

tlic
A\'i

the hack

the ]iou>c. while Steel, the ])o;in~,


into the house.
to

gate at Midwards,

ami

I'aiil

Ment

They

ci.inpell(,'<l

^Ir.

Hart

an<l his

t'aiiiily

up
u]i

stairs atel got ^\hat


t(

remain quiet hy money was


iiK.ire.

tlireats,
thei'e.

while they went Tluy then went

the

office,

at the court hon.-e,

and obtained con>ideiable


citizen in

which they broke open, Un the way they met a

the street whom tluy ma<le a pri.-oner and took with them, and Solomon A'ickers was plact'il over him as guard
at the ctjrner
"\\'riirhtst(.twn
ot"

the

jail.

It

i>

said the robbers

went

to th.e

school

house, whei'e tliev

divi(le(l

the spoils.
shares, each

The nionev was

(livide<l into

t'ourteen or titteen

one reeeiviu'T alxjut ^14(1


sylvania currency.

in s]ecie,

and some

sixtv in
ot"

rennati'air,

The Doans were

at tlie liead
li\ iiitr

the

and one John Tond)leson or

Toiidin.-^'n,

near Newtown,

harbored them while making their arrangements.

t'cw

rears aiio 3Irs. Elizabeth Honixh, dauixliter ot"^Fr. Ilait. wh(>

was about seven


author
liouse
lier

of age at that time, related to the 'I'he money at the recollections of the event.
yeai's

was in the room where herself and the rest of tlie chil"W'lun tlie rol)bers entered the ro. .m dren were sleeping. Some of the children beu-an to crv, when one of them .-aid,

"Don't be
2oini>- to

afraid, children,

we

will not hurt

\<<\\,

we

are only
father.''

take the

monev
int<i

ui>

to

the

otlice

to

vour

Several

men came

the room.
lu'd
t<i

^Ir-.

Hough

thip.ks
in.

they

took a pillow case from the


alst> thiidvs

put the nioiu'y

She

they woie

hei' father's

great-coat U{ to the otlice,

the peo[ile \vliom they might mei't would believe it w-as tlie trea>urer liin;>elf. "When they entered the house
so
tliat

Ixobert

Tlioma.-, a TieighlKT,

was

>itting

talking with Mr.

60

irisTORV or rnr: nArrr FAMrrr.

Hart, and raided up to into his .<cat again and

g-d,

Imt the latter pulled him dowTi

kcj^t liini thore.


]\[r.

Three years

after^vard

Hart

aj^plicd to tlie legislature

for the passage of a law relieving him from the payment of The State appointed Francisthe amount of money stolen.

^lurray,

John

Carr, and Alexander

who
make
;Mr.

"Were joined

with

.Tose[ih

Hughes commissioners, Thomas, a member of the


matter anri
the statement of

House, who were authorized


report.

to in\estigcT,te the

Hart,

The following is a copy of made under oath and subscribed

before the

com-

missioners, viz

examination of John Hart, treasurer of the county of Bucks, respecting tlie robbery of the treasury on the night
of the 22d of O(;tobcr, 1781, takeu the 9th day of January,

"The

1784

"Who
kitchen

saith

22d day of October, 1781,


tire,

That about 10 o'clock of the evening of the as he was sitting at supper by hishis house-keeper ^lary

in

company only with

Hellings, and Robert Thomas, one of his neighbors, the door (which had been shut and latched) was nncerimoniously

opened, and a number of men, unknown, armed with various weapons, instantly intruded themselves into the house, forminir a semicircle around th-e exftminant and those with him.
salutation (on seeing the latter rise at the first " of the Keep your seats, good people.'* door) was, opening this examinant, accompanyingat a now pointed pistol They

Their

first

the same with other menaces, and a variety of hasty questions, respecting who lived there, what arms were in the house, and

where, and whether the examinant had not charge of the This they said they were come for, and were public money. resolved to have. spare candle lying, on the table, one

with several othersu[> and lighting it raji and staJrs theiu-e the into up (leaving a guard of two parlor, men behind them). There they broke sundry locks in search
of

them took

it

of

tlie

moncv, which having found, they bore or sent

all

awav.

IIISTUUV

nr

Tin; IIAIM iAMH.V,

CI

toi:jetlior

with some

iii'iiioy an<l

otlxT

article.tliiis
t<>

private jTojtcrty.
caiiic

That having
tlie
liiiii

fniiijiU-te"!

the

riil)lt(.ry

tar, tliey

to

exainiiiant
cli'sely

ami

<leiiiaiiileil

the key
iii't

the otiicc, nue.-tioiieil


atnl

whether he
i*r

ha<l

any unM,

wlietlier

it

wa.- at

the Ikhisc
lie

wliich
at the

To all othce, or uinh'r lock an<I key. to that hiinselt' he ha<l aii>wer. uhliireil thoUi:;ht g(M
and that
it

<ithce,

was not innler lock


lanthorn arnl

an<l key.

partv

now went
it

off, takiiig a

caii'lle

with them,

ami

as

where
tity of

at'terwanl appearcil to exariAinant, entered the <:ithee, having broken oju'n a <le.~k, they rol.l)eil it of a (]nan-

money

it

containe<l, hoth
;

only a few small pieces had been ?o particular,

silver, leaving ahout which they goM with a considerahle sum of State

pa[>er

ami

hut that the

money, esca^^ed

their search.

This heing done, ami after

having kept the examinant and associates nn<ler guanl, as he thinks upward of three hours, they let"t his Iiou.-e, hut in so
cau-tious a
final

manner, that he could not know the time t.'f their departure, as some of them were heard loitering out of

doors,

on hoth

sides of the house, a considerable time after

This examinant further saith, they had all gone out of it. that at the time of said robbery, he had good reason to believe the perpetrators were between twelve and twenty in
nund>er, as he freipiently saw live or six of them together, and at the same time heard others of them, both in doi)r6 and
j

without,

who were

not in sight, and further, that by the said

robbery the said examinant was deprived of the precise sum of 735. 17. 0."; in hand money which belonged to the effective
'
'

'

supplies for the }ear 17S1; and that as to the time during which he had the same on hand, he liegs leave to refer to a copy of his ea>h account, for that tax, which he says exhibits

the true date of

all

hi-

recei[its

ami payments on account


is

thereof to the niirht of the r^'bherv (which cop\


eubjoined).

hereunto
list,

That with respect


to alK>ut
t'
I

to

the

State

money

(which belonged
that
it

to the public,) this


.")'>7

examinant further

saith,

il

amounted

according' to the best esti-

(32

HISTOID' OF Tin; u.wit family.

Illation in liis

power
"id

to

make, and wliolly appertained


8tli

to the

geveral taxes levied in continental


tirst

class

and

and

money, but eliietly to the monthly, one-third whereof was

received by hiiu in September preceding the robbery, and about two-thirds whereot" within the month of October when
the robberv Wcvs committed
saith not,
'"

and further

this

examinant
ITart.*'

(Signed)

" Joiix

was subsetpiently passed for his relief, though I was not done until after his death. The affair Some of the caused irrcat trouble to himself and family. arrested and in this robberv were afterward parties eniraijed
bill

believe

it

brought to punishment.

I believe that

Tomblesoii was sub-

sequently hanged for a graver oifenee. John Hart had a taste for poetry and occasionally indulged Ke sent some of his efi'usions to his uncle in its composition.
Oliver, at Charleston, S.
as

C,

for his opinion of their merits,

he was considered a proper judge. In his uncle's letter to his father, dated July 17th, 17G1, he writes, "I have not yet made my remarks on John's poetry, but hope to do so by
next opportunity."
sion

This was
it is

eiorhteen years of ao-e, but

when he was a young man, not known whether the pas-

continued
it

^N^either is

when he reached his more mature years. known what was the 0}>inion of his uncle Oliver

about his youthful productions, for the "rcmaiks" promised to Ills father have not come under mv notice.

H..

I.

uisi-i.KY <tr Tin: iiAur r.vMir.Y.

(.;:'.

C H A

PT

VAl

[,

J-^OHN
\:JJ^
ot"

llAIiT .ltd
yt\in>

:it

Nowt'u-n.

tfie ocli ot'

June, 17SG,
early a^e
besi'le

two

bct">ro lu> Iu->uortvl t";itUcr, at the

torty-tUreo, in the
iti

prime

ot"

uuuihi-"i'h

and

\\:\< hii'l

hi^ anvestors

the

oM

iriave ;j:i""^nul at

nitharn^'t'ni.

P<vtor

Planning, president ot' Uh'-"le l^hui'l e'lle:ie. nieuri"U5 in his ace<nuit of a i<MU-ney he nunh' l'> Thi^a h'!phia. in 177v\ that

he "rearheJ .John Uart'?,


V.

ecf'piire.

at

NeuTown. two

o'elock,

M.,

Jnne
raia.

"i'nh

was vh^taiued jhe ni^ht by

a sea^'niaMe
:u:a:n sr.>p:-iC'l

heavy

anl

treate'l tno-t hvst'irah'v."

He

over night. with Mr. Hart the 27th ot" July, reriirnin,: to Plhladelphia trotu H'^pewelh New Jersey, whither he haJ

been on a

visit.

He had seven

children, five son?

and two

dariirlirjrs,

sriz

^V^lUanl, wluwlievl in intancy.

William -d.

Eli-a''ei:h. Joi^eph.

John. Oliver, wh't

die^l

when

Thrte

sons, William. Jivsoph

aii't

three days old. an^.l Kuphemia. J'-hn and his tw.> da ij:h:ers

isurvived him.

Ot" these ehilb/e'-i.

AVil'iam

Isr.

who

dievl

at

the ai^

ot"

ele\ en,

and William
His wi'l
bet'-^re
biis

John

in

Warminster,

atvl J.;-epli. Kli.:aborh.

in Chester eount\.
176t>, a
t"ew

Sourhamptou. and Kupheruia was exceutel the oOth ot" 3Iav.


death.

'Jd.

were born

in

days

He had
lett
**

but a small

estate to leave.

KIi.;Hbeth
steads,

daughter Hart one feather bed with grceu high-poste'l "' curtains and counterpane. He gu' e to his sou Wil-

Am Tig otl;er be. priests he

my

i;4

iiisTOiJY

OF Tin: hAut family.


to;^'etlier

liain

hh de^k and

book-case

with

all

his school

books.

"Oil condition as to the

lust only,

that he resume his

at llhode Island college, under learning and place liirnself After liis the tuition of the reverend Doctor Planning."

death the children probably removed to their grand-father's, in Warminster, as their mother had been dead some years,

and he was the person most


welfare.
I

likely to take
in this belief

an interest

in their

am

strengthened

from the circum-

stance that one of the daughters, Elizabeth, was married at Ills house a few vears later.

William, the eldest son, studied medicine, but I am not informed whether he comjjleted his scholastic studies at

Khode

Island college, as requested in the will of his father. studied his profession in Philadelphia, and was there in At the suggestion 179i3, when the yellow fever was so fatal. of his uncle Joseph he left the city until the disease had

He

abated,

when he

retui-ned

and finished
is

his studies.

In a

letter to him, dated Philadelphia,

September

17th, 179/3, he

writes,

"The

city at this awful time

very far fi'om being

In the same letter he meneligible place of residence." tions that he "is going out of town this afternoon to spend a

an

few days with Dr. Wistar."


at a
at

While

in

the citv he boarded

Mr. White's in the northern Newtov/u.

liberties.

He

settled iu

practice

On

the 31st of October, 1800, he

married Maria Irwin, daughter of tlie reverend Nathaniel His Irwin, and had issue, a daughter, who died in infancy.
wife died the 28th of September, 1802, two months after her infant daughter. He probably made Newtown his place of

residence until he was taken with his last

illness,

when he

removed

to the

house of his father-in-law.

appointed him register

Governor Snyder and recorder of the county June 1st,

He tilled 180.i>, and re-appointed him I'ebruary 14th, 1809. these two offices to his death. He probably never practiced medicine to any extent. In the winter of 1810 he pui'chased
the farm of his ;incle
Sila-;,

in AVanriinster, fbi'

the

sum

ul'

msTi^UY or THi:

hakt
siiuu''

r.vMn.Y.

Gr>

tfi'rty

tl(>ll;iTs

per

M-vc.

It is

tlio

iiov
it.

(twiu'd

li\

Isaac.

Hobousai'k.
April
(ith,

lit-

iu'\iT

lixod

iipon

Uis will

is

dated

18U>.

His hrotlicr-iK-]a\<, Xathanicl Irwin, was

his doputv.
^Ir. Irwin, his t^^tlu'r-in-law,

was

a distirguisliod character

lli> was horn in Chester day. CiUinty, in 17.")(;. and >vas of Scotch-Irish descent. He graduated at the college

in

liis

of

New
ot'

Jersey

in

177(\ studied thccdoixv and was licensed to


lie

in jtreai'li

177'_\

was
mTiS

settU^l at
t<

Xesliumlny i-hnrch, the


pri^udi
hiri^e

1st

May, 1774, and I'ontinued


1812.

there until his

death, in

He

man

o\'

infurniatiiMi,

and

possessed great inthieuce, hotli in the i-hurch and out ot' it. He was a noted politit'ian, and at ono time his wi>rd was all

powerlul
county.
eloeteil,

in the forinati(^u

i^t'

tlie

OiMnocratic ticket

in

Hucks

He was strongly urged for congress a few years before his death, and C(Mild easily have heen n(>niinated and
hut dei'lined the honor.
first

He was

a great patron of
to

the Sciences, and was the


the
inveutvir

who gave encouragement

Fitch says, John Fitch, that while he was M-tching the revolutions of Mr. Sintcm's chaise-wheels, as he followed behind it one Sunday returning
of the stcand>oat.

from listening
struck

to

one

ot'

Mr. Irwin's >ernhuis, the idea


l)c

tirst

him

that a boat

He by wheels. from Xewtown, and the new


tixed at

ju'opi^lled tluough the water ij.n'ght was active in the removal ot' the ccnmty-seat
site
is saiil

to

have been

ir.ainly

Ib^ lived in the Dovlestown throui^k .bis intluence. B. now owned Sanmel white house W'ilgus, on the by hirge Dovlestown and Willow (uvu-c turujMke, a mile below ^Var-

He dictl there, and probably rington, in that townthij*. that w;us his re^illence the greater [Kirt of the tinao ho was
;it N^eshaminy. Dr. William Hart had a great-uncle, Silas, wh(> lived aiul <iied ill Virginia, childless, towanl the close ot' the last cen-

pa-stor

turv,

lea\ iuiT

ciuisiderable

estate.

The

diH'tor

eviilentlv

expected

to receive part

of this estate on the death of the

CC
iiru'lo,

ni.s-mr:v

or mi.

ii

\i;i

r.vMir.v.

jii(I;.:;iiig

fr<)ni
In'

the tenor of a \oMov fo his

iin<!t; .foscplr,

uiltffii

uliilc
ciikfi'

\Vii,><

hhidvlng
1

rticcliciiu;

in

IMiilmU^ljiliia.
jctiu'^ili

IJiuUt
of
Ft

olMulv
:iii<i

If It,

7iUJ, lie writes,

"At

<*<j)y

flic lu^t will


:i|nt':irH

f('-fatinMif <if Illicit* Sil:i?>


jturf

lliuf lius !irri\(!<i.


is

tliut

the [triiuipul
to the

of his

<,'>tufe

deviled for

hettt.'r jMtrju)sc'H

than the tiiuiuifucturirig dcx'tors,"


left

The

<!.st!it(j

in rpiestion

was

IMiiludelphiM

na[>tist assoeiafioii.

He

died

rin^rtoti

I'Uh of Anjrn^t, 1810, at Mr. Irwin't., in W'arwith hin dt^ath hivH immediate brnrieU to\\ii>hi|i, and
the

He of the Hart family became extinct. the ofHce of rejri^ter by John I'ngh, uho
Auguht
will of
3li!t,

wm

sueeeeded

in

was*

appc)itited

1810.

Hiji

lujit

onieiul act
2();h.

\vaj

recording the

William

Htacklioiij^e,

Jidv

The
of

eldest danj^liter of

John Hart,

Kli/abeth, wa*^ married

to I>r, Silas Houj^h.


lisane

'I'hey

were cousins.

He whs
the;

the son

grand-daughter hi. Hough progenitorof the family in Ameri<-a, JTOtJ. were married wuij born the 8th of I'ebruary, l'<'y the 20th of JIarch, IVl'l, at tluj house of her uncle, Joseph
of the
first
I

Hough, who

marri(Kl Kdith Iluif,

Hart,

in

at Pennepaek. liaptist minister studied medicine and pra^;tic(>d

Warminster, by the reverend 8:unuel Jone-. I). They ha<l uo is;sue.


in

!.,
II'

Montgomery and ihicUs


lb
revererul
:

counties, but afterward turner! his attention to theology.

wa baptised May
license<l
l^^^i!.

8tli,

175)0,

by

the;

Mr.

White;
in

to
In

preach
]^(''~)
lif.'

in

Au^ru^t,

]S(\'.\

and ordained

June,

Montgomery Baptist duties of the pastoral otlice and practiced in his profession for eighteen years, among the same |)eople- A chronicler of the church says, "His reputachurch, wheie he dis<,'harged
tlui

was called

to

the

tion for social arul religious

worth was excellent."

The second

Sun<lay church at

in

March, 1818, he was stricken with jialscy in the New Jiritain. After this he was able to pre.ach but a

few times.
erend

He

died suddenly on the

ith of

May,

182.'},

and
rev-

AVHS buric'd in
J<^t^epli

tli<;

Montgomery

iiaptist

gra\e yard.

The

Mathias, his personal

tricrul, |>reache<| his t'uneral

HitsTuuv or Tin; iiai;t lAMir.v.

G7

pernion.

I lis

Midow

sur\i\'o<l liiin ii(?arly

torfy ycnis.

She

Xorristown, tlie .3(1 t)t' July, iSflO, ag<'(l eiglity-spveri and nine days. She is sai<l tn have been one of the years most beautiful WDnien of her time, and .-In.' retained lier
:it

died

beautv
"svas

in a

remarkable detrrec to Ikt death.


an<l

Her

disposition

her features were eoniely. the third died unmarried. sun, John, the tVmrtli Joseph,
as as

sweet

amiable

son, nuirried a daui^hter of


left

numerous descendants.
180.'').

Joshua and Tiachel Duncan, and They were married the 2Sth of
.Tacksoiiville,
in

April,

He

lived

at

Northampton

township, Bucks county, where he carrieil on an extensive business as farmer and inerchaut. He was a man of Lrreat

He was several times elected and nuu'h respected. and had considerable influence in local politics. county auditor, He died in IS41. lea\ing children and grandchililren. They
integrity

intermarried

with

the

families

of

Bonham,

lUe,

liobb,

Johnson, Pierce, Fetter,

and Shelmire,

and have had a

number

of children.

Charles B., son of .T<jshua and ^lartlui


Jfeisev cavalrv durinir

Hart, was a soldier in the tirst Xew the late war, and died at camp Custus,
in

December, old homestead


his

ISlJl.

ne:u- Alexandria, \'a., William, the second son, lives on the in Xortham[>tou township, which he purchased

at

father's

death.

^'irginia,

and purchased
mari-ied.

where he

few years ago John removed to farm a few miles behjw Petersburg, In ^lay, 1S()4, he was conscripted into
a

the confederate arniy and served until the close of the war. He was Piu't of the time he drove a bairuaire wairon.

taken prisoner during the concluding operations around Kichmond, and was confined f>r some time a prisoner of war at Hart's i,-land. New York harbor. .Joseph settleil in about twenty-ti\e miles from i"'airfax county, A'irginia, the war he was several times city. During "Washington
tiiken prisoner
fineil

by the two contending armies, but never con-

church.

He resides no;ir Falls any great length o\' time. He married Jane Pierce, of Yates countv. New

68
York, and
four
luis

niSTOKY OF THE

flAPa' FA.Mll'A*;

two

cliiUlren living.

His brother John hasthe vonnrrest

ehihhen,

'rhonias

llnniphrev,

son

of

John Hart, is en>r:iircil in the niercuntile business at AddisA son of WiUiaui is pursuing hisville, in Bucks county.
studies at llut<2:ev college,

Xew Jersey,

The husbands

of the
ofi"

daughters are farn\ers, and the desceiulants of this braaich. the family occupy a highly respectable position in life.
Silas Hart, the third son of -as

bom

in

Warminster, Qctobei' 4tb, 1747.

his

youth and but little of his 29th of January, 1770, he intermai-ried with Maiy Daniel, as will be seen by the following copy of his marriage eertificate, the original of whic-li is in the possession of his descendants, viz
:

Joseph and Elizabeth Hart,. Nothing of manhood is known. On the


rr.r

twenty-ninth day of Januai-y, in the year 1770, before me, Peter Peterson VanHorn, minister of the gospel,
personally csime Silas Hart, of Warminster, in ye connty of Bucks, and ]\Iai'y Daniel, of Lower Dublin, in the comity of Philadeljiliia, both in the province of Pennsylvania, they

"The

having obtained a license under the Imnd and seal of the honorable John Penn, esqp., heutenant governor, &c., of the province aforesaid; And. did solenndy enter into acovenant of marriage,
in.

consequence whereof I did thera


"V\ritn<iss

pronounce man and


year above
std.

wiie;

my
.

hand the day and

Ten

""Peter Peterson YanHorn." (Signed) children were the issue of this miU'riaiie Elizabetlu

born September, 21st, 17G9 Rachel, born September 22d, 1771; Hamuih, born December 30th, 1772; ;^lyn^ born 1773;
;

and Silas, Oliver, William, Sarah, and Ellen. Silas Hart was a farmer, and lived and died in A\rarniinster, near where he was born.- I have not been: aJjle to discover the date of
his death nor that of his wife.sale in 1807, but I

do not know whether


nuule that year

His farm was advertised for it was sold at that

time.

An

old survey

by

Isiuic

Hicks, of

HLSTor.v fr Tr;

uwiv

F.\>rir.v.

f/J

Xewtdun,
laiils

states tluit

it

cuiitaiiiLMl 7.")] arrcs,

ami was liouridcd

Hart, I'lnnnas Fiilwell, Benjamin by Jainesi and <itlier laixls* of saiil vSilas Hart. Trave.-, Jones,
^\'ilIi,ll^

of Dr.

Tliis

is

the same farm


is

tl^at

va,->

lately owne'l 1>v

Amos Snyone
a later

der,

and

s^ituato

on the Bristol road,

in \Vai-minster,

mile from Joluisville.


period,
it

At

liis

deatli, or perlia[>s at

fell

iutd tlvc

hands of

his eldest son, Siliu-,

where he
a verhal

died, snddeiilv, the !Uh of Aiiiru.-t, Isl4.


will

He made
;

on

his death-l>od, ]>y


his del>ts,
ti)

which he
were.

left his estate, after the

payment of
n<'t

his three sisters present

hut

am
and

intormed which

tlunt<i

have not been able


in

trace the descenilants of Silas

a satisfactory maniier, because of the imperfection of the family record. Kli/.abcth, the eldest danghter, married William Powers, of Bhilailelphia, ]\Iay 2d, 17i)3, and

Mary Hart

had
IS

issue

seven children

Sarah, Elizabeth and Rachel.


11.

Ann, Eu[themia, Mari;u Joseph, AVilliam Powers died .Tnly 13tli

Rachel, the secor\d daughter marrfeil William Ciilbert,

of Piiiladelphia, April :50th, 17!9, and had two children, William Duncan and SihL> Ilart. The former died at the age ot*

nineteen

the

latter luvs

been twice nuirried and


wit'e w;is

is

living in

Philadelphiiu
Ills

His

first

Caroline

Ann Wihon, and

second Jane

^[itchell.

He

h;us

been the father of ten

Rachel Hart and William children, eight of whom are living. Gilbert were cousins. Oliver, the second son, married ]\[ary
Randall, about
1810, and had three children,
first

John,

Julia,

Ann,
living.

atid

Charles, the

and

hist

nnmed

of which are

A\'illi;uii,

the third sou, uMiiTied Elizalteth Randall,


issue, Silas,

about 1807, and had

Abraham and

^lary.

His

wife was probably a sister of his brother Oliver's wit'e. The Beventh and youngest daughter, Ellen, married Dr. Thomas
]?achelor, of Ma>,-achusetts,

who was

a surtrecMi in

wneral

CJates, durinif the

revolutionarv war.

thearmvof Thev had na


AVarminster,

children.

After

his

marriage

he settled

in

^\here he continued to

resiile imtil his

death, whith occurred

70
the
14tli

III6T011V

or THH

II

ART FAMIF.Y. His


reniiilns
lie

of

Septeml)cn-,

1823.

in

tlie

YaTii^ant tamily graveyard, near Jolmsville, in that tcnvnship, where a phiin tomb-stone ^vas erected to his memory. I

have only been able

to obtain

the dates of the birth and

death of fonr of Sihis Hart's ehihhen.

His deseen(huits are

nnmerons, and intermarried into the faniihes of Livezey, I'arker, Feaster, 3Iorris, Faunce, A\'ilson, MitcheH, Jiidaman,
Clothier, Twining, Webster, VanTIorn, majority of them reside in Philadelphia
<ki'.,

<kc.

''i'lie

great

and the

vicinity.

Avas

Josiah Hart, the fourthsou of Joseph and Elizabeth Hart, born at the tamily mansion in Warminster, the 17th day

of Jnly, 1749.

His yonth was passed, no

doid)t, like that of

his brothers, in assisting in the labors of the plantation, with ILe was the usual attendance on the neighborhood schools.

married

at the a^re of

twentv-uine vears to a dauffhter of one

of the best families in that section of the country.

The

Southampton Baptist church, from which have been obtained niauy of the facts embraced in this volume,
records of the

thus

tell

the storv, viz

"Josiah Hart (son of Joseph Hart, of Warminster township, Bucks comity, esquire) was married to ]Miss Nancy

Arthur Watts, of Southampton, county aforesaid) January ye 11th, 177G, by the reverend John Blackwell, after being published three Sabbaths at Southampton meeting." Nancy Watts was born the 5th of

Watts (daughter of

]Mr.

in Southampton, and was only seventeen She months old at the time of her marriao;c. years and three was a lineal descendant of the celebrated i)r. Isaac AVatts. The first ancestor of Nancy Watts who came to this country, was John A\'atts, who was born at Leeds, Kent county,

October,

1759,

England, November 3d, lOGl.

He

landed and settled in


1G8G.

Lower Dublin,

Philadel[>hia county, in

On

the 23d

He of February, 1687, he was married to Sally Eaton. and at the same church the Pennepack year, Baptist joined
was baptised by
P^lias

Keacli,

Xovember

1st.

He became

HISTuKV

<!

Tin; IIACT FAMIF.V.

71

lie wa> elected to the pastor (f tills clninli :it>fr Kcadi lft"r. otHce December l."'')tli, lii'.Xi, 1)\it \vas in>t ordaind t>ii account

of the dislike enteitainc'l

I'll-

Kt a'h.

who

on the occasion, as no one el.-e was (jualiticd. Pliila lelphia, K!!)."), he was invited to {.reach In
]3ai>tist

imi-t he einjiloved In A|>ril,


at

the

tirst

church, which he

diil

oeca>ionally to his ileath.

He

died at Penne[>ack, of ^inall-[io\, AuLTii-t L'7th, 1702, and was buried at Cold SorinL:-, near lhi>tol, in Ihuks countv. He

was a
talent

in;in

of good under.-tainling and a tine sj>eaker.


jiublic

His

for

^lorgan
scholar."

Edwards

s])eaking says of

tirst

brouLrht
that

him

him into notice, he was "an EnLrlish


Davies Di.-abled," in

He

wrote a book entitled

'

answer

t<~

what were considered the heresies of reverend


pi-eacher.

William Davies, a Keirhiaii


catechism in
17<ii.

He

also published a

He

ordained Samuel J(mes,


Mi".

Mr.

\\'atts

had

(juite

a
in

contest
Dil'S,

with

Davies.
t'alse

whom

he excom-

nnmicated

because of his

doctrine.

Davies

charged him with iniijuity in his exf-oninmnication, anil challenged him t<) a public discussion of the [M.infs he considered heresies. This was declined, but .Mr. \\'att> proposed
to leave the eipiity of his ci>nduct to the decision of six

men,

whi<-h

was

airreeil
l'.')d,

t(.

house, ^lay

l(!i)i),

Thev met at the Keithian meetimr when Mr. Watts and his church were

justitied, and an instrument of writing given to that eflect. The mn['ires chosen by !Mr. \\'atts were, one Inde^'cndent

and two Presbyterians: autl those <'f Mr. Davies three EpisThe immediate ancestor of Xani-y ^^'atts [uirchased co[)alians.
a tract of about two hundred acres of land, from AVilliam
l*enn, situate in the up[)er

minstcr townshi[>

line.

believe

end of Southampton, on the A\'arall this tract is now u\vned

bv

jreneral

marriage.

John Da\ is, whose wife wa> a d.ui:^hter of this The Mite of dosiah Hart was si-ter of ^Villiam

Watts,
ter

tor

many

Se.-sious,

and afterward

years prothonotary and clerk of the Quarassoi-iate iudire of the Connuon

Picas of Piucks count\'.

72
Tlie father of
liis

nrsnmY or
.Fdsiali,

Tin;

hart

famit.v.

as already metitioncd in tlie skcteli of Dr. the of life, grist mill, iiow the property in ^lorehind "VViUiani Hullowell, on the Pennopuck creek,

owned

]Jy deed bearing date April township, ^[ontgoniery county. i)th, 1777, he granted and confirmed this property to his son.

He

probably moved to the mill immediately on his marriage,


nearly

He lived there twenty years. the warmest period and during through the revolutionary war, he was obliged to sleep in the wood at night to keep from
where he resided

He was purfalling into the hands of the British and tories. sued because of his known activity in the cause of the colonies*
partook of the patriotism and enthusiasm of his father, and of all his sons Josiah was the most active and energetic

He

during the Revolution.


militia

He was
"

captain of one
as

of the

companies,

or

associators,"

they were then


in
'

known, of Philadelphia, ]Moreland township being then

that county. In January, 1776, one Thomas Austin, a member of the committee of Philadelphia county, charged " with havins; uttered many declarations inimical to the cause of

American

liberty,

and tending

to excite groundless fears

and
\

apprehensions in the minds of the good people of this province," was cited to appear before the committee on the 6tli
of February, and Josiah Hart was subpcrned as a witness, Mr. Austin appeared, apologised, signed a declaration of
retraction,

and promised

to say

nothing

in future reflecting

on
)

the public nieasures of the country. on the committee.

He

resigned his place


'

Belonging to captain Hart's company was a "Fugleman," named William Scout, with whom he had a slight dithculty.
probably brother of the somewhat famous James an eccentric and well-known character of that period, Scout, who bore the soubriquet of "C(be Scout" to the day of his
death.
jjay
It aj)j)ears that the

He was

him

the wages allowed

wiptain refused or neglected to by the "connnittee on battalion


a
petiti(,)n

exj^enses."

Scout presented

to

the

legislature

iiisToiiY

or

nil; ii.\i;t famit.v.

74
directions

>3cttin"" fortli,

"Tliut
lia<l

tlir

jictitioiuM' nL'i'or;iMo to tlic

of the House,
][\\n

to

]'a_v

on cai^tnin .r"i>i;ili Flart aiiil re<[uested the account allowed by the eoiiiinittec to tlic
waitcil

iH'titii>iicr tor his

services us fnglemaii to the

company

of the

said Hart, and that the captain had absolutely


jiient

refuse<l

pay-

of the s;un(\''

The House took


and
:

the petition under immediate consideration

fi>rtln\itli brought Bar of the House by the sergeant-at-arms to answer The speaker for his contempt o{' the order of the House." issued a warrant, which was delivered to the serireant-atarms to be executed. On the Oth of April the committee

"Resolved: That the said Josiah Hart be

to the

on battalion ex}>enses reported to the Hnuse, that in obedience to the order of the sergeant-at-arms captain Hart ha-i appeared before thetn and "paid all the e\[)eiHes incurred by
las late

misconduct

:"

whereupon the House ordered

that he

be discharged without a[>pearing befn-e the Bar. "Cobe Scout," nicntioned in this connection, was well

known

throuirhout

all

the surrnundinLT countrv.

He was

.'iilver-sniith

by trade,

and traveled from

j'lace to place follow-

ing his calling. I have seen a nundter of silver spinous made by him, M Inch the housewives of olden times considered better

than could be obtained elsewhere. They possessed the virtne of being made of pure metal, and many of tJiem have descended
troni

mother

to

daughter as precious heir h>oms.

He was

also

a gun-smith, and

some of

his

long

ritles

are

still in

existence.

carried one of these famous long guns while a soldier in the revolutionarv war. The irrandfather of the writer wit-

He

ne-sed one of his It occurred exploits with hi- unerring ritle. while the American wc-t Iniid-c o[' the I the a;-my tK-cupie J T!ie latter were Delaware, and the H'.'s-i:in- lay at Tri'nt.m.
in the habit

and

then

of coming d )wn to the river tor water, and now wouhl maki' insultiuLr irestures at our soldiers.
;

^cout Could not stand this

so one dav he

drew

his

ritie

on

10

74

iirsToKv oriiii;

halt

iwMir.v.

the iinp\i(lent fellow wlio gave the aflVont, and sliot lilid This wa^ coii^idcreil a great shot and added to the dead.

To shout a man across the Delaware in reputation of Seout. those (lays was considered a great feat with the ritle, but
would not be thought an extraordinary shot with some
of our

modern

firearms.

Scout

u-ed

to

live

at

Charles

the farm owne<l by A\'illiani \'ans;int, in "Warminster, half a mile west of Davisville, and worked ia an old log blacksmith shop, a portion of which is still
Garrison's,
standina-.

now

He was

intimate with

memory, and is said to model of a steamboat. The first boat was Hoateil on the mill dam on the Watts plantation, just over the township line
in

John Fitch, of steamboat have assisted him to build his first

Southampton.

In April, 1795, Josiah Hart sold his null property on the Pennepack to John Shelmire, of Horsham township, and soon afterward removed to the saw-mill and farm now owned

by general Davis, in the remainder of his

Southampton township. Here he spent life. I do not find any mention of his aiul it seems that he devoted his held public office, having He died the 2.5th of entire time to farmiuir and milling. October, 1800, at the age of 51 years, and was buried His adminisin the old Southampton Baptist grave yard. trators v/ere his brother Joseph Hart, and his brother-inThe settlement of his estate was filed law, William Watts. the 2d of February, 1807, which states his jiersoual property to have amounted to .$.'5,152.24, of Mhich amount there was
the

sum

payment
silver

of $2,270.44 to be divided among his heirs after of his debts. It is mentii>ned in the inventory of
effects, that

his personal

his

watch

at

valuation,

$1.3. .3.3."

