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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY

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RORIT 159 7

DIED

16 70

SUPPLEMENT
THE HISTORY AND GENEALOfTY

THE DAVENPORT
ENGLAND AND AMERICA, FROM
A.

UmU
D.

1086

TO

I85C.

COMPILED AND PKKPARED FROM ORMEEOD'S HISTORY OF THE COUNTY OF CHESTER COLLECTIONS FROM THE HARLEIAN MSS. STATE PAPER OFFICE, LONDON PAROCHIAL AND TOWN RECORDS LOCAL HISTORIES IN ENGLAND AND AMERICA, ETC., ETC.
;

PUBLISHED IN

1.'')1:

AND

CONTINUED TO 1876.
BY

AMZI
:

BENEDICT DAVENPORT,
(OF

THE TWENTY-FOURTH GENERATION.)


SO-

ORHESPONDING MEMBER OF THE NEW ENGLAND HISTORIC-GENEALOGICAL CIETY LIFE MEMBER OF THE LONG ISLAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

'Inquire, I pray thee, of the foriuer age, and prepare thyself to the search of their lathers." Job viii. 8.

PRINTED FOR THE FAMILY.


STAMFOKD CONN.
1876.

Entered according to act of Congress, in the year

1877,

by

AMZI BENEDICT DAVENPORT,


In the office of the Libi'arian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.

WM. W. GILLESPIE A CO., STEAM PRINTEBS,


STAMFORD, CONN.

DESCENDANTS OF

REV. JOHN

DAVENPORT,

THE FOTTNDER AND PATRIARCH

NEW HAVEN.
WHO CHERISH THE
PRINCIPLES.

OT.,

EMULATE THE VIRTUES,

AND ILLUSTR.\TE THE EXAMPLE


OF THEIR DISTINGUISHED ANCESTOR,
THIS VOLUME
I.S

RESPECTFT^LLY INSCRIBED BY

THE AFTHOE.

INTRODUCTION
It
is

now

twenty-five years since a History

and Genealogy of the Davenport Family was published by the undersigned. But few works of the kind had, at that period, been Since then they have been undertaken. greatly multiplied, and their importance generally recognized as tending to illustrate the

history

of the

first

colonies of our country,

and

in

perpetuating the early record of the


in those

prominent families who were engaged


settlements.

As

there have been

offshoots,

numerous shoots, and of our Family Tree, for the past


it

quarter of a century,
print a

is

now proposed

to

Supplement

to the

volume then

issued,

repeating, briefly, the record of the past generations,

and bringing down the


;

lines of de-

scent to the present time


tions

with such correc-

and additions as have come to the hands of the writer, or which he may have been able
to gather.

The former
years

edition having

now
its

for

some

been

nearl}' exhausted,

editor has

11

INTRODUCTION.
to re-write the

been repeatedly solicited


ill

work,

ail

enlarged form.

This he has declined to

do, but will aim, rather, at giving the increase,

or family "development," above indicated, leaving it

for

the

period

for

others

who

may come
ate a

after
in

work

him to enlarge and perpetnwhich he is happy to have

been a pioneer.
It

of Rev.
to to

was hoped that copies of some letters John Davenport to Lady Digby, said exist in the British Museum, and supposed have been written about the time of his
first

sojourn in Holland, or

settlement of the

New Haven
ed for
this

Colony, might have been obtainit

work, but

has been impossible to

procure them.
to in

One, however, written by him


in

Lady Mary Yere,

1639, and not found

my

former volume, communicated by Rev.


of London, and published

John Waddington,
in the
ical

N^ew England Historical and Gi-enealogthat


letter

Register for April, 1855, will be given.

From
child,

we

learn,
lad,

that his

only

John, then a mere


his

did not accom-

pany
ica
in

parents on their coming to

Amercare

1637,

but

kind friends in

was London and arrived


left

in

the
in

of

Quinni-

INTRODUCTION.
piac,

ill

(New Haven,)

in 1639, "

the first shijj

that ever cast anchor in this

placed

Continuous thanks are due to Rev. Leonard Bacon, D. D., for invaluable aid drawn,

both

in

previous and present edition, from his

"Historical Discourses," (published in 1839,) " On the completion of Two Hundred Years

from the beginning of the First Church in New Haven," a monument to the industry,

research and eloquence of one


for over fifty years,

who

has stood,

as a successor of

John

Davenport,

in the pastoral office of that church.

Mr. Frankhn B. Dexter, A. M., Secretary

and Assistant Librarian of Yale College, has recently read before the New Haven Colony Historical Society, a very interesting paper, upon " The Life and Writings of John Davennewdy gathered by him, from the records of Coventry and London which will soon be published by that Society. William L. Kingsley, Esq., also of New Haven, son of the late learned Prof Kingsley, is now preparing for the press, (in two large quarto volumes,) a history of Yale College, in the first chapter of which he shows most conport,"

containing

much

information

clusively,

that that institution, although not

IV

INTRODUCTION.
till

established

several years later,

and efforts Davenport and even more than intimates that it should have received its name from
origin to the influence
;

owes its of this John

him.