"son William Hart took his His widow' died 3Iarch

1815, at Doylestown, of typhus fe\er, contracted of her Her father, .Vrthur "Watts, by his son, wdiile nursing him.
2d,
will,

dated October Kith, ISOI), left to her the Southampton where he died, and also llie tract

farm
in

in

War-

iii.sT.)i;v (.>r

riii;

hai.i

lAMir.v.

7^3

luiii.stcr,
l)iith
ill

contaiiiiiii; tit'tcea

;'.cro-,

a'ljoiiiin_'.

Tliev avo iiuw

dt'licr S'iri-in-la\v, irencral D.ivis. ]i<is>os.>i.)n


.-ix

Josiah Hirt hal


of
mIhhii
tlic

chiMroii, no ><>n
to

aiiil
I

five

(laughters,

lu'Xt

yoimire-t
at

dio

in

other cliiMrtMi were


Leth, Kel'i'ci'a,
vouiiirest

HvitiLj

hi- <h'ath, \\/.:

S
2il

intam-y.

The
was
tlie

irah, p]H/.aS'>u

Amy,

ainl

^^'^llIarn ^\'atts.

The

1790.

Januarv, His father intemled him fur the bar, and lie wa-j
faiiiilv,
<>f

of the

and was horn the


llo

educated for

tliat

pnr[>ose.

wa-

a student at the
tini-lied
liis

Doylcs-

town academy
studies
in

in

ISO!!, or 1S()7,

and

aeadeniic

of Eiios

Morris,

the city of Phihidelphia. He entered the ottice of Newtown, ah^ut LSll, with es(|uire,

^vhonl he studied law: and mi his


practice on
tlie

>ti(>n

wa> almitted

to

He opened an ottice in .Tune, iSlo. which the harl just been plaee county-seat Doylestown, He was deputy removed, where lie re-idt- until his death. re<j;ister of the cnunty in 1810, under his cousin. Dr. William
3d of
to
1

Hart

and he most
duties at the
register

likely

read law and attended to his

otticial

same time.
in

deputy admitted to the bar.


thonotarv
in

and recorder

IS 13,

Mr. Pui;h appointed him soon after he was

He wa^
by

March, 1^11.

his

also appointed deputy prouncle, \\'illiam AVatts.

On

the 2Sth of February, IS 14, governor sioned him clerk of the ori>lians' court.

Snyder commis-

When
He joined
of colonel

the British
fall ot'

army threatened

rhiladel[>hia. in the

summer and

1814, ^Ir. Hart volunteered his services.

^vas elected tirst lieutenant.

the com[>any of captain Magill, of Doylestown, and He was afterwar<l made adjutant
of volunteer
rifle-

Thomas Humphrey's regiment

men,
the

in

fall

which capacity he served through the campaign of He wa> mustered out of service in of that year.

December, and returned home and resumed practice. In the fcdlowiu"- Februarv he was taken with the tvohus fever, The disease of which he died on the iMth of tiiat month. \\ith L. Dick, whom ho was contracted of his friend John

76

IIISTORV OF

Till:

HART

FA.Mir.r.

had

svatc'lied

diiriiig

his

illness until his death.

^Fr. ITartr

died at the early

aire of twentv-tive years.

He was

a youriir

man

promise, and his death, as he hsid just stepped on the threshold of life, ^yas a sad hlow to his family and
of
friends.

much

jjublic

His youth had not permitted him to acquire any reputation, but his anuable qualities and tine talents

gave great promise for the future. He died at the house of liis uncle, William Watts, in Doylesto\yn, tlie same where 3Irs.

John Fox now


servant boy
"weeks.

resides.

The

fever

was very
sister,

fatal that winter,

and besides himself,


all

his mother,

a relative,

and a

died in the same house in the space of three

His was an example where the, most flattering prosHe was the pects in life are suddenly terminated by death. most promising member of tlie family at that period.

11I8TUUV

nr

lui; i[Ai:r ^A^^lLV.

<

II

A VT K K V

I.

TlI^vATJAir,

tli.^

cM.xt

.lau-lit'M-

of Jnsiah

ami Ann" Hart,

t^C^
the 7th

intennarritMl witli Williaui Slielniire, "f Pliihuleljihia,


ot"

DoceinUer. IT'.T.
f<>ur

'L'liev

had

.seven cliildren, three

Bons and

daughters. daughter died in infancy.

others arri\ed at years of Joseph married Jane, daughter uf Charles and maturity. of Thiladelphia, Man-h 27th, 1S27, an.l ha.l Milh-r, ^lavy three children,

The The

elder-t

son

and

tlie

eldest

who married

int>

thp families of Allis"n,

James Allison, the Leland, jmd Riley, and have ehiMren. husbatul of ^lavy Jane, the eMest daughter, was horn in
Seot^ind.

Amy Hart,

Shelmire, married

John

second daughter of Sarah and "Williiuu F., son of William and Mary Purdv,

cliildren,

of Southampton, X(.)Vrmher Otli. IS2'.\, and had i.-sue three two sons and a dauirhter, of which the latter oulv is

Living,

and unmarried.

The Punlv familv was <f cousiderahle ])romineiu'e in the county. Her husbaiurs father, Willianv Purdv, commanded
a company of volunteers in the war of ISIl'; was at'terward a meniher of the legislature, and [>rothon nary, or (derk of
the court
of

Comm

mi

Plea<.

He wa>

hrotlu r-in-law

ti>

His grandfather emigratnl tV<>in Ireland an<l Joseph Hart. settled on the Pennepai.k, where he married Ciris>y Dunlap. He dreamed one singular dream is related of this couple.

uiifht that

he

wa-:

going

to

Philadel[<hia

on a great

white

78
horse,

iiisToiiV

o:-'

Tin; ii.u:t iw.miia'.

and

ii>

lie

went

l)v

Abiniiton,

on

the

Chelteiiluiin

turnpike, the hirse turned int( the grave y;ird and r()lle(L About the same riini^ his wife (h'eained that a hirije white
liorse

came and pulled down

halt"

her house.

tew days

at'terwai'd

he attended the election

at

Xewtuwn

Ihicks countv,

wdiere the poll was held tor several townships, which brought Thev were running together a huge nund)er of people. horses through the town, and while ^Ir. I*urdy was crossing

the street tliev

came suddenly
iret

ui>ou him.

He
wav

turned to
a
lai'rre

jjo

back, but betbre he could

out of the

white

horse ran ao-ainst him aiul

killetl

him almost

instantly.

Thus
in truth

was

this strauij-e

dream

fultilled,

and the white horse

did "pull

down

half her house."

Mary Ann,

the third daughter,

Philadelphia, in 1830, by whom sons and three daughters. Of these


dauijhters are married,

married Robert Xeal, of she had seven children, f(jur


to ]\[a]'y

Thomas

two sons and three Ami Smith AVil:

ham
to

to

Barbara
to

Ann
all

Ililtner; ^latilda to
:

Henry Diddlebock;

Mary Ann

Frederick ^'an Ciuntan


of Philadelphia,

and

Emma

^lathews

youngest daughter of Sarah and William Shelmire, intermarried with Uriah, son of Uriah and Rebecca Mathews, of Bucks county,

Samuel Sheetz,

liachel, the

and had four children, two of which died in infancy, leaving The son, ^lorris 31., maiTied a son and daughter living.
Caroline Cecilia Binder, of Philadelphia
;

the daughter, Sarah


^Mr.

Ann, Harry P. Duncan, of the same

city.

Duncan was

a captain in the 104th Pennsylvania regiment during the late war. "William Shelmire died in I*hiladelplila, in l83o, and
his wife the

3d of

:\Iay,

1838.

was married
five

Elizabeth, the second daughter of Josiah and .Vnn Hart, to Arthur Yerkes, of ^loreland, ]\[ontgomeiy

They had eight children, county, the 30th of March, 1797. sons and three daughters, Ann, Elias, Horatio Gates,
"William,
Isaac,

Rebecca,

Arthur Watts,

and

Elizabeth.

The

eldest

daughter, .Vnn,

married W^illiam ]Michener, of

iiisTdUV or Tin; iiaui- i-am!I.v.

i\[orelaii(l,

Ity

\\li(iiii

.-lie

Imd four
(!'

cliilflrcii,

wlio have

iiitL'i-

lunrrinl witli

tlic

taiiiilios

S[H.t!> niid ?iliiriay.

Tichecca,
ot"

the second (laughter, married (Jhri-tnphrr Krewsoii,


uiiipton,

Southdied ia

and had

issue

t\v<

(diildreii. liuth

ot"

wliicdi

^Ii-. l\ic\v>(>ii died I-lIias, the I'V-liruary ."id, 1S(!!. infancy. eldest son, married Ihurirt Kreusim, and had nine children,

^v]l()

interrnarrlcd with the iainilies of ]Iai:ernian,


a

DeCoursev,

and Lugar, and ha\e


the second son,

nundxr

of

clii'.dreii.

intermarried with
Addis.

Kh'/.a

Horatio (Jates, .Vnn, dau;;hter of


cliihlren,

Amos and Ruth


eldest son,

They had eleven

three

sons and eiudit dauuditers, of whicli ti\e dauirliters and the

Amos, are nianied and have


1>.

children.

A\'illiani,

the third son of Klizaheth and Ai'thur

"^'erkcs, internuirried

with Eli/a
dren,

Yerkcs.

of ^[orehind,

an(l

had eleven

chil-

nine

of

two daughters
issue.

whicli are living. Of these two sons and are married and have (diildrcn. Isaac, the

fourth son mtermarried with Klleii ^IcKinstrv, and had no

Arthur

^\'atrs,

the

fifth

and younge-t son, intermarried

with Charlotte Knight, of \\'armin>ter, l-'ehruary Dth, lb4.'), and had tour children, two of which are living. The eldest
son, "William

Watts Hart, was

a soldier in the

l"2Sth

Penn-

svlvania regiment aTid !o.-t a foot at the hattle of Antietani. He holds an appoiutmeiit in the (juarterma,-tcr'> department, .Vi-thur W'atls \ crimes is deceased. Eh'/.aAVashin2;ton citv.
heth, the vouniiest dauirhter, married I^aac Clark.-on .Vddis,

of Southam[iton, the she had live children,

'_M)th

of Jamiary,

184(!,

I.y

whom
Arthur
South-

the eldc>t

hcing deceased.
his

Yerkes spent the greater part of


ampton, wdiere he died
(

married
l.^O.

life

in

)cto1u'i-,

"J.")*!,

His wife died

the same day of the >amc ncnth in 1>.".1. liebecca, the third daughter of Josiali
intermarrie(l with

and Ann Hart,

\Villiam

?ililes,

of I.owi'r I)ul)h'n, Phila-

lSi7, by whom she had delphia county, Septemhcr -J-lth, which are living and marof all t\v( son> and two daughters,

so
rioil.

iiiSTOKV

01'

Tin: n akt tamiit.

'J'ho

oiliest
first
I>y

son,

Au;j;iistu>

^Vatt.s

luu

been twico

iniirried,

the

time to
both of

Leah
\vhoiii

Fislier,

and the second to


issue.

^lurtha

]>i'aiU's,

he had

He

resides

in Baltimore.

Ann

the ehlest danghter and child, married

Charles lieans, und Khxalietli, the youngest, nuirried John Both 35oile;v'i, both of Lower DubHn, \vhere they reside.
dauirhteis have children.

The

vounirest son,

Wilham

Hart,

York, and has eiii'ht children, three of whom are deceased, and one married. He lives in Brooklyn, but is in business in New York. ]\Irs.
married Catharine Carr, of Lansingburg,
died at Doylestown, the 4th of ]March, 1815, of typhus fever, which she contracted while nursing her mother. The family of 3Ir. ]Miles produced one member of more
ISIiles
]\Iiles, son of William H. He was and grandson of William and Rebecca Miles. born the 27th of October, 1834. At an early age he evinced great fondness for scientific pursuits, and much of his time

New

than ordinary mark, Edwin A.

Miles,

was spent

in exploring the mineralogical

and geological

for-

mations around Cincinnati, Ohio, where his parents resided. He was a close student, but delighted most in perusing the

He commenced to write for tlie public great book of nature. his wit, journals at the early age of sixteen ; and such were
humour, and sarcasm, that he was offered the position of associate editor of the leading comic newspaper in New York

when

but nineteen years old. of age he made a trip across the continent, During his journey he correpartly to recruit his health.

At twenty years

sponded with the

New York

2' (Hies,

and wrote an interesting

account of the Indian tribes

inhabitinii-

Utah

territory.

He

city, but not liking the he arrived in the where he on to location, California, pushed nuich He traveled throughout that State and spring of 18o6.

taught school for a time at Salt

Lake

the territory of Nevada, exploring and prospecting for mining Wliile thus engaged he wrote a vocabulary of companies.

the laniruarres of thiee tribes of Indians, givini: the significance

snsiui;'^

or

nir. ii.mm rA:\in.v.

bl
profession of
fi)rrus[)Oiulcnt
('iia^t.

of

tlic

wor(]>

ill

Knirli>li.

]\v

i'iiiIiimcimI

tlie
;i

iniiiiiii; enijincL'f mikI ircoloj^i.-t.

Iff bci-amc
<ii

of the leading
al?o

sciciitilic

new

.-{lapers

tlif

Pacitic

lie

imlulged

siiiijowliat

in
Ic

nMiiauee ami
hi-

jaililislied

some
lie

pieces of poetry.

He ma

homo

at

Sicramento.

\Vhih> explurim^ the ITome (op[>er jiiet a inehmeholy death, mine, near Xeuca-tle, on the l.'Jtii f Xovemher, 18(54, lie

was smothered to death hy the over the month of the mine.

hurniiit: of the

frame Imilding

The iSan l'"rancis(^> ^['in'intj <in'l S /nfin''- Pi'CSi, of Novemher IDth, in speakiiiLf; (jf his death, says: " 3Ir.
Miles was a vounir ireiitlemaii of rare ]>romise, and most

ardentlv dev(_)ted to the cause of science.

Thoui^h never

having enjoyed the oj)[)L>rtuliities of a liberal education, he had nevertheless stored his mind with an amount of practical
information
in relation to rhe hatural sciences

and mechanics

which,

at the

earlv a

'-e

of twentv-ei'dit, was alreadv intro-

ducing him prominently to the scientific world as a profound and oriirinal thinker and a readv aiid iihle writer." The

Daily

I" Lag,

of the saiiie city, in noticing his death, says:


brilliant

"Thus

perished a really
Mile.-,

young

intellect.

Thus
his life

perished E'hvurd .A.


this

young man who, had


ike
his

been spared, was bjund

tu

m irk

on the history of

There i> a promise that his great mineral country." will ami be collected publishe(l in one volume. writings the and fourth, Amy, y<juiigest, daughter of Josiah and

Ann
]\[i-.

ried to

Hart, wa> born the :2Uth of June, 17S4r, and was marJohn Da>is, the 2.")d of ^larch, 1813. Tiie tamily of Davis emiirrated from \Vale3 the beirinniiiLr of the last

centurv and settled in S leburv township, Bucks couutv, His father where John w;ii born, the 7th of August, 1788.

was a
the

soldier of

thi^

Iicvolution.

"Washinirton at six'^een \-cars of

ai:,e.

and entered the army of His first service was in

Amboy
11

Joseph Hart.

expeilition in tli" smnmcr of 177(J, under Colonel He wa< a private in the compauv of captain

S'J

iiisT)i!V

or Tin; hart tamiia'.

Samuel Smith,

father of g-oncral Aiuh-ow J. Smith, \\\w He fought at the l)attlc distinuuislied liiinscU* in tlu> late war. At that time he was hving at Rol)ert Xeely's, of Trenton.
tlio

beh^w XewIIiipe, wliere James ^[adison, afterward PresiihMit of tlie United States, who was wounded at Trenton, was In taken and remained some time to recover of his wound.
the
sprin*!"
tlie

younir Davis, not vet seventeen vears ohl,


service

re-

entered

and served

of captain Butler, Pennsvlvania line, hut was afterward transferred to the

company

lie joined the of colonel Butler's regiment,


for tive years,
li^^lit

infantry under ireneral Lafavette.

Amonf? others he ])articipated in the battles of Brandy wine, Germantown, ^Monmouth, and the stormino; of Stony I'oint. At Brandvwine he was within a few feet of Lafayette when he was wounded, and carried him to a calling a soldier to his assistance, the two He was married to Ann Simpson, the 26th place of safety. of June, 1783, ainl ten yeai's afterwar<l he removed with his

family to ^laryland.

He

resided there until about

1816,

when he emigrated
Sciota river.

to Ohio,

and

settled

on the banks of the


After his death his
that

He

died there in 1832.

widow received a pension for his revolutionary services. John Davis purchased the farm in Southampton
belonged
to the heirs of Josiah Hart, his wife's father,

which

he moved upon soon after his marriage. When Philadelphia was threatened by the British, in 1814, ^Ir. Davis volunteered his services, and held the commission of ensign in colonel Humphrey's regiment of ritiemen. On his return he became

He wa-; elected colonel active in military matters at home. of a line regiment of volunteers, afterward made brigade
inspector,

He
for

and was twice elected major general of the division. was equally active in politics. In 1828 he was candidate sherifi' but defeated. During governor Wolf's adminis-

works.

of damages on the public candidate for delegate to the convention to alter and amend the constitution of Petmsvltration he

was one of the

a[i[>rai.-er>

In 1836 he was

liiSTuuv ur iiu:

ii.\i;i

iamily.

b3

vaiilu.

In

IS.")',)

he was elected to
l'<>!k

c(tiij^re->,

and

swerve*!

one
lie

term.

President
Ie1[i]iia

ajijiointed liiin >nr\ey(ji- of the port of

Phihi

in

1S4.^

which

lie

held
in

for

four year.-.

retired from an active

jiarticijiation

jiolitics

some years

He is a niendiei' of the Ilatlioron-'h liaptlst church. ago. Jolin and Amy H.irt Taxis had seven chiMren. William,
The other chiMren are Ann, int'a:i<'y. Watts Hart, Sarah, Kli/.al>eth, and Amy. Ann was married to James Erwin, of Xewtown, the 10th of Decendier, IS,').'), and had f>ur children, of whi(di one dauirhthe
first hoi-n,

died in

Rebecca,

\\'illi.im

ter only,

Anna Mary,

is

ik.w living.

She intermarried with


countv, wdiere tliev

Ilenrv ^lercur,
reside,

of 'I'owanda,

Pra

Itoi-d

and have one

child, a son.

in mercatitile pursuits.

Her hushand is e^igaged Janu>s Erwin <liel at Davisvi'dL', the


Ptehecca

28th of Decend.er, 1844.

irrie.l

Alfred T. Duf-

the -Ith of January. 184(^, tield, of I*hiladel[>hia counry, whi(di all of are living, 'i'lie eldest and has tour chilih'en, son, John Davis I.)utiield. served an enlistment of nine months
in

the

122d

Pennsvlvania reiriment

in

the

armv

o'i

the

The regiment was at Potonuic, as (piartermaster sergeant. After he left the service he the battle of Chancellorsville.
studied law, at Xorri-town. with

Fox, esijuire, and Mr. Dutheld is was admitted to the bar in January, 181)7. a descendant of Penjamin, son of Robert and P>ridgct Duttield,
(J.

R.

who wa- boru


and

in Enu-'aiul, ^^'atts.

the IDth

()f

Decend)cr, Itidl.

Ke
up

married Kli/.abeth
a tract of land in

He

emigi'ated to

America

in l)7l),

settled at ]>ui'lington.

New

Jei>ey.

In KiS-"; he took

^loreland town>hi[i, Philadelphia county, He died in Philadelphia, the oth of to which he renu>veil.
]\Iav,

1741.

His deseeutlants are \ery numerous, and some

The tir.-t person of them have held di.-tingui.-hed p.isition<. buried in Penne[>ack P)a[itisr gr.ive yard wa- Robert Dutheld,
February
."jth,
l(.i!)i*,

aged 80 years.

father of lienjamin.

This was probably the The f)urth ehild. Wil'iam Watts Hart,
at

was educated

at

the militarv univei--itv.

Norwich,

Wr-

g4
mont.
iiiilitiirv

IIISTUUV OF Tin: ff.vRr fajiilv.

On

ai>i>i)iTit-(>(l graluatiii-Jicadrmv at Poitsiuoutli, Virginia,

lu'

\v;t-

a professor

in

flic

whore he reniained

two years. On his return home he stiulieil hiw with Hon. John Fox, of Doylestown, and was tuhuitted to the bar in

He completed his September, 1S4G. law school. university Cambridt^e While at the university he enlisted
reo-iment, then

k\L;al

studies at the

colonel Cushing's

recruiting

in

Boston, for service in ^lexico.

He He
Jie

-svas

couunissioncd

first

lieutenant, then

made

adjutant.

appointments on the stafl'of general Gushing^ and was afterward promoted to a aptaincy, in wdiich ])ositioii
filled several
(

served to the end of the war.

On

his return

home he

commenced the practice of the law at Doylesto\yn. In September, 18o;3, he wtis appointed l)y President I'ieice district
attorney of the United States, for Xew ^Mexico, where he removed and renuiined four years. In the summer of 1854 he was appointed secretary of territo^ry and for more than a year he was go-vernor and superintendent of Indian affairs. Two years of the time he edited and published the Santa Fe He resigned his commisGazette, in English and Spanish.
;

In and returned to Bucks county in December, 1857. T)emocrat the he the spring of 1858 Doylestown purchased When the newspaper establishment, which he still owns.
sion
late

war broke

out, 3Ir,

months' men.

When
full

their time
six

Davis recyuited a company of three had expired he raised a

gun battery for three years, the and sewed tenn, greater part of the time He was twice wounded, commandiuii: a brigade or division.
out his
in the left
shell,

regiment of infantry and a

elbow by a ritle l)all, and in the right hand by a which carried away the fingers, and was also struck by

The President conferred a spent ball on the right breast. of brigadier general, fir "meritorious upon him the brevet eonduct" at the sieire of Charleston. ]\Ir. Davis is the author
of a

work on

Xew

]\Iexico,

Pennsylvania Reu-iment."

On

and the "History of the 104th the -4th of June, 185G, lie

HisTui;v

or

Tin: iiaim FAMir.v.

a.'y

iiitcriiianlcd witli Aimii


l>y wIkhii lie

Cai'i't'iitt-r,

<>f

I'lonklvn,

Xfw

York,

had

t<nir cliildrrii, tliiof ut"

liiili

are

liviii:;.

Sarali

Siiini,-(tii,
ot'

the

thii'd

dauLditer, wa.-

iiiaiTi'ecl

to Uly.-.-e.s

^lercur,

Tonaiula, I'radtoid county,


IS.'jO.

retitisylvaiiia, the 12tli

of June,

He

is

a iiuinlier

ot"

the

hai'

\va< several
in

years ]tresident jud^'c

ot"

that judii'ial (h-triet,


con^jress,

and

1S<)4
in

he

Mas elected

a nienih(>r

ot'

and re-elected

iSdd.

The
anil

father of Mr. Mercin- received

Mas

in

\'ienna in

1S().">

when

lii- education in lun-ope, the French arniv, un<ler

Xaple<>n, entered that city.

1'hey have five children.


of Duhlin,
that
]>lace,

The
as her

vounirest dan^hter, Ainv, Mas married the same dav


sister

Sarah,

to

I)r.

Ilohnes

Sells, at

Ohio.

He

practiced

medicine several years


to Atlanta,
in

removed
remained
the
fall

the city

Mhen they Mliere nt)\v reside. they (u^oj-^-ia, They during its bondiardment l>y Sherman in
lived
f)r
six

of 1S()4.

and

M-eeks
.-hells

in

their

cellar,

})rutccte(l Ijy

cotton hales.

Several

>trui-k

the lioiise

and the kitchen Mas entirely demoli>hed, the cookini;-stove being about the oidy article uninjured. \)ue morning a shell burst on the bed from Mhich Mr.-. Sells had just risen, and the concussion thrcM' her through the pai'tially opened door into tiie yard. Her husband and son lyiii::' on the bed Mere
not injured. They had tMo children. The eldest, Charles He had a great talent for nni>ic, and Watts, died in 1^(12.
for a child of eleven years

Mas

ijuite

noted as a

p*^'i"f"i'iiier

on

the piano.

Amy

Hart

l)a\is

Mas a niend-er of the

Southampton

Baptist church o\'er forty years. ha\ing been baptised the She died at Davisville the I7th of 19th of May, ISO.').

August, 1^47,
of coloutd Jose['h and Elizahetli Hart, Mas born at \\'aiMnin>ti'r, the 7th ot' Uecendier, 1738.
Jo.seph,

the sixth

Poii

He had
M'iis

better

t'acilities

than the voutli of that dav urenerallv


l)ooks.

for ac(|uiring a

knowledge of men ami


iA' laii:'e

His fither

a i^entli'man

int'uriuation

and

readiiiir,

and he

SG
iriet

lusToiiv

OF Tin:

iiAirr r.v.MiLV."

under

tlic

j-atcnial

roof some of

tlie

most ])r()minent

during the critical period of tlie He was a nicndx'r of the Ilathorougli hhrary, Ivevolutidii. and was an extensive and careful reader to jndge by the
eharaeters
in

the

State,

number and

quality of the books


]\lr.

lie

took out.

tind

no

Hart took during the war, in the }iart service, although he may possibly have turned out military lie married into the Folwell family, one ^vith the militia,
record of any
I tind of the most respectable and influential in the county. in the Souththe certiticate of the marrias-e thus recorded

Hmpton

Ba]tist

church book

"To
"These
Folwell,

ALL

WHOM

IT JNIAV

CONCEHX.

are to certify that Joseph Hart, jr., and Nancy both of the county of Bucks, in the State of

Pennsylvania, were joined

together in the holy bands of matrimonv, this twentv-tifth dav of December, Anno Domini one thousand seveu hundred and eighty-three, in virtue of a

publislunent,

by
(Signed)

" WiLLLv.M YaxHoux, of Southampton.


(Witnesses.)

" Betsy

Y ax I bjux

" Willl\.m

Watts,

"Willlvm Maghee, "Eu:axor Tiio.mas, " Safety " Rachel Maghee, Watts, "ThOJ[AS HoLGH, "BeXJAMIX JOXES, " William IIaut." " William Folwell, The wife of Joseph Hart was the sister of William Watts He was graduFolwell, who was distmguished as a scholar.
university of Pennsylvania, and thiee years after was tendered the appointment of professor of rhetoric He continued to reside in that institution, but declined it.
ate<l

at

the

at

Southampton

until

1807,

when he removed

to

Seneca

York, where he died, October 13th, 1858, in county, He was noted for his intelliirence and libehis 91st year. He became a his intere.-t in letters. rality, and kept alive

New

HISToUV or
mpin^t-r
c-liristiaii.
<>f

nil.

11

,U1

r.VMII.V.

8:

clinicli

wliilc

i?i

cilloo-r.,

..md

livcil

tli<'

life

of a

Ilr wa-; al-u a <1cmtii<1;ui1 cf


j>arfif,^

Pi-.

I~.i.i'-

\\'att<.
tatlici'.-,

All
la-it

tlicst'

lia\e Itrcii

irarlifivd

to their

the

one

to j'ay tlu^ ilcht of nature lie'n^f Safetv AlaLrhee.


a^To,

who
M''.

died a few vi^ars

u|i\\ard

"f

niii'-tv

veafs of

au''.

Mart took

his l)ride

home
tlu-ir

to the old ho-aiestead

and

rt'si(K'd

^v:th his ]>aivnts until


esta\)lis]icil

their death.

Tho. otluM- chiMreii liad

houics of

own

><ine tinn: hetore,

and

it

was
tlie

rcser\^?d

the youni:ost son and dcelininu' years of their jiarents.


for

hi^ witc

tu

cheer

Joseph Hart early

to..k

an intere-t in I'uhlie

affai-s

and

enjoyed the confidence of hi^ fellow citizens. Durinj^ the famous whiskey in-urrection h<> was a['i>ointed j>avrunster to colonel IIanna'> hriuade, and acco'n[)anied the ai-inv in it.s

march

towar<l

I'itt-hui-ic-

I'lider dan- of

October
"

14tli,

17!U,

he writes to

his wite tV'>m


[>lai'e

"Camp

Strashur:,'.

that the

armv
the

arri\ed at that
before,

"in n^ood health and

hiu'h

>[>ii'it>"

and the next day e\[)ected to niar<-h to Fort evening He* returned with the Littletown on the way to I>e(ltord. ami hi> discharire retired to his home army, ujmih rcM-eivinir
in \Varmin,-ter.

In 17!'7 he
to

was one of the commissioners


setth-

tlu^ hy di-jiuri- between the Warwick of \\'armin>ter and about repairing the t(jwn>hips ]3ristol road. Hi' wa> >everal times county auditor. He was

appointed

the ciuit

a nieml)er of the senate of Pennsylvania a< early as 1S(>4, in mIucIi body he held a M'at fir several years. He wa< a useful
In and active senator. niittec which re[ioi-ted a
ISO.")

he was chairman of the com-

fi\or of building a new poor This measure a[>[>ear.- to have met house fir the county. with much oji[io>itioii and cri'ated givat excitement, judi^ing Hi-> from what wa-^ said of it at that ]iei'iod. ne[ihew. Dr.
bill in

^^'illiam Hart, writes him. under date ot" January, ISOS, at Lancaster, where he was attending the session of the senate: "The poor hou-e purcha-i' ha< ca',i-;ed a great U[iroar in
.

some

sections of the county:

the di-conteiit and opposition

8S

uisTuiiV

OF Tin: haut family.


Hand-bills, memorials, Sec, arc

ori>'iuate(l in Biiekinu-liam.

the public mind, and truly oirculating, tendini:: to projii<lice if the pun-hase is as represented it is by no means judicious.

The

soil is stated to

be

sterile,
;

and incapable of improvement

destitute of a sufficiency of good adequate to the object water, the well and spring in certain seasons of the year
o-oin<''

nearlv drv, u-ciiuratinir animalcule,

worms,
it

tad-i)olcs,

necessary to ike, niter the water before u.-iiig it. ^>uch, say they, is the place of the humanity songht tor the reception and acconuuodation
A:c., >ki-., in
It was during this present session that unfurtutuite poor." 3Ir. Hart ottered a resolution in the senate, for the first time,

such (piantities as to render

for the renun'al of the county-seat

from Newtown, which led

to

its

being changed

letters of ^Lr.

Hart

which have
.J.

to

the present

The site, Doylestown. been preserved show that

he had an extensive correspondence with the leading men of the State, such as vSanmel D. Ingham, Nathaniel B. Boileau,

John Binns, William

Duane and

others, by

whom

he was

much

esteemed.
of his senatorial career Mr. Hart returned

At the conclusion

to Warnu'nster, and devoted the balance of his life to domestic lie was not excelled bv anv in those virtues which i)ursuit3.

make men esteemed

being a good aitiong their fellows faithfnl friend. and citizen kind parent, upright neighbor, He was a member of the Southampton Baptist church for
;

manv

vears.

He

died

the

l;;th

of April,

1811,

and

his

remains were laid beside those of his ancestors. survived him over thirty years, and died the 11th of starch,
1843.

His widow

Ul.^OkV of T!IK

IIALl

r.NMII.V,

89

CHAPTKIJ

r'OSEnr
Ji

ari'i

Ann

H.irr

liu'i

<<."ve:i

cliil'lron,

tive >on.r,
Lv"A'is

and

t\v.,

ij:uii;-liri;-i--;,

Tli<'ni:i>,

J"lin,

Charles.
"t"

Fohvell, Thoni:i<, Kliza Ann.

uv.d

Clari. ;i Maria,
li^'in,^ at

which
Tlie
half,

three sons anl


eldest
s-"*!!,

t\v.> dauL:hter.->

wei'e
tlie

his deatli.
^I.\

Tiinnias,

died

at

a^ro

ot'

and a

in 1701,

and rho third smu,

Charles,

in

[7'.'7,

at the ai:e

of eight years. .Vt tlie dearh .:.f J'.:-{^ph Hart what remained of the ancestral plantatir^n in AVanninster was divided into three farms ami he<]\U'athed to his 'hree sens Hvin::, John,

Thomas, and Lewis.

The homesteJ.d hniUhngs

fell to

the lot

of Thomas, while th(? '>ther tw. sons erei-ted nevv- innn-os-ements on their p'V.-' ions. They were three as tip.e farms as

coukl be found in the towi:shi[>. John Ilarr, tlie eMer <>{ the three

s.;iis

livin^ at the

death

of his father, was horn at ^^'arnlins^er, April Orh, 17S7, He %vas married to Mary, daughter of John and M:iry H')rner, of

Bucks countv,
Eliza,

the 10th of Afarch,

iSlO, arid had is;ue eiirht

children, six s<jns and t\vo dau^'hter.-. Jr.seph, A\'i'Iiam.

Ann

Mary Darrah, Jan^es, He w.is a Thompsiju Darrah.


the ceumtv, and tor
influence.

C!e'irij:t\

man

of

and l^Mijamin some prominence in


F.
,

manv

vears had

C'-'nsidera'']i.'

i^olitical

"When the

Ih-iti-h
lu-otlicr-

threateiied

r;.;!ailel[>hia

iu

IS 14, he an<l hi? tW'.

Purdv's " ' companv, 12

c(->lonel

William and served regiment, Hnm[l!rc\'>


eidisted in captain

DO
ill

msToiiV or the haut


tlie

I'A.Mir.v.

field

until soiuetitue in Decenibei-, Avlien

thv.

danircr

passed the troops were mustered out of serviceAfter the return ot' peace lie took an interest in the military of the countv, aiul at one time was colonel of a rey:iment of
liaving-

militia,

lie served one session in the legislature,

and occa-

He. was a warm piatron of the sionally held a local oflice. Ilathorouirh library, which his ancestors had been instrnmental in

founding.

His house

will

long be remembered as the


at all

seat of a generous hospitality,

which was dispensed


all

times to his acquaintances and friends. The sous of Jolm and ^hivy Hart have
the eldest, was a student at
to his father^s
01

married.

Joseph,
the 18th

Cannonsburg college, and returned

house on

iinishino; his education.

On

Jane, daughter of AVilliam aiul Ellen Vansant, of Warminster, where he is settled as a farmer.

March, 1847,

lie nuiri'ied

They had

three children, one of which


is

is

deceased.

Tho

second son, William,

in the

railways, in riiiladelpliia.

employ of one of the passenger He married Rachel, daughter of

William and

]\lary

Ayres, of Moreland, December 27th, 1843.

They have

three children, two of

them

bein"; twins.

James,

the third son, married Rachel, daughter of Isaac and Hobensaclc, of Warminster, November 2d, 1848.

Emily

They

had

six children, the

two youngest being twins.

George,

the fourth son, went to California in 1849, soon after the He remained three or four years, when discovery of gold.

he returned

He

is

home and engaged in business in Philadelphia. now junior partner in the mercantile house of Schumwav

and Halt.

He
is

is

nuirried and has children.