Another item of

interest

brought to light
is

since the date of previous publication

the

discovery of the Christian name, and date of


death, of the wife of Mr. Davenport,

In the Kings Chapel Burial Grounds, in the


City of Boston, was dug up by Mr.

Thomas

Bridgman,

"

New

England's Old Mortality,"


near the tomb of Governor
far

in October, 1851,

Winthrop, and not


scription

from the grave of her


in-

husband, a moiumient with the following


:

" Here lyeth buried


y''

body

ol

MRS ELIZABETH DAVENPORT


wife of

Mr

John Davenport

dec'^

aged 73 years September y'' 15**' 1676."


ofl
i

Evidences have come to the knowledge


.

the writer, since the date of former edition,

tending to

settle the conflicting

statements of

Anthony Wood,

in his

Athenag Oxonienses,

and of (Jotton Mather,

in his

Magnalia Christ!

INTRODUCTION.

Americana, as to the relationship of Christopher Davenport, whose rehgious name was PVanciscLis a Sancta Chira, and our J. D.

Wood

asserts that thev

were

brotliers,

and

makes each "son of John, by Ehzabeth Wolley his wife, and grandson of Henry," who was Mayor of Coventry. Wood's testimony for he was cotemporary with both, and is said to have had a personal acquaintance with Christopher

has

clusive,

heretofore been considered conand almost universally followed.

Mather,
says,
''

who was

a gi"andson of Rev.

John
^^

Cotton, a most intimate friend of Davenport,

was Mayor of Coventry, and that the Franciscan, "was not a brother, as a
his father

certain woodden historian has said, but a kinsman.^'

Mr.

Dexter,

before

above referred
Register

to, visited

preparing the paper Coventry, and in the


of
tlie

of baptisms in the Church


city,

Holy Trinity of that


liar

among

other fami-

surnames, (Shakespeares included,) found the entry of the baptism of "John Daven-

port, son of

Henry, April
"

9th, 1597.''

In the same Register he

baptism of Henry, Oct.

also noted the Christopher Davenport, son of 1. 1590." and inferred that this

VI

INTRODUCTION.

might have been the famous Franciscan, although the date of his baptism was some
eight years earHer than that invariably assign-

ed

to his birth.

But from

my

Coventry pediI

gree, (Harl.

MSS. 1100,

fol.

109,)
;

was

at

once enabled to

settle this point

for Christo-

pher, the third son of Henry,

was married

to

Frances Higginson, and had a daughter Elizabeth

was Alderman of Coventry, and Justice of the Peace in 1619, and was the Christopher Davenport who was Mayor of Coventry
;

in 1641, thus confirming the

statement of Maw^as the son of

ther versus
a

Wood,

that "

John

Mayor," (Henry,) and

also, that the

famous

Christopher

"was

not a brother but a kins-

man."

John

is

named

whose mother's who maiden name was Barnabit the


son of Henry, and Barnabas
as
first,

in the Pedigi-ee as the Jiftk

had one son Christopher, and the evidence from the pedigree clearly indicates that the "khisman" was a nephew, (son of Barnabas,) although but one year younger than John. In the State Paper Office, in London, is a letter from John Davenport to Sir Edward

Conway, the principal Secretary to the King, dated Oct. 1624, a day or two after his elec-

INTRODUCTION.
tioii

VH

to the vicarage of St. Stephen's, in Colesti-eet, in

man

which he says ''Yea myne own Father and Vncle who are Aldermen of the citty
of Cov entry.
^^

Before the Municipal Reform Act, no person was eligible to the


office of

Mayor who

had not previously filled the office of Chamberlain and Sheriff. The Ex-Mayors were, and are now, usually chosen to the Aldermanry-

The Leet Books and Annals of Coventry, show the election of Edward Davenport as
Chamberlain
in

1534, as Sheriff

in

1540, and

Mayor

in 1550.

Christopher Davenport was Sheriff in 1593, and Mayor in 1602. Henry Davenport was Sheriff in 1602, and

Mayor
in

in

1613.

Christopher Davenport was elected Sheriff


1632, and

Mayor
the

in

1641.
:

We
1st,

have thus undoubted proofs

From

pedigrees,

that

Elizabeth

Wolley was the wife of John Davenport, the Puritan instead of his mother as Wood makes her and this is collaterly supported by her name on the tombstone. 2d. Both the baptismal Register and John's


VIU

INTRODUCTION.
the son of Henry,

own statement make him the Mayor of Coventry.


ocl.

Christopher Davenport, the brother of


office,

John, was married and held civic


his

while

issary of
4th.

nephew of that name was Rome.

a religions

em-

But one person of the name of John


and there
is

appears either on the Coventry pedigrees or


records of that period
;

no

evi-

dence that there was another, except the erroneous statement of Anthony
occasioned
to

Wood

which has
the

the author,

and

his family,

numerical

loss

of one generation.