Benjamin

E.,

the fifth son,

a inxrtner in Yerree's foundry estabhshment

in Kensington.

He was nuirried the 9th of April, 1867, to Annie H. Barnett, daughter of Thonms Baruett, of Phila-

Thompson 1)., the sixth and youngest son, is delphia. He was book-keeper in the house of Schumwa}- and Hart. married to Susan, daughter of John and Rebecca Suedecor, of Philadelphia, April 10th, 18-31. They had unc child, a

iiisiuuv ur

iiii:

iiAur r.v.MiLv.

91
S.x.u after;i

'.l;uixlitcJ*.

Ilis wift'

(liud

Aii;,ni.~t

2<)t]i,

IS.V.).
lie

ward
lioine

lie

^vent

to

I'ikc's

Peak,

^\lle^e

.-pent

year

in

prospect iM|j;

fur gold, at

the cml of

^vlli(ll

time he returneil
sisters

no

rielier

than he went.

Their two

removed
all

to

Phil:\delj)hia

on the death of their mother, Avhere

the

members of the family now reside except Joseph, The family of oohjnel Hart furiii.--hed two soldiers
for patriotism

to the

country during the late and public


the

wfir,

and maintained

Its

spirit.

James entered

rejiutation the 1st Xew

Jersey cavalry

in the summer of LSIil, as tir.-t lieutenant, in commanded company by his cousin, captain John II. Shelmire. The regiment was attached to the army of the

Potomac.
service, aiid
otiicer.

He saw
He was

an

iimi.--ual

amount of hard and dangerous

was noted
l)Otli

for his services.

He

as a faithful, vigilant, and gallant breveted, and prom()te<l to the majority, was killed at the battle o( Five F<.rks,

Virginia, April and interred in the

1st, 1SG.">,

and

his

remains wt-re brought

home

funeral discourse

Southampton I)aptist burying ground. was preached by the reverend Jacob


and
friends.

Belville to a lari^e concourse of niourninic relatives

Thompson joined the 104th Pennsylvania regiment and was commissioned first lieutenant of the companv commanded bv
cousin, captain Alfred ^larple, and was aj)pointed adjutant when the regiment was organized. He served in this position
In's

through the Peninsular campaign, and the 1st of Xinember, He saw service 18G2, was commissioned lieutenant-colonel.
in

Virginia,

North and South Carolina, and Florida.

He

nmch of the time in command of the regiment, and commanded the brijiade a few weeks durinir the sicire of Charleston. John Hart died the iSth of June, ISIO. 3[ary
was
Hart, his widow,
dietl

Augu.-t

.'JOtli,

lsr)S.

Lewis Folwell, fourth son of Jo-cph and Ann Hart, Mas He interborn at \Varminster, the 17th of 31arcli, 17'J"J.
niarried with
Si^lney
CJill,
v\'

Northampton township, by
His
life

whom

he had nine sons and two dauirhters.

was

02

inSTOTJV

OF THE UXUT

I'AMIf.V.

prineipalTy spent

in ngriciiltural

pursuits.

About 1837 Re
lie

removed

-vvitli

liis

tamily to Illinois,

wliece

died.

The

family afterward -went to ^lissouri and settled in the neiirh-

Two sons died in infancy, wliile borhood of Jefferson city. live sons and two daughfers are still h'ving, viz: Henry G., Charles, Louisa, John H., Thomas Jeflerson, Aiuh'ew Jackson, Rebecca, Lewis,
is

and Joseph.
St. Louis.

Henry

G., the eldest son,

married and resides


lives in

at Bellcview,

IlUnois.

Charles,

the

June 7th, of (Jrandison and Ann Eliza, daughter ]\[ary Brannon, of Hamburg, Illinois, to which place they removed from Virtrinia. They had ten children, seven sons and three which are living. six of Threo of tlie daughters daughters, are married; Emily Garrell, the eldest, to William B., son Ann Elizabeth, the of John Defoe, of High Point, 3Iissouri and Julia Ann, third, to William H. Low, now of California the fourth, to Alfred P., son of Rufiis and ^laria Frost, of Rutland county, Vermont. Louisa, the eldest daughter of Lewis F. Hart, first manned Gustavus Bosbyshell, of MontIn 185G he fell overboard ffomerv countv, Pennsylvania. from a steamboat on the Ohio river and was drowned. She
second son, 1839, with
lie intermarried,
;
;

intermarried a second time with B. F. Bradford, of ^Missouri. John PL, the third son, is in Idaho, or some of the neighboring
territories.

Thomas
S.,

Jefferson,

the fifth son,

intermarried

with Harriet

daughter of John and ^laria Vanartsdalen,

of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, ]\Iarch 16th, 1848. had twelve children, five sons and seven daughters, of three of the foimer and four of the latter are deceased.

They
which Mr.

Hart was

in service

during the late war,

first

as quartermaster

in the ^lissonri

home guard

until that corps

was disbanded

afterward captain in the 43d and 48th ^Missouri regiments, and served in ^Missouri and Ill health caused him to resio-n his commission Tennessee.
in Jamiarv, 18Go. Ilebccca, the younfrest dauirhter, intermarried with H. J. Dunlap. Emily, Thomas Jefferson, and

by general Fremont.

He was

Hisuna
Ec1)0('c;t,

(ri'TiK: riArn

r.VMir.Y;

U:J

with

tlicif laiiiilics,

and likewise

tlse

two uriiunrried

sons live near


Tlii)iiia.->,

HiLrli I'oint,
tit'tli
1

Mi-.-onri.
.r.'t>(|'li

t?io

S((ij

dt'

;mi(1

Ann

Hai't,
.'>tli,

was

l>.>i-n

the

3(1

of Jun(\

TIKI,

ami died Xuveinber

1838.

He
One

intermarried wit]>

('Iiarity,

dauirliter of Derrick and Eliza

Kroesen, and had i>>ne


of the sons died
at

tln'ee

sons and one dan^hter.


>e\"eTi

the nue of

years.

His children

intermarried witli the

^^'a!to!ls, r.oni::s,

and
(

tin' A\'aketields,

The
and

eldest son, Theolore,

lemoved

to

)hio a

few rears

aijo,

settled near C'Olum})ns, a firnn-r.

The hushand
Hatl)oroU,di,
in

of the
^Tont-

dauirhter, ^Ir. "Wakefield,

resides at

gomery county, Pennsylvania, ami is the lil)rariai> of the Union library. Thomas Hart received for his portion of the ancestral estate that whi<di contained the old family mansion,
in

which he

lived

and died.

His

life

was devoted

to farnn'ng.

At

his death the farm

was

piirchasiM]

hy

his lirother John,


it

and
it

at the hitter's death his children hon:;-ht

and

re.-ided

on

several years. At the death of the mother, in the fall of was it sold at puhlic sale and pas.cd out of the family. 18')S, Down to tins time it had heen continuously owned hy the

Harts since

1()S2, wlien

it

was purchased of "William Pcnn.


died the Kith of July, 18')3, in the Southampton

The widow

of

Thomas Hart

and was buried beside her husband


Baptist grave yard.

daughter of Josejdi Hart, was born December the Sth, 171>7, and iiitri'man ied with David, S(^n
Kli;'.a,

Ann

eldest

of Nathan and Elizabeth 3larple, the 2d of Decendter, 1817. He is a native of ^lontiromerv countv, Penns\l\ania, but has resided in hhu-ks

Josei)h Hart, Alfred,

many years. They liad eleven children, Ann Eliza, Clarissa Hart, Mary Purdy,

Sila-, William Warren, Caroline Virgini;u Sarah, and Eu^-ene A., several of whom have married and some deceased. !Mr. 3I;ii-ple was a man of considerable In 1SI4 he joined a prominence in the county, in his day.

Nathan,

Ellen,

voluJiteer comjiany that

was raised

at

Hatborough and served

94
tt

liisioia

OF Tin: haut i'amilv.

from camp

After his return tour of tliree inoiiths, as orderly sergeant. lie tauglit school for a few years. He became

quite active among the military of J^ucks, and was collie was also active in politics. onel of a militia regiment.
ter of

In 1837 the governor of Pennsylvania appointed him regisBucks countv, and he Avas afterward elected to the

same office under the new constitution, in which capacity he served three years and ten months. During the administration of President Polk he was chi(;f clerk to the surveyor
of the port of Philadelphia.

He

is

and
the

resides in

Warminster township.
Baj)tist

a farmer by occupation, He is a member of

Joseph and where Silas, emigrated they located land near the town of Burlingame, and became William Jamison and his wife, the eldest daughter farmers.
Ilatborough
church.
in
to

His sons,

Kansas

the spring of 1855,

of colonel Marple, followed them to Kansas in April, 18G0 and his daughter Clara joined them in December, 1SG2. On
;

whom
18G4.
]Mr.

the 1st of January, 1858, Silas married Mary ^lorrell, by he had four children, two of them twins. Clara inter-

married with reverend Lewis

W. Hover, the 3d of December, removed to western New York. have since They Hover served sometime in the army as fii'st lieutenant

of the 12th Kansas regiment. Few families in the country furnished more soldiers to the

Federal army during the

late

His

five sons

were

in the military service, four of

war than that of colonel Marple. them com-

missioned

William Warren, the youngest, joined the company of captain Davis in April, 1861, and served the
officers.

He afterwaid raised a three months' campaign as corporal. for the 104th company Pennsylvania regiuicut, in which he
served as captain about 20 months, when he was appointed lieutenant-colonel of the 2d South Carolina volunteers, a

necro rciiiment, afterward known as the 34th United States colored, and in the spring of 18G5 he was appointed colAfter lie onel on the resignation of colonel 3lontgouiery.

IIISI'-UV

nr

Tin;

IIAI;!'

r\MII.V.

9,3

vn>

iiuistorc'il

out of fOi\ i<f


lrii;:i<lier

tlic rrc.-iilent

cnntrrrcd on
oii

liiin

the brevet of
ishiml,
S<iitli

ireiier;il.
is

Tie

resides

Port Royal
^f.

CaroliiKi, ixwd
tlie

eiii:a;^aMl in

the liunlier lousiness.


^Ii?.s iSiisan

lie Wius

married

'JSth
tlie

f>f

.Tune, IS'K!, to

Tracy, daughter of
Ma,-,-aclm.-etts.
1).

hite

reverend

).

Ti"a<-v,

of

I'o.-^ton,

In
at

tlie tall ,-lie

embarked on the steamer T.


tor

Wagner,

New
vessel

York,
took

Charleston,
at

to

join

her

liushand.

1'he

tire

sea

and was entirely

destroyed.
losing
all

The passengers
their effects.

barely escaped with their lives, Alfred, the seconil son, also com-

manded

eompanv

in

the iDtth I'enn.-vhania re-dment, in

whieh he served three years. J(X-eph, the eldest son, enlisted in the 11th Kansas reginjcnt, the 14th of September, 18G2,

and
Hill.

partieij>ated

in

the battles of Prairie (irove and


[ilace, in

Cane

lie died near the latter

of Decembes, 1SG2.
this

Arkansas, the iSth His younger brother, Silas, enlisted in


Ht-

regiment, at the ,-ame time.

wa> promoted

tir^t

lieutenant in the iM

int'antry of Kan-as, a negro afterward regiment; changed to theG.">th Uiiitnl States in 1S(;4. He died on the stcandnjat J. colored, h'ebruary, S. Prini:le, en nnite for New Orleans, the 27th of .Vuirnst, 18(54.

mounted

Nathan, the third son, enlisted

in

the 128th

Penn-

sylvania regiment, raised for nine months, the 8th of August, He 18G2, and was mustered in on the 14th, as a sergeant. %vas subse(|uently ajipointed ami commis>ioned a first lieutenant.
ville, at

He was
the
lattei*

in the battles of

of which he was taken

Antietam and ChancellorsHe was pri.-i>ner.


in

marched
prison,

to Richmond and contined t'our day> when he was paroled and >ent home.

the

Libby
dis-

He was

of 31ay, l8(J."'. \'irginia Caroline, the charged and Ann I^li/.a Mai-i'le, intermarof I)avi(| vounirest daurhter
the
I'Jth

ried with

Charlo McNair,
2.'5d,
181)."),

o\'

Living>ton county,
child.

Xew

York,

November

and has one

Clarissa Maria, the youngest daughter of .Toseph and Ann Hart, was born the ll'tli ot' December, 1S(I2. and intermarrit-d

$>G

iiisn.iUY

or

xiir.

hai:t tamilv.

\vitU

Jo?0[>]i

Ciirver,

taniior

of Solc1)iUT,
'H'Ah of A|u-il,

tlic

SHtli

of

Decomlx'i-, 18-JS.
issue.

She died \hc

ls;;i, witliout

died July 2iM, IS "),">. Silas ILirt, fourth sou of .Toiiu aud Eleanor Hart,

He

and

LrotluM-

of colont4 Joseph Hart, was I township, the 5th of .May, 17 IS.


at
in
life

horn

in

AVariniiister

know nothing
for himself.

of his

youth, but suppose he spent it in its labors until he started

home on

the farm, assisting

In early

numhood he removed to Virginia and settled Augusta He went there county, ]>ut I do not know the exact time.
in

before 1749, for on the 2Gth of September of that year I find He that ho was married to Jane Eobertson, of that county.

was now 30 years old, and it soon after he came of age.


divided and

is

probable that he settled there In 1778 .Vugusta county was


set off

Rockingham county

from

it,

in

which Mr.

Hart's residence was included.

He was
little

wholly engaged in

agricultural pursuits and took but

part in local politics. He occupied a highly respectable position as a citizen, and was a warm advocate of the cause of the American colonies during

the revolutionary struggle, but never entered into the military He was appointed justice of the peace in Rockingservice.

ham

on the county, in 1778, and being the senior magistrate He declined him sheriff. commissione<l bench the governor
but the governor sent him the conmiission accompanied by a letter, requasting him to assume the duties Ions: enouii'h to oro;anize the court and get the business set in
the honor at
first,

motion.

Once inducted

into othce he

most probably retained


Tn
A[>ril

it and enjoyed the honors and emoluments, written to his brotlier, Joseph, under date of

a letter

IGth of

that year, he says

"If
it

can procure a de[uty to


the usual time."

my mind
There
is

perhaps

may keep

(the otlice)

few people are disinterested enough it, to relinquish, voluntarily, an othce of honor and profit, and Hart to reconsider his first it was quite natural foi- Mr.

no

douljt he kept

for

decision.

The war

did not reach the part of the State in

wliu'li

lie

livi'il,

jiikI

tliori-'foro

lie felt

none

(A'

tlic

distress

iiitlii'te'l

hy the
ot"

c-<ntfiiilini;
ill

armies.
<'iMinty.

^Ir.

Hart

(liril

Rocl<iii;_'li:iiu
1

without cliildren,

the
liis

"JlMli

<)c!>i1mt.
<le\ i^i'd
J>,ipti.-t

will

he

Phila(h'l[ihia
"eiliiratioii of"

>p\vuty-<*^\en year.s. By the principal part of his estate to the associntioii, as a j'rosj'ertive t'liiiil tor tln>
7 '.*'>.
-Airnl

youth wlio aj'pear

promi-iii:^' tor

the

iiiiiii>try,

reservi?i:^

family.

pretereuco lor the de.-ceiK.^uits of his father's In aiMition there were a few small lejjracies. He
the
(

left ]')() to his hr<ther

Oliver

his ifoM sleeve huttons

and

shoe huekles to his ne['he\v

.Tose^ih,

and

li)()

to his gran<l-

nephew,
tution

Willi,-^n

Hart.

'J1ie

l>a[>ti>t

i<>soeiation reeei%'ed

nothing from his he'inest, as it was not an ineorporate<l instiand eouM not take under the will. The ease was

up to the suproiue e(Mn"t of the United States and deeided aiiainst them. Tlie executor to the will was the
carried

defendant, and the case was coiulucted for the assoeiatiou by


tlie

honoral'le William

ten tluMisand dollars,

The property was worth about and was divided among the heirs.
\\'irt.

13

1>S

ni8Tut:v

(.)!

Tin: n.vur famh^v.

C [lA VTF/ll

X.

^^
(lied

:^i^)I'CRET[A, the second daiigjiter of Jolm ntu] Eleanor Hart, was born at Waniiinster, July 22d, 1720, and

December

15th, 17G0, in the forty-first year of her age.

She was twice married. On the 15th of October, 1741, she intermarried with William Gilbert, who lived either in Bucks
or
the
neiirhborin2;

countv of

^Montj^omerv.

am

not

informed of their place of residence after marria<re. By hira she had three children, Seth, Silas, and Joseph, named after
lier

three brothers.

"William Gilbert died about 1750.

She

did not long remain a widow, for on the 5th of ]March, 1752, she was married to .John Thomas, a resident, I believe, of

^lontgomery county. By him she had four children, John, Elizabeth, Isaac, and Eleanoi-, the youngest of wliom was l)orn the 3d of I)eceml)er, 175'J. She had forty-six grandchildren, nearly

of whom were living at her death. I have not been able to obtain nuich information of the
all

descendants of Lucretia Hart.

Seth, her eldest son, married

EHzabeth Henrv, the 5th of Jamiarv, 17G7, and by her had The only knowlediie five children. I have of him after his CD
</

inarria2;e

is

found in a

letter written

by

his uncle Oliver to

his brother Joseph, dated Charleston, S.

C, Jaimary

14th,

1779, in which he says: "Seth Gilbert and his family are still in town, but in low circuui.-^taiices lijinself for the most
;

part aiHng."

They were

still

in

Charleston the following

msTouv or
DeceinKer, Imt
aftt-r

iiii: n.\i:r

iamii.v.

i)i)

that pcn'cxl

all

trace

oi'

tliern

i> lor-t.

doiil>t wlit'tlier tlu-y

ever retiininl

iinrtli, aii<l

their (k-scend-

ants pmlialily are to ])e fuuiul >catter'<[ thrciutrliMut the south. The other two suns hy her first hushaiKl, Sila-^ auil .J().-e[ih,
settled
ill

^'ir:^'inia,

in

tlie

iici^diliurhoud

ot'

I)iiintVies,

\vhere

no douht
cousin

their descendants are

still livini;,

Sila-

married his

Eli/.al>eth,

daughter

nf"

his aunt

PMith Hiuigh, on the


^[<-)ntLromerv

let of August, 1771.

.7(jseph

married P^u[ihemia. daughter


<A'

of David and Mariraret Kees,

Hathorouirh,

county, Deeendter (ith, 1770, sister to the wife of his cousin, John Hart. The-e two 1)rothers had thirteen chiMren.

William, the eldest son of Silas

(Gilbert,

married his cousin


liad

Rachel Hart, William and

^fareh 24th,
Silas.

17!H),

and

two children,

Tiie latter only lived to arrive at the


settle<l in

age of maidiood,

who married and

I'hiladeliihia.

^ly knowledge of the descen<lants of Lucretia Hart, hy her seeond hushand, extends only t<j her eldest son John Thomas

and

his sister KIizaleth.


at

He

settled in ^Maryland.

It is

not

known

what time he removed there, but nio.-t pmbably The family record shows that on before he was married.

the ^Ust of Uc''ober,


ter of

Abraham
oi'

he was marrie;! to Eleanor, dauichand Eleanor .Tai-rct. They had thirteen


177('),

children, six sons and se\en daughters.

He

settled in

the

neitrhborliood

l'>altimore

and

eniraLred in the millinLT busi-

ness, but beeonu'ng dissatisfied

ami endiarrased on account of

the depression of the times, he soon relincpiished it. He and other real he au<l sold his mill, whatever estate owne'l,
en<raired in the wholesale

and

retail

mercantile and ireneral

trading business, in that part of Baltimiire known as Fell's Point, becoming a partner in the firm of .Tohn (Jiveu and

company.
In a

He

remove<l there the day befoie chri.>tmas, 177S.

lettei' writttm to his uncle .Foseph, on the ISth of .June, 1779, in which he speaks of the .-^ale of his jtroperty, he

reirrets havin^r sold his mill,

and savs that since the


" ha- been refused for

sale four
^Ir.

times the

sum he

sold f>r

it."

1432(>0

100

iiis'nrcv oi' Till: fiArri' F'AM(f.\.

Thomas

WifS of

;t

religions turn nf mind,


ditin-li.

and

^adio'NC u;t>

iiieniber of tlu'

Htiptist

In a lette?- to his cousin,


tlie

Jolin Hart, fivm Ualtiinoiv, wrkten

he

Avrites thus

13th of July, 1780,


?

" ]^ut

relii;ion

^vhat

sliall

\vc say of relii^iou

-that wliich

ouixht to be first

and

hist in all
I

admitted within our walls


out Christianity
?

Wlritlter
find
it

our tljoughts can scarcely be sltall we go to search


find

Shall

we

or navy

I fear not.

Shall

we

predoniinent in the army it in our trading towns

and

cities

of

commerce
?

sitting in ease

and

affluence, or
is

the busy multitude

Fearful I

am

there

less of

it

among among
in

these latter than the foruK'r.

AVhere then

shall

we go

Or shall we stand and behold it afar ofi* wanfjuest of it ? in sheepskins and goatskins, being destitute, about dering afflicted and tormented, and not have heart enough to follow
m
to espouse
its

cause or nuike
I

it

more honorable.
is it

Oh my
in

impenetnd)le heart that lukewarm state

how
'?

long wilt thou stand

unmoved
all

How hard
I

for tlie almost christian

to enter the kingdont of heaven ]\[ay the God of and from mv niere hal)itual mercies o-race deliver me

our

cliristi-

anity and inspire nie with religion evangelical!"

No
was
five

doubt,

Jolm Thomas ended


living!:

liis

that his descendants are


living with

there.

days in ^laryland, and His sister Elizabeth

him
her

in 1780, at

which time she was twenty-

veal's of aire,

and

sinirle.

She afterward returned to

Pennsylvania,
county.

On

I believe, in Philadelphia the 11th of ]\Iarch, ISOl, she was married to

home

being,

Arthur Watts, son of Stephen and Elizabeth Watts, of She was his second wife and had no issue. Southampton.

He died October i)lli, ].S()1J. a<'ed uearlv He was a grandson of the reverend John
in a [)revious chapter.

seventv-six years.

Watts, mentioned

^C

Isaac died at the age of seven yearsA I liave no knowledii;e whatever of Eleanor, the voun!;est child,

nor of the children of John Thomas or their descendants.


Oliver,

the

fifth

son of Jolm

and Susannah Hart, and


<^

HISTUi:V

OF

Tllf.

11

\f:T

FAMIf.V.

101
^^'ilIiaIII
17l'.'>,

C^rrinJson of .Ftilm Jlart, \\\u>

came

to Aincrit-a witli
<lav
..t"

IViin,

He

was was a

Ixirn

in A\'annin>tri-, tlie wtli


<>t'

July,
^vll.l

brntlicr

tlio

cidoiu'l

Jo.-c'iili

Hart

was

.so

proniiiieiit

(luring the

rt'vulutioiiary strugirlo.
ot"

ha\e not

been able

to learn anytliini;

his youtli
(n

ami early eduratinn.

No

donl)t his btyhuul

wa>

|pa~>e<l

the custom of the


of a carpenter,

peri)<l.

JIc nnist have learne<l


it

the plantation, as was tlie trade


time,
fir
I

and followed
174S,

some

find that

December
minster,

.'Ust,

"Oliver Hart,

carpenter,
to

of

War-

ail

Sarah his wife" gave a mortgage

liis

i>rotlier

Joseph, on a tract of fit'ty at-res (f land lie owned in \\'arminster, "to secure the payment of one Inmdred pounds." This is the oidy mention 1 find i)f his liaving learned a trade.

At

this

time he was twenty-tive years of age, and one year


(h)ul>t

married, and no
carpentei"ing.

sup[>orted his tamily by

working

at

At

that |>enod there

classical school in tlio

(piite a celebrated old stone school house near the S utli-

was

ampton Bapti.-t chui'ch. torn down some vears airo, ami which was kept at one time, I believe, l>y the revereml b-^aac Eaton, \. !M. Here the si>ns of many of the leadinij citizens of that of the count)'y were educated, and (>'iver Hart may have part About received the major ]>art of his early edm-atiou there.
the time he arri\ed at man's estate an<l his serious attention

was direeted
celebrated

to religious matters,

Mr. Kat(Mi had charge of a

Some

clas^i(al academy, at Hi>[tewell, New Jersey. of the admireis of 3[r. Hai't believe that he was edu-

cated at this in.-titution, and was the fellow student of Samuel

and David Jones, James ^[aiining, JJavid Thomas, Jolin Gano and others, who afterwanl became distinguished
divines, but
I

can find no evidence to sustain this

belief.

am

clearly of opinion that he

was selt-educated, and was not


to

imlebted to the
possessed.
intellect,

His close

and

learning lie ^tudy, strong native ap[ilication unatiected piety, enabled him to reach his
as a mini-ter of the go-[>el.

teachings of >fhools for the

distinguished

]>ositi(.in

102

iiiSTuuv

01'

Tin: iiAi;r i-amii.v.

lie was not intended, originally, for the ministry, bnt his labors were dii'ected in that channel hy his conviction of duty. lie was early taught to attend chuiTh, and accompanied his
father's tamih' to Southam[>ton.

"

From

his associations

and

not atall strange that he became a professing christian and entered into the ministry. At the pei'iod of

teachings

it

is

which

I write,

Whitetield, the Tennants,

Edwards and other

distinguished preachers were traversing the colonies and Mr. stirring up the people to a sense of their lost condition. Hart heard several of them, and acknowledges to have derived

great benefit,

in particular,

from the sermons of "Whitefield.

was early impressed with a sense of the importance of religion, and at eighteen years of age he was baptised and received into the Southampton Baptist church, as we find from the following entrv in the church book " Oliver Hart was baptised at Southampton, by Jenkins
:

He

Jones, April ye 3d, 1741." No doubt, he turned his mind to the ministry, and began to make preparations for it by study soon after he was
baptised.
V\'e

have no record that he entered any college or

himself for this important office, but read and seminary studied at home, and probably received instruction from his
to
fit

pastor.

At

this

time he must have been learning the carpen-

From

tering trade, and pursued his studies in the interval of labor. the time he became a member of church he was active

In 174G he signed the petition to the Pennepack church asking for a separate church organizaton at Southam[)ton and his name is also signed to the
in all religious matters.
;

chuicli covenant.

He

at

once became a

leadin<i|;

and useful

member

in the

new

orgam'zation.

Of

the date of

December

church book, "Isaac Eaton and Oliver Hart were called bv the church to be on trial
20th, 174(5,
find this entry in the old

we

for the

work of the ministry


3Ir,

to exercise at the meetino:s of

preparations; or in private meetings thatnu'ght for that purpose

be appointed."

Hart preached

in i)ul>lic, at

Southamp-

HisTuKv or Tin: mai;t


fi.r tlie tir-f tiino,

i-.\\[ir.v,

lo:^,

tr.i.,

on Simdav

tlic '2\-\

nf l^'rhrunrv, 1748,
tlif
<it"

\vliilo

the

rov(Mvnil
til

.f<>>lni;i
(

I'otfs
)ii

"liad

iiie;i>le.,

find

jirrfoniii'd

^atI-f;l(till^l."
"L'!i\t-'

tlic

Kith

Aju-il.

flic

samo

vrnr,

tlio
t')

tlmrcli
I'lcai'Ii
oi*

t'ull

rail to ()livor

Hart and Isaac

Kat<in, their

in aiiv

l<tt>,

need

j-lmc wliri'c Pi-iividcncc ini::lit cast l\o was niarrird tlie 28tli of rctjulri' 1."

Feltiiiai'v,

174S. to Sarah Hrcesc, dautrht<'r


ti>\vn>hi|>,

of Iien>aleni
Ilorn.
Slie

hy the
tlie

>f Henry l^roeso, revermd Peter Peterson ^'an-

was horn on

7th of Dcceinher,

17l'!>.

the de.-tiny of Mr. Hart w.is puddenlv clianired to a di.-tant iiart of the ciumtrv, whither

Toward

the close of 174!)

he was called
this

to lahor in the canse of

liis

Divine ^Lister.
P)a{)tist

.Vt

time

tliere

was groat
tir.-^t

destitntio?i

of

ministers in
S.

the South.

The
of a

]5ai.ti>t

church of Charleston,

C,

was

in

among
It luul

not having liad a settled minister Munt jKi.-tor, tliem for sr\ eral years. The last was the reverend Mr.
1

Sinmions, under whose i>ast'ir.-iii[> the church lia many trials. l)ecome so much reduced while he presided over it tliat tliere remained hut two c()miifimicants, one man and one

woman.
mend)ei's

^Vilen ^Ir. W'hitetield visited Charleston, atter ^[r.

Simmons' death, a great revi\al took place and one hundred were added to the church. 3Ir. Chaider now them supplied occasionally, l)ut hetween liim and the congreSi)me memhers of the gation a serious difriculty h.id arisen. cduirch wrote to the reverend Jenkins .Tones, of Philadelphia, '* in the fill ot" 174i), to know if there was any minister sound
in settle

the faith" that might he prevailed upon to g.- there and with them. The letter was received in Se[temher,
tin- >c->ioii
it

during

presented
<^hurclies
^Ir.

to the

of the I'aptist a>soeiation, and ^Ir. Jones mini.-ti'rs and messengers of the sevenil

in

attendance.

Aniouir others
to

it

wa^
call,
if

laid

hefore

Hart,
cro

who was urged


vi>it.
tv> it.

res[)ond to the
to

or at least
the church

U)

on a
aiiree
at

'.riiis

he consented

do

would

meeting

The matter was brought up in church Southampton the 14th of October, when consent

104
\v;is

iiTSTORY or tin: iiAirr iWMii.v.

given, niul it was ui rani;iHl tliut lie sliould l)c ordained A special elinirh meeting was held on oil the iSth instant.

that day tor the pui'pose, and the oet-a^ion was ko[>t hy tasting nnd prayer. ^Ir. J tart was ordained tor the W(trk of the
irospel

niinistrv

reverends Joshua
Jersies,"
3Ir.

hv praver and laviiiij: on of hand>, ])V the Potts, and IkMijainin MiUcr, ''from tho
S.

and Peter Peterson \'aiiIIorn, of I'ennepack. Hart set out from A\'arminster for Charleston,

C,

on the 18th of Xovend)er, 1741), bearing ^\itll him a letter from the Sontluunpton <'hnreh, recoininending him to the
lie left his family at liis father's people he was about to visit. until the next summer when thev remained where house,

they joined him, after he had received a call to preside over It would be interesting to know by what means tlie church.
himself and family traveled to their

new home

at that early

day, and what incidents happened on the journey. among the few papers in tlie hands of the family there

But
is

not

a line to enlighten us on the subject.

He

arrived at Charles-

ton the 2d of December, the day 3Ir. Chanler was buried, who for some time had l)een the only ordained Baptist
minister in that part of the country.
preaclunl soon after his arrival, must have made a great impression u])on his audience. Mr. Benedict in his history of the Bai)tists, sjiys of this event:

His

first

sermon,

"So great was the satisfaction of the chui-eh on hearing him, that he was immediately invited to take the p)astoral charge
of them, with which he was accordinglv invested the 16th of

February following." His coming was believed by many to have been directed by a special Providence in their favor, so
his arrival. He entered at once uj)on tho discharrce of his hioh callinj; in an extensive field of usefulness.

opportune was

His ardent pnety and active philanthrojn', his discriminating mind and persuasive address, raised him high in the esteem of the public, and gave him a
writer above quoted says
:

The

''

di>tiniruished claim to the afl'ections of his brethren.'"

iiisTonv OF Tin:

hart famiit.

1(i,^

settled

Tl\c earliest letter preserved, written after he had l)ecomc at Chiirlestuwii, is dated the 10th of March, 17.37,
to his

and addressed
'*

"Honored

I'^ather," as follows:
I

Ik'ing unwilling to lose

to let

you know

this any opj)ortunity, that thriuigh the toinler compassion of CJod,


in

embrace
and
I

I yet s\d)sist ami with niv faniilv

irood health,

still

in

the

enjoyment of numl)erless
I

hle.-sings.

All

want

is

thankful heart.

hut tind
desire.

come

trying to lahor for God, a^ enalded, short of that eiiLrairedncss which I could
still

am

Souls are preciou>, otherwise

tlic

Lord would not

And Lave done so much for their salvation as he has done. can I trifle with them ? Cio<l forhid I fain would he maile
I

instrumental in brinirin;;
I believe the

manv

souls

home

to Jesus Christ.

Lord has owned


I

sylvania and .Jersev,

while in Pennmy poor have received several letters iriving


lal)ors

me some
8uch

encourairinir accounts of somethlni; beiuLT

done bv

an unworthy instrunuMit, while there: may all the I have nothing praise be to Him to wIkhu alone it is due. The extraordinarv to add friends ,are <;enerallv well.
:

weather has been veiw wet


your
son."'

for

some time

past.

remain,

(Signed)
^Lr.

"O. Haut."
the christian niiuistiy in Charleston

Hart labored

in

thirty years,

and

his etlVirts

were crowneil with

trreat success.

he assumed charge the churcli was weak, distracted, and ahnost without influence, but before he left it, it luid

When

become one of
South Carolina.

the largest, most wealthy and influential in He pursued his path of usefulness in a

distinguished as a In a few years he raid<ed as one of the most preacher. famous I^aptist nn'ni>tci-s of that period. As an appreciation of his christian cliaracter, abilities and uset'ulnes.s, the C(^llege
of
ferrcd on

meek and unobtrusive way and became

Kh'de Lland, at their lirst ctimmencenu-nt, in 171)1), C(UiHis preaching him the di[>]oma df Ma-ter of -\rts.

attracted gi'cat attention, and he was receivi^l with approba14

lOG
tion
1\
:ill

IIISTOKY OF Tin:

HAUT FAMILY.
Di'. ^ruiily, in
(

ranks.

Tlie rovei't'iul

his discoui'sc

on

tlic liistitrv

of

tlio I'nptlst cliiirch in

'liaclcstoii,

niciitidiis tlio

following incident as :v v(M'_v pleasing e\ idenee of the esteem in Al)out 177U he \vliieh he was held bv the citizens at large.
>vas

robbed of

."'(>.

^^'luIl

it

gentlemen

of other societies

became known in the town the made him a ]>resent of 7.'U),


tlic

M-hich they raised

among

theniselves, without

help of his
Avide-

own

conirregation.

^iv.

Hart's influence as a (diristian


aiul

minister was

not sim[>ly confined to a faithful discharge of spreud, In 1751 he originated his clerical duties in the clmrch. the association of the ]?ai)tist churches in the soutli, and liis

name

is

sis-ned to the articles of union.

The one

first insti-

tnted took the

name

of "Charleston association,"

which was

formed by the union of four churches, and Mas organized At the meeting in 17o5, the association October 21st.
authorized liim to procure a suitable person as missionary to preach to the destitute settlements in vSouth Carolina and the

neighboring States, if money could be raised for his support. In 1756 he visited Pennsylvania and New Jersey for this purpose, and prevailed on the reverend John Gaiio to undertake
it.