In continuing the line of family descent in


this country,
it

will

be noted that the

first

three generations, covering nearly sixty years,

marked but one son in each yet the increase in the number of descendants for the past quarter of a century has been more than one
;

hundred; while there have not been wanting


in the family those

who have done good

ser-

vice

to their country,

and to the Church of

Christ.

In closing, the writer would here tender his


grateful

acknowledgments
and

to those

who have
our

aided him in collecting the materials here presented,

render double

thanks to

INTRODUCTION.

IX

Heavenly Father for the manifold blessiiiP-s bestowed upon us as a family and upon our
comm<^i^ country
till

this

Centennial Year.

Davenport

Eiclge,

Stamford, Conn.,
Oct. 30th, 1876.

P. S.

Just

as his delayed

manuscript was
printer.

going into the hands of the


1877.) the writer has

(Jan.

come

into the possession

of a valuable manuscript volume, entirely in


the handwriting of John Davenport, embracing

96 leaves; 41 written on both


clear,

sides,

and 55

on one side. The writing is finely condensed, and remarkably legible for a manuscript two hundred and fifty years old. The book

bound in calf, with much worn by time. This volume came


is

gilt

edges, but of course

into

the family of Rev.


first

Abiel Holmes, D.

I).,

whose
Stiles,

wife

was a

daughter of President

of Yale College,

and from them

to

William A. Saunders,Esq., of

Cambridge. Mass., by whose kindly consideration and munificence it has been restored to
the family in the person of one
eldest

who

is

the
its

born,

living, lineal

descendant of
it

author, and to whose lot

has fallen, in

an

INTRODUCTION.

humble way, to be the historian and genealogist of what may be denominated the New Haven and Stamford branch of the family. On the first page of this volume, Mr. Davenport has inscribed the Latin questions to

which he made response on his application, May 18th, 1625, for his degree of Bachelor of Divinity, which he had failed to receive since
he
his
left

Oxford, upon the partial completion of


ten

study course,

years

before.

These

questions and his response will be noticed, in


their appropriate place, in the historical sketch

of Mr. Davenport,

Then

follows a controver-

sy called forth by Dr. Alexander

Leighton,

the father of Archbishop Leighton, covering

some

sixty pages,

upon the custom of "kneellu addition, there are

ing at the sacrament."

nearly sixty pages of notes, reaching to about the period of his leaving his charge in Cole-

man
ing
:

street,

1633, with this significant heady" safety

"

Grounds whereupon
is

of con-

formity
of y'
,

built,
it

together

with the sandines

and

may

be supposed to contain the

record of his private conversion from a conformist to

non-conformist.

Reference

to

these manuscripts will be further

made

in the

body of

this

work.

INTRODUCTION.

XI

Among

not the least ibrtunate results of

the delay in going to press,

may be mention-

ed the receipt of valuable information, obligingly furnished by Mr. Wm. Geo. Fretton,

who,

in

1871, edited an edition of Sharp's

History of Coventry.

Mr. Fretton has generously furnished, from the original painting in St. Mary's Hall, a
lithograph engravhig of Christopher Davenport, the luicle of

John,

who was Mayor

of

Coventry, in 1602,

which has been Photo-

Engraved for this work. Through this source, the Author is enabled to correct some errors into which he was led, in previous edition, in
regard to the free school said to have been

founded by

this

Christopher Daven))ort.
is

No

separate foundation

now
life

extant, but Mr.

Davenport during his


school for

time supported a
entering into
for
6s,

poor
for
its

children,

an

agreement
charged

perpetuity,

which he
yearly.

his estate

with 13,
in

8d.,

This Institution was continued for nearly two

hundred merged
Free
It
is

years,
in

when
English
School.

1794,

it

became

the

Department of the
that a change

Grammar

proper, in this place,

should be noted,

which

will

appear

in

the

Xll

INTRODUCTION.
to

Coventry line, from about 1375. This branch is herein given as descended, not from Richard, as shown in previous volume, but from Christopher, of Woodford,
descent
the

named
of

in the

Ormerod pedigree
was the
first

as

'
'

ancestor

of the Davenports of Lowcrosse,''

Edward

who

the father
Covenof Mayor.

of the

try

branch elected to the

office

This

second son,
Sir

makes the descent from Nicholas, the (instead of Thomas the first,) of John Davenport, No. 38.
are thus enabled to account for the fre-

We

quent occurrence of the name of Christopher in the pedigrees of these two branches, and which is not found in any other.

That
writer,

this

was the

real line of descent

is

in

accordance with the judgment given to the

many years since, by the late Rev. W. Davenport Bromley, whose son Bromley Davenport, Esq.,
liament, and in
tates
is

now

(1877,) a representative
in the British

from North Warwickshire

Par-

whom

is

vested the ancient es-

Bromley and Davenport, in the Counties of Warwick and Chester, the former of which descended to him from his father, and the latter from his grandof the families of
father, the late

Davies Davenport, Esq., M.

P..