He was He
new

born

at

Hopewell, 2sew Jersey, July

20t]i,

1727, and was a


fortitude.

of distinguished piety, elocpience and accom])anied }<lr. Hart south and entered

man

upon

lu's

duties with great zeal.

About the same time

Mr. Hart originated the Religious Society to assist destitute vouns: men to obtain an education for the ministrv, and he was one of the three trustees appointed to manage the He was one of two ministers funds raised in Soutli Carolina. draw a in to 177H, up system of discipline for the appointed,
Charleston association.
of
unitinir all

In 17(52, mIicii there was a prospect the Bai)tists in the State in one bodv, and the

"Separate

Ba[>tists," as they

were

called, j>ru]M)unded several

queries to the Charleston association, ]\Lessrs. Hart and I'ugh In 1774, when ^rcat interest were selected to answer them.

IIISTUKV

01'

Tin: IIAIM lA.MlLV.

107

M';is

ft'lt

ill

su.-taiiiiii;^

TJlioiU-

ami

IV'lot

\\i'rt'

;i[ip(iiiitc'<l

to luMrcss tlie

I-laml college, Messrs. Hart associations l>aj>ti,-t


a
lie

tlirougliout
auirinciit the

America, ami
endowiiients
the
;

ask

contrihutioii

(it"

t"iiii<ls

to

ami

was one of two selected


the
ith

to

receive

confriltution.->.

A\'lien
1>.

celehrated

^Fr.

AMiitetield was in South Cai-olina, he

preached

in,

and

worshipped at, Mr. ]Iart'> church. Mr. Hart and tin' di,-tinguished

Hr.

Manninir,

si>

long

president of Khodc Island college, hecainc acquainted while the latter was a student at Mr. Eaton's academy, at Hope-

The doctoi's liiogi'a[>her says that this Jersey. acquaintance prove<l to him a source of ixreat pleasure and They maintained a corres[>oridence with each other profit."
well,

New

for nianv vears.

In 17(i.'5^Ir.

Hart was authorized


I>r.

to

employ

an
or

assistant,

and he wrote
ire

ti5

Manning
at

to

accept the

situation.

This was hef

he had arrivt<l
eolleire.

such eminence,
de(dined the

become connected with the

He
the

offer.

He

ohtained

the

assistance

of

reverend

^Ir.

Bedire<?ood, who had been converti?d under his i>reachin<;, He Mas an Englishman, and Ijrought ami lia[)tised hy him. a man of popular talent> and p'k'a-ing was an up ]-qu'scopalian,

address, and

became
Hart
fell

divine. (piite a distingui>heil

He

tried to

supplant
failed.
liis first

^[r.

He

i)wn chui-ch and congregatitMi, l)ut from <;race bv niarrvinu- a second time while
in his

^^'h!]e Mr. HaiT ['resided over this wife was living, church it <j;ave several vonni; men to the christian niinistrv,

some of whom became prominent.

Besides ^Ir. P>edgegood, received into his church the an.d he mentioned, baptised just reverends Samuel Stillman and hMmuml Bott-ford, who
studied

theologv

under

his

instruction.

The

latter

was

In ordained by ^Icssrs. Hart and IVlot, ^larch 14th, 177l\ November, 177;', Mr. Hart accompanie<l Mr. Telot into the

upper part of CJeorgia, m hither they went


tist

to constitute Baj[H.

churches.
lla-.'t's

Mr.

wife died the "JOth of October, 1772, leavingfour

108
cliildren living.

HISTORY OF THK irAKT FAJIILY.

He

remained single bnt

eiglitccn inontTis

of April, 1774, lie "svas niarned to Mrs. Anne JMaria Grind );ill, of Charleston, a niend)er of an influential

and on the
fjimily of

Stli

South Carolina. She was a daughter of William and Sarah Sealy, of Eutaw, and the ^vidow of Charles Grindjall. In Novend)er, 1773, 3Ir. Hart aecompanied the reverend Mr. Pelot into the upper part of Georgia, to constitute a
Baptist chui'ch.

uisToiiv OK Tin: haim iamilv.

109

CHAPTEIi X

"i^^lHE
$^;:i<

Itreakiiii:

out

vi'

the Rcvolutiuii
;

IVmiikI

^Iv.

Ilart

laboring in his
it

church
the

but 'svhcn the tocsin of war was


patriotic ardor that

sounded

tilled

him with

same

burned

He at once in the bosom of the other members of his family. arraved himself on the side of his attiicted country, and ijave
all
liis

his influence to the cause.

South Carolina soon called


In the

services into

recpn'sition.

summer

of

177.")

the

provincial congress of that State desired 1,0 send a commission into the western counties, "to explain to the people at large the natm'e of the unhappy dispute between Cireat Britain and

the American colonies

to

endeavor
;

to

settle

all

political

disputes between the people

to (piiet

their
in

minds and

to

order to preserve themselves and their children from slavery."' This important
enforc-e the necessity of a general

union

and delicate dutv was entrusted


Dravton,
iiant.

to

the Imnorable William

aiul the

reverends Oliver Hart and William Tenof ^lessrs. Drayton and Tennant

The commissions

are dated July 2od, 177.5, and no doubt tliat of Mr. Hart bore the same date, but I have not been able to tindit among

the family papers. They started on their mission about the 1st of August, aiul returned the middle of September. I
^Ir. Tennant, which gives a minute It was attended with great fatigue account of their journey. ami much versonal dan^'cr. Tluv went to the extreme

have seen the diary of

110

iii^sTOKi'

OF Tin:

iiai:t

family.

'western frontiers of the State, where nianv of the inliabitanta


"vvere nnic-li

(h.-atrected

toward

tlie

Ilevohition.

^Vfter

their

ackn<jwledgnient of their in the public service, adopted the followand zeal patriotism ing resolution, the 29th of November:
return the provincial congress,
in

"On
erend

motion Resolved

That the thanks of the

congress

are due to the Reverend ^Ir. Tennent, and also to the Rev^Ir. Oliver

Hart, for the important public services by

respectively rendered to this colony in their late progress writer speaking of his services, into the back country." savs : " It was believed tliat the influence 3Ir. Plart exerted

them

means of preventing blood-shed The same year he went to the High Hills of Santee on a similar errand, where he rriet a large number of dissenting ministers and others, called
on
this

occasion was the


first

wlien the tories

embodied."

together to consult on measm^es for the common welfare. As the war progressed 3Ir. Hart ke})t up as frequent cor-

respondence as the means of comnumication would permit, with his brother Joseph in "Warminster. His letters which
are preserved breathe a lofty spirit of patriotisni, and are filled with interesting incidents of the campaigns in the south. The following, dated Charleston, S. C, July oth, 1778, pictures what he considered the country would become when
it

had achieved

its

independence.

The language
is

is

that of a

sincere patriot, and the picture drawn. He savs


:

not much,

if

any, over-

" With joy I look forward and contemplate the rising of this continent its inhabitants nourished glories by the
;

most free, generous, and perfect form of government ever modeled and cherished by the best of rulers chosen by ourselves, whose interest and inclination will conspire to
;

make when

shall flow"

the ruled hap[)y ; when Peace, like the swelling tide, over the mountains and cover the whole land ;

religion, freed

from

its

shackles

learning and virtue

encouraged and promoted

shall spread far

and wide

wisdom

Jl"

l'.

l*M,""''

IIISTOKV or TKi: ITAKT FAMir-V.

Ill

nnd knowledge
iiiidt-r

>]i;ill

iiici'en-o

aiul

every peasant shall

be

qualitied for-a senator,

trade,
all

Kv^tv man tlia'l fit down peacetully liis own vine and nndn- hi- own tig-tiee; and the favor, and protection of Anieric-a will l)C eourted by

nations undiM Ileavm. lliis is the prize tor wliieh we are contending, and this is the legacy we mean to berjueatli In the eni'ovmcnt of whi<-h our chihlren's to our ])osteritv. childreK to the
blessed."
last

stages of time will rise up and call us

In February, 1780,
to retire

when

the Briti.-h

lav sietre to Charleston, the triends of Mi'. Hart advised

army was about to him


hands of the
into

from the

citv to avoid falliuLT into the

enemy.
their

He

had been too active a


mercies.
into

jiatriot to trust himself to

tender

He
the

left

home and went


[>art

the
I

country,
iiave

probably no knowledge where he took up


uii[icr

of the 8tate, but

his

residence for the


to

time
in

being.

\\'heii

the

city

ca[)itulated

the

enemy,
in

^fay foHowing, he returned to his birth-[>hice

^^'ar-

minster, Pennsylvania.

He

left

kis family at Charleston, as

most jirobably he had


to

to leave in

such ha>te that he had no

them with him. They afterward jtjined opportunity him at Hoiiewell, where he was settled, but it is not known at what time they arrived. C)n his way north he was joined bv ^Ir. Bottsford, who iourneved with him as far as \'iririnia, where he remained during the war. The British converted
take
visions,

the church building of Mr. Hart into a ?tore house t^r proand damaged it badly. When they evacuated the

city there

was utithing

left

but the liare walls and the roof.

His

loss

was verv

hea\\', mo.-t of his personal elfects tallinir

into the hands of the J^ritish, including

many

c>f

his nu:>st

valuable books and ['apers. of poems, priiU'i[ially of hia

Am^ng
own

tlie>e

was a large volume

compo.-ition.

He

received

warm welcome from

his

munerous

relatives aiul friends in


to

Bucks county.
left his

He

never returned

Charleston; he had
.-ea forevei".

plea-ant

hoiiu' in tiie city

bv the

112
]Mr.

HISTOPvY OF TIIK IIAKT FAMILY.

Hurt

reiiiainc'd

in

^V;unlinstel

until

the

tullcnvinj]'

December,
Hopewell,
"uncertain,
Jic

]>reiu'liiiig occasionally at

Souiliamj'toii
]5aptist

and ekechurch
at

where, Mheu he received a

call

from the

New
liis

of the war being Jersey. friends advised him to acce[)t the call, which

The termination

did and innnediatelv removed thither and took charire of


A\'hL'n the

the church.

at Charleston advised

him

war was closed his old conii-reirtition that it was his dutv to remain
his place.

where he was then


a minister

settled,
till

who

could

and requested him to send them At this time he was sixty

Tears of age, and probably he did not care to go so far a second time from the home of his fathers. The question of

age no doubt had its due influence with his former congregation, who wanted a young and active man to regather their
scattered flock.
lie labored in his

new

fleld the

remainder

of his

life.

took up his abode at Hopewell sometime in the fall or The following letter, written to his beginning of winter.
brother at this period, under date of December 23d, 1780, gives us some insight into his arrangements for housekeeping.

He

He savs "As there


:

meeting, in
to

is no house or family near or convenient to the which I can be accommodated, I have determined

go into the parsonage and keep house myself. undertake to furnish me with necessaries, and I
of procuring Nelly

The people

am

desirous

Thomas

as

my

housekeeper.
to

In this I
a shock-

hope

for

Nelly to

your concurrence and assistance so come. Should she refuse it will l)c
I

far as to advise

me

cannot see that her coming can be ing disappointment. detriment to either Nellv or any body else. any

"I have been


Stephen

so confident of succeedinii; as to encouraire


Stout,
es(]rs.
,

Barton and Xathan

two of our

deacons, to go over with a light wagon for Nelly, and with tliem f:;oes ]\Iiss Rachel Stout, a mo.-t valuable vounji; ladv,
j)urely
for

company

ti

Nelly.

If,

after

all,

the attcmjit

ins:n)KY or Tin;

iiai;i

iamii.v.

113
liow to
]\o\(\

eliould

fail

of siicco-s,

I slmnlil

lianlly

know
''

up

xnv liead or look

iiiv tVirinl- in

the face;

therefore imist ben

rou to use A'oiir iiitliieiifr in \i\v

fnor.

The Nelly
ilauf^hfei-

hoiv t^poken of was a nicee of Mr. Hart, of his sister [-.neretia hy her .second hu.-hand, John
'Ihoirnu-i

Thomas.
aljove

His wite ha

not yet joineil him.

"Should the eniMiiv eoiitinuo quoted he remarks: any time in Ciiarlestot) I should he for scndiiiir f 'r mv wife
to

In the letter

come

over,

and

it

might he an inducement f r her


is

to

come
go to

did she

the

know I had a home to bring her to. This manv considerations that have induced me

one of

to

Mrs. Hart no doubt joined liim the following housekeeping."' In a year. ubse<pient letter to his brother, written in 1785,

he says tliat the people have exerted themselves to make him comfortable. They engaged to allow him s200 in money
per

annum

besides the benefit of the parsonage, which they

The church and congregapromi.<ed to assist him to work. tion had just then added 'M acres to the parsonage, which he
thought would make
tliese
I
it

more

profitable.

He

says:

"With

hope my living here will be tolerably advantages The gootl t.)ld man did not lay claim easy altho' not grand."
to the riches of this
in He<aven
'.

worM

there was laid up for

him

a store

At the

close

of the war the church at Charleston was


a

reorganized.

At

agreed to invite

^Lr.

meeting held .Vpril 14th, 17S;>, it w;\3 Hart to return, and the reverend Richard

He replied requested to write the letter to him. under date of June 2()th, and decline<l the invitation, assignFurman was
inir as

reasons,

to

Hopewell,
;

"The Pr(vidential direi-tiou he had received Xew Jersey the strength of mutual attacli;
:

the pleasing prospect of the church he then served ; and his o[>inion that a younger and his own better health
nient

more 1784

active
tlie

necessary for them.'' church renewed the invitation,


-ireat reluctance, after

man was

In the spring of
mIucIi

he again

declined with

some

delav.

He

recoui-

lo

114

HISTORY OF Tin: hart famiit.


^fr.

Furinan, proini;?ing that if he dechnecl he ^vouhl come himself or send one better qualitied. The liealtli of Mr. Hart had been failing some years before

niended them to invite

liis

For several months he considered liimself in a He was taken ^vith his last illness in dying able to walk about Iiis room for some was December, but Before he was confined to his bed he called for his davs. will, which he gave to a friend, whom he requested to liave
death.
condition.
Ins remains

conveyed to Southampton, the faim'ly burying His struggle for brcUth suffered great agony. ground. His cough and a blood vessel he that so was ruptured great

He

until December 31st, 1795, when spitting of blood increased lie as (}uietly expired as though going to sleep, at the age of

72
to

veai's,

5 months and 2G days.

His remains were taken


slab thus recoids
liis

Southampton, where a plain marble

virtues:

deposited all that was mortal of that pious christian and eminent servant Reverend Oliver Hart, A. 3L, Pastor of the Baptist church in Hopewell, New
is

" In this grave

Jersey,

who exchanged

this

world for abetter December 31st,

1795, in the seventy-third year of his age."

The death

of ^Ir. Hart caused quite a sensation in the

religious world, eminent virtues

and many eulogies were passed upon his A leading Philadelphia newsand abilities. " His character is too well as follows of him paper spoke known to stand in need of description. Tlie endowments of
:

his

mind

his early

and unaffected piety

his abilities as a

Theologian and ^[inister of the Sanctuary; the regularity of his whole life ; his domestic virtues and universal philanthropy,

would

ample foundation for a newspaper enlogium. bore a long and tedious confinement with exemplary in patience, becoming resignation, and to the last was strong
afford

"He

faith,

giving glory to (Jod.


fur the

" 'Mark the perfect man and behold the upright, end of that man is ])cace."'

iiisToiJY

uF TiiK HAirr

r.vMir.v.

115
on
tlie

Anioni^ of

tlie fiiru'ral

tlisoourses ])r<>tioun('e<l
(.liviiios,

occasion

lu's (Iratli,

by

cuiiiicnt

wxs one
7tli,

loli\t>ro<l
17!>(i,

Furmaii,
publi-lu'cl

at
;

Charleston,

Fobniary

by Dr. which was

another by Dr. Wilh'ani Rogers, professor of and I>elle Letters ii) the nniversity of Pennsylvania, Knghsh
luul

delivered at lliipewell, April 10th,


lished

17!)(],

by particular
is

retpiest.

The

text

that

there

The widow and youngest chapter, and child were present at this discourse. Dr. Rogers preached
the substance of the same sermon at Southampton, on the 10th of .Tanuarv, the Sundav after the interment.

a great man fallen in part of the 3Sth verse.

which was also pub" Know ye not Israel." 2d Samuel, 3d

was

Mr. Hart was something of an author, but few of his ]>roThe ordy ones which have come into hands two arc one entitled " The (lospel church sermons, mj jmrtrayed and her orderly service pointed out," delivered at
ductions are extant.
Philadelphia,
at

the
;

opening of

the

I'aptist

association,

October 4th, ITDI

Inunble attempt to repair the christian temple," a sermon delivered in Philadelphia, October l*2th, 17S3, also at the opening of the
the other
entitleil,

"

An

association.

He

delivered a sernn^n on Thanksgiving Day,


17i^9, in Philadelphia,

Noveml>er 2Gth,
appeared
*'

in that city in 17tn. in

which was published Several others of his productions have

print, viz:

"Dancing Exploded
At
his death

;"

"A

funeral
;"

discourse on the death of the reverend "William

Tennant

Circular Letter on Christ's mediatorial character," and

''American Remembrancer."

he

left in

manu-

on public and script many valuable discourses delivered common occasions. In a letter to his brother .Toseph, dated

September

lOth, 177S,

lie

mentions that he sends him two


Their
title is

publications, the first he had made. but as he says that "one copy of
sister Edith," that

not given,

Dancing Exploded is for was probably one of them. He wrote considerable devotional poetry, but I have only been allo
to

rracc the following,' \erses a- being the i>ro<bicti<.in of hi>

IIG
pen.

IirSTOIiY

OF TIIK lIAUr VASllLY.


trial,

Tlicy were written at a season of great published after bis death :


"Foreboding thoughts and gloomy
fears

?nd wore

Crowd

thick into

my

breast

Perplexing doubts and anxious cares Forbid my soul to rest.

Happy ye

Saints,

above the
;

skies,

Beyond the reach of woe Dear Lord, command my soul With joyful haste I'll go.

to rise,
.

...
*

The world
-

in safckcloth

and
feet
;

distress,

I'd leave

beneath

my

And mounting
I

in a heavenly' tkess,

would

my Saviour

meet."

tveio-bt

lie was a friend to schools and learning, and gave the of bis bio-b character to advance the cause of virtue
religion.

and

The reverend doctor Fnrman,


in

his successor at

Charleston, and doctor Rogers,

their funeral discourses,

paid a high tribute to bis character as a man, a christian and a patriot. Dr. Furnian says: "As a christian and divine^
his character

was most conspicuous

no person who heard

his pious, expen'inental discourses, or his affectionate, fervent

who beheld the zeal and conprayer Btancy he manifested in the pid>lic exercises of religion, or
addresses to
in
;

God

the disinterestedness, luui>ility, benevolence, charity, devotion, and equanimity of tempef he discovered on all occasions'
in the private walks of
lite,

could for a

moment doubt

of

his^

He possessed being not only indf/, but einlnently religious. in a large measure the nioral and social virtues, and had amind formed for friendship." James Hardie, in bis Biographical Dictionary pays
following tribute
to
the:

the

memory

of ]Mr. Ifart.

He

says;
as-

"Mr. Hart was blessed with such


bis

strons; natural ah'dities

to lav a foundation for those frrateful services,

which from

youth

to a

good

old age he rendere(l to both cburcb and-

ifibTonv

OF

[in:

haut

rAMir-v.

State.

Ilis iiiKifj^iiiMtioii

wMs

livi-ly Mini
tlie

liis

jmlirincnf tiriii;

heiK'C thouirli he never enioved

advaiitacrcs re>ultinr troiii

[iri><;re>s tlir<iu:,'li any puKlic schonl or university; such were the improveinents of hi-; riun<l hy self-applicayet close rcadinir^ ainl haliitual i-etlection that few nien more tion,

a regular

richly deserve"! tln^se honors which,

hy

oui"

tir.-t

seminaries

of learning, have heen in bestowed. The college of


institution forwarded

many instances too uncautiously Khodo Island, however, was not


in

wh(dlv inattentive to his worth, tor


of Arts.

the vcar

17()I)

that

him a diploma constituting him

ilit-^er

lie scarcely left an c]ual in the religious society to

whi(di he belonged."

The reverend John


excellent,

Plake, in his

"Universal Biographical
the

Dictionary'' also pays a titting tribute to

memory

of this

man.

He

says:

"Mr. Hart

w;is a self-educated
;

man;

his

countenance was open and mardy his voice w;vs clear, harmonious and comnianding: his mental powers were strong,
being enrichetl with a fund of useful, classical, scientific and theoloirical knowlcdifc; and his tates were eleirant and
refined.

He wrote
:

were most evident


with

nuu'h devotional poetry. But his merits ;vs a chi'istian and a pastor; he walked
ethcacions irrace were

God

the do<'trines of free and

precious to him; his desire fir usefulne^ss was ai'dent and incessant."

The widow
late
in

of Oliver Hait remainevl at

Hopewell

until

the spring of 170(5, when, with her

young

son, she

returned to her
pjissed

the

There she family in South Carolimu remainder of her days. She die<l the 5th of
7.'5d

own

October, 181."V in the

were interred
Ihland.

in

the \\'il>on

year of her age, and her remain* burial ground on Wadmalaw

Oliver Hart \\a- the lather of ten children, eight by his Their names were Seth, first, and two by his second wife.

Eleanor, Hannah,
Silas

C>li\t.r,

.Tohn, Joseph, ^Iavv Baker, Sarah,

and \Villiam Roixcrs.

The

elde-t \\as born

November

118
18tli,

lILSTOliV

OF Tin:

llAliT FAMIfA".

1748, luul the youngest December


lUit four

13tli,

1784, thirty-six

years afterward.

were hving

at

his death,

OHver,

John,
all

]\rary ]>aker,

and Williani Ilogers.

Of

those deceased

died in iufancy except Eleanor, who Hved to the age of 32 She was the ehlest daugliter and next to eldest chikl, years.

On the Gtli of ]\Iarch, 1770, she was united to colonel Thomas Screven, a widower of Charleston, South Carolina, a member of one of the hest families in the State, and brother of the general Screven who was killed by
and the
tirst

married.

He the British and tories during the revolutionary struggle. his third 24th was wife bom of 1741. She was the June,
and he but twenty-nine years of age
at the

time of the mar-

After her dea':h, in 1782, he married a fourth time, riage. He was a member of the and died the 4th of i\Iay, 1804.

Charleston Baptist church, and many years a deacon. The Screvens were an English family. The first progenitor
of the name, the reverend William Screven, was born in England about 1G29. He emigrated to America and settled at Boston in 1G81, where he was a member of the Baptist church. In 1682 he began to preach, and the same year he became pastor of a church at Piscataway, !Maine. He was
so

much

persecuted on account of his religious

belief, that

he

was obliged to leave; and between 1682 and 1690, in company with several other Ba[)tists, he removed to Charleston, South Carolina. They established the first Baptist church in that citv, the same over which the reverend Oliver Hart afterward presided. Thence he removed to Georgetown, South Carolina, where he died in 1713. From him in regidar descent came James Screven, born in 170G. In 1737 he
intermarried with Mary, daughter of the landgrave, Smith, of South Carolina, and both died in 1758.

Thomas
Their

Bon, Thomas Screven, was the husband of Eleanor Hart. The Screven family, it is said, intermarried with the descendants of the counts of St. .luh'en, who emigrated to Carolina

IIISTOKY OF Tin:

HART

FAMir.Y.

119
(k'srciit

(luring the
tlie

rciij;n

f)f

Louis

XW.

'J'liey

cluiin

from

family of Lord 'riionui.-^ Croimvell. The Smiths are Hinoii'' the m)st tlistiii;;ui.-he(l ami wcalthv

people of South Carolina.


in

The

tirst

progenitor of the family

America, landirrave 'Jliomas Smith, was born at P^xeter, lie wa- compelled to leave P^ngland on England, in 1(148.
the restoration of

Charlo

II.,

because of the part he took


to

in

the Revolution, and in \(u2

emigrated lie settled near CharlesBceompanieil by his brother dames. ^vhile hir? brother removed to ]>o,-t(n. Tlie wife of ton,

lie

South Carolina,

John Adams, second President of descendant of James Smith. Tlie


a

the Uniteil States, was a

German

wife of the landgrave was On the l."Uh baroness, a beautiful young widow.

of ^lav,

1G91, he was created landirrave

bv the Enirlish

Li 10i)3 government, with a grant of 48,000 acres of land. he was commissioned governor of the province, which he

held until his death in 1(J84.


witli Sarah,

I lis

son

Thomas

intermarried

daughter of colonel Joseph l^hike, second son of the great English admiral of that name. lie lefr a numerous

progeny.

Thomas and Eleanor Screven had

seven children, four sons

and three daughters, Sarah, ^lartha, Thomas who died the day of his birth, James, ()liver, and P^leanor, all born in nine Four of the children died in infancy, and the rest years.
married,
ilartha, the eldest daughter of

Thomas

atul

Eleanor

Screven,
Carolina,

intermarried

with

about

ITUo,

Hcnjamin l^onneau, of Sjuth and had one daughter, Elizabeth

On the Vanderhorst, born in Charleston, ^May 31st, 1798. 2oth of May, 1820, she was nuuried to Samuel, son of John
and EHzabeth Murray, of Santee, South Carolina, and had issue eleven children, Jolm, ^\'il!iam Bonneau, Elizabeth Nelson, Martha Sc-re\en and l'>!lcn Cox, t%vins, Edward Lang,
Ellen Cox 2d, Kcnjamin Calhoun, Mary Cornelia, Elizabeth Nelson 2d, and (leorge fiercer, of which three are deceased,
Ellen,

Elizabeth,

and

I'cnjamiu,

and

six

marrit-d.

.John,

120

'

niSTOUY OF Tin: haut family.


intcnnarriod with
!M;irv, vouiiircst duutrliter

tlie eldest son,

of

colonel J: S. Spanii, the L'Uh of I)e{'end)er, 1848,

by whom

Jr.,

live children, Isabella Norella, Ellen llaJisom, John Ransom, and Sarah. Tiie second daughter is deceased. William ]3onneaii, the sect^ud son, married Caroline ]\Iiddleton, eldest dauiihter of colonel Robert H. Goodwvn, of Colund)i;i, South Carolina, October 27th, 1840, and had issue, Elizabeth Vanderhorst, Charlotte Thompson, William

he hud

Bonneau

Jr.,

Samuel

J.,

Eli;ial,>eth

Vanderhorst 2d, Caro2d.

line ]Middleton,

Emma Bradly,

James Nelson

Elizabeth,

]\Iartha Screven, James, Emily, and Sarah are deceased. the second daughter of Samuel J. and Elizabeth ^lurray,

intermarried with doctor

1848, and had issue

May, ilathew Singleton, Elizabeth Boimeau,

Mathew

S. ]\Ioore, the 4tli of

John Isham, Sarah Richardson, Arthur Rose, Samuel Murray, ^lartha and Screven, twins, Mary Cornelia, Burchell Ellen Cox 2d, the iit'th dauofhRichardson, and ^lacDonald. K. Bennett, and had issue live children, ter, married Isaac S. Samuel 3Iurray, Henry, Isaac S. K. J., J. C. Faber, and
William
daughter, of

Bonneau.

Elizabeth

Xelson 2d,

the

intermarried with S. J. Bradley, and


are living.

youngest had four

children, John,

whom

Gordon M., i\Iary ^Murray, and Samuel, all The youngest child, George Mercer,

married Martha Pinckney, and had one child, Plopson, now Samuel J. ]\Iurray was born June 22d, 1794, and deceased.

The family seat of the Murrays is at 1st, 1850. On the maternal side, the ^Murravs South Carolina. Sumter, descended from are landgrave Thomas Smith, and the revdied July

erend William Screven, the in South Carolina.

first

baptist minister

who

settled

liiKTOKV

(,)r

TJii; jj.\j;t

tamiix

121

ClIA I'TKR X

r,

'itifj>i(H<3]\I

Eleanor Screven, and grandson of the reverend >liver Hart, was horn Augnst IGth, 1774, and died the 12th of June, 1838. The

AS, the

eldest sou of

Tliomas
(

aiul

U^::^

31st of December, 1S03, he intermarried with ^Tary Ann, danghter of .Vrcliie an<l 3Iary .Vnn Smitli, of Charleston, by

whom

Ann, ^lartha, and Margaret, from whom have descended a nnmerous posterity. The eldest dauirhter of Tliomas and Marv Ann Screven
slaughters,

he had three

^lary

intermarried with Dr. George 1*. Frierson, son of John and Eliza Frierson, of St. John's JJerkley, Charleston district, October 20th, 1S.'5(). Dr. I'rierson removed t*,) Alabama and

thence Louisiana, where

1..:

now

resides, in

De Soto

parish,

on the bank of the

lied river, cniraLred in ])lantinir.

Bv him

she had seven children, four of


St.

whom

are living, William,

On the Julieii, and ^Mary Eleanor. George Archer, death of his tir>t Mife, November 19th, 1844, he married her sister ^Martha, November 2.')th, 184G, by whom he had eight
chiUlren,

four of

them

li\iiig.

l"'om-

of the sons

of Dr.

Frierson were

in the confetlerate
;

at Sharpsburg

"NVitten

killed

Jidien wounded at ^lanassas.

Archer was wounded army. at Chancellorsville, and St. The fourth son, Screven, was
at

a snro-eon.
1()

"\\'itten

was educated

Princettin college.

122

iiisTonv

01'

TiiK iiAirr FAMir.v.

made
tuuiul

liis

him

acquaintance tlie last year he was in college, and The phliitation of Dr. to lie a nohle young man.
ot"

Frier^un lay in the route

and he
trooi's.

s^utlered

great loss

Uanks' army u[> the Ked river, tVnm the (le[iredutions of the

The

vounirest dauiihter of Tluimas ami ^larv


]''ran(is

Ann Screven

intermarried Avith Dr.


Alahanui, }.[av
l."tth,

A.
is

IS.'U).

He
:

Lee, of Dahas county, son of I'aul and Jane E.

She had eight children, Lee, of Charleston, South Carolina. Thomas Screven, Trin<i;illa of "vvhom seven are liviuir, viz Althia, jMartha Eleanor, Julia Enima, Francis Audibon,
Burwell Boyken, and
the
eldest

Wm.

Henry.

One

child

is

married,

daughter, Tringilla, wlio was united to Julius Amelias Smith, of Charleston, the 2i)th of June, 1859, and "When the war broke out Dr. Lee has issue three children.

had but one


service.

son,

Thomas, old enough

He

volunteered in April,

to enter the military 18G1, joinmg the first

of cavalry raised in Alabama. He was engaged in nearly all the leading hattles, ftom fort Pickois to ^Marietta, He was captured at the latter place, while on Georgia.

company

picket, July 4th, 1864, the close of the war.


also

]\Ir.

and confined at camp Douglas until Smith the son-in-law of Dr. Lee

served throuirh the war, as an artillerist. !Marv, the wife of Thomas Screven, died October 2i)th, 1819.

Eleanor, the yomigest daught^-r of

Thomas and Eleanor

Screven, intermarried with John, son of John and Siisaima He was born in 17G9. His Cox, December 22d, 1800.

England, about 1750, and York, where he married a daughter Albany, of John Johnson, the ancestor of judge William Johnson, late of the United States suj)reme court. Jolin Cox, senior,
father

emigrated from

Surry,

Fettled at

New

was
ton,

killed

bv

beiui--

thi-own from his carriaire in Albanv,


to Charles-

about 1770.

His widow soon afterward removed


in
180.'j,

South Carolina, Mhere she died

leaving five

children.

Tlu^ youngest son, as well as the vouni>;(>st child

iiKsTOKV

OF Tin;

iiAKi

r.wiii.v,

1_';}

of

tliese pai'ti(\^, inarrioil Kloaiior Si-rcvtMi,

t1i('

i^r:iii(lil:uiu;liter

of Oliver
three

Hart.

Tliov
Jo>'jili

liatl
I

oiirlit

cliIMrcii,

ti\c sons ainl

dani^lit^-rs,

fart,

'^riidiiias

S., .Inlni

Joliii^on,

Eleanor Susan,
Klizalieth, and

.Ti>lin

\\'a>liin:/tc>n,

Marv

Aniareiitlia,

Sarah
(h'ed

Iu>lK'rt.

Six are h;cea>e<l, of wliieh five


Ii<.rn

without

issue.

The

eldest son, .Tose[>li,

()ct(.lM'r

iSth,

18U1, (lie(l in Aberdeen, ]\Ii>sis.-i|)j.i, Januarv ITtli, lS.">f). He married ^Fargaret L., dauuditer <if Isaae Le Xoir, of S >uth Carolina, Oetol)er Kith, iS.'lt, and ha<l seven children, Mary

Amelia,

Thomas

S.,

Isaae

Le
the

Xoir, Sarah Sereven, Eleanor


'2A,

Screven, Sarah

Screven

and

Addia Ainarentha.
i>idy

Three died
ried.

in Infancy,

three are

.>inLr]e

and

one

is

mar-

P>!ean<r,

the third dauirhter, horn in

IS^J, married

Augustus J. PiuTi', of NewPjern, North (.'arnlina. and ha? two children, Augustus and Eleanor. I'hey reside in Hale Thomas, the eUle-t sr.n, is living in county, Alal>anui.
AVashiuirton countv. In that State, unmarried.

Eleanor Su^;^l, the eldest daughter of John and Eleanor Cox, born Oetoher 17th, ISdS. intermarried with l>r. ^^'illia^l Luyten :\IcCa:v, the J4th of.Iamiary, 1 S.",(\ Ho was horn at

August Stlu ISOO, studied medi1S22 cine, and in graduated at the univer>Ity of Pennsylvania. He emiirrated to MareuLTO count\-. Alabama where he resldeil

Camden,

Soutli Carolina,

until his death, 'May 20th,

IS,").").

The McCaa

funily

is

of

Si'oteh descent

and came
is

orlirlnallv

from the Hiirhlan<ls of

Scotland.

The name

pure Gaelic,
is

children of the crow."

It

and signifies "the said that the ancestor of ^Vil-

liam Euyten f )ll<jwed the baimer of the unf )rtnnate prince Charles to Cullodin in 174'), under I. iclilel of Cameron. His

name was John.


lie

He

afterward settled
s.uis

In

l)mnfries,
to

where

probably

died.

His three

emigrated
.Tohn,

.Vmeriea

al)out the close of the revcihitionary war.

from

whom

our branch of the fimily South Carolina whi're he marrle


I>

dcsi-ended, settled near


1

Louisa ()"Kain.

Camden, He was

an active, enterprising bu-inc>< m\n, a m.Mvhant, planter,

ll>4

1II8TOUV

01'

Tin: IIAKT FAMILY.

and

null

owner,
in

and

amassed groat

wealtli.

Ho was

jl

Federiilist

politics,
Ity

and

licld

otKce nndor

John A<htns.

He
The

lost hoavily

a tire and afterward

by the Embargo-.
luul tbnr c'liildren.

\ViIliain T.nvten
eldest,

.McCaa and Eleanor Cox

He Engeno, Mas Ixtrn Xoveinlier .'50tli, 1830. in afterward South Carolina IS.jl, college grudnated and is now in stndied law and was admitted to the bar
at the
;

The other three children practice at Deniopolis, Alabama, ai-'e Mary Louisa, Amelia, and Bona, all unnuirried. 3Iary, the second daughter of John and Eleanor Cox, intermarried
with Dr. James R. Jones, of ]\Iarengo county, and has issue four children, PLlizabelh Fiimey, Roberta Daisy, and James
Robert.

John Cox died

in Charleston,

in

1829,

and his

widow in ]Marengo county, Alabama, February 17th, 1845. The coat of arms of the Cox family was a Pheasant on a field The mend)ers of this branch of the descendants of azure.
office, nor meddled in public from but inattei's, generation to generation been quiet southern planters, neither buying nor selling slaves, but from father to son inheriting ample estates and good social

Oliver Hart ha\'e never held

position.

They

Oliver, the fourth

suffered greatly by the war. child and eldest son of the reverend

Oliver and Sarah Hart, was l)orn at Charleston, the 7th of

November, 1754. I have not been able to learn anytliing of He studied medihis youth, and but little of his manhood. He was asurgeori cine and settled in practice in Charleston. in the revolutionary army, but it is not known how long he remained in service. On the 19th of November, 1778, he
intermarried with Sarah Brockenton, of Charleston. letter written by his father to his brother Joseph, of
In a

War-

minster, in the [)revious January, in speaking of her who is soon to become a daughter-in-law, he says: " She is a poor of a virtuous character, who I may hope will make girl, but

him

a good wife.
six

They had

Her parents have been dead many years." children, Sarah, Thomas Washington,. Eleanor,

1IKST0I:\

OF

Tfli:

HACT FAMILY.
Arai'v, aii<l

125
.Tnlm died in

^I;irv, Oliver, iuul Jnlin,


iiifuiicv,

'I'li()nia>,

and Saiali died

vduiii:
let'*^

and

iinniairied, wliile

Eleanor
father,

and Oliver married and


die<l
in

i>sue.

Oliver Hart,

tlic

September or October, 17!H>, and bis


His two sur\Ivinir
tlie

widow about
emiijrated to

the year 1800.

cliildren

Kentuekv with

tarnilv of their uncle lieniamiu ^lerrell,

who manned
and remained

became members of
in
it

Mary, the youngest sister of their father. They liis faniilv, by whom thev were adopted,
until tlu^y t^ettled in
life.

The

daughter,
a Mr.

Eleanor, nuirried three times.

Her

first

husband was

Stout, a merchant, the sec()nl, Mr. Harris, a planter, and the She left two third, a Thomas Ikmnett, likewise a planter. Bons, a Stout and a Harris, but had no children by her third

husband.
but
I

The

s<:>n,

Oliver, also married

and

hail

cliildren,

have not been able

to learn anythini; of

them except

that one of his sons, Oliver,

where he

settled,

removed to Xashville, Tenne.-see, married and died, leaving a large and


tifrh

respectable family. John, the second son ai\d

('hild

of Oliver and Sarah

I Hart, was born at Charleston, the (>th of March, 17.jS. at him until he arri\ed tit'teen of of have no record years age. In 1773 he was entered a fre^hinan at Khod.e Island eolletre,

then

under the maiuigement of the distinguished doctor.

From the little we kn(>w of ^Manning, his father's friend. him John was a wild \-outh in his college davs, and gjive sore Under date of November 5th, displeasure to his father.
1773, about
^Ir.
Ills

Hart writes
son
:

to Dr. ^^[auning in the following strain

"I am sorry John has so conducted so as to ijive you so much trouble, and to forfeit the place he had under the maiuigement of ^frs. ]\[amnng. Had 1 been apprised of his
unworthy comhict sooner, perhaps
liim back to Carolina, for
I

should liave remanded


in

am

not
in

such affluent circum-

Btances as to throw

away money

the education of one


I

who

has no yiew

to his

own

ailvantaie.

thank

y(^u,

however.

12G
for
all

iiibTOKV or

THE

iiaut family.

the
trial

]t:uiis

vou have taken

Avltli

him, and that vou have

made
that

ehuuld

I should he sorry he of the discipline of the rod. He also mentions return a ^vorthless blockhead.''

him hut once in twelve months, and on him to M-rite. His father nr<]^es Planning him for his neglect, over and over had sharjily rcj>roved It is to he hoped the application of the rod had a again. John was probably under salutary effect on the wild youth. the care of Dr. Planning before he entered college, and most likely he was fitted by him to enter that institution. The American Revolution broke out when John Hart was

John had written


l)r.

to

to pi-e\ail

in

the midst of his college career.


to

Being an enthusiastic

patriot he took up arms


at

defend the colonies.

He

fought

Hill as a private, and no doubt was a member of a company of students that marched to the defence of Boston.

Bunker

delay only prevented him taking part in the battle of He graduated in 1777, at the age of nineteen, and Lexington.

Some

returned to South Carolina.


fiill

The Revolution was now

uiu.ler

headwav, and he immediatelv re-entered the service, and was commissioned a lieutenant in the 7th South Carolina
brother Joseph of Warminster: and seems to long for an opporarmy, his of valor. I doubt not his courage, but tunity improving wish he may have equal conduct, and not be too rash." He rose to the rank of ca[)tain. He was taken prisoner by
his

continental regiment. 1778, writes thus to

His father under date of January,

"John

is still

in the

the British at the capture of Sa\annah, in June, 1778, and sent to New York, where he endured jirreat sufferinj;. He

was liberated on his parole and returned to Charleston, but soon afterward resigned his commission. While at college ho had studied medicine ; but as he never finished the course nor
took his degree he relinquished the profession and establisiied himself in trade at Charleston, where he continued to reside

The 17th of June, 1784, Mr. Hart married several years. the second danirhter of ircncral James Screven, of ]\Iarv,

nisT<i:v

(!

Till: iiAi;T

iwMir.v.

127
in
tlie

Soiitli

C';iruliri:i.

He

m;i>

proiniiicnf

a"-ti>r

south
life

during' our aiul lortuno

rin olntiniiary
f.)

(ti-iii:;_'lf,

ami

^ai-rlticod
..t"

liotli

the cau^t".

^V!lilt in

]>ur~iiir

the Britisli

niid torios lie r-auu' ^'Ul^l(Ml1\ ujinii

tln'm in the
(Jcur^'i-i.

swamp, near

<f his aides IJlicrty coimfy, "here exclaimed, are, (Je.'ieral," when the iiiranfidii-ly they latter t'ell murtally wouiided, with eleven bullets in his bodv.

!Me<l\vay cluirrli,

()m'

lie wa- carried fo the cliurrli. but afterward to the house of

colonel

P^lliott,

where he wa-

left

under the prt^teetion of a

white fla^ and a small guard, in a dying ci^nditiijn. The eneniv tired the house over his head, and while he was being: carried out he expired on the ste[s. He was ])in-ie<l in the

Medway
arouml

cemetery,

and tradition
death.

reports

that

his

grave

\va-

indicate his
liis
it.

l)li>o(lv

painted black ami ti[)[)ed CoiiLrrcss voted a monument to

the paling with red to

memory, but the appropriation was never made to build The wife of John Hart was a niece of Thomas Screven,
^Tr.

the husband of his sister KleaTior.

Hart continued
His
tir>t

to reside

in*

Charleston after

hi,^

mar-

riage.

business viMiture after that e\"ent was the

establishing a store at
cessful.

Monk's corner, whit-h was not suc-

He

afterward taught school for a time.


i:>f

He

wa,s
;

then elected sheriff


but betbre his term

Charleston

district, a lucrative othce

ha<l expii'eil

he removed to Columbia and

otiice,

On the expiration of his discharged the duties by deputies. about the close of the century, he rem(>ved to I^^xing:

district, where he erected mills where he passed the remainder of his

tun

thence to (Iraid)y,
^\'hile

lite,

there he

tilled variou-;

public otHces, such as clerk of th(> court, ordin-

He became a judge of the inferior court, vV'c., t.V:c. professor of religion in early lite, and himself and wife were
ary,

members

of the

Ba[>tist

church.

In

17S4,

and

for

some

years afterward, he wiU'^ one (f the tru.-tees of the Charleston Ba]ttist church of which lii> father was formerly pastor; and in ITS!) and 17i>< he wa<mainl\' in^tiMunental in i-.aisimr means

1"28

iirsToUY OF

TiTi: iiAiiT

r.uirLY.

to pjiy

oft"

the debt on the chuicli.

He was

member

of tho

society of the Cineimiati.

He
lii.s

died at CJranbv, 8oiitli Carolina,

^lareh 17th,

1814,

and

remains were interred

in

the

In December, 1815, his Baptist grave yard at that place. widow and children removed to Sunbury, Liberty comity, Late in life Georgia, where she died December 27th, 1845.
slie

received a pension from the government for the revolu-

tionary services of her huskind.

iii,"^^>vv

or

'i^ii: !i

urr iamilv.

12'J

CII

APT

1:1;

"'^(:^f(">IIX

Hart

w.is

tlio

fiitlier

<f

nine diildren,

.^i.K

son.'?

>^^

and three daughters, Oliver James, Esther ^lary, John Screven, Charles Thomas, Henry William, The Elizabeth Screven, Odingsell ^V., and Smith Screvun.
!Martlia L.,
tirst

and fourth chiM died


:

in int'anev

the second at the aire


u[>

while the others grow of seventeen years Six were living womanliootl and married.
the father.

to

man and
death of

at the

Of these, .Marflia L., tjie eldest, horn July lOth, 1790, intermarried with John '., son of ;-aptain John Bell, She lived less tiian a year of Granby, December ."U^t, ISIS. at^er her marriage, and died Xovember l-3th, 1819, without
(

issue.

Her

husl>and survived until

1S').">.

Charles Thomas,
at

the

fifth

child,

and

elde.-t

son,

was born

Charleston,

lie intermarried with Ann CathSeptejnber 2Gth, 1794. arine, daughter of the reverend Jacob Durdiam, of Liberty

the 4th of January, 1819, and died -Vpril of this marriage was one daughter, was who marrieil to William R. (riguilliat, Helen ^lary, of ]\[cIntosh county, September 19th, 1838. (.re<n-gia,

county, Georgia,
'Idle

3d, 18^54.

is.sue

They had
revocation

fi\'e

children,

all

sons.

Her husband
with
the St.

is

of an

old Huifuenot familv which emiirrated from France after the


i>f

the

edict

of

Xantz,

Juliens,

DuPonts and
^liildreji,

others, and
I\., tin-

settled in

South Carolina.
law

Of

their

"William

ildcst. >tudic<l

at the uni\ ersitv

]7

I.'5()

iiisT(i;v oi' iiii:

iiakt iwMir.v.

lie of Virginia, and settled in practice at Darien, Georgia, intenuari'Ied with TIattie TIcywood, (tf Aikcii, 5>.)utli Carolina,
also a descendant of a

Huguenot

family,

and

lias

three chilClilhert.

dren.

Two

of the

sons are

twins,

'^riiomas

and

The foi'nier married Kllen J>arl)ara, granddaughter of the reverend C. O. Screven, of A\'althonville, (Jeorgia, but the
latter
is sinirle.

During the war

A\'illia!n li.

was a lieutenant

of artillerv, and the tv.in-bi'others were mend)ers of a cavalrv


couipaiiy.

Gieenwood, the beautiful family residenee on

the

baid-cs

army.

of the .Vltamaha river, was burned by the Federal Tleury William, the sixth child a!id fourth son of
Ilnrt,

John and ]Mary

was born

in

Cobnnbia, South Carolina,

July 13th, 1798. He settled in Edgefield district in 1823, wliere he married Harriet Beams the loth of Anonist of that
j-ear.

baptised by Dr. He afterward ^Manly and united with the Baptist church. remo\ed to near Tnskaloosa, Alabama, where he entered the
children.
mini.-try,

They had no

He was

married ^\'illiam V.
Elizabeth

and died there August 1st, 183(). His widow riiifer, and still resides at Tuskaloosa.
Screven

Lee, the sc\enth child and third daujrhter of John arul ?darv Hart, v,as born at Charleston, the 25th of Eebruai'v, 1801. On the 2r>th of January,
1820, she was united

of Liberty

county,

nuirriage to captain Joseph Jones, (Jeorgia, son of major John Jones,


in

aide-de-camp to general 3IeIntosh who was killed at the His &iege of Savannah during the i evolutionary war. grandfather emigrated fiom Wales and settled in Chaileston,

where he married

into one of the first families of the city.

The granduK^ther

of nuijor Jones was 3Iary }\ewton, who claimed lineal descent from Sir Isaac Xewton. The husband

of Elixa))eth Hart was an extensive and successfid planter, and a gentleman of wealth and relinement. He coumiandcd

a company of cavalry
children,

in

the

war of 1812.
are
in

I'hev had fourteen

of which

four

only

living,

Henry, Eiruna,

Andrew, and Helen,

Tlii-ee died

infancy, and one, the

iiisnca' OF

riii:

ii

ai:i

I'.win.v,

i;u

vouiiijost, at tlio

eldest

soil,

\v:v.s

Charles Berrien, the of flfNcu years. at the (Ji'orL,Ma iini\er>it_v aii<l at"tercihicateil
ai;t'

Nvard studied law.

After practiciii;^ a tew years he settled as

a {>lantcr
Clarion

in T.iherty eoiinty.

He

Ix'canie a j'roniinent

man,
of

and was a
S.,

nienil>er
tlanixliter

of of

tlie

(ieoi-ixia

>enate.

Ih'

married

\\'illiaiii

and Mary

.Vnder.-on,

Waltlionvillc, and had five children, Charles ]\[arioii. Mary <.renivievo, WilHani Anderr-on, Sarah .Vmlerson, and ,Iu>c[>li

^laxwell.

He

die<l

at

Savannah,

Al'id

-"^tli,

is.")?.

.His

eldest son entered the confederate

the war, beinLT twice wounded.

fouj^dit thronL^h 'Jhc e!de.~t dau:^hter is like-

army and

wise married.

Evelyn

Pihuiisa, the

Mc.nd
.Ti

eliild

of

.Tosc[ili

and Elizaheth Jones, intermarried with


and had
died
issue

s<'ph A. Andersor,

two children,

]H's>ie

ami K\ a Ji'scphine.

She

November 2 l>t, 1S4!\ and her hu>l>and in April, 1S()(). Both were memhers of the ^leilway Pre-Iiyterian church. Their youmrcst daugliter intermarried with James lo.ss, of

Thomas connty. Henrv Hart Jones,


(U'orixia university

the third cliiM, was educated at the

and settled as a planter near Sunhury. "While a student at collejxe he joined the ^ledway chmeh. The 21st of May, 1S4(!, he married Ahhie S., daughter of

Samuel Dowse,

wealthy planter of liurke county.


Josej.!!,

They

had nine children,

Henry,

Evelyn, Ella Sturgis,

James, Newton, Eli/a Eow, Stuatt Howse, J< hn Sturgir, Abhie Auirusta, and Hem-v Hart, The tii.-t four and the When the war liroke out ^Ir. last named are deceased.
Jones entered the service
as a member of the Liberty C(Mmty to command the eleventh detailed afterward troop, but wa.s He lost verv heavilv. Un the return district of (Jeor'da.

of peace he established him.-elf in the men-antile bu^ines.s at James Cuthbert, where he likewi.-e etlits a newsi>aper. Elizabeth and of child Jones, fourth the Newton, Jo.-eph

devoted his time excluslvelv


bar, his fathei's plantation.

to I'lanliuir,

ami resided

at

Load-

He became a

professing christian

132
at sixteen vtais

lllteluUV

UF
Tii

Till: ilAr;T

FAMff.V,

ut'.'i!:;^.

XoVcmherj 1851,

Ik-

Intcniuin'fed

with

Sarali .lane
eliil'l,

had one
After
\vliere
liis

Xonuaii, of iJlierty ((mity, by whom lie lie (li(<l OctoLer 8tli, 18.34. a daiigliter.
aiul
cliild

death his u idow


ii>w resi(h'.

i-einuved to Savaniiahy

they

He was

n gentleinau of great

worth

Knuna Ak'laide, the fifth- child, and died nuieh regretted. married Dr. Stephen X. HarrKs, of IJryan county, in Augiib% lie established himself in practice at Savannah, where 184(5. She had four children. he died of yellow fever in 1854. She afterward removed to Liberty county, where she married
Columbus
of 18-58.
raid,

Harris, a brother of her

first

husband,

in

the

fall

Their resilience was


it

in the track of Kilpatriek's

whose men robbed


Augusta,
]Max\vell,

of

all

moveable property.
intermarried

Ilettie

the sixth

chil<l,

with Dr.

Troup

of Florida,

the

l'2th of

Two

years after the marriage thev settled in Tallahassee.

December,. 1848. In

removed to Key West, and soon afterward was appointed surgeon of the United States hospital at that His wife and cbild died there of yellow fever the place.
April, 1857, he

He returned to Tallahassee on the following Septend)er. death of his wife, and two years afterward married a second
time.

When

the war
ice,

ljrt)ke

out he raised a

company

for the

coLfederate ser\

and was afterward commissioned colonel

of the 5th Florida cavalry.


battle of jVIissionarv

He was

taken prisoner

at

the

Johnson's island,
nandina,
Florida,

liidii-c and confmed eiirhteen months on lake Erie. At present he resides at Fer-

of mIu'cIi

town he

is

mayor.

Edward

Joseph, the seventh child, died at the age of two and a half

The eighth child, Andrew ]\Iaybank, graduated with years. distinction at the university of Georgia, and commenced the
study of medicine
to
in

Savannah, but

ill

health compelled

him

a planter. In 185G he intermarried with Evelyn A., daughter of Robert Harrison, of Amelia island, Florida,
lution.

become

and graiuldaughter of colonel Cooper, a patriot of the RevoFor a time thev lived on the i.-laud, but atUn-wayd

ifi.vroKV

(II-

Tfn;

rf.\i:r

CAMif.v.

1;^:>

renins

c<I t<j

JiK.'ksotn

illc.

I'1<ri<la,

wlicre

lie

studied law

and
wius

Wlien the war lirokf mit he piuctice. eoniinissioTied a lieutenant in the ]>t Florid;w regiment.
(oiiiinciu'cd

He

served u year

in \'iri:inia, |>artici[)ating in

town

and

the

battle
tt>

of

the siege of Yorkhealth ^Villia^l^h^^lg, when ill

compelled him
dwelling

re.-ign.

He
his

returned

home

to

find his

hurneil

dnwn and

family refugees.
t\\<>

He now
Edwin

resides in Fernandina, Florida,

and has

rhildren.

West, the ninth ehild and


died at the
aire

sixth son of
in

Jones, niarrie<l in S;ivannal

IS.^7,

Joseph and Elizabetli and had one son who

of three vears.

He

volunteered in ISGl, and

an artillery company in the army of Virginia. He was killed by the bullet of a sharpshoDter at the battle of Sharixsl)urir, while nianninir his i^un, and buried at nijrht, bv
served
in
liis

comrades, under a

tree.

His widow married a second


the

time.

Tlionias

Screven

and

Elliott

^laxwell,

tenth

and

eleventh children, died

Jo>e[>hinc Caroline, the twelth child, was educated at tlu"seminarv of Miss Thirstun,
in infancy.

at Elmira, New York, and on the l.-t <jf August, 1857, intermarried with l)r. J. J. ^lawvell, of l^rvan county, Georiria,

Soon atter marriage nephew of her sister Hettie's husband. thev removed to Kev West, whither her husband went to assist She was taken liis uncle in the care of the marine hos[iital.
with the yellow t'ever a few days after her arrival, and died tlie 13th of September, at the age of Hghteen years and a
bride of only six weeks.

Her

sister

had died of the same


r^:)\iis:u

disease a few davs previously.

Helen

the thirteenth

child, was united in marriage to Dr. K. A. Quarterman, a graduate of the Philadel[)hia medical scluxil, in July, 18G"2. He was assistant surireon in the confederate armv, and now

has charge of a tnedical school


wife
is

at Cuthbert, Georgia. His a meml)er of the Presbyterian chnrdi, her mind having been first awakened on the subject of religion by a sermon of Kcnnedv, the " bov i>ie:u-licr," while at Sai'ato^a in 18C)*'-

134

HJSTOUV

01'

Tin: llAUr I'AMU.V.

The

Vduiigorit child died at tlie fige of eleven years.

Ciiptaiii

Jones died the ISth ot" Ortoher, 184(5, in the sixty-second His (hath was^ caused hy au accident. year of his age. "While driving over his plantation to note the damage done

by a severe stonn,
threw him
three days.

his horse

out, injuring

became frightened, ran away and him so severely that he survived but

Odingsell Witherspoon, eighth child of John and Mary Hart, was born in South Carolina, Decend)er Uth, 1803. He

was educated

at

the Georgia university, and settled as a

He amassed a large fortune, but lost planter near Sunbury. most of it during the war. He was twice married ; the tirst
]\Iary Caroline Stevens, January 12th, 1826, whose had emigrated to Georgia from Vermont. Three of her brothers were Baptist ministers, one of them a missionary to India. They had tive children. The eldest son is deceased.

time to

father

Edward Henry, is a physician, aiul is settled at Camden county, Georgia. He internuuiried with Esther Dunham, of Liberty county, by whom he had one

The

second,

Jefferson,

son. to the
is

Dr. Hart served as a surgeon in the confederate army end of the war. His youngest son, Charles Thomas,

also a physician,

and graduated
filled

at the Cincinnati

medical

college,

where he

medical journal for some was practicing in northern ^lissouri, whence he entered the confederate apmv as a surgeon. He intermarried with Dora
Kelley, by Arkansjrs.

professor's chair and edited a time. When the war broke out ho

whom
The

he

luis

one

child.

They now

reside in

wife of Odingsell Hart died in 1836, and two years afterward he intermarried with Sarah, a daughter of colonel Wilson, aiul granddaughter of general Stewart, of

By this marriatie he has ei<rht children. Liberty county. His second wife died September loth, 1858. The wealth
and intelligence of Mr. Hart gave him prominence among his fellow citizens. He held several [)laces of ])ublic trust, ami represented Bryan county foiu- sessi(jns in the legislature. At

IIISTuKV nr Tin; IIAl:T lA.MIf.V.

1;''>

tliC

r]iQ of the
111.'

war

lie iviiii\

dl

to Qiiitiii:m

l?rr>oks conntv,

was w.i^ and killed at the liattle of CoUl army, Arltor. The yonii::(\^t was tlirce times marrle<l and had si\ children while the eldot danirhter, }dary C'arjlino, interX\hcrc
ill

Mow

ri'.-ides.

Ills cl<li>>t

son

l)y his >ecori(l wife

thi* conff(](.ra*i'

married with

'riioiiin- I'ai-ki-r,
i>\'

of l'>ryan conntv, hv

whom

she

had two children, one


in
1S(1;',.

them deceased.

Her hn-hand died

Smith Srreven* the ninth ami yonn;,'C>t child of John and Marv Hart was Ix-rn in Lexington (h'.-trict, S. .nth Carolina,
Ajiril

loth,

iSm;.

He
re.-ide
1

settled as

planter

in

his native

some years, when he removed to He was thrice married. His tir.-t \\'alth<:)nville, Jeoriria. wife was Mary Coleman, who died two years after his marcounty, where he
(

riiiire,

leaving; a S(n wlio lived ten

months.

He
c)U.-^in

intermarried
of
liis

a second time with Elizaheth


"vvite,

Fnltoii. a

first

he had Hve children, Thomas Henry, John, Mary Caroline, Mari<>n, and Screven, of which the four elder are living. The eldest son was a soldier in the confederate

hy

whom

armv
^Ir.

was taken
at

T>risoner at

lettv.-hurir,

and

tell

mortallv

M-ounded

Cold Arbor.

At'ter the

death of his second wife

Hart intermarrieil with Harriet .Vtwood Newel, oidv child of reverend Samuel Newel, missi(uary to Ihirmah, in
ISoG.

He
to

liad four children

hy

this mari'iage,
;

two of which
at

are living.

He

died Fehruary ^(irh, 180G

wiien his wife

returned
Elinira,

the nortii

ami now resides with her aunt

New

York.

He was
<IIeil

memher

of the

Baptist

church.

The widMW

of

John Hart

Hecember

27th, 1S4.5.

the third daughter of Oliver and Sarah Hart, ^lary Mas born at Charleston, S'ptemher (Uh, 17<)2. The Ilth of
]*>aker,

January, ITM', whom ^he had


^Martha, and

.-^he

intermarried with IJenjamin Merrell, by tive children, Sarah, .John Mclver, Wilson,

^Maria.

About

1>^<'.')

,,r

iSdG colonel

3Ierrell
a ]>lan-

removed with

his familv to

Kenfuckv, and settled mi

I'M)

iin5Tt)i:v

or Tin: iiAUr family.


three miles fntin

tation

called BelvidiTc,

Lexington.
^\"ite

TTc

amassed a large fortune.


the date of their decease
intermarried with
is

Here

liiniselt'

and

died, but

not known.

The

eldest daughtiT

by

whom

l^arton, a merchant of Lexington, 'IMie elder she had two sons, Abraham aiul John.
ajxe

Abraham

died at the

of twentv-onc,
liis

at

Ilavanna, island of Cuba,

whither he liad ironc for

vounix and met a violent death.

sons of Benjamin and 'Slniy to tlie far west with their fanu'lies, which

John married verv John and Wilson, the two Merrell, marriejl and removed to
licalth.
is

tlie

last

that

known

of them.

The second

daughter, ^Martha, late in

life

married Thomas Bennett, the former husband of her cousin The marriage was an unfortunate one her Eleanor Hart.
;

spent her fortune and afterward deserted her. the vounirest dauohter, died sin2:le. ^laria, yC The reverend Oliver Hart had tw(j children l>y his second wife, Silas who died three weeks after his birth, and William
liusband

He was educated in Rogers, born Decend)pr loth, 1784. South Carolina among his mother's kindred, and is spoken of by those who knew him in his youth as a gay and dashing young man. The 27th of December, 1809, he intermarried with Sarah, an estimable and wealthv vouuij ladv, dauii'hter
of
lina.

James and Elizabeth Thev had three

Clark, of Edisto island. South Carochildren, AVilliam Charles,

Thomas

31r. Hart settled as Bannister Seabrook, and Oliver James. a planter on Wadnudaw island, where he resided during his 182.">. His widow survived him life, and died in ]\larch,

until

February 17th, 1844.

Their remains wei'e buried at

the Clark family burial ground on Edisto. The eldest son died The second son is a bachelor April 2d, 18G0, unmarried. and resides with his yijunger Ijrothei-. The thin! son, Oliver

James, studied medicine and settled on \\'admalaw as a The 2(3th of February, 1845, he internuirried with planter.

Joanna

Adelila, dauirhter of Richard

and ^farv Sealv Town2")th,

send, of the

same

islanil.

Slu'

was born Apiil

1828,

iiisTORv or Tin:

hakt tamift.
suns
jiiid

137
three

'J'lio is.-iio

(.if

(hi.-

iiiani.igc

is

nint^ cliililrcn, six

<J;iiig}iters,

eii,'ht

of

whom

are

liviii;^.

AVlieii

the Federal

approached Charleston at the heijinning of the war Dr. Hart and his tarnilv retired into the interior of the State,
trooi>5

where thev remained


i-lantl.

nntii iteare

^Vi^ianl

lii>gcr.->

Hart

was

when thev returned tlie named t""r professor


ti.)

lk\'ilh'am

Rogers of the
tlie

univer.-itv of Pennsylvania, the inti-

mate
l>orn

frien<l

of his father.
third (lauu;hter of .Tolm

Kdith,

and Eleanor Hart, was


Nothinir
is

the 4t]i

of Mav,

1727.

at

"Warminster.

known
was

of her nntil the 2!>th of Se[>tember, 1748, when she married to Isaae Ilongh, who lived in Bueks or Mont-

gomery connty.

She had eleven

children, Eleanor, Elizabeth,

Susannah, John, Mary, Isaac, Thomas, Oliver, Silas, Joseph, and William. The youngest child was born the 12th of
Septemlier, 1770. the age of man or

So far as known all tlie tdiildren lived to womanhood. Nine of theui married and

had children, and two, ^lary and William, died unmarried. Edith and Isaac Hough were both members of the Southampton l^aptist church. The records state that they were
baptised August 1st, 1772, by tlie reverend Mr. A'anllorn, ''and received into church fellowship, by [irayer and imposition of haiuls, the next day.''
tlie

Their remains

lie

buried in

His occupation was that of old grave yanl at that place. a f;u-mer. He died the loth of April, 178G, while his wid^nv
survived him nearly twenty vears, and died 3Iarch 27th,
IS 0-3.

ilv knowledire of

litli

Hart's descendants

is

verv limited.

The eldest daughter, December ISth, 17(5(5.

Eleanor, married

TIuMiias

Craven,

They

resided in

liucks ci^unty, until about 177S,

when

townsliip, they removed to Eou-

Waiwick

Their removal was probably caused don county, N'iigiiiia. She was the bv the near ajiproaeh of the British army. iiiother of nineteen childroi-, of wlom nine were sons and born in Bucks county. the Hi'.-t eight ten daiiirhters * l)eing ^ IS
:
_

,1:1S

][is!'iti;v (ir

hi: iiai;i' rA.Mir.v.

'\\\i) ot" thi'in

wvvQ twins, ;i'i<l >i.\ (HcmI in iiitUiiey. Seven of the children married and had ehikh'en horn to them. ]0(htli,

Ahner, and riTariiaret married Sinchxir-s, of Virginia, John married Catharine Duh'n, of Loudon county, for his tiist wife,

und
^vith

at

Ehzabeth P.

her deivth six months after marriage, ])orrell, of Fairfax county.


;

lie

intermarried

Josiah married
;

and Ehzabeth Shepherd Joseph married Harriet Stcere The hitter liad twin-dauirhKlcanor married Robert Owens.
ters.

Tlionu^s Craven, the husband of Eleanor


8th, 1795.

Hough, died

February doubt live

The descendants

of Eleanor

Hough no

in \'irii'inia to this dav.

John, the eldest son of Edith and Isaac Hougli, married Charity \'andescn, !May 1st, 1774, and had one daughter born in Virginia. His wife died in 1810.
Susanna, the third
daughter, married
issue

Benjamiu Jones,

June

one daughter. married Elizabeth Ilarton, April second son, Isaac, the She died 2oth, 1781, by whom she had three children.
23d,

17th, 1773, and had

December
Eberth,

1788,
IGth,

when ho married
1793,

]Mrs.

Elizabeth

February

by whom

he likewise bad

three children.

Two

of their sons, Constant and


into

George

Washington, marijed and had issue.

the families of Smith and Prall

Thomas, the

third son of Edith and Isaac

Hough, married
he had eight

Hannah Tompkins,
children, six sons

April

1st,

1790,

ly

whom

and two daughterKS.

Oliver, the fourth sou, married

Phebe Cadwallader, April

16th, 1790, bv
six daughters.

wdiom he had eiiilit children, two sons and Three <jf the daughters and one son died in

infancy.
ley,

The third daughter, Jlary, nuirried Samuel Yardwho was a merchant at Doylestown for many years, and
She
f)ur children, two sons and Uvo daughters,
all

then j'emoved to I'hiladeli'hia, where he lately died.


liad

of

whom
J.

are deceased.

One

daughter,

I'liebe,

married James

Smith, of DoylestowU; and the other, Lytlia, marrletl Joseph

iiisTouv

oi'

Tin; iiaki ia.mka'.

loi)

^Tatlicr, of \\'hitein;\r.-li,

Moiitgumery

cuiiiity.

]>)tli

daugli-

ters liad is>ue.


<lau<rliter

The

sons died unuiMi-rieil.


Ilouirh,
(

Marv, the fourth

of

OHver and Phehe

married Mahloii K.

Taylor, of Bucks cuuiity, the 2."'.d i>f )btol)er, IS17, hy whi'ia she had eight children, four sons and twur daughters, six of
^vhonl are living. died January '2'2<\,

Two
]8G.'.

of the sons are twins.

Mrs. Taylor

Uf

these children three have niar-

rie<l. Iiebccca, the elde.-t daughter, niarrieil John S. I'rown, June 12th, 1844, by whom siie has three children, two sons and a daughter. i"or se\eral years ^Ir. P>r(jwn was the proprietor and editor of the Bucks county [nf-U'ig' w:ri\ x\ At present he tlourishing and influential country jonrnal.

resides in Philadelphia.

Benjamin, the

tliird

son,

married

George B. Yardlev, June IGth, lb-33, and had five children. lie is lately deceased. Phebe marricd Samuel ]\[. 8hute, September 1st, 1S.j2, and died with^[ercianna, dauirhter of

out issue.
Silas,
fifth

son of Edith and Isaac Huu^h, marrieil his

cousin, Elizabeth Hart, of ^yhom a more extended account will be found elsewhere.

Joseph, the sixth son of Edith and Isaac Hough, married Elizabeth ^larple, December loth, 178'.), and died ^yithout
issue.

His -widow died September

1st,

1829.

These few

paragraphs contain all the information I have been able to Beyond \vhat I obtain of the descendants of Edith Hart.

have WTitteu there appears to be nothing known of them by and they have been so long other branches of the family lost sight of that inquiry fails to discover them.
;

have now arrived

at the

end of
is

my

task,

History of the Hart Family''

finished.

and "The The concluding


I

pages embrace such genokigical data of the fanuly as

have

been aide to obtain in the course of

mv

researches.

^ p E :x 33 1 :k
1'

GEN

i;a l.or;
OF thf:

n ^v R T

F ^v :m I L ^^,
OF

Warminster Townstiip, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

"^yilS
"J^:^
issue
:

family it; desccndoil from CnrnsTonii:!; .wn Mauy H.vin", of Witnev, Oxfordahire, Enirlund, who hud

JOHN,

born Nov.

IGtli,

\r,r,\

died Sept., 1714.

KOHHliT, horn An-usr l>t, 1(J.";. ^lAUY, burn A^^ril 1st, l(i.")8. JOSKPII, horn Octuher lUth, ICCl.