INTRODUCTION.
111

Xlll

this line of descent,

we

gain, numerically,

another
lost
It

generation, to complement the

one

by the error of Anthony Wood.


only remains to be added that since the

opening of the present year, (1877,) the Rev. Edward E. Atwater, a descendant of David Atwater, one of the original settlers of Quinnipiac, has read before the

New Haven
upon
"

Colony

Historical Society a paper

The Voy-

age of the Hector and her Passengers"

that

being the name of the ship that brought Rev.

John Davenport and his company to New England in 1637. Mr. Atwater had recently returned from England, where his researches had added, somewhat, it is believed, to the
copious extracts already gathered

from the

I^ondon State Paper Office by Mr. Dexter.

Through the courtesy of Mr. Atwater,

am
ter

also supplied

with the copy of another

from Mr. Davenport to "My Lady Yere which in he tenders her Christian consolation and sympathy upon the death of her husband, whose eminence both as a Christian and a soldier bore no small resemblance to that of our

let"

modern Havelock.
f

The State Paper

Office reveals

most forcibly

the treatment Mr. Davenport received durhig

XIV

INTRODUCTION.

the stormy days of Archbishop Laud, sliow-

ing

how

he was pursued from one place to

another by spies and enemies,


tinually maligning his motives,

who were

con-

and seeking to

destroy his reputation and influence, in Eng-

and during his sojourn in Holland, unby the force of circumstances, us well as his own well formed convictions, he, who before had so long labored to discharge his duty both in his civil and ecclesiastical connectland,
til

ions,

became a Non-Coyiformist a Repvhlican,


,

and a Puritan^ and sought to found .an hide'pendent State and ChMxch on the shores of
Ainerica.

A. B. D.
Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 22, 1877.
)

PLftN

OF THE

GENEALOGY,

in the line The Arabian figures mark the number children the number letters Roman The descent.

of of

a family.

To
bian

trace

backwards the

line of descent, take the

Ara-

number prefixed to any name, and number of the person whose issue is there
repeat the same
(42) ni. shows
Sir

refer to the

given,

and
:

thus with each preceding generation, of son third the be to John Davenport

38, John Davenport, No. 38. Turning to to shown is generation ninth John Davenport of the of the No. 21, Davenport, Thomas be the third son of

No.

Sir

eighth generation, &c.

FAMILY OF DAVENPORT

Annx

of Davenport.

Argent, a chevron sable between

three cross crossletts fitchee of the second.


Crest.

On

a wreath a felon's head, couped at the

neck proper, haltered Or.


Office indicated,

Magisterial Sergeancy.

(See page 22.)

&ENEALO&Y OF THE DATENPORT FAMILY.

FIRST GENERATION.

1.

the

Ormus de Daiinei:)orte, born in 108G, and assumed local name in the County of Chester, England.
)

This
the

is

the date assigned to him by four j^edigrees in

British

Museum, and by

the Bramhall

pedigree,

collated from the records of the College of Arms, Harl.

Mss, 2119, Sic, and which

made

liim fifty years old at

the birth of his son Richard.

He

witnessed a charter

of enfranchisement of Gilbert Venables in the time of

William

II.,

or

Henry

I.*

* The family name of Davenport is of local origin. The township of Davenport is situated in a sequestered part of the Hundred of Northwich, County of Chester, England and is about twenty-five miles from the ancient city of Chester. It stands on high ground above a range of rich meadows, through which the river Dane flows rapidly, with a winding and irregular course. The banks on each side are remarkably lofty those on the Davenport side are a series of verdant slopes, bearing evident marks of having been covered with timber at some former period the opposite ones have been broken by the force of the currents and are more precipitous. These features of the circumjacent landscape constitute some of the most pleasing scenery of the hundred and they are backed by what must have had no ordinary charms for the ancient chief s of Daven; ; ;

20

SUPPLEMENT TO

SECOND GENEEATION.
Issue of

Oemus de Daunepoete.

(No. 1.)

(2.)

I.

Richard de Daunejjorte, born in 1130, to

whom

Hugh

Kevelioc, earl of Chester, granted

by charter

the chiefforeder ah ip of the forests of


held, 1166.

Leek and Maccleswhose

His wife was Amabilia, the daughter of


father,

Gilbert Venables, baron of Kinderton,

Gilbert Venables, was the


ton,

Norman

grantee of Kinder-

Davenporte, &c., before 1086.

This Richard de

Davenporte, had also in marriage with Amabilia, about


1176, a moiety of the townshi23 of Marton by grant

from her brother William de Venables.


is

This township

noticed in the

Domesday

survey, and

was

held, to-

gether with other estates, by the Saxon thane Goderic.

From

various coincidences in the

appears that Wufric,


the Confessor, 1040,

Domesday account, it who lived at the time of Edward and who was grandfather to Marwas heir

garet Venables,

the mother of Amabilia,

port, the adjoining hills of Macclesfield, the scene of their fa-

vorite sports

and feudal power.


history of the township involves a subject of

The manorial

England, the descent of a family in one uninterrupted male line from the Norman Conquerors of the palatinate, possessing at the present day the feudal powers with which the local sovereigns of that palatinate invested it, and
rare occurrence even in

preserving in
the proofs of
F. A. S.,

its its

archives, in a series of original documents,


its

ancient history and


is

unbroken descent.
S.,

History of Cheshire by George F. Ormerod, A. M.. F. K.

from which

drawn much of the history and many

of the ancient pedigrees of the family.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(probably brother) to Goderic, and that the

21

Norman

Conqueror who had dispossessed the


instance readmitted

famil}' in the first

them

to

Marton, Cranage, &c.*

THIED GENEEATION.
Issue of Richard de Dauneporte, (No.
2.

(8.)

I.

Thomas de Davenporte, HAdng


II,

in the time

of

Henry

or before 1189.

FOURTH GENERATION.
Issue of

Thomas de Davenporte,

(No. 8.)

(I.)

I.

Richard de Davenporte, to

whom

Randle
acquit-

Blundeville, earl of Chester, granted

by charter

tance from suit in the Shire and

Hundred

Court, for

himself and heirs, between 1209 and 122G.

FIFTH GENERATION.
Issue of Richard de Daa'enporte, (No. 4.)

(5.)

I.

Amicia Davenporte, who became the wife


in the

of

Randle de Cheldleton and had lands


Vivian de Davenporte, to
Chester, granted

Abbacy
Randle

of Dierlacres
(().)

II.

whom

Blundeville, Earl of

by Charter the

Grand

Sergeancy of the forests of

Leek and Maccles-

*0f the Marton Estate, Manor and Hall, which has passed through successive generations, to its present proprietor, Bromley Davenport, Esq., M. P. we shall speak hereafter.
3

22
field,

SUPPLEMENT TO

between 1209 and 1226, and

also acquittance of

juris of

County and Hundred.


married
Beati'ix,

He
It

daughter

of

Bertrand

de

Hulme, Harleian MSS. 2094.


appears that this grant of the
office of

grand
his

seru-ill^

geancy was made to Vivian Davenport, againd


as a compensation for the park
field of

and

vivaries of Maccles-

which the

earl

had deprived him, but which

Vivian did not consider an adequate comj^ensation.

The powers

of this office
it

were the highest which the

earl could bestow, as

placed, in several cases, at the

disposal of the sergeant

and

his itinerant subservients,

the lives of his subjects, without delay, and without appeal.

At

this

period the
first

illusive crest

of

the
to

Davenports

is

said to have

been adopted,

and
and
the

have been home


in their

upon thehelmets of the master sergeants


bulations tJivough the

peram-

peak

hills,

tjie

forests of Leek

a) id Macclesfield, to the

terror

of

numerous gangs of

handiVi which then infested those

ivild districts.

There

is

now in the possession of


roll

the family at Capes-

thorne, a long

(without date, but very ancient,)

containing the names of the master robbers

who were

taken and beheaded in the times of Vivian, his son


Roger, and grandson Thomas de Davenport, and also
of the fees paid to

them

in right of this sergeancy.

From

this

it

appears that the fee paid for a master robfor their

ber was

2s,

and one salmon, and


There
is

companions

12 pence each.

also

an account"of the master

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

23

robbers, and their companions slain by the sergeants,

and the
(7.)

fees thereon.*
III.

Walter

Davenporte,

second

son,

had

lands in
(8.
)

Somerford Booths.
IV.

Peter Davenporte, living in 1263.

Harl.

MSS.

2119.

SIXTH GENERATION.
Issue of Vivian Davenporte, (No.
C.
)

(9.)

I.

Roger Davenporte

of Davenport,

who mar-

ried Mary, daughter of Robert Salemon of Wythington,

with

whom

her husband had a moiety of Wythington,

also a part of

Tunstede and Wultroke Wheltrough.


(

By

an inquisition taken before [Reginald de Gray, 10

year of

Edward

I.

(1288,)

it

is

found that Roger de

Davenport held his sergeancy in the


clestield in the
*

Hundred

of

Mac-

Bach kc, and that he


is

shall find eight

On

the roll

a note
:

by the

tirst

Davies Davenpirt, of
great,

Woodford, Esq.,
the roll
is

"The numbers are very ancient and much defaced,


to wit
to

and though

yet several of the

names appear." Co//i/)iH>i)'crt/e(7


renport, hi 1819.

Ormerod hyihe Bev. Walter Da-

The same gentleman, who afterwards bore, by royal license, letter to tha name of Rev. Walter Davenport Bromley, adds in a "Though the office of grand sergeancy the compiler in 1850 comparatively obsince the time of Queen Elizabeth has been
:

solete, yet Waifs,

Estrays and Mortuaries were claimed as late


;

as

father succeeded to the estates and I remember The roll of names of persons beheaded still the old steward. exists, and I think the names are visible." Davenport, Esq., M. P., the present proprietor of

when my

Bromley

24
sergeants
shall

SUPPLEMENT TO
(one
a horseman) to keep the peace,

who
have

come

at the king's

summons,

at their

own

cost in

the county, and at the king's cost

when

the}' shall

passed the Dee, or gone out of the county.

The same

Roger, in 1248, witnessed a deed of Alexander Wythington.