John
plHT

llarl.
aiul

'Mr.-t ion of Christ

o
to

Crispin,
Holiiu',
i.-^.^iu'
:

nnd

!Xi-.indil;ui;;httT
I'.i,

of

Thnmua
iind h:id
11. 17I.J.
:>(',

AiiRiica
Sii>aiiii;i,

.M;iiy H:irt, witli NVillhiii

wliu

l;iiir'

Novi-iiiU-r

17<i'<,

roiin, iii:irriid

daui;litrr of William and Annlia Kn-li, ol bybony. Pt-nn-yhania, in the lall uf Kiv!, anil had i.->u"" : KC!. .luhn, I. Jiilv li;. lil.-'l d Martli Tlioinas. l> L._ d 1714. J,,^,.|,l,. .To.-iah, I. Mary, 1^ d 17-j1. Si'i.-anna Hart dii d Fi \<'v 'IT. 17.V>.
;

John, b St-pfr 10, Susanna, Lt April


17.;t.

ITdl^; d
.'<>.

.Juni.'
;

1,11
;

d Marcli

-:'.,

William, h March 7. 171:! d Oit. 0. 1711. JoM ph. h Sjipt. 1, 171.i d Feb. .'.. K.S"*. d (.ti'r 17;t,j. Sda,-, b.M.iy ... 1. !.<< Lncnlia, b Julv JJ, 17Ji; d Ditvinbor
;

--'l'.

<

1':

Kcn.
.'i,
;

'

.lo!iii,
li;,

rldi'.*t .<on

iiari.iiiarriid
1<;'^7;,

of John and Snsaiina Kliaimr (born Sipt. n.b r

K.':) Oliver, b .hdv Edith, b .May 4. r.-.'7 Srth. b June 11, 17:tl
Olivi',

d Dec. ;i]. 17i>.">. d .Marth -.T. iMi.").


d Oct'r

M.
1:5.

171i>. 17:!4.

b .Fnlv

.1.

17;!J;
dicil

d.iuuhtvi ofSila.-*

ami

H,.-li.r

Ek-.mor llart

d An'zn:*t October

_".,

1.".il.

gi:ni:alo(!y
of John

or

riii:

haut family.

o1iii, rldost
H:irt.
ilii'd

soil

;iik1

Elonnor
I

in

Viixiaia

sinii'lc,

bciiiLC

killfd by the McciiUut.il (liscliargi- of his uiin ill hi.s own li;iiul.-<, 1711!.

Rachel, h April 15, 1810. William Reese, b June .5, 1812. John, 1) I)eeend)c r ;'.l, l.-<14.
Jose[)li S..
I)

June

22, 1^17.
2!t,

Thomas
Stirah,
1.S55.
1)

H., b April

ls20.

Niis:iiiii:i, I'ldost d:iiiu:ht(T of Jolin and KkMiior Hirt, niiirricd Joiiii Piice,

June

in. ls-.'2.
;5,

March

:'>1.

\sM, and had issue:

Elizabeth H., h SeiU.

1825

d Oct.

10,

Josi'Xih,

March

;>,

17.>l'.

Rebecca, h Julv 20. 1X27. Sarah Hurt d'ied June 20, ISIO.

Jo>'i3i.
Hurt,
(^boni
Ml

tliird scin

of John and EU'anor


)

invd
1 1,

Muv
:

his cousin, ElizaliL'th, 171 1. dauiihtcr of Jolni

and Mary" had issue


\VilIiani,
Silas,

Culh'l,
4,
2;>,

October
1741
;

1,

17in,
1.5,
,j,

and

JnsiiiA DiMiAN, eldest son of John and Sarah Hart, married Martha Gilliughain, (born June 22. l.^oD,) daughterof

h Dec.
4,

d Oct.

17(50.

Joseph and Letitia Bonham, Nov. 1820, and had issue


:

I,

John, b Nov.

174.>

d June
;
;

17G.

bOct.

1717:
-Jl,

d
d Oct. d Jan.
:

Jusiah, b Julv 17,

174'.)

2.% 1800.
;iO, 17.r2.

Sarah, b Sept. ix, lf^27. Joseph, b April 8, 1.^2'.! .Marv, b Sept. 18,

mw

d Feb. l.S, 1833. d May 21, 1K32.

Joseph, b Nov. Joseph, b Deo.

17.j1

L<titia H..

I)

Fel.'v 11, 18:}2.

7, 17.').s

EUzabeth Hart died Feb'y


beth

A[)iil 15, l.sll. i;>, 17.s.

Rachel, b Julv in. l,s;J7. Charles B., b May 24, 1840

Dec. 26,

IWl. John, second son of Joseph and Elizamarried Rebecca, (born 174t:,) daughter of David and Margaret Keesc, Sept. l.S, 17t)7, and has issue d Dec. 8, 17t)0. "VVillaui, b Sept. 9, 17GS d August 13, "William, b April 11, 177i>
Hart,
i'],

An:,aist

Elizabeth H., b May 28, 1845. John, bJulv l.i, 1847. Marv Anna",, b Oct. 25, 1850 d AprU
;

13,

1852.

li<ln.

Elizabeth, b IHGO.
17;4.

June

-.'4,

177:};

d July d Dec.
died

S.

Joseph, b Nov. 17th, 1771


Eupheinia,
ti:

20,

Sarah, eldest daughter of Joshua and Martha G. Hart, married John K., (b Nov. 13, iHl.s,) son (jf John and Lenah Spencer, Dec. l.s. lx\s, and has issue: Samuel K., b Sept. 11, IXV.K John Charles, b Feb. 23, 1G3.
RvciiKt., fourth daughter of

b.

Dec.

22,

1775

March

Ixjo. John, b Oct. 10, 1777

d July 1, 1^41; Ohver, b Oct. 15, 17.<j d Oct. 17, 17f<5.Rebecca Hart d Nov. 0, 1787.
;

Joshua and Martha G. Hart, married Cameron G.. (b Nov. 24, l.s3(i,) sou of Samuel and Sarah Spencer, Feb'y 10, Ixo'.), and h;ia
isaue
:

Wii.i.r.v.'M,

second sou of John and Rebecca Hart, married Maria, (horn Dee. 2, 17(i.) daughter of reverend Nathaniel Irwin, October ol, L^Ott, and had
:

Horace Greelev, b August 4, 18G0. .M itlie H., b Feb. 25, 1804. A. Lincoln, b Nov. 17, iMiG.
Raci[i:t second daughter of John and Sarah Hart, married I'hom is Woolston.

Lisue

Louit>:v Matilda,
0, 1(I2.

FebV

7,

1802

d July

{h Dec. 20, 1.S07,) .son of Thomas and Mary V. Bye, .March It;, ixol, and had
issue
:

Maria Hart d Sept.


Ei-iZAfjirrn, eldest

28, 1802.

Rebecca Hut,

daughter ot John and married Dr. Silas Hough,


]7i)t),)

Mary V., b .March John Hart, b Dec.


.Sarah H., b

14, 1832.
l*.

ix:',:).

.-

Nov.

1),

1n35.
;

(bom
no

Feti'y x.

son of Isaac and


20, 17;il,

Edith Hough, .March


issue. Dr. Silas

and had

A son b Oct. 20, 1x37 d same day. Thomas D., b Jan'vol, l.sKi; d June
1M42.

2.5,

Hougti died May, 123.

Thoma.s H., b Sept.


1H45. Victorine, b Feb'v
1.S17.

22,
2(;.

1S43

d Oct. 20,
17,

John, third son of John and Rebecca R>b?cca H art, married Sirah, (b')rn May 2, 17x5,) daughter of Joshua and R-ichel Dung ui, April 2s, ]^;ii:;, ^nd had
idsue
:

Lsld; d Julv
;

Anna R.. b June 0, IXis d April 20, ISCG. Frank, b June 22, Ix.'rJ. Thomas Bye died Dec. 21, 1H(;5.

Josliua Dungan, Tj Sept. K icliel, b Sept. n, iMdt;


iV.LUain,
\i

17, 1801.
;

Oct.

2'.

l^tn.s

d Nov, 7. d Juuv.'l'

1H(I7.
L>ii..

JiiiiN

II vitr,

eldest sou of
Byi-,

Thomas W.

and Rachel D.

married Helen M.,

CKM.AI.oi.V
(I.

t'l

llli:

IIAKI'

lAMILV.
11.
l*.'i!.

M:iy
IHi;!,

><,

iHl

Jdlin-iiii
;,

iiiiil

1.^ (Iniiu'lit'T (r S.imiKi Mini- At\n:i l':i\iiii,>[an li

Shclmiro. >ray
i>-uc.

and

has"

no

nnd

li:i.'<

no

i.-r-uc.

Saicaii nixi

H \i:t.
W. nnd

scoiiiul ihuiu'litfT

of Tlioin:irrir(l
i

Rirln

D.
:.'7.

+*.><.
\x'-'>'>.

(iuritavu.-* A.. (1>

Sept.

^"ln

of

.lu-tici' nn'i

Miry Cox, Nov.


:

L'l.

l?<.'>i;.

and
Bt-s-ic

li:is i.-'.-iic

El i-iiiMiA. .'ocond (laughter of John and K<'b;Tra llirt. niarrit-d Thonia-*. (b Jan'y X. 1771 1. son of Tlmnia-' and Sar.\\\ Munii'hrcy. Marcli I'l. 17'."'<, and h I'l i-^iH: Eliza Hart, b Janv l.'.. \::<:<: d An-'. :><.

Murv- R.. b Fl.'v2x. C, b Sopt. -',


i.iAM

!'<">'*.

1..-..-,.

1 -...

Sanih.
.Tolni
(

t) March 17. 1 s^o d Dr. KcUcca, b Airz- !''. ixoj.


;

-JI. l.'^l."^.

Wii

Rki
ll.nt.

-F. third

son of
Mnrj'.

nnd

Thoni.is IlnniplnTy. d Oct.


Ei.i/v

'^.

1x22.

8:inili

inirricd
1.
I)

li

Fi tiy
:

t.i. l."li'>.i d:uiu'lit"

ripf Uic'li'inhind .\nii

H m:t.

Idi-st

(1

>U','hfi'r

of Thoinn.'^

Robb.
Ricli.nrd
JO.

.MmpcIi

lx:'.x, ;in<l

bid

i->iM'

Knbb,

Julv

-.M.

].;!;;

d .Inly

\ni\2.
-s.

b Au:nii*t John, b Julv 17.


Sar.ih,

1>*t1.

and Kuphi-niii nuniphrcy, married Siniml. ibO:t. _'<. !7:>-.'i. son of John and Hannah Wintz. Fcl/y I'.", l-<l'.i, and had issue
:

\x\:<.
. isi:,
;

Thomas
d

Hart, b

Mav

21. ]sJO.
.!.

Ann

Rol>b.'b

Fibv

Jany

.'i,

Silas Hoti;;h. b Scp't.


;i.

IxJ:'.

d March
1><19
;

iM.Vt.
7.

Marv, bFebV.'J.

l.^.j].

Sarah Humphrev. b March

John,

fourth ?on of

John and Sandi


and had i^^uc

March 7. l.><l'.i." Samuel Wcntz, d


P^iiza

Sept.

11. IhjG.

1H-2X.)

Hart, marriod .Miry Klizi. {h Jan'y h. dauirhtcr of Martin and Elltn


Di-c.
'jx.

TiioMAs Hakt. oldest son of Samnil and


^Ventz. married Isabella, b Feb'y 14.) iMJ'.i. daui;hter of (JeorLrc and Catharine Boyer. Nov. "2". l'<47, and
i

Johnson,

ix.'it.
li'.
."..

John
Sanih
Oct.

I.vnian. b Fov.
p!iliii.

]s:,:,.

b Sept. 1.<>7. Elizabeth Houirli. b Auiru^t


J:!,

P.-

]><.".;

had issue:

ixilo.

Mary

Eliza, b

March

-.'.t,

l>n;i.
-Jn.

Martin Johnson, b Dec.


Ei.i/.Ar.KTii

ixi;:).

Clav. b Jan'v 1 I. Silas "Hou^li. b Feb'v ;!, IMJO.


Sir. AS
i

Henn-

]-<i:\
l.-."io
;

d Julv

.10,

Hoi(;ii. fourth dauichter of


)

John and Sarah Hart, married Benjamin. (b June Jo, l.><lo, son of Anthony and Maria Rich. Nov. l.'i, IS'tl, and had
iasue
:

Hoi .,11. second son of Sanuiel nnd Eliza WenLz. marrii il Kate, ib M.irch 27. \s27 ). daii'.;hter of Peter and Ann

John Hart, b
Ji>.>Krii

Oct. 10 IXoo.

Emerick. November 3i>th, Ixi'*, and had issue: Kate Gilbert, b Oct. -.'7. 1S40. Howard Emerick. b Nov. l^.V.'.

.><.

SACKi-rr, fifth son of John and >rary Hart, married Jane, (b Fi-b'y 17, ix.t-/,) dauu'hter of Abniham and Betsy

SiL.vs.

third son of

Joseph and Eliza-

beth H:irt. married


.".",

Pierce,

Mav

Mary
17b'.t

Daniel. Jau'y
;

JV, Ih.VI.

and had
:

issue:
4, l.s.-)|.

177(1,

and had

i.ssue :'
-JI,

Frederick, b Ap'l U. Lillie P.. b April 17.

l.x.'il

d Julv

Elizabeth, b Sept.
l.H;t7.

d Feb'v
d Feb'v

1;!.

is.",.-,.
_".'.

William

L.,

b Jan'y

1M.VJ.

R;ichel.
Ix-JH.

b Sopt.

'-'-*.

177!

2'^(,

TitoM.vs HiMi'uur.v. sixth son of John nnd Sar\li H.ut. married Kieliel (.'.. {\t Dec. M, ls'-'7i, dauu:hter of William and Elizabeth Fettir. Noveml-cr l-^.
l.><4'.>.

IT

innah. b Dec.

Myra, b
Sii:i.s.

,''.0.

177-.\

177;:.

d Feb'v

JO.

l,-<,;-.>.

Oliver. William, :?;inih,

and Ellen.

and had

issue

Sil.i-s

Hon^h, b Sept. -JI. 1m.",u. Ella RelH'Cca, b Sept. -J", 1'<.".7:


.'S.

Miv

Ei.iZAr,imi. eldest daughter of Sil:i5 ntid Mary Hart. m:irried WiUiim. (b Nov.

l.xr,;l.

Elizabeth Carrell, b Nov.


-Ml.

1, l-<i;ii

d April
l>i"l.

iHi;.!.
I'.i,

son of William and >[ary 1. 17<i'.'). Powers. .M:iv -J. 17'.':!, and h:id issue Ann. b Feb'y ii',, K'.'l d Dec. :!1. isiin. Euphemia. V) Nov. J>^, 17'.'.'" dicil Jan'y
:

William Humphrey, b March


fifth daiiLiliter

lo. l>^i;7.

Maria, b Julv
Rkiu-.cca, nih Hart, married Daviil. (b Fi by 1ft. JHISUX son of (Jeor^re and Meii'i(tt:l

17;^.
Js. l^Ol
Isir,.
;

of John and Sa-

Joseph, b March
iso;;.

d Julv

JI,

Smih. b Mavj:'.

G
Eli/nlK-th.
lf<l'J.

CiKNKALUoi' OF
b April
April
28,

Till':

IIAUI'

FAMILY,
anJ and

180C; d Oct. 25

Ra(

111

1.,

sixth daughter of William


isoii,)

Elizabeth Powers,
I)

Raclun-l.

Stli,

Isio.

Sept.

2t;tli,

married John, (b son of David and


14,

\ViHi;uu Puwii-s diidJuly Li, InII.


EiTiiK.-MiA, second dauirhter of William and Elizabttli Powers, married Jonathan, (b Oct. 3, 17S8), sou of David

Hester Fauuee, August


liad issue
:

1832,

June 2.5, 18.33. Maiy Amanda, b Nov. 10, 1835: d


R., b
26, 1S37.

William

May '

and .M;iri,raret Livezey, Dec. and had issuerJohn, b Julv


."),

30, 1823,

Elizabeth, b

June 1.3, Sarah Jane, b Nov. 3,

1838. 1843.

18-_M
2<;,

Willi;uii, b Oct.

Elizabeth, b Jan'y

d Oct. 26, ]82. 1N27 d Sept. 7, 18G0.


;

;,

l.s-Jti.

Jonathan Livezey died Dec.

6,

1852.

John-, eldest sou of Jonathan and Eupheruia Livezey, married Rosanna, (b April :\ 182(1), daughter of Josei)h and Elizabeth Hill, June 14, 1847, and had issue Elizabeth Euphemia, b Aus: ", 1848. Fraucis Frederick, b Aus:. Ill 1850. William Lewis, b April loth, 1852.
:

R., son of John and Rachel Faunce, married Eliza, (b Sept. 30, l>f26,)daui,^hter of.Josei)h D. and Marg:iret Mills. Oct. 2, 1S55, and has issue : Mary Elizabeth, b Jau'y 31, 1867. Ellen Mary, b May 25, 1865.

William

Rachel, second daughter of

Silas

and

22,

Hart, married William, Cb June 1774,) son of Silas and Elizabeth GUbert, April 30, 171t',>, and had issue :

Mary

Anna Maxwell, b Dec.

2h, 1,s54.
14, 1857.

Rosanna Livezey died Dec.

Silas Hart, b Oct. 11, 1811.

William Duncan, b March August 2, 1823.

22:

1804

il

William, second son of Jonathan and Euphemia Livezey, married Mary;-aret,


(b Dec. 16, 1M37)," daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Parker, Feb'y 13, 1854, and has issue: Elizabeth b Nov. 18, 1854.

Sit-vs Hart, second scm of William R;ichel Gilbert, manned Caroline

and Ann, Joseph and Anna Barbara Wilsou, and hiid


(b Feb'y
:

1,

1818,) daughter of

third daughter of William and Eliabeth Powers, married George, (b ) son of George and Sarah Feaster, Sept. 1C>, 18-2(^ and has issue: Powers, Rachel, William, George, Sarah, and Joseph.

Marlv,

Ann, b >Lircli lO, 1835. Caroline Ann, b May 8, 1838. Amelia >lasilda, b F'eb'y 4, 1840. William WUson, b June Vj, 1842. Albina, b August 2, 1844. Joseph, b August 11, 184i;. Anna Maria, b Sept, 7, 1849 d Noy. II,
:

issue Rjichel

1849.

Rachet.. eldest daughter of George and Maria Feaster, married Jo;i;ili Cbnard, and has issue William, Charles, Kate, George, and
:

Caroline Ann Gilbert d August 11, 1850.


Silas

Emma.

Hart Gilbert on the death of his first wife married Jane, (b Feb'vl Itli, 18l'7,) daughter of John and J;iue Mitchell,

AprU
eldest son of

10, 1853,

and

h;id issue
:

Florence, b Feb'y 26, 185-1

d July

7.

George and \Liria Feaster, married Mary, daughter of Mark and Jane Fleming, and had issue: George, Frank, and Jennie.

William,

1861.

Myra Hart, b AprU 10, 1856. Florence Lavinia, b May 9, 1861.

Rachkl Anx,

'Sarah, second daughter of George and Maria Fea.-iter, married Edward, son of James and Rebecca Walton, and had
issue
:

eldest daughter of Sila and Carohne Ann Gilbert, married William, (b Feb'y 21, 1828,) sou of David and Charl()tte Benner, July 5,
:

Emma, Hany,
Edwin.

Susan, Mary, Samuel, and The last two are de-ceased.

1857, and h.ns issue Maggie Minerva, b Jan'y 3, 1860. William Crilly, b Jan'y 16, 1865.
Ann-, seconddaughter of Silas and Caroline Ann Gilbert, married William H., (b Sept. 17, l8-.>8,) son of John and Maiy Waldrou, Feb. 5, 185-, and has issue Anna .Imelia, b June 3, 1856.
:

Elizabf.th, fifth daughter of William and Elizabeth Powers, mariied Hirim, (b Sept. 1."?, 1S07,) sou of Aaron and Sarah Morris, Julv 26, ]>< lo, and h.as issue
:

Caroltnk

b June 10, 1x41. William Powers, b Dec. 1m, 1844. Janjcs West, b .March 25. 1847.
J. Kitts,

Thomas

Clara

"Viririnia,

I)

Se[it. 2. 18.-.7.

(;i;m:.\i,ih;v *)V tiii; iiaki

lAMir.v,

Ainaiul;!. liN'oN.

.'.

1s.".0.

WII,I,IA^t.
-">.

third .son of Sila.s

and Marv

CurnliiK' (iillMTl.

1)

July

l>(i.i.

Hart, married Elizabeth K.indall, \>riA'>ably a sister ()f bi.s brotlii r Oliver'!*
Silas,

AMi.r.iA >[atii,i>a.

tliiril (l.iii:ilitcr(if^il:is

and

'VViiliain.

Caroline Ann (JillxTt. married (b Feli'y :>. ]x.','<. sun of Klias and Sandi Ann'Crilly. Dec. :'.l, Im.Vs.
i

Marv. b

wile, aliont ]H(i7. and f) Jan'y J-.', l^os. fnid.

had is>uo

Abndiam

K;uidall. b >rarch

1,

isli.

and had is(>tie Ida Amelia, b Jan"v


:

IJ,

l.>^(',();

Mav

.'..

Sii.A>. eldest

ist.i).

Willie,

I)

March U.

IsCl

dSept.
-I.

-'1. lx"",j.
;

Willie (second), b Sept.

lx{).'>

d Nov.

Snnih Ann. h Sept.

-J-.',

18im.

son of William and Elizabeth Hart. niarrie<l Caroline Bushy, (b July 7, l-^li;. dauirhter of John' and Eleanor Webster, Juny 17. l.x;;7. and has issue Elizabeth W.. b Oct. ^C. ls:V..
) :

Wii.i.iAM Wii.snx, eldest son of Silas and Caroline Ann (iilhcrt. married Sarah
lx:'>'.'. Ann, (.h Jnne danichterofJohn and Aim IVulaman, Auij^iust l.'>, Ix'i", and has issue Samutl Hart, b Oct. 1<\ ixC,:,.
;">,
i

John W.. 1) Jan'y k. ImH. Maiy Ann In:;ram, b Ai>ril


Silas

1,

l.'^l.'j.

Ei,i/.Ar.i.Tii Wr^l.-T^.^. eldest daui;liter

of

Ar.r.iNA.

fourth daughter of Silas and Caroline Ann Gilbert, married John. Cb March 4. l^^li.) son of Jacob R. and Elizabeth K. Clothier. Feby ;i. isi;.},

and Caroline Hart, married Thr>(b Oct. 11, ]>^U\') son of Isaac and Cynthia VanH(ni, Sept. ;>, If^i'iJ, anc has i.<.suc Ida Man.-, b July C, 1.><C.1.

mas Craven,

Isaac. b'July

f<,

'1.>^(m.

Mauy,
betli

and

ha.s issue

Clam

Viru^inia.

b >ray

7, l'*r.7.

second son of Silas and Man.Hart, married Man^-, daui^hter of Abraham and Mariraret Swieny Kandall, about lMi>. and had issue Je^hn. b June 7, It^ll. l.^ll. Julia Ann. b Ju.y ix. Is]:] d Charles, h March "l, IMii. Hart d l.'^K). _', AprU MarjOi.ivK.n,
: ;

and Eliz.iHart, married Jacob Betts, and had issue Goonre Jacob, b Sept, i-i, 1>;."'>1, d Feb'y 21. 1.<.7 Elizabeth, d: and William. Jacob Betts b deceased.
: : :

daui;liter of William,

Jacor, seco;jd son of Jacob .ind >[arT." Rett's, married Elizabeth., (b Auu'ust
2
1,

ett,
,

Ix^A.) dauLchter of Mai-y Ann Oct. 27. ]-<.'il.and has issue:

Hcw-

second son of Olivcrand Maiy Hart, married Mercy M.. i^b April 11, of Joseph and ^[arj' dauLThter l.'^l.S.) Twinins. Sept. 10. 1><:\'.\ and had issue": Harrison.' b Auijust 0, ls4fi. Joseph Twininir, b April 4, 1^12. Samuel Twininir.lJ Dec. H:. 1^1:!; d Feb.
CirAitr.Ks,
11. 1>*41.

Georire Henrj-, b June 22, lx-33. Marj- Emma, b June 24, ]>'<'>. Jacob Monroe, b Apr'd 1 1, l.s,")7,

Ar.n\iiA>r

Rani>ai.i., yonnirest son of William and Elizabeth Hart, married

Ann
ter

>[aria.

^_b

March

12. I"<r2.)

of Philip and
:

Ann
8,

dauirhShafer, and had


;

issue

Thoma-s, b Auonst
IStM. Elizabeth, b Dec.
l.x.".4.

1834

Mars- Jane, b April -20. l.'^t.'i. Elizabeth E.. b Jan'v II. 1h|7. Albert Hil>bs, b Mav 1. lsi;i. l.<jl. Amanda Pettitt. b June b Nov. l.'>. is.'ij; d August Susanna Elv,
_>,

1,1,

William, h yi.w
ls.-,l.

2.'),

IM.

IM.-,!.

AbnUiam, b June
is.-j:!.

11,

Antinelte Louisa, b July .'>1. ]x|l: d Auirust 14. is.". I. Man.- Hart d March Js. isi:,. On th'e death of his first wife Charles

Aim Maria Hart d Feb'y 8, l'<.')7. Abndiam Randall Hart, n'larricd a second
time with Mercy, (I) Oct, 21, 1X:U),) dauirhter of Thonias and Maiy Walker,

Hart married Tacv Ann,


]x27. daughter of l^'homas
Fosti'r. Au;;ust 0.
l^.'i."),

(\)

Sept.

.'<,

and Rebecca and had issue


:

May

12. 1>.'.7,

and had

issue:"

William Roberts, b Rebecca F., b May


IMI'.J.

May

7.

l.^^.'.i;.

7, iVr.r,

d Ausrust
r,o,

'-'l.

>[arv'Elizabetli, b Nov. lo, isru. Ida,"b April 10, l^r.l ; d Sept. 17. 18C-2. Enuua Bateman, b August 10, ISGI.

Clementina Kirk, b
Anu'ust .'.!. lXi'>-2. Iaac IVrcv. b Julv
7.

May
isi;.*.

ls('.(l;

TinnrAs. cldc-t son uf Abraham and Anna Maria Hart, married Mar,riret Eliz d.eth. n. Feb'v I. is;;;>.^ dau-hter of

(JEN E.4LU(.i Y

OF

Till:

IIAKT FAMILY.

George and ^anih Ana Taylor, Oct. 5, and Ihls L~siie Anna, b June 22, 1?'J9. Thom;w Wiufidil Scott, b Feb 7 19, 1861.
1858,
:

SAii AH Ann, second daughter of


11.

Joseph and Jane Shelmire, married Beiija2,

Ellen, eeventU daui^htor q{


Biiclielor, and hud no issue. WiUiam Richelor d Sept.

Sil;\s

and

EJizahfth Hart, uiarruil Dr. William


23, 1823.

an nd Lucy Leiand, 1, Feb'y and has issue Th.odorc F., b Feb'v 12, lMt6. William H., h August 8, IM-IS. Benjamiu L., b June 30, 1850.
:

mm

mill L., (b Oct.

lM13,)_son of Henja25, 1845,

Mary Jane, b

Sept. 11, 1859.

JosiAH, fourtli son of Joseph and Eliz:ibeth Hart, uiiirried Ann, (b October 5, 1759,) dau^^lUer of Arthur and S;irah Watt.s, Jan y 11, 1776, and had issue : d .May 3, 1m;J8. Siinih, b Nov. 6, 1776 ElizalKth, b Dec. 13, 1779 ; d Oct. 23,
;

1S3-1.

Marv

Wii.i.iAM, son of Joseph H. and Jane Shelmire, married Sarah Ann, (b Jan'y 28, 1827,) daughter of William and Ann E. Riley. June Gth, 1848, and had issue Warren R., b Feb'y 8, 1851.
:

Elizabeth, b Dec. 21, 1853

Bebecca,
1815.

b Jan'y
30,

14, 1782

d March

d July

4,

8,

1857.

Amv, b June
1847. 1789.

1784; d Anajust 17,


22,

William H., b Oct. 1, 1855. Charles Wiltbank, b Oct. 3, 1857.


AiiY H.VRT, second daughter of William and S;irah Shelmire, married John F. (b March 9, 1801,) son of William and Mary Purdy, Nov. 6, 1823, and had
issue
1

Frances, b August

1787
2,

d March
;

7,

William Watts, b Jan'y


24, 1815.

1790
1815.

d Feb'y

Ann Hart d March

2,

William
Sar-vh, eldest daughter of Josiah and Ann Hart, married William, (h 1772,)
1X25.

S.,

b Nov.

6,

1824

d Feb'y
;

13,

WiUiam
John

Watts, b Nov.

13, 1825

son of George and Richel Shelmire, Dec. 7, 1797, and had issue d August 16, Charles, b June 20, 1798
: ;

May

12, 1852.

SanihS., b Jan'y
F.

14, 1828. 23, 1838.

Purdy d March

1799.

Joseph H., b Dec.


J836.

19,

1799
;

d August

31,

MvRY Ann,

Charles, b Jan'y 29, 1803 d Dec. 25, 1827. Ann Eliza, b Dec. 10, 1801 d Dec. 23,
;

third daughter of William and Sarah Shelmire, married Robert, 25, (b August 1804.) son of Thomas and Elizabeth Neal, 1830, and has issue
:

1801.

Hart, b July 29, 1805. Mary Ann, b Nov. 1, 1807. Rachel, b AprH 25, 1810;
1862.

Amv

Thomas Dunlap, b March 7, 1831. WilUam Shehnire, b March 27, 1833.


Matildii, b

Jan'y

1,

May

12,

Jan. Charles, b

Mary Ann, b

9,

18b7. 1839.
28, 1844.

William Shelmire d Sept., 1835.

Emma

Mathews, b
Oct.
8,

Mav

and Samh Shelmire, married Jane, (b August 8, I8IX),) daughter of Charles and Mary Miller, March 27, 1821, and had Lssue Mary Jane, b June 2, 1822.
:

Joseph Hart, second son of WilUam

Henry C, b

1*11.

Matilda, eldest daughter of Robert and Mary Ann Neal, married Henry, (b l83tJ,) son of Frederick and August Mary Diddlebock, April 18, 1853, and
'J,

has issue

Sarah Ann, b Oct. 9, 1824. William, b Feb'y 17. 1827. Jane Shelmire d March 5, 18G0.

Henrv

.M.,

b June

27, 1854.

ILiiy Ella, b March 17. 158. George Martin, b March 24, 1860.

M.VRY Jane, eldest daughter of Joseph and Jane Shelmire, married James,

Mary

(bom Edenburg, Scotland, May 9, 1816,) son of James and Margaret AlU8on, Oct. 21. 18^11, and had issue Emilv G., b Sept. 13, 18-12. Mary M., b Sii>t. 18, 1844. Margaret C, bOct. 12, 1817. James, b Oct. 5, 1m.-)() ; d Sept. 4, 1851. WUliam S. b Sept. 22, 1853. George Grler, b Feb'v is, 185G.
at
:

Ann, second daughter of Robert and Marv Ann Neal, married William H., (b April 2, 183.s,) son of George and .Margaret Wallace, Sept. 28, 1856, and had no issue. William H. Wallace d Dec. 2, ls56.
a second time,

Marv Ann Neal married

Frederick, (b Sept. 29, 1^29,) son of John and Elizabeth Vau Gunton, .\pril 4, 1861, and has issue Adaliuc Wallace, b August 9. ]S.V>.
:

(JLNLVl.<)i;V (IF

llli: lIAi:i'

IA\11I.\.

{)

Tiii'MAs
aiul

Dim

M-,

cltli >t

S"ii

of Kol'trt
.Muiy
><(
2'>,

William, b S.pt.
I-aac. b .Spt.
II.
'.I.

-J.'l.

l>o7.

Miiy Ami
iiml
liail

Nial,

iii.irrinl
)

\xi)'.>.

Ann. ()> J.oi'y >*, l^.i--^. (l.m.'liiir William ami .M u y :<iiiiili, July
l."<.'i;l,

Arthur Watts, b
K.i;.
Eli/.al.rtb.

.^[aleh

2;>,

I>i:;

d Nov. -

l>-iK

>r irch 14.

1.-<1<'.

William
Eiiiin;k
i;i.

lltiiry, b.liiiK'

i),

^^')\.

Anhur
d June

Vcrlves.

d Oct.

l-^K'.

Vir^ima, b Jaii'v
li

li,

l^J->;

ixiil.

Ann. cldist

Maiv Ann.

Mav

-J-*.

l<i;.

Emiiia ElizabLlir b .Maicb

Jl,

l>'i;.5.

icust

datiirhtiT of Arthur and F.ll/.nbeth Ycrkcs. married Williaiii. Hi .\nson of Thorn isaiid Ann .30. Isoii. .Michener, Diceuib;^r .<. I'^JO, and lia^
) :

Wll.LIAM Slll.LMIKL. irt ana Mary Ami Nc.il. bara Ann, vb yrj)i. It. 1>;).J.; dau;;liur ot Willi.iiii aud Saruli Uiliiar, Oct. \'<, iN'iJ, and lla.s irjiK' Mary Ann. b M uvli ;J, ls.j3. William Wallaci-. b J>rlit. 2<'>, 18j7.
:iiC<i|ul
:

son of Rnbiiiarri'd Bar-

issue Charles, b N.^'. 17. Is21. Eliz lb .th v.. b Marcli -J.'. 1823. 8ar.ili Ann. b June 21. ixy,.

Arthur Yerkcs, b Sept.

2:'.,

ls^:;2.

CitARLF.s, cMfrit son of Willnin


17. l2o.l <lauu'ht<r

niiil

Ann

Sallu' t'urdy, b Marcli 2i,

l^.'.'J.

Laura, b Jan

JJ,

l>ij-.'.

Emma Mathews,
Sainui-I. b Ai>ril

Miehciur. married Catharine, (b March of John and Ann Spott.^, Dec. U, 1"<1'>, and has no issu'-.
Elizai-.i.th. eldest d.iuirhter of Willi.im

yuuni;t?t dan;:liter of KubiTt and Mary Ann Nual. married 1, 111,) son ot Samuel aud Mary JscUeetze, July VJ, lo3, and has uo issue.

Kaciiicl, fourth dauiihterof William and Sarah Shelniire, married Uriah, ib

and .Vnn Miehener. married John (b Dec. 2S, l>iH.) son of Jotiu and Murray. Sept. 184.^. and has issue Anna Y.' b Auimst 20, ISiy. John Thoma.s. b July 2, l"*.')!. William Walter, and Ella Laura.

April
lK;eca

11, iHijLt.)
:

sou of Uriah and Re3, 1K>.>. utid

Mathews, M.ireh
b Nov.
J

had

El. IAS, cldist

sonof .Vrthiirniul

Eli/.ibeih

i^sue

Morns
;5arali

.M..

I, Is.V.).

Yerkfs. married Harriet Krewson. tb Sept. 2:>. ]s'm:.) Dee. :\K 1-^21. ami lia
j

Ann, b

Fi-b'y

Iti. l.s.ji'..

Marv- Ann. b Julv

IJ.

l.s'.'.i;

Nov.
isi:;:

William Watts, b August Nov. IM.;.


_'.'.,

l'

3Ioui:i.s

M., eldest son of Uriah aud Mathews, married Caroline Cecelia, (^b June _'!, l)*o'.i,) dauu'hter of George and Antoinette hinder, August o, 1^68, and has no i^^ue.
Ricliel

issue : Eliza Ann, If Dec. (^ ls2:.. l'<2-*. Hannah Shay, b Jan'y lf<^0. .\niaiula Wil'lielmiiia," b Aii'zust William Watts Hart, b Nov. 1, 1.SJ2. l'S:j,.'>. Rebecca Jane, b Sept. Ann Hart, b Nov. 14, ls;>7. Harriet Elhii. b June M. 1810. Sarah Emma, b June I.'!. Isil.'k
:'j. .'>.
.'>.

Laura Augusta, b June

o. lx4-<.

Eliza
^ArtAii Ann-, eldest daughter of Uriah

.Vnn, eldest daughter of F.lias

and

Harriet

and
P..

Yerkes,
is-.'.',.)

R;ieliil

{b Ai>ril
:

-Jl,

Matliews, married Harry son of John and 1^:!.'.


)

June

20.

married Henry, (,b sou of Henry and Jane

Elizabetli had issue

Duncan, June
-.'i',

11.

I'^.'jT,

aud

Ella .M.. b June U:,s. Joseph H.. b March 1 1. I.^t.l

March

1,

HauaMinan. Dee. 22. 1S4'J. anil has i>suc: Williaui Edwin. ! Aui,aist 1. l^.M. Harriet Jane, b June 2:>. IS.'i;;. Elias Yerkes. b Sept. 14. I^.m. OUver Hart, b April 2^. l.^OO. Henry, b Jan'y 20, lsG2.

Harry M., b Oct.


Ei.izAr.Ki
II.

i'J,

I.stU.

Hannah Shav,
second duiLjhter of Josiali and Ann Hart, married .Vrtluir. (I) Fib. ITii'.'. son of and liebecea 11, Yerkes, .Niareh ".o, 17'.7, anil had issue Ann, b July J?. IT'.'S.

second dau::hter of F.iia< and Harriet Yerkis, married Stil'hen, lb Dee. 4. 1."<1'., ^ou of William .and Mary DeCoursey. .March 4, 1^.'<\. and
)

has issue:

Walter

Eli.i-s,

b June

.'0,

I^OO.
20.

Horatio Gates, b June


4, l.^itJO.

iMiJ; d Fcb'v
;

Coltoii. b Dec. T.. 1^.".:!. Sells. 1. Oct. 1.''. Is.iC. Fr.uiK E., b .M.ucli 11. If^iio.

Holme,
d O.t.

Jiebeciis b
I

March M, isuo

1.'.

\Vii.i.i

M
t

WA

>

Hah

r.

son of
1

F.liis

and
ib

Kit;.

Hirii

VevUes.

niarri.'

M)rv

.\iin,

-'0

10
Dec.
ll>.

Gi:xi: Ai.udv

or nii: iiaut
.\mv

rA.Mii.v,

S;U;il

Lui|-.ir,

I.^IO.) ilall^litiT ol' J:icr/1) ;iihI Nov. 1, 1^.')^, iind li:is

Ki;r.i;('rA,
(li

sixth danL:;hter of [[oiatio


Y'erkes,

(Jates
ret

and Eliza Ann

Charles,
Ilanii't .\nn:i. b Aii<;ust 'JC, lf<.V.i. Harmaii Aiulcrsoii, b Jau'v 2J, l.-^til.

(Jet. 10, is.to.)

married son of Gar28, 18G1,

ond .Mary WynKoop, Feb. and has no issue.

b Oct. 10, iscj. Eihvunl. b Jiiiic l.J, 18(5.').


Cliira,

Mauv
st)!!

HouATii) Gatf.s, second ami Klizabctli Yerkcs, iiianicil Kliza Ann, (b Sti)t. 18, 180.3,^ dau-litcr of Amos and KiUh Addis, Nov. is, 1827, and had issue Julia Anna, b August io, 18-.'S d Oct.
:

of Arthur

Loiisa, seventh daughter of IIoand Eliza Arm Yerkes, married James, son of Jlu^xh and Ellen Thompson, Feb'y 11, iMUtj, and has no Issue.
nitio G.

Amos Adius, eldest son f)f Horatio Gates and Elizi Ann Yerkes, manied Rebecca, (b ,)uly .^ 1812,) dauixhtia-

of John

1844. Elizabetli Jane, b Dec. 20. 182!). Elh'n .Morrison, b C)ct. 27, 18:!1. I8:);j. Sarah .Michener. b >[ay Amos Addis, b Jany 2. I8;j(j. Kuth Anna, b June f!, 1^:57. Rebecca, b April 2t;. 1830. .MaiV Louisa, b May 4. 1.^41. Artliur Watt<, b .^[arch 2t;, 1843. Joseph Morriscni b Dec. .30. ]8l.j. Luetta, b April 8, 1840.
.>8.
,').

and .Mary Slack, Nov.


issue
:

1 J,

1800,
;

and had
21,

Anna

>[ary, b

},l:\y 11,

1802

d J[arch

18i;4.

Horatio Gates, b Jan'v

11, 1801.

Amv

Ri^BKCCA, second dau;;hterof .\rthur and I",lizabetli Yerkes. married Christopher, (b Jan'y 1(), 1700.) son of Ganct and

Jane Krewson,
10, 1824.

in L'^23,
1,

Emma

Elizabeth Jane, Feb'y

1821

and had issue: d Aujrust


;

Ei.iz.vnF.Tit Jam:, second daugliter of Horatio flates and Eliza Ann Yerkes, married Bazalicl. (b .March 20, 1S20.) son of Ezra and P^lizabeth Croasdale, Jan'v 8, l'<.'>3, and has issue James" .Madison, b Feb. 20, 18,34. Flora, b >[av 2.3. l.s,37. Charles W.,"b Juny 20, 18G4.
:

d April 12, 184i;. Rebecca, b Christopher Krewson d Feb'y 3, 186-t.


;

William,

third son of Arthur and Elizabeth Yerke.s, married Eliza B., (b Ausust 3, lf<0.3,) daughter of Jonathan and -Mary Yerkes, August 10, l^i20, and had
issue
:

Jonathan, b April

Ellen >[oRnisoN,

ratio Gates and ried Moses, (^b Jan"y


:

third dauuhter of HoEliza Ann Yerkes, mar2i;,

182(1.)

son of
23,
8,

Benjamin and Sarah Yerkes, Feb'y 18.34. and had issue


Benjiimin,
!_
)

2, 1830, Elizabeth, b .M iv 1, I831i b Au-t. Arthur, 2s, 1832; d Augt. 1.5, 1853. .Marv, b Jan'y 17, 1^.35. Harriet, b M.'iy 5, 1830 d May 11, 1858.
; '

b Dec.
18.34.

5,

1854

d Dec.

Araos

Adilis,

Auijustus Gates, b Au'jriist .3, 18.37. Georiic W.. b Feb'v 23. isQO. Sarah Emma, b DJc. 23., l^t'.l. Charles B<juclier, b March 23, 1804; d
April
S.AP.Aii
11, lGo.

24, -}"^'^y-'UNov. Jane S., j Christopher K.. b April 17. 1838. Rebecca K., b Oct. 10, 1'<U.

18.39.

JSdward, bMirch 11, 1843. MaruMret A., b Oct. 2.>, 1846. Eliza B. Yerkes d Dec. 25, 18G4.

Jonathan,
MiriiFNFi;, fourth dauirhtcr of Horatio (i. and Eliza Aim Yerkes, married David, (b Nov. 25, 1820,1 son of Gcoriie and Esther Cherry, of Ireland,
ter

eldest son of William and Eliza Yerkes, married Miranda, daugi\-

of James and

.Mirarula
:

Watsuu,

March
l'tJ2.

4,

Ixox.

and had issue


7,

Oct. 20, 1S50, and has issue Judson, b Sept. 10, Istil. Anna J., b June 2, 1864.

Marv Ann,
WUlieJ b

b Dec.

1850

d Jan.

],

Elizabi-.tii, eldest dauiihter of

Auirust 10, 18G0. Ella, f (1 Auiiust 10, 18G0. George, b P'eb'v 28, 1^0 1.

William and Eliza Yerkes, married Harrison, (b Dec. 3, 1^27,) son of Jacob and Ann has no issue. Putl', Nov. 24, 1X53, and

RiTii Anna, fifth diu<rhter of Horatio Gates and Eliza Ann Yerkes, married Charles, (b Jan'y 18, 1838,) son of Joseph and Susanna Addis. ]hc. 21. 1X1)3, and has HI) issue.

HAtiiUKT. thii'd dau'^hter of William and Eliza Yerkes. marriid William, son of William Keas, March 12, 1857. and had
issue
17,
:

I^enton Hart, h April 21.


l8.-,.s.

l>i.""<:

d Aiigu~t

(;r.M:Ai.tM;\

ur im;
F'.li^ii_v I'.i,

ii.\i:i

\\ii(.v,

a
is.jn.

I-\
I

V.

foiiidi -oil

of Aitliiir mil
l

cMi Yiikcri.

iiKirric

Kll< n,

>[

isir.,) <laiii:littr of Tli<>iiris mihI Cliiis1 i. tiaM;i MfKin-tiy. H.;7, aii<l

Jany

b Julv 1:5. i-<:yj. b Au-u.-t 17. 1SI.>. Thoinn-. b.riine 1. ls|.'). Elizabeth, b Feby in,

Lvdii

J.iiie.
,,

Chirh

Amy

has
Ai:riii

IK) issiK'.

t:

ATi-i.

fiftli

sun of Aitlniraii<l
I

El. 17. vni.Tii, 'ecoii'l d.iu.:hter of William .nnd Ribieea Mill s, married John, (b

Elizahitli Yiiki-.-. irih 1-. IMK. (,h

iiiarriid I'liarlDllr.
I

.May
'

111. i.sii;,

son of Nathan and Lydi.i


:

<laii::lit(T
Ktiiirlit.

"f

.f'Mvi'.i,

tlian

.111*1

Kli/.al>ctli

Fil>'y

Boili ail. JiiiH' 11, 1">:'>7. and had i-.-ue Willi iiM MilK. b 1-Vb'v r.t.l.S5S; d Feby
l.i.

IX

i:'..

and

hill issue

is.-.l.
1.

Wiliiain Hart. I. Nov. :H\ lyj:'.. Ainv Davis, b June l'.>, l>l.'i il April
;

Nathan, b Jan'v
J.^

I'^IO;

d Auc;ust

I'.\

1>II.

.Tiilm Kni-lit,
I-i;uic.
I)

1)

.Tunc
is.'"'

".0.
;

isis.
Oi-t.
><,

Santi Ann. b Au^u.-t 12. I^IS. John Davis, b Nov. Jl. ls.">:!.
1*.'>1.
1

Dtc.

;!'.

Wii.i.i.vM,

second
.Mill s.

.on

Ei.i7 Ar.r.TA. tliinldauLTlitii- of Arthur and Elizal'oth YiMkcs. ni arrii-d I.~aac Clark-

'

Reberc.i
I

tTiarrii'd

of William .ind Catharine, (b

Jan'y
issue

son, (b Sept. .'."1. I'^l!".) son nnd Addis, Jaii'y _".>. had issue

of

Amos
and
d

daughter of Richard and Su:^an Carr. Dec. 26, is;};}, and had
:!1.

1x1:5,)

Amy
I.

1>^1<'>.

Edward
I

Aitiistus.
1.},

b Oct. 27,

IS:}!;

Christopher Krewsou, b Dec.


Aui,Mist

2.

1^4';;

Nov.
I I

IMU.
:

Amv,

Mav
li

1x17. J."), is IS.


Jl. Is.VJ.
!,

Anna, b April

'

Howard,

April

Isji;.
I
j

Catharine Ame., b March 26, 1*:;7 d Dec. 2. 1.S12. Sarah Jane, b Sept. 2-*. ls.5'.i. William Hart, b April 1, l-sU. Rebecca Hart, b March 20, 184.5 d March
;

Kh;r.F<\-.\. third

Ann

dau'jhtcr of Jo-iidi and Hart, married Wilii.nn. b .Tune


i

2'.'.
I

isl.-,.

11. 1771.

son of.Iosepband

Ann Mdes,
:

Sept. I't. isii.'i. and had is-ue Aui^ustus Watts, b Au^'ust 1:5, isoil. Ann, b April 1. Isos. Willi iiu Hart, b .Julv s. isio. Eli7Tl--th. h Julv <:. Isli. Willwm Miles d May JD, l.^j,').

Alfred Leaman. b August 10. 1816. .Marv Emma, b Julv 22. ls4'.>. Charles Richard, ^"Oct. 7, 1851. WiLLi.v.M H.^RT, second son of William

and Cathariiu'
I I

.^^les.
4,

manied CathadauLrhter of
:

rine,

(b

Feb'v

ls,57.")

John
I j

(Jrinlield and Catharine Clayton, Sept. I'J, ls64. .and has i-suc

ArcrsTrs Watt-^.

eldest son of William and Rebecca .Nfiles. married Leah Jane, (b Feb'v It;. Isii7. dau'.:bt> r of and Elizabeth Fisher, Feb'y I'l, ls:3.>, ami had issue
)

Catharine

C,

b June

12, 186-?.

Amy. fourth
I

dau'j:hter of Josiah

and Ann

Hart, married John, (son of Juhn and Ann Davids, >Lirch 2.S, 1813, and had
I

Leah, b March -Jl. K..^. Leah Mihs d March -.'7. 1.:>:1. Auu'u.-tiis Watts Miles married, the sec-

issue
181.).

William Hart, b

Mav

3,

1814

d Julv

8,

ond

b in lso;i,) daiiirhter of Peter and Mari^aret Blades, AplU is-ne an<l had ItUh. is.i.j,
tinn', Martlia.
t :

'

John Davis, b Feb'v


ISCl.

1,

1<M; d
1,

Sept. 12.

Adoniram
Au;,ni-tii-

Judsoii, b

Au^u>t

0, is:';7,

Hart, b April 13, l.slj. Reb.eca Mills, b Jan'v 27, 181'5, William Watts Hart, b July 27. 1820. Sirah Simp-on, b Nov. li.i,"lS22. Elizab.th Neely, b Feb'y 20, Isjj. Amy Hart, b June 21, 1827.
.

Ann

Watts,
lsl7.

b Au^'ust

isll; d

Dee.

7,

Ann
I

llarri.t Krades,

b Sept.

10, isjl.

Ann,

William and Rem.inied Charles, (b May son of William and Auii l.'>. 17'J."),) Beans, Dec. 11. ls.V.>, and had i-Jsue d Dec. :!, ls.J7, K'beec.a, b June 1, l^M Elizabeth, b Sei-t. 1 1, isjri d Dec. 3,
eldest daimliter of
-Miles,

'

becca

H.vrt, eldest dauszliter of John and D.ivi.-, married James, (b Nov. son of Olivi r and Ann Erwin. Die. 111. is.-..'), and had i--ue John Davis, b Nov. 21. Isi6 d July 20,

Am.v

12. isVJ."*

ISlii.
] 1

Amv

Aun, b March

20,

1838; d Julv

1,

1S3S.

18:56.

Ann.i .N[arv, b Oct. l.'>, Oliver HiVt, b Juu'y 4, 1812; d


1830.
I'J

May

12.

(Jnllith Mil. 2>': is:>.

'^.

b Nov.

.>.

I>i.i7

d Au;:ipf

16.

J-irn.:'

r.rnin d Dtc. :'.

I'^ll.

12

c.EXii.viA'tiY

or Tin: iiaim tamil^'.


William, b
Aiiril
-'.!.

A>"XA Mary, dauiiliti n^r Jaims.iml Ann BLirt Erwiu. rn.uried Kiiiiy, (0 .Mtiy.'.. and Sarah' A. 18:39,") son of Hliuv S. Mercur. Oct. 18. 1860. and lui? issue Iknrv S., b July 'Jl, I8ti7.
:

1>1:!.

.\nu Kiiza, b Jan'v 17, 1><17. .\Iarv D.irrah. b J'nlv is, lx\!<. d Jam'es, b Dee. 15," l.s-.>0
;

March

31,

l,si;5.

Oeor-e W.. b April

IS, isj;!.

Kkkkccv

socond daiiixhtor of married Vlfrctl T., (bOct. 11, l^i:!.) son of Jacob ;\nd Jlamuih Dullicld, Jan'y 6tli, 1810, and
Mii.r.s,

r.eiijamiu F., b .March 22, ls25.

.lolm and

Amy

l)a\i>,

Thompson D.. b AuL^ust II, lsJ7. Mary Hart d August :!0, Ls.j.s.
JosKVH, eldist son of John and Mary
Hart, married Jaiu', b .March 2s, lxls,> daughter of William anil Ellen Vansant, March is, 1.^17, nnd had issue George W., I> March 25, Is Is. .Marv Ellen, 1) Feb'y 22, is.-.j d March 16,
(

lias issnt'

John

Da\i^,
IT.

t)

>rarch 13,

181:?.
'J.

Thomas

Htiiton. b Fib'v

1815.

AVilliam Watts, b S^iit. ;, Amy Hart, b .May 1, 18J8.

is.'/J.

William "WArrs

IlAur, son of John and


(

1S..2.

Amy
sue
:

March 8, 18;)-.'.) dauii'htcr of Jacob and Mary and had isJune 24, 1856, Carpenter,
Davis, married Anna,
b
17, 18.';7 r

Charles Howard, b Jan'v


Ella,

0, 18.33.

bSept.

0,

1S55.

William, second sou of John ami Marv


Hart, married llacliel, (b Xov.s, islt;.') Ayres, ' daughter of AVilliam .and Mary Dec. 27, Isi:;, and had issue John, b August 5, is 16; d August y
:

Aniv Hart, b April


1S57.^

d April
18,13. 18(;o.

l'i\

Jacob Carpenter, b Angust 2;?. Maggie Spra^nir, b Anuiust TJ. John Davis, h Oct. 20, 1802.

is 16.

Charles A.,

&AKAH

and August
issue
:

Snii'soN, tliird dau;;hter of John Amy Davis, married Ulysses, (b


12,

b June

Ueujamin
married

6, l.s-lS.

F.,)

1818, sou
12,

Mary Mcrcur, June

of Henry and K)^\ aud has


1><.'>1.

J AMIS, third son of


liachel,

John and Marv "

l[art

Rodney AngiL-tus, b S?pt. 2;i, John Davis," b Julv 15, l-<5;}.

ilary Eliza, b Mav 4, 1855. J.ames Watts, b D'cc. 3, 1857. b Marcli 12, l.s(;7. Ulysses
,

(b Oct. 21. ls-_'4,> daituhter of Is.aac and Emily Hoben^ sack, Nov. 2, 18 is, and had issue ^Vlbert, b Oct. 5. 1S50. Anna Mary, b May 11, 1853. Is.iac Newton, b Nov. 30, 1854. William Hobensack, b Jan'y 24, 1854.
:

Amv Haut,

fifth

dauibter of John and

J"^7'

Emily Louisa,

I-

b Oct.

2'.), '

1850.

Amy
I'J,

Davis, married Hohnes, (b .March .son of Charles and Amanda i><2t;.


)

Sells,

June

12,

IS,')*),

and had issue


15, 1.S51
;

Charles Watts, h
1),

Mav
1.

d S

pt.

1X&2.

John

Davis, b

May

1857.

Tiio.Mi'soN D., sixth son of John and Mary Hart, married. Susan A., (b Dee. 17. 1S-J7,") daughter of John and Keliecca Snedieor, April 10, 1S51, aud has issue
:

Joseph, sixth son of Joseph and Elizabeth Hart, married Aim, daiiiiliter of \VilILam and Elizabeth Folw( II, Dee. 25, 1783, and had issue
:

Florence, b .\pril 21, ls.',5. Sinan A. Hart d August 20,

185;).

Lewis

P'oiam.i.i.,

11. 17.sl; d Marcli 22. 17'.)1. 177 d June is, l.sin. John, b April Charles, b .March 2'.), 17s:i; dSept. 25.17'J7. Leu-is Fcihvell, b March 17, 17'.2; d Thomas, b June 3, 17H5 d Nov. 5, 1^38. FJiza Ann. b Dec. s, 17'J7. d April Clarissa Maria, b Dec. I'.t, 1802

Thomas, b Oct.

and Ann ter of John

fourth son of Joseph Hart, nianied Sidney, daiigh^


flill,

and had issue


8,

'.),

Henry

IslS; LouLafavehe, b in ls-J5 isa; John H. Thomas JertVrson, b Feb'y 0, 1S26


S.
;

Charles, b Feb'y
;

; ;

Andrew Jackson
and Josej)h.
Sidiiev Hart d
CiiAi'.LLs,

Rebecca

Lewis 2d

26, 18:;i.

Ana
Jt)iiN',

Fohvell d March

11, IH-l.?.

second son of Joseph and Arm

Hart, married Mary, (b daughter of John and

May

3, 17'.>0,>

Mary Horner,
:

March
Jf.<cr>li.

2'K JSIO, aud leid issue b Jiii'v -JI. |.>I1.

second son of Lewis V. and Sidney Hart, intermarried with Ann Elizii, (b'M arch 20, lsl'.. daughter of (Jrandison aud Mary lir.muon, June 7, 183',', and had issue Miiry Louisa, h Oct. l", lslO; d August
)

I.

Is|_'.

'/i

(;i:Ni:.\i.n(;v

or nii;

iiAirr

TAMa.T.

l;-,

J-:milv r:irn

II.

1.

>[:ir.li Jo, ]s|.>.


.
,

Am,
.im1i;i

Vli/alMtl.,l.

Ami.

**

'

,.j,._

j^,,
'.'i;.

Elmer, b July 10, ].s,'i7. Frank Alvin. b June 1, \syj.


ErtZM.i rir. daii^htiT of Thomas anil Charity Hart, married Charles. i|i Die. ]0. Is.M.) son of Thomas and Edith Waketield. Nov. 1. ls|:i, and had no
issue.

Viru'ini:!,

b S.i-t.
I)

-.'0,

]H1T; d Julv
Is-l'.i
;

.John

Ltwi.-j,

Juno
li

:;m,

.Nfiy

I-t,

diroWuc Dcwcv,
jr,.

Mav
'2.

(I,

is.'.j;

d July

i!<:,\.

llfurv

C'l;iy.

1)

Jim."
Ii I)

\!*:<'>.
I.

Ell:i Jn,i'(i"liitlf.

Jlirir

iM.')?.

Dkkkick Ki:i>i>r.N. second son of Thomas and Charity Hart, marru Jaue.
il

Cyrus

Siiiii\-i,

Nov.

J.'i,

ImIo.
I.otii.s.111(1 Siil-

(b Au'j:n-t

2'..

\x\:<.\ daiiL'htcr
[.oult.

of An10,

drew ami
of
1><|S.

Mariratcl
i~.~ue
17,
?<.
;

March

loi

ISA. ckU'.>t dmiLclitiT


II:irt.

nvy
flull.

ni.inicd
w;i.>

who

(Justivus Busdydrowui'd in the Ohio


h;ul

and had Andrew. U .May


Lizzie.
1)

is

I'.".

.Vu:.aist

Is.'il.

ri\ t-r in

l"*.')!!.

Thfv

uo

issur.

.Ma^iiie Loraine. Jane. 1> Oct. 2^,

b March
l.s.V.t.

21.

I'^.'iO.

Thomas Jkkh
(t)

iison. Gftli sjmi

of

I.owi.^

Mary

Louisa, b

Feby
.'p.

22.

I><0,I.

and Sidnrv Hart, married


Fcb'y
l.'^t^'.

Ilarrii-t S..

-jj.

ls;;i>.)

dauu;litfror
:

JohnC.

Sus.m .Miles, b June Jane ILirt d Feby

2-'i,

IsOI. 1>07.

J.

Vanarudakii, Marili and had issue Ixli". K Siiit. Annie Loui.sa, b Dec. 11, is.jO; d Jan'v
.Marin Davis
I)

and
1<;,

Bvron,

Ei.iZA .\\v. eldest dauLrliter fif Joseph and .Vun Hart, married David. bSept. son of Nathan and Elizabeth ii'. 17111.
(

Jf<.

iN.Vi.
1.

Marple. Dec.
Auirusl 10, Auijust
-Js, IS.',! -II.

Howell Dornian.
.\pril IC. l.x.Vl.

18,')2

Joseiih Hart, b Alfred Ann


;

1><17, Isls
Eliza

2,

and had is.-ue d Dec. is. IsOJ


:

Clarissa
;

Hart

Howell Dorman,
-.';.

1)

ls:>:]

Mary Purdy
:

Nathan

Silas,

d Atiirust

Jan'v ix.M. Maria Louisa, b Oct.


is.Vl.

d Dee.
;

-10,

27. isOl; William Warren: Caroline Sarah Ellen and Euicene Vir^^inia d Au-nst 1, Is 1. A., b Feby 1. Is 1
:
1
-.

Lillie

Josephine,

li

June

10.

ls,',i;

d Juu.
-\r-KnF:rv.

4. 1M<;.!.

second son of David and

Eli/.a

Frank H., b June ;;o, Laura Louisa, h Dee.


Louis

l.'i.'iSi.

in.

l,s,-,0.

F.. b Jan'v 1, IM).'. U. S. Grant, h Sept. J.'.. 180:!

d Oct.

:>,

INOI.
J^illie Bell,
lsi;.-i.

Marple. 'married .Vnna. dauichter of (iarret and Sandi Vansant, May .'II, ISl'.i, and has i.ssue Frank Kossuth; Mary Eliza WUliam Warren and Florence.
:

Ann

FebV

-.'M.

isr,:,;

May

I'N

Ann

Emma

Rosalie, b

Nov.

17,

l^M.

"JiioMAs, fifth son of Joseph and Ann Hart, married Charity, ^b Nov. 2'2. 17'.'",) dauirhter of Derrick and Elsie Kroesen, Dee. 1"^, l>il7, and liad issue: Theodore, b March U. IxJl. Elizabeth, b Feby Ki. 1.-<J:!. J>erriek KnMsen,'b Auu:iist -J-^, l.^i'.'i. Thomas, b Oct. :!. I'*."." d Nov. 2:!, i^oT.
:

daucrliter of D:ivid and Marple. married William, .son of James and Ann Jamison, Jauy 1, isi'.i, and has no issue.

Ei.iza.

eUUst

p;iiza

Ann

Sii.As Hai:t. fourth

.son

of Da\id and

Eliza .Vtm .Marple. married .Mary Fannie, (b .May 1. IMO.') daui^hter of John Gabriel :m(l Fannie Viellet .Morell, Jan.
1, ls.)S,

and
'

h;ul issue

Clam

L..

1)

Charity Hart d July


TiiKoi)(.i;i:.

10,

\x:,:;.

Clarence.

.March 17. is. isun.


I

lsi;0

d March

William Warren, b .March


eldest soil of Thomas .and Charity Hart, married C'ath iriue .\iin.
Silas Ilouuh. b Auu:ust
t.

2^. 1802.

isOl.

(bSe(.t.

-'7.

lsjl.'> dau_'liter

of Odbert
:':!,

an.l .Mary

Ann Walton, Nov.


:

lx|:"..

Cf.At;issA Hap.t. second daughter of David and Eliza Ami Marple, m.arried

and had i.-.^ue L'wis Walton, b Thomas, b April

L'wis M. Hover. Dec,


.Sept.
'.'s.

:".,

Isill.

1.

1^11.

Isp;.
ls.,ii;

CAUoiisr.
d Sept.
D.

\'ii:c.iNiA, ftuu'th dau'j:hter

of

Hannah
ix"'.].

Louisa,

li

.\[av H. ]H|s.
17",

,Mrv Ann. b July

D.i\id:iud Eliza Ann .Mar[>le, married Charles W. McNair, of Liviu^stoa county. N\-w York. Nov. 2."', iso.'i, and
\\:\.<

-lane Craven, b Nov. li,


Willie, b Au-ii^t
.'.

K>2.

Is-iK'

1M.".I.

Will.

Wan<

u.

b Oct.

isOO.

21

14
Wu.i.iAM

ni:\i:\i.()(;Y

or Tin.

irAirr famii.v.

\\'.\i;i;i;\, y(lml^t^t

son of Da-

vid Miul Kli/a Ami'.Mariilc. man itd t^ti:ui M., daHLclitc T <{' {\\v late rcvtiTiul

Jn^i.ni, third sou of Lucretia and Wi(liam (Jiliiert, married Eiiphemia, (b

July
I

29, 17 IM,)
:

daughter
(J.

<if

O. Tracty. of Huston.
Junt"
!'.-<,

Ma.-^sailiusuttji,

.M-ir-^aret

Kees, Dec.

1770,

David and and had

"isC';.

issue
17X.S.

Lucretia, b Seiit. 20,

Cr.AHissv

^Faiiia. second daiiu;Iit('r of Jo<i'[ili and Ann Hart, married Josepli Carver. Dee. iV), l.-^-.'.s, iuul liad no isJose[ili

1771; d Sept. 21,

isiie.

Carver d July

William Hart, b Jan'y 12, 1770. Dt c. ;!!. 177f<. Joseph Hers, .A[ar-aret, b Nov. :>, 1782; d Sept.
li

21,

l*-,

\xi-').

'"^O.

fonrtli ^on of Jotm and Eleanor Hart, married J.iue I^lhert^on, (jf Ausriista county. Viruinia. Sept. _'<;, 171S1, and died without issue. Tile date of lii.s willow's death is not

Snn<<.

Rees, b Oct. 9. 17H7. Kebeeea Hart, b Feb'y 22, 1790

Euphemia

d Oct
2.3

iMll. 1.'), Silas Hart, b 1791.

March

10, 179:>

d Oct.
0,

known.
I..iior<'ti:i, second dansiliter of John and Eleanor Hart, married William
Gilbert,

Euphemia

Gilbert d Sept.

l.soG.

John, eldest son of John and Lucretia Thomas, married Eleanor Jarrett, (b
April 21, 17J8,) dau;,diter of Abraham and .Martha Jarrett, Oct. ol, 1770, aud liad issue Abraham Jarret, b Sept. 0, 1777. Elizabetli, b April 4, 1779. Mary, b Feb'y 19, 1781. John, b April 0, 1783. Oliver, b August 25, 1785 ; d Au'nist 22, 1780. Oliver Houu:ii, b Aus^st, 26, 1787. Martlia, h Oct. 25, i;.s9. William Tagart, b Oct. 18, 1791. Joseph Hart, b Julv 30, 1793: d Aynist 3, 1794. Lucretia, h Sept. 28, 1795. Joseph Hart, b Jan'v 20, 1799 ; d Aujjust 3, 1799. Eleanor, b Nov. 8, 1800; dxMarch 7, 1801.
:

October
IS!,
:!,
:t.

1.'),

1741,

and hud

is-

sue

Seth, b .March Silas, b March Josepli, b Oct.

-[:.[.].

17

it;.

171.<.

death of William Gilijert Lucretia Hart married John Thomas, March a, 1752, and had issue John, b Jan'v ;31, 17.").'!. Elizabeth, b "March x, 17.')5. Isaac, b Nov. 13, 17:.7: d Oct. 11, 17(;0. Eleanor, b Dec. 3, 17j!.
tlie
:

On

SETit, eldest .son of Lucretia and William Gilbert, niariietl Elizabeth Henry, Jan. 1767, and hail issue
;'),
:

William, b Nov. -Jt;, 17G7 d Elizabeth, b July 1:5, 170'J


;

May

.31,

1770.

Joseph, b March _'. 1771. Sarah, b Jan'y 17, 177.'). Eleanor, b Jiilv^ 17. 1775. Seth, b ^[ay 17, 177,-<.

John, .second son of John and Eleanor Thomas, married Eleanor Bus>ev, AiiShe died m l.s(i5, in child i;n-t. 1x04.

second son of Lucretia and WilGilbert, married Elizabeth, liis cou'iin, daii-htia- of I<aac and Edith Houi;h. Au-iist 1, 1771, aud had issue Susanna, b August 9. 1772. William, b June 2.), 1771. p:dith; John; Myra, b April 1, 1789. 1800, Joseph, b Sept.
SiLA.'s,

He afbed, together with the infant. terward marrieil .Mary Theresa Bertouhad issue Joseph Bertouuue.
line, Sept. 2x, I.nuO, u'ud
:

liain

-Martha, fourth daughter of John aud Eleanor Tliomas, married John, son of John and Ann Clark, Nov. 11, 1800, and had issue Eleanor Ann, b Oct. 2, 1807.
:

Elizabi-.tii, eldest

daughter of John and

SrsANNA, eldest
and had issue
Eliza,
1)

dausjliter of Silas and Elizabeth Gilbert, married Peter Crispin, (b Sept. 2, 1771.) Jan'y ',, ]7'J7,
:

Lucretia Thoni.is, married .Vrtliur, (b Oct. 29, ]7;i3. ) son of Stephen and Elizabetli Watts, Feb'y 11, 1801, and

bad no

issue.

N(n-. 9, 1797. Lucretia, b .Nov. 2:5, 17f;i. Mary Ann, b Oct. 1, 1801. William, b .Vutrust 9, 180,'). John, b Oct. 2u, 107. Silas Houtch, b Julv 2'.. I'lu.

Oliver,

Myra.

I.

lifili son of John and Eleanor Hart, manic (I Sarah, (,1) Dec. 7, 1729,) daughthr of Henry aiul Hannah Hrees, ot bensalem town.-hip, liueUs county, 17 |h, and had Pennsylvania, Feb'y
:'.'>.

rv

I.

]>i{:).

issue

f;r.Ni;Ai.itt;\

or

in; ii.\i;i

wiii.v,

15

S.-1I1.

I.

Nn\.
t)

IH. 17l'<;

Eliinor,
17 m'.
H:imi:ili,

X.iv

-'J,

IT.'id;

a Oct. IT.'.n. d April l.'i,


-'.'.
:

'

JmIIV. ehlest child of Samuel J. .and Eliz;>lieth .Murr.iv. inti

rmarried

wiili

'

Oliver.
17'.M.

1)

h Dec. n. ir.VJ Nov. 7, 17.M;


;

d Srpt.
il

'2,

17.'>:i.

S. pt.

or Oct..
1>1
1.

TouniT' st daUL'hliT of clonel J. !s. Spanii. Dec. l:t. 1^1M. and had i.ssuc I-abella Norrelli. 1. Sipt. 1.1. l-xp.t. Ella Ransom, b Sept. 12, 1.'<.)1 d Auju.<t
:

Mary,

John, h
.Tos.pli.
S.inili.

>r:irrli C. 17."iS

.^r;^|(ll 17.
(I

9,

1><.".2.

I.Nov.
I>

IJ. 17i;ii:

Oct.