(10.)

He seems
II.

to have died in 1291.

in 1272,

He assumed

Edward de Davenport de Newton, living the name of Newton, and beof the

came the ancestor


(11.
)

Newtons

of

Newton.

III.

Richard de Davenport, who was the fathin

er of

Roger de Tornock, and who had lands

Somer-

ford Booths.
(12.)

IV.

Robert de Davenport, living


of

in

1272

he

assumed the name

Lawton, and was ancestor

of the

Law^tons of Lawton.
(13.)

V.

Beatrix Davenport, in some pedigrees

called the wife of Bertrand de Hvilme.


(14.)

VI.

Thomas de

Davenj:)ort.

the joint estates of Bromley and Davenport says in a letter as late as Feb. 8, 1877: "The old robbers roll' still exists, and was
'

an object of great interest to the person employed by the Historical Commission, to examine my MSS. and papers, bnt besides losing the practical right of putting any body we pleased to death, (for tlieoreiically it still exists, and in all legal documents I am described as the hereditary Grand Sergeant and Chief Forester of the forests of Macclesfield and Leek with the formidable powers belonging to that position) we have by disuse also lost the advantages, iohate\eY they were, of claims on Waifs, Estravs, and Mortuaries."

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

25

SEVENTH GENEEATION.
Issue of

Kogee de Davenpoet,

(No.

9.

(15.)

I.

Peter de Davenport, son and heir, died

without
(IG.)

issue.
II.

Sir

Thomas
1st,

Daveni:>ort

of Davenpoat,

knight, married,
Maccleslield,

Agnes, daughter of Thomas de


in

who was born


issue.

1287.

She was the

mother of
daughter
of

his

His second wife was Eoesia,


of Sir Wil-

Kalph de Vernon, and widow


Sir

liam de Brereton.

Thomas died

in 1320,

and

his

widow survived him


(17.)

in 1322.

III.

John de Davenport, who married Matil-

da,

daughter of William de Rode, by

whom

he had

is-

sue, Richard.
(18.)

IV.

Ellen Davenport,

who was married

to

William de Burldegh, eldest son and heir of Robert


Burkley, Esq., and ancestors of the lords Burkley.
(19.)

V.

Henry Davenport
married,

of ^larton,

who

also

had lands
Roger,

in Macclesfield
1st,
;

in 1292.

He had

one son,

who

Mary, widow of William


2d, Margaret,

Mainwaring de Peover

and

widow

of

Thomas de Swettenham.

EIGHTH GENEEATION.
IssTJE

or SiE Thomas Davenport, (No.

1G.

(20.)

I.

Sii-

John Davenport of Davenport, knight,


first

married for his

wife in 1301, Margery, daughter

26
of Sir

SUPPLEMENT TO

William de Brereton, by Roesia his

wife,

daughof his

ter of Sir
issue.

Ralph Vernon.

She was the mother

His second wife was Agnes de Bradford, who

survived him, and was remarried to Robert Massey,


senior, of Sale, in 1858.

Sir

Jolm Davenport,

in the reign of

Edward

III.,

(1343,)

founded a chantry in the Chapel of Marton,


at the Reformation, or after 1500.

which was dissolved

After the dissolution, the site of the Chapel was grant-

ed by the Crown to the Davenports of Davenport,

in

which family it has continued to the present day.

The present
small

Chajoel, consisting of a belfry, with a

spile, j^orch,

nave and chancel, with side

aisles, is

built exclusively of timber, except the chancel,

which

has been rebuilt of brick.

The

side aisles are separated

from the body by rudely hewn timber beams, resting


on
pillars of the

same

materials,

and

in

some

of the
1

windows are fragments

of ancient painted glass.

The only monuments

here,

worthy

of notice, are to

two
the

mutilated figures placed in the Churchyard,

south of the Chapel, representing knights armed, as


far as

can be traced, in plate armor, with conical hel-

mets, and boots pointed at the toes and

much

curved.

The hands
head

are

clasped in prayer

the feet of each

figure are pressed against an animal,


of each is the
;

and under the


a felon's head
of

Davenport

crest,

couped

the rope

is is

only visible round one

the

heads, the other

placed on something which has

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

27

more

the appearance of a chapeau, or cap of mainten-

ance, than the wreath

and hehnet with which

it

has

usually been borne.

These figures are sup})Osed

to

be

those of Sir John Davenport, and his son Urian.*

About a quarter

of a

mile from the Chapel,

is

the

present Hall of Marton, a plain building, built with

timber and

plaster.

The center and wings of


The porch

the front

project and terminate in gables.


ter

in the cen-

open

to a hall in
;

which some long pikes yet remain


a wainscoted parlor, over the

suspended
*

on the

left is

The

cliurch notes of this Chapel, Harl.

MSS.

2151,

p.