HI. 17iiJ.
I77.>.

M.irv H:ikor. li Oct.


Sir.ili ir irt

Sept.

i'..

17i;j.
l'..

John R.msom.
Sarah,

l:t.
il

177J: d Oct.
-Jii.

b Sept. tw ins. b

2.".,

18.-,1.

Oct.

177-.'.

On

ni:irricd

the dc.uli i.tliisfii>t wile Oliv. r Il.irt Anne N[.iii;i. hjaii'v 17. 1711.
(

Wrii.i\\i BoNNi

widow
tor of

ot'C'harlcs (Jriinl':dl. :iiid i|:ui:;liWilli. iin and .S;iiali Si;dy. of

.vr, second child of Samuel J. and r.liz il.i-th Murray, intermarried with Caroline MidiUeton. eldest daiii^hter of colonel Robi-rt H. Good-

Charleston.
1774.

Sontli
:

Carolin.i,
;

April

.'>.

wvn.
d

(Jet.

-1^.

isir,, nii.l

had

i:^.suc

and had issnc d Sept. 21. 177.'.. Sil.T-. b An-ust .U. 177.". William Roircr.-, b Dec. i:i, llf^l d
;

ElizliUfh Vand.-rhorst, b Sept. 22, 18(7

Au-ust

9. IH-Is.

Marrli.

Ix-.V).

Anne Maria

Tlart d Oct.

.1,

l.->i:].

Et.F.vNnii, eldest daui^litcr of Oliver and Siir.di Flart. intenn.irricti with Thomas.

Oct. 1, l.*18. Wm. Bonneau. b Dec. 8, ispj. S inu>l J., b Jan"v 17. l^.jl. Elizabeth Vanderhorst 2d. bSept. 20.18.r2. Caroline .Middlelon Bradly ;
;

Charlotte

Thompson, b

Emma
;
;

(h.Jan'y '.U. 1741.) son of Thomas and Mary Screven, of Charleston. South Carolina. March G, 1770, aiid had issue 1772. Sarah, b Dec. 4. 1770 d Juno Martha, b Sept. ,i. 1772 d .Inly 2<;. 17;^. Thomas, b August lt>, 1774 (i June 12,
: ;

James N'lson Geori^e (Toodwjii Mathew .M.jore Sarah and James


;

Nelson

2d.

Martha
el J.

Si;rf.vkn. fourth child of Samu.^[urray, intermarS. .Moore, M. D., ;ind h.id issue :

.">.

ried

and Elizib'th with .Miihew


4. IH4.S.

May
Martha

IxX).

Jdmv^. b Oct.
Oliver, b Oct.
IM.').

1777 d Oct. 9, 1777. 177m d Oct. 2.>. 177S. Eleanor, b Nov. 12. 1771); d Feb'v 17.
2,
;

lf<.

"

John Washin-ton. b March


April
l.i.

29.

17S2

17.X2.

Thomas Screven

Mav

4,

1801.

Siii-leton. b .March .". 1840. Elizib'th Boiiiie.iu. b Jan'y 23, I.-'.tI. Isliam. o .\I arch 1. ls:.)2. Sarah Ri'liard-on. b Nov. 21. 18.i3. Arihur Ro-e. b Jan'y 1, Is.'tS. Samuel .^[u^|ay, b June 8, ISoS. Martha, b Julv 17. 18.-,9. Screven, ) .Marv Cornelia, Oct. 13, I860 d March

John

Marth.\, eldest daui^hterof Thoma.s and Kleanor Screven, intermarried with Benjamin Bouueau, Feb'y 26, 17'JJ, and had issue Elizabeth Vunderhonst, b May 01, 1798.
:

6. l>it;.5.

Buichell Richardson, b Sej.t. MacDonald, b Dec. 2(5, l.-*iji}.

5,

1803.

Ellen Cox
J.

Ei.iz.vnFrrti V.VNi>Fi;imRST, daughter of

Benjamin and .Martha marrieil with Samuel 1791.) son of John and rnv, N[av 2.'). 1h20. and John, b >f.iv 4. 1x21.

Bonneau. ititerJ.. (bJuni' 22. Elizabeth Murhad issue


:
j '

with sue

2d. .seventh child of Samuel and Eliz ib;lh Murniy, intermarried Ls:uic S. K. Beuuett, and has is: ;

Samuel
J. C.

Murray

ri'-nry

Isaac J.

K.

Fiber; and

Wm.

Bonneau.

Wm.

Bonneau. b Dec. U. 1822. d Nelson, b Jan'v 10, Js2.'. July 9. 18:;.j. d May Ellen" Cox. > b Dec. 18, 1S2G Martha Screven, f 9, 1827.
Elizabeth
;

Elizvbkth Ni:lson 2d, tenth child of Samuel J. ami. Eliz ibcth .Murray, intermarried with
S. J.

Bradley, and
;

h;i3

'

issue

John
I

Gordon M.

Mary Murr.iy

and

S.imuel.

Edward Lan;;. b March Ellen Cox 2.1. b .March

.".,

1828.
ix:^).
I

:'..

Benjamin Calhoun, b Aiu il 10, 1.><;V2 d Oct. 1, IKiG. >[arv Coniidi I, b Feb"v 2i'.. 18;i4. Elizabeth Nelson 2d. ii Auuu>t I. 183''. r,eor;:e Mercer, b March 22, 1S)8. SmuiucIJ. >rMrnn- d -Tub I. I'^.'.O.
:

TiioM vs. eldest son of Thomas nnd Eleanor Screven, inti rmarried with Mary

Ann Susanna,
ter ot

(b July 13. 17><4.) dau:^hArclur and M uy .\un Smith,


:

Dec. 21. 1N)3. and had issue

Marv Ann.
is'll.

t^

FehV

21. l^ll

d Nr.r.

0.

ItT

(;i:vr..\r.(u;v

of

irit;

rrAin'

iamilv.

Marilui Eloannr,
;Nt:ir>;:\iTt

1.

N..v.

-Jl,

l^l
17,

I.

J;mi'.
1:5.

b Aii-iist
Siis:uin:i

l.^l;i;

.Much
.M;iiv
J'.r,

ixt!.'>.

Amu
iNl'.i.

.>rariou Screven, b Feby 27, \f<C,-2. "Horace Warini::. b June iM, ISfJl. Francis Lee, b July IJ. Isou.

S< irvt-n

d Oct.
Ei.KANiii:, yonnircst daui;iiter of

Thoma*

M\n\
and

Ann", tUlc!*t daiiijlitor of Tlionvis ^[ary Aim Siisamia Scri'vcu. iuter-

and Eleanor Screven, married .Tohn, (t> in l7ii'.t,)son of .John and ."Susanna Cox,
1S(M>, and liad is.Mie Joseph Hart, b Oct.

of Chai-|eston. Soutii Carolina, Dec. 22,


:

iiiarriiil

IfiOS.) soil

with (Iforiic I'.. 1> .Taii'y l:!, of John and Kli/.a FiiiTpou,
1

18,

ISOI
;

Oct.

_'>.

ls.;o,

and had

Jany
8,

i-.<uc

17,

ls.-,((.

Artlmr Sciivcu, b Aii-ust

J-',

l^-iJ

Thomas
is.'.l.

S.,

b Dec.

12,

lsn:j

d Nov.
;

William

Aiiiiust 1, l.s:!.!. Scrcvcii,


T.

Iv

June

2'>.

ISol.
ls:!S
it

John Johnston, b
.'),

April

1.'),

IsoC

d Oct.

(k'oruc Archt
;;,

b Juiu"
.\.ugii:^t

".':?.

1>>:>7.
;

isos.

John Witton. b
isi;:;.

li',

May

Saint Julieii, h .\.i>ii! 17, IMl. ilarv Eleanor, b Oct. ^ is I.'.

Thonias Screven, b Oct.


2S. isi:>.

;5.

l^M

d S^pt.

Eleanor Susan, b Oct. 17, ls(i8. \Vashini;ton, b Sept. 11, 1811; cj July -Jti, is 111. 5, 1810. Mary'Amarentha, b Sara'h Elizabeth S., b ls22; d Au''ust 17,

John

1811.

Robert
>L\p.TH.v Elk.\.nor, jiccond tlani^htcr of Thomas and >[ary Ann Susaima Screven, intcrmarriiHl with Gcoi'l^c P. Frierson, her hrotlicr-in-law, Nov. "_'a, 18-KI, and had issue
:

L.,

b Oct.

1,

1824

d Sept.

!.'>,

1811.

John Cox d
Jos[;!-i[

in 1820.

Geor-ette Philipa, h Fcb'v 10,1818; d


is IS. is I'.". Clarence, b July b Nov. 17, ls.')I. Victor, Eui^ene Francis Herman, b P'eb'v.'S, is.j;;; d Oct.

April

1-2,

Thomas
M,

.".,

l.stU.

iLir;;uret

ILirtha Irene, b Oct. i.'.. ls.31. Screven, b June "J-J, isr)7

March

5. IS.V,).

Philip Bernard, b Oct. .J, is.',!). Lorraine Screven, b Au^iust 7, 18G1.


Wii.Li.\>r S( i:i;vF,x, second

HAi;r, eldest son of John and Eleanor Cox. married Mari^arct L., of Isaac LeNoir, of SoutU Carolina. Oct. IC, IS.U, and had issue ; Mary Amelia, b in is;',.') d in infancy. Thomas S.. b June. ls;!7. d in infancy. Isaac, b IS.'iO Sarah Screven, b IslI infancy, Eleanor Screven, b lsl-.>. Sarah Screven 2d, b Sei)t. .W, 1816. Adella Amarentha, b March .'JO, 18-18. Mariiaret L. Cox d iu isOi).
dauijjhter
;

dm

son of Gn\ and .Mary Ann Frierson, married Flora Mclver, Feb'y, is.'jii, and has IsP.

sue

Mary

Screven, b Sept. 12,

isi;,:..

S<iu;vtL\, tliird clattrhter of Joseph and Mari^aret Cox, intermarried with Au;;ustus Ives, (b Nov. is.'.s. ) .s(in of Farimfolil and Elizabetli Pearee, Jany 1"), l8i;i, and had issue: AuiTUstus Cox' b Ans^ust 21, ls(;2.
Ei.r.ANoij
,'>,

il.vi'.GARF.T

Thomas

Jam;, third daui;!uer of TIiom.a-s and Mary Ann Susanna S<'re\t'n, iuterniaarietl Nvith Francis A., (b Nov. '21, ISlt;.) son of Paul S. II. and Jane E. Lee. May l.jth. ls;!;t, and iiad issue
:

Joiiti

Maricaret Elizabeth, b Sept. IC, isiil. b Nov. 7, 18GC ; d Nov. 10, Bryan, "
ic<;.

Er.i;ANoi: Sr.sAN, eldest

daushtorof John and Eleanor Cox, married William

Screven,

I)

Triniiilla Althia, b

Feb'v _':. iSiO. Jnlv s. Is 11.


_'_'.
;

Martha Eleanor, b March HI, lsl:3. isls d same d Dauu'hter, b March


Julia

Emma

ly.

Luyton, (,b Aui^nst s, ls(Mt,)son of John and Louisa .MeCaa, of Camden, South Carolina. Jan'y 21, iSiiO, and had iasue: EuLcene MeCaa.'b Nov. 20, ls;jo.

Paulina, b .M-.nch

1:!, is,')]'

Marv

Louisa, b Sept.

i:!,

ls;5(j.

Roland Andibon. I) Jidv il. ls.">_'. Bur^vell Hoyken, b Dec. 9, ls.>7. AVilliam Henry, b Feb'y, ls(;7.
Tf.iNc;iL(..v

Amelia B., b Jnlv 20, ISlC. Bona, b Sent. 2^', 1818. William Luy tou .McCua d M.ay

20, ISj.*).

Ai.TiirA, eldest daui^htcr of Francis A. and Mtu'v Jane Lee, intermarried with Julius Ami lius, b .luly 10, IS.'U, son of Jarne-s E. and .M iry Ann Smith. June '2'.>. |s.'i;i, and had issue :
(

A.\tAiii:NTirA, second daujrhter of .John and Eleanor Cox, married Dr. James K. Jones, of Mareiii^o county, Geoitcia, and liad issue Elizabeth Finney; Hol.erta L. Daisy;

3Iauv

and

-I

inies Itoberl.

(;i;n I'.Ai.itcv <>r

iiii:

hakt tamilv,
I.e.Siirrlericr,

17
b
.Vpiil Jl. Isiil. lo. isi;;;.

fli.ivi-.i;.

spcoiul son of Oliver


ititrriii irriiil

;iii(l

Surah

William

Hart,

with Sirah
:

lirocic-

Thomas Hevwood, b Feby

iiit'in, Nov. r.i, 177s, and iiad is^iic-: (1 :Sarah. h Ort. 11, 177:i Thomas Wasliiiiztoii, \> Jiiiir .".. 11^2

Hi'len .Mary [[art, bJunei':;, Isf.j.


;

An:;iist 17.

KM.
1.

Eleanor, h

Marv,
OliviT.

1)

:W. 17s 1. d June J Jan'v.':.. 17sr,


.^[a^cll
;

I,

17s7.

Tiii>M\> I[Ar:r, son of William R. and Helen M ny Ci'.ruiUiat. married Elh-u Barbara, d.au^hter of Tliomas S. and Ami Screven Williams, of WalthonvUlcT
Geor;.;ia,

1)

Mav

17SS.
17s'.t
;

Jtdy

l.'>,

lsi;:>.

John, b July
yi.

I't,

Au'^aist,
.>

17'.i7.

H;'.Ni:v

John, thirdson of Olivir and


intcrniirricd

irah Hart,

Mary Scrcvon, (It Sept. l'>. 17(17. 1 daui;ht(r of James and .Mary Sereven. June 17, 17s|, and had
issue
17S.-..
:

with

Wii.i.iAAf, fourth son of John and Marv Hart, intermarried with Harriet Beaiiis of Ediretield District, South

Carolina, Aui^ust
is.sue.

1.), is-.':;,

and

liiw

no

Oliver James, h Oct.

1'.,

17s.-)

d Oct. d Oct.

17, is,

Ei.i7.\ni;rit Si

Esther .Marv, h April


ISO
I.

'l:).

17s0
;

rkvkv Li.k. third daughter of John and .^[a^y Hart, intermarried with Joseph. youuLcest son of John
and had
.^[ary Jones.

Jan'y

I'),

is-.'",

and

.Martha
l.sr.>.

L.,

b Julv

l'.,

17;m)
J:!.

d Nov.
:

1.'.,

issue

Charles Berrien, b Nov.


17!t2

11. Is.'o

d April d Nov.

John
l-.>.

Screven, b Sept.
17;t.

d Sept.
17'.)

b, ls.")7.

Evchni
.'(;,

Eloui.sa, b
I'.).

June

'J,

IsJ-.'

"Charles

Thomas, b S'pt.
.?.

I;

I.

'is

April

ls:Vt.

Henrv William,
irust 1, ls:',h.
<Odin'j:sell

b July

1:1,

170><

Au

Henrv [[art, b Dec. n, ls-23. James Newton, b Sept. 1 1, 1><2'>

d Oct.

Elizabeth Screven, b Feb'v -J."). Witherspoon. b Dee.


l:;,

Isii].
'.K
;

Emma
l.\

isO:!.

b .Vu^ust -2X lsJ7. Hettie An','u>ta,b Feb'v 1.3, Isi'.) d SepL


;

is, IS.VI. .Vdelaide.


ls.-,7.

.Smith Screven, b April


_>(;,

isoC,
isl.'..

d Feb'y

ist;i;.
"27,

Edward
ls;;-2.

Jos-ph. b April

-20,

1S30

d Oct..

.Mary Hart d D.c.

Mautiia. second dau^'htcr of John and

l^.il. Andrew Mavbank, b Oct. Edwin West, B Sept. 1, ls:5:! d Sept.


1''..
;

17,
;

Mary Hart, intermarried with John C, son of John and .^[ary Bell, of South
Carolina. Dec.
:!1,

]st;-2.

Thomas

Screven, b .Vug-ust 10,

IS.-l.j

Isis,

and had issue

Sept., ls:!7.

one child, which died in infancy. John C. Bell died in is.');',.


CiiAr.i.i:s

EUiott Maxwell, b
i;.

Jany

tl.

1S:;7

d July

ls;!7.

Calhariue, dauu,hter of reverend Jacob D. Dunham. Jany 11. l^U', and had
issue
17.
:

Thomas, third .-on of John and Mary Hart, intermarried with Ann

Josephine Cartdine F.lizab-Hli. b May 1:>, d S.-pt. 1;!. ls..7. is:;:) Helen Louisa, b Sept. i'.!. l-*ll. Laura N[atih!a, h .Mav 16, iSl:?; d .March
;

2-2.

is.-, 1.

b March Helen >rarv, "


ISG-.'.

l.',

isJl

d Jnue

IIkxuv

llAiir. eldest son of Joseph and Elizabeth Jones, intermarrieil with Al)bie S., only dau!j:hter Samuel Dowse,

Hki.kn ^[ai:v. daughter of Charles Thoncisand.Vnn Catharine Hart, intermarried with William K.. son of (iilbert and >[ary Oii^nilliat. Sept. l'.>, ]s;j.s, and liad issui' William \l.. b June-J1, Is.-.'.i. d Jan'v 11, < harles Hart, Oct. 1:;, is 11
:
:

Mav
:,o,

"21.

isu;,

Jo.seph [[enry, b
is.".:;.

and had issue March S, l,si8; d Sept.


:

Evelvn, b Oct.
Ella"Sturi;is.
17. is.Vl.

.'..

l>*in

d Oct.

.'..

IS

p.).

b March

22. Is.Mi;
is.'.d

d Nov.

James Newton, b.Lm'y


2'.>,

1(1,

d Jan'y

ISIJ.

is.'i'.t.

<;iUMrtWc>t.

) )

Thomas

bNov.

1.-..

IS 12.

[art.

Wii.i.tAAt Roc.Kur. eldest son of

William

K. and Mary (liu'niUiat, marrieil Hattie, danu:hter of Tlnnuas J. and Mai^caret [[.

Eliza Law, b Mav 2, ls.-,.S. Stuart Dcjwsc, b Jan'y l'.>. \)^<'0. John Stur-is, b Dec. 21. isci. Abl)ie AnuMista. b Feb'y s, lS(i|. Henrv Hart, b Dec. I. isc.l d June 17,
;

ISCC.

joliua. .Vuiriist

a[[eywood. of .\iUen. South i;l. ISi'.ii. and has issue:


(.

18

(JKNKAi.iKiV ui'
otMoIin
witli
)

iiii; iiAi:r

ia.mii. v.

Oi>iN(;sr.i.i. W'.. ciulitli cliilil

;>iul

M:iiy

l[;iit,

iiiteiiiianird
(".,

Mary
1"_',

Scaly Townsend, of Wadmalaw Island, Sout'ii Carolina, Feb'y 2i;, 1st,"), .and

Civrolinn, (b .Timo
ISi'd,

l^-tis,

il:in'4htcr (if

had
is

issue

OlivtT and >[ary Stcvriis,

Jaii'v

Sarah Clark,
17.

Mav

0,

and

isK); d Sept.,
."0,

liad issue

Williani Odi^^'s^ll, b Fob., InJ7 d Sopt. ISIS. Edward }Unry. b Ftby, ls:]_'. Two obililri'u who died in infancy. Charles Thomas, b Sept.. ls:U. ^[aly Caroline Hart d Feby i!, isr.C. Odinu:soll W. Hart, on the dVath of hi.s witli Sarah E., wife, intermarried d.inirhter of colonel Josiah and Mary
;

Rieiiardine Wiliielniina, b Dec.


(ieo.
ls,-,l.

l.slS.

Washington Seabrook, b July

27,

William Thomas, b April 11, ls.-,:5. 01i\er James, b August 20, ]s,Vl. John Townsind, b June r>. ls,')S. Joseph Seabrook, b Ai)ril 21, IS.'.O. Richard Henry Jeidiius, b April
lS(iO.

2'.\

\Vilsoii,

of Siaibnry county, Georgia,

Mary

Scaly, b

August

29, 18G3.

in is;!s,

>r:irv Caroline,

and had issue b Feby,


;

IS.'jn.

Robert Wilson, b Oct.'. ls.50. Josiah Wilson Martha Lee Sarah ElizaAlice Lucile Helen M. and beth
;
;

third daughter of John and Eleanor Hart, intermarried with Isaac Hough, Seiit. 29, 17 is. and had issue Eleanor, b August 2, 1719 d March 1,
l'34li(]a,
: ;

Emilv

Odin<rsell.
l.'j,

1S02.
isi'.s.
;

Sarah E. Hart d Sept.

S.MiTii Scia-'.vr.N',' ninth child and youncjest fon of John and Mary Hart, ititer-

niarried with Mary Coleman. They had issue one sou. Joseph Henry, who died at the a::;e of in months. At the

d Elizabeth, b August 21, 17,->1 Susanna, b June 2S, 17.0;> d John, b March 12. 17,'),') d d single. ]\Iary, b May 19, 1757 d March Isaac, b Sept. 15, 1759
;

17,

isol.

death of his first wife he intermarried with Elizabeth Fulton, by whom he had issue Tliomas Ilemy, Joim, Mary Coleman, Maiion, and Screven. He was married a third time to Harriet
:

Thonuis, b Oct. 7, Oliver, b August


ISOl.
Silas,

17(;i.

27, 17(53
;

d Jan'v

18,

b Feb'y 8, 17';(; d Mav 14, 182.'?. Joseph, b Jiine 17, 1708 d julv 3, 1799. William, b Sept. 12, 1770 d single.
; ;
'

Atwood, daui^hter of reverend Samuel Newell, in ls.')(;, and by her had issue Samuel Newell, b Dec., ISJG Hattie
: ;

Isaac

Hough d

April 13,

ITbiJ.

A., b

1S(3().

Mary

Bakf;i:, yonni^c-st daughter of Oliver and Sarah Hart, intermarried with Benjamin Merrill, of South Carolina,
11. 17s9, aiul 4, 17s;.

Jaa'y

had issue
]S, 170l>.

Er.K.VNOu, eldest dau;j;hter of Edith and Isaac Ilouiih. interui.arried with Tliomas Craven, (b June I, 17;;9,) Dtc. is, 170(1, and had issue d Feb'y, 1809. Isaac, b Sept. 29, 1707 Edith, b Nov. 7, 170s. Ahner. b Dec. 11, 1709.
: ;

Sarah, b Oct.

John Mclver. b Feb-y

Nathaniel Wilson, b Nov. It. 1701. Martha Bonneau. b March 11, 17!is. Anna Maria Gilchrist, b Jany Jl, ISO].

WiM.iAM

Ro(;i:p.s, youngest son of Oliver and Anne Maria Hart, intcnnarried with Sarah, (b June .'<), 17s:!. (laii;,fhter of James and Eli/.abctii Clark, of EdLsto Island, South Can^liua, Dee. 27,
)
:

Margaret, b Sept. ,7. 1771. Amy, b Dec. 12, 1772 d Auorust 9, 1773. John, b .March 19, 177 1. d August 9, 1777. Seth. b Dec. 2S, 177.) Josiah, b Jan'y 27, 1777. (These chihiren were tiorn in Wanvick township, Biuks county. Pa.) Elizabeth, b Feb'y 17, l"77'.>. Wiiliam. b March 5, 1781 d March 5,
;

17s].

1809, and had issue William Charles, b Aui^'ust 20 isll


April,
2, 1S(;2.

Joseph, b Jan'y Thomas, b May

2:!, 17s;;.

], 17s 1. Eleanor, b Sept. is, 17s.',. Rachel, b Dec. 2S, 17s7

d March

28,

Thomas
isll.

Bannister Seabrook,

))

Jan'v

-H.

1790. Mary-, I) April

1 1,

17S9

March

20, 179it.

Oliver Jamc.s, b June 2S, ISIG. Sarah Hart d Feby 17, lS4k

James, b Jan'y

Olivki:

Ja.mi;s, youiurest son of William Rollers' aiul Sarah Hart, intermarried witli Joanna Adejija, b April 2.'., l^Js. )
(

.il, 1791. > twins, b Jan'v 20th, 1792. Harriet, Ciiarlotte d Feb'y .s, ]792. Charlotte. )" Lueretia, b Jan'y 17. 17l>.'). (The last eleven children were born iti

London county,

Virginia.')
8,

daUL^hter of

John Richard and .Mary

Thomas Craven d Feb'y

179J.

(;i:m;ai.<i(.v

<v

m:

ii \i;i-

iamii.v

19

Ei>iTii, elilot il:ui;;lit'T (.f P'lrauDr and witli Tlionii:! Cntviii, intiiin:iirir(l
S.imiiclSiiicliiir, (hSijit. K". ITCJ.
(if

ramel.i. b Ani;ust o, IxOfJ. Lucretia. , ,


.

.Inlm

aiiil

S:ir:ili
:

t<iiul;iir,

son Nov. 7,
)

^^^'"^-

I'-

Elizabeth./

IT'.i'J,

lUid liMd i.--ur


ti

Thonris McU.iwtll,
('CO.

Hmi^li, b

Si'jit. .".o, ]7'.:!. Ai'ril ix, 17'Ji;.

SisANN A. third daughter of Eilith and Isaac Hough, intermarried with Benjamin Jones, June 17, 1773, and had Issue
:

Sanili. b .riily

."..

Kl'X.
2i".,

Sanuiil Cnivcii, b Dec.

Im").

Edith, b

March

10, 1771.

Au-NKK, sccnnd son of EIt':>nor and Tho-

John, eldest son


dest'n.

mas C'ravi-n, inti-rniMnicd witli Siiiah Sinclair, ib C)ct. 1.'), 177.").) danirlitcr of Jolinand Sarali Sinclair, Nov. Id, 17'j'.>,
and had
i.<>uc
:

of Edith and Isaac Houirh. ititerniarried witli Charity Van:

William, b Anu:ust .S. ISOO. Sophia Vanhorn, b An-nst .". ISO.l. ) twins, b Fcb'v 17, ixOii. Silas. d Oct. 12, 1x07. Saniuol, r Sarah, b Mav.'H, isns. Abucr Craven d Sept. 12, 1808.
jrAiu-.AUirr,

May lit, 1774, and had issue one daughter Edith, born in Vir:;inia. Charity Hough d Sept. ,5, 1810.
Isaac,

Sil.is

second son of Edith and Isaac

Hough, intermarried with Elizabeth Harton. April 2.). 17sl, and had iasue: Constant, b Aprd 7, 172. Thonia.-J. b March 20. 17s4.
Charlotte. July 2i;. 17s7. Elizabeth Hough d Dec. 2:5, he intermarried' with .Mrs.
Etierth.
17.'<><,

second daiiLrliter of Eleanor and Thomas Craven, intcrniarrit d with Georiro Sinclair, son of John and Sarah Sinclair, .Tan'v 1. 17'.t'.". and had is.-tie Pamela, b Dec' 22, 17'.''.l d Aui;iist 27,
:

when

Elizabeth

Feb'v

1C>.

17!':!,

and had issue:

IJ^O.J.

Anna
;

d Sept. 24. isoj. Delia, b Dec. S. ISOO Eleanor, h Nov. r.>, ixul d
;

Geo. Washington, b Dec. 2:?. 1793. Maria, b Oct. 10. 17:iO. Elizabeth, b Julv 13, 17P0.
eldest son of Isaac

Isaac, b April 20. isos

Emra:i, b Fel)"y 27.

Iso.')

d Sept. 10, d Dcc.G,


;

isO.'). l.'^OO.

Constant,
beth
rine

and Eliza-

Hou:j;Ii,

Geon^e. b
Sanuiel, b

May

IS, isiw;.
7. ls(i8.
.3

Ann Smith,

intermarried with Catha(b Oct. 4, 1784,) Au-

June

And one

sou died nameless

weeks

old.

John, third son of Eleanor and Thomas


Craven, intermarried with Ctitharine Dulin, of London connlv, Virtrinia. 17:)s, Sept. 28. ]7<,'7. She died M:ncli when he intermarried with Elizah,>th Dorrel, of Fairfax county, Virginia,
'.".

gust 31. li<04. ,Tnd had issue: Constant, b Feb'v 2o. isnr,. Catharine Ann, b April tl. isO'^. Elizabeth Houghton, b April G, 1810.
Gi:o.

Wasiiincton, eldest son of I^aac Houzh :md Elizabeth Eberth, intermarried with Rebecca Prall, May 30,
l.xlO.

March

lit.

isoa.

and had issue


27, \!*in.

Llewellyn, b

Feby

Thomas,

JosiAU. fifth son of Eleanor and Thomas Craven, intermarried with PUizabcth Shepherd, (b Dec. 2(;. ]7Nr..) d.-iughter of Charles and Eleanor Shepherd. August It;, l.Hiil, ;iiid had issue Eleanor, b Feb'v 1 1, isos.
:

and Isaac intermarried with Hannah Tompkins, (b Oct. 7. 17t)i;,) daughter of James Tompkins, April 1, 17W, and
third son of Edith

Houirh,

had

is.-.ue

1701. Sarah, b Jan'v Lewis Hart, b Feb'y 2i;, 1702.


.-).

JosF.i'H, seventh

mas Craven, intermarried with


Steere, (b Sept.
Isiiac
Is:iac,

sou of Eleanor and ThoII iimah 2. 17M.) dauuhli'r of


2.j,
:

Xancv, b June 6, 1701. William, b Nov. s. 170.'). Joseph, b Oct. 27. 1707. John, b Auiru^t I'l. ison.

Jonathan Tompkins, b Jan'y

IC,

1803.

and Elizabeth Steere, Oct, 1K04. and had is.-ue

Thomas, b Jan'y
Oi.ivti:, fourth

12, l^OG.

b Dee. 2t;, Isd... FJeanor. b Sept. lo. 1mi7. Abuer, b Oct. ;!, iMi'.i d March h\ 1>11.
;

son of Edith and Isaac Houirh, intermarricil with Phrbe Cad.wallader. April M, 1700, and had issue: d August 14, Elizabeth, b Julv 21, 1701
:

Et.KANoi:.

Tlioina-;

daughter of Eleantir and Craven, intermarried with liobertOwens. lb Jan'y 21. i77i;,) Airil 1. I80,'p. and had i->ue
fifth
;

170.'<.

Uebeeea. b August 31. 1702. .Marv, I. Mav 2>i. I7'.'l, died Januarv 20,
IS.". I,

20
F-liz:\bctli,
1>

(fKNKAr.'KiY
d

or

Tin; icakt F.onr.v.

Oct.

-2:'.,

'iT'M)

.T:iii"y

-22.

d April x, ls(f2. 2:), Isaac, Rnrhel. 1) M;iv I. isoO; d Oct. 17. l.^iU. Vhvhc, I) .T:m"v 17, isoj d IX'(>. I'O, iMi;;. Oliver. 1> VvU'y 11. isiU.
i)

June

17S>!

b Oct. 21, 1H21. Benjamin F., b Dec. 2, 1^2t;; d July 20v


J.,
lsi;i;.

Edw:ird. Uel>ecea

bNov.

21.1810.

Piiel)e II.,

bXov.
)
t"

7, ls2'.l

dSept.

1, ls.'i.j^

M.VKV.

third d:ui:;hter of Oliver Plu'be HouLcli. iuterm:u-rii'(l witii Sum1^00,) son of Siuiuiel and iK'l, (b ii\ Lydiii Yardley, March .'.', Is 22, and
:

^''- *' Thomas C. and Mary Elizabeth, b July


Ri:i:i:(
I

Augustus,

KTv.,. ^*

11 ^

is-.i '' ^
1, 1S:!(;.

dauLchter of Maldorfc K. and Elizabeth Tavl(<r, marri<'d J(jiuii

J., eldest

had issue Phebe H., b Jan'v


IS,-).-;.

S.;
,

(b Dec.
:

17, ls).">.)

son of SamueL
12,

IS':;

d Nov.

1.'),

and .Mary Brown June '


has is>ue

l8ll, aiuL

Lvdi:^ b Sept. ) q" ,

2, 1><21

p;\-r UU\er 11.,

U Sunuel
Oct.

d Nov. (5, IS 17. d Dec. 1<>, \s2X.


..

Edward

T..

b March

20. 181.J.

1, ls-.'7.
^j
:

Flarrv Clav, b Nov. 20, 1x17. Mary, b 0<'t. 11, ls(;i.


J

(^ij^.^,,. f J

^j,,.j^

j^,;

Charles, b Dec. 11, lx-.>0 d April H;, isiJI. Sanuiel Y'ardlcy d AprU 2:], l.sG7.
Fiircni-.
II., eldest dui^Iitcr of Samuel and Mary Yardley, intermarried with James B., son of ircueral Samuel A. Smith, Jan'v is, 1,S42, and had issue
:

Bi:nmami\ p.. third son of Mahlon K. and FJizab'tli Taylor, married .Mereianna, daughter of (}eor;^e :uid Eliza P. Yardl'V, June lO, ls.');i, and had issue : Helen, b ".March :;], is.'.t d Jan. 12, lx.')7.
;

Ijliau, b Oct. H;,

is.'r.')

d Jan. 12, ixru.

M.u-v Elizabeth, b Sept. 12. 1S4:5. n.)u-ard Charles, b June 27, ISl.'j.

KL, b Dec. 5, l.<)7. Eliza Y., b Auirust ?.o, is.'.!). Geon;e Y., b Mav 18, 1802.
PitKi-.K IT., second danuiiter of Mahlon K. and i;iizalH}th Taylor, married Sam-

Mahlon

Lyoia, second dau2:hter of Simuel and Maiy Yardley, intermaraied with Joson of Jo.sepll M.. (bJulv 2'). 1S19. seph and ElizalK'tli W. Mather, Oct. 1.'). 1841. and had issue
)

uel .M. Shute, Si'pt.

1, 1S.V2,

and died

without

issue.

A daughter,
llenrv, J., 1H17.

b Jan"v 2',, 184('.. b Julv Id, 1817: d Sept.

Sjf.As, flfthson of
2:5,

Edith and Isaac TFoulcIu internuirried with Elizabeth, dau;^liter of John and FJizabfth Hart, .March 20^
17!)
1,

:n\d died

without

issue.

Elizaiiktu, fourth dauii-hter of Oliver and Phebt; Itounh, married Mahlon K.. (b June l, 17'.>1,) son of Benjatnin and Elizabeth Taylor. Oct. 2:!, 117, and

Josi-.rir,

sixth son of Edith

and

Isaac-

Housh, intermarried with P'.lizabeth Marple, December 1.'!, 17S!>, and diect
wiihoiit issue.
FJizalieth

had

issue:
1)

Oliver IL,

Au-u-t

12, lsl.-<.

Uoni;h d Sept.

1. 1S2!).

Ei'.RATA.

Tiic word

"sixtceirh"

in flip ser-ond lino

of the

first

cliapfcr

shodld read povoDloentli.