54,

contain a drawing of the


this note, "It
is

monuments

in the Churchyard, with

said bj- auncient i)eople that the were Sir Jo.

and Vivian [Urian] his sone, who founded the Chappell of Merton, and they lie buried there." In the painted glass was a kneeling armed figure, with surcoat, quarterly, 1 and 4, a chevron between three martlets 2 iind li, Davenport. In the windows also arms of Davenport, Siddington and barry of 4 sable and argent, the second and third indented. (The Siddingtons, as far as can be judged from their coat of
Daveni^'t
;

arms, were originally Davenports, their coat dift'ering from the


latter

family,

only in the addition of three cross crosslets

fitchee in the base.

The Davenports had estates in Siddington as early as the time of Edward I., 12721307.) Among the Davenport deeds is a grant from Sir John de Davenport, knight, to Robert de Bradshaw, etc., of 4 messuages, and 60 acres of land, with the appurtenancs in the woods and wastes and all other profits in the ville of Merton, Ac, of the one part, and Yeaton on the other, to maintain a fit juiest celebrating mass in the Chapel of Merton, for the souls of himself, his parents and successors, and all faithful people deceased
forever
;

and he

also grants to
till

them common

of pasture in all
;

pastures in Merton,

they should be appropriated

and

if

any heir of Daveniiort should contradict his will and they should incur God's indignation. Witnessed, 1390.

grant,

28

SUPPLEMENT TO

mantle-piece of which, amongst old carvings in oak,

apparently older than the building, are the arms and


crest of Davenport, inlaid with various colored wood.

Behind the

hall to the west, is a

mere which gave


is

name

to the township,

and near which

the site of a

more ancient mansion.


(21.)

II.

Thomas Davenport de Wheltrough,

to

whom

his father
&c., &c.
,

gave lands in Withington, Wheltrough,

Marton

who became

the ancestor of the Dav-

enports of Wheltrough, BromhaU, Henbury, Coventry,

and Woodford, (now


Elizabeth
(22.)
*

also Capesthorne. )*

He

married

who

survived her husband in 1339.


senior.

III.

Roger Davenport,

All these townships, except Coventry, are situated within a few miles of each other in the County of Chester, and not far from

the original seat of the Davenports of Davenport.

Lower Withington, with Woodford and Capesthorne,


the parish of Prestbury.
cient timber mansion, in
II

is

in

contains Wheltrough Hall, an ana

branch of the Davenports I, between 1250 and 1300, from which descended the collateral branches of BromhaU, Henbury, Coventry, Woodford and Calveley. Woodford, about six miles from Davenport, is noticed in the reign of King John, between 1199 and 1216. In 1356, the manor and appurtenances were granted to John Davenport third son of Thomas of Wheltrough. Capesthorne Hall, about the same distance from Davenport, has long been the seat of the inheritors of these ancient estates which have descended from Nicholas Davenport living in 1400, to Christopher living in 1421 John d. before 1477 Nicholas,
seated themselves in the reign of

which

Edward

John, d. 1575 William, d. before his father, 1570 Christopher, 1593 William, d. 1632 John, d. 1653 William, d. 1656 John, d. 1686 Monk, d. 1735 David,
d.
9,

before Feb.
;

1522

b. 1696,

m. Mary daughter and sole heiress of John Ward of

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(23)
of

29

IV.

Peter Davenport, who assumed the name

Denton
(24.

in 1329.

V.

Roger Davenport, who had lands


gift of his father

in

Whit-

tington,
(25.)
(2().)

by

and brother Roger.

VI.

Mallicent Davenport.

VII.

Roesia Davenport.

NINTH GENERATION.
Issue of Sir John Davenport, (No. 20.)
(27.)
I.

Thomas DavenjDort
first

of

Davenport,
in 1343,

who
and

married for his

wife Matilda
to

was afterwards married


without issue.
(28.)
II.

Eve

He

died in 1380

John Davenport, who became rector


d.

of

Capesthorne, Esq., and of the Inner Temjjle,

1758,

whose

son Davies Davenport, of Woodford, Marton and Capesthorne, Esq., and of the Inner Temple, b. in Red Lion Sqiiare, London, Oct. 2, 1724, married Phebe, daughter and co-heiress of Richard Davenport, of Calvelej' and Davenport, which latter estate he settled on his daughter Phebe, who became the wife of Eusibius Horton, Esq., and whose descendant. Sir Robert Wilmot
Horton, now holds it. Davies Davenport, son and heir of the last mentioned Davies, was b. Aug. 29, 1757. Was member of Parliament for the County of Chester, from 1806 to 1830. He dying, in 1837, was succeeded by his eldest son. Edward Davies Davenport, Esq., to the
estates of

Woodford, Marton, Calveley, Capesthorne,

etc.

He

died in 1847, leaving Arthur Henry, son and heir, who dying in 1867, was succeeded bj^ his cousin, now Bromley Davenjiort, Esq., M. P., son of the late Rev. W. Davenport Bromley, who
also of the

has since been the possessor of the Cheshire estates, and now Bromley estate, in Warwickshire, and who may be accounted one of the largest landed proprietors of the Com-

moners of England.
5

30

SUPPLEMENT TO
the
side of

the Church in Swettenham, (a village on


the

Dane

opposite to Davenport,) in 1335, of which

Church

his father

and several
married,

of the succeeding- Johns,

were patrons.*
Sir

He

1st,

Johanna, daughter of

Henry

Delves, of Dodington, knight.


of

His second

wife

was Margaret, daughter

Henry Done, who mar-

ried Sir AYiUiam Brereton, knight.


(29.) III.

Sir

Ealph Davenport, knight, the conmale


line of the

tiniier of the direct

Davenports of
In 1380, Sir

Davenport, who married Joice

Ralph bound himself by indenture


ard, with three archers well

to serve

King Rich-

mounted, to make war for


j^leased.

a year

beyond the sea where God

He

died

in 1383.

His wife held the grand sergeancy, by letters


II.,

patent from Richard

during the nonage of Ralph,

son and
(30.)
(31.) (32.)

heir,

dated December 11, 1384.

IV.

Richard Davenport, living in 1350.

V.
VI.

Roger Davenport,

living in 1350.

Urian Davenport, distinguished for his

great stature, was buried at Marton.


(33.)
*

VII.

Arthur Davenport, of Calveley,

who

The Church is a neat buikling of brick, with a tower and side aisles, the former of which forms an interesting object in
several romantic views along the
:

banks of the Dane.

The Harl. MSS. '2151 68. have notes of this Church. On the windows are many ligures, arms, &c. On one is this inscription "Of yr charitie pray for Bond ell Mainwaring and Margaret and Ellen his wyves, which made this window A'no
:

D'miM'^CCC'^XL." In the same window, the arms impaling Savage.

of Davenport,

and Davenport

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

31

married Katharine de Calveley, and became the ancestor of the Davenports


of

Calveley.

He was

slain

on the part

of the Percies, in the battle of

Shrewsbury,

1408.
(84.)

VIII.

Margaret Davenport, who married Sir

John Hyde, lord of Norbury, from


the distinguished
(85.)

whom

descended

Edward Hyde, Earl

of Clarendon.

IX.

Isabella

Davenport married Robert de


;

Eaton, baron of Stockport


ford.

remarried to John de Staf-

NINTH GENEEATION Continued.


Issue of

Thomas Davenport or Whelteough,

(No. 21.

(86.)

I.

Thomas Davenport, with whose son and

heir Richard, the direct line of AVheltrough continued.


(87.)
II.

John Davenj^ort, who married

Alice,

daughter and heiress of Godfrey de Bromhall,

and

who became
haU,
(

the ancestor of the Davenjiorts of

Brom-

18G().

88.

III.

Sir

John Davenport,

called also Jenkin,

to distinguish

him

fi'om his elder brother of that

name,
be-

knight, justice of Lancastershire, 1884, and

who

came the piirchaser


beth, daughter
erton.
(89.)

of

Henbuiy.

He

married Eliza-

and co-heiress

of Peter

Legh

of Betch-

IV.

Alice Davenpori, married Sir


of the

John de

Hvde, knight, ancestor

Hvdes

of

Urmetson.

32

SUPPLEMENT TO

TENTH GENERATION.
Issue of Sir John Davenpoet, (No. 38.)
^

(40.)

I.

Margaret Davenport, married Thomas de

Leghes,
(41.)

Jr.
II.

Tliomas Davenpoi-t, ancestor of the Dav-

euports of Henbuiy,
1366,

named

1st, in

the

Henbuiy

entail,

and

3d, in the

Woodford

entail, 1371.

He marwho was

ried Margaret daughter, of

Hugh

Venables,

afterwards married to Su' William Newjjoii.


(42.)
(43.) III.

John Davenport,

living in 1366.

IV.

Nicholas Davenport de Widford, ances-

tor of the Davenports of

Woodford,

&e.,

Hving in 1371,

and had lands


Romiley,
Sac.

as

by indenture

in 1413 in Bredbury,

He

married Ellena, widow of Edward

Massey, of Timberly, in 1371.


1423.
(44.)

She died a widow in

V.

Grifiin Davenport, living in 1371.

ELEVENTH GENERATION.
Issue of Nicholas Da\'enport, (No. 43.)

(45.

I.

Christopher Davenport, of Woodford, eldheir, inherited

est son

and

together with the father's

estate, the tliird part of the vill of

Oxton

in Wyrhall,

Henry

V, (1421).
of

He

married Alica, daughter of


Cecilia,

Hugh Arderne
Henry

Harden and Alvanlay, by


Man-iage
articles,

daughter of Ralph de Hide.


V, (1415.)

dated 2

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

33

TWELFTH GENERATION.
Issue of Christopher Davenport, (No.
4.5.

(46.

I.

John

Daveni:)ort, of

Woodford, died before


IV, (1477).

Christopher his father, 10

Edward

Marri-

ed

Alice,
(47.)

daughter of Ralph Prestwick.


II.

Rev. Randolph

Davenport,

parson of

WHnislow, 20 Edward IV. or from


(48.
)

145(5 to 1500.

III.

Charles Davenport.
Nicholas

(49.)

IV.

Davenport,

maiTied

Agnes,

daughter of Robert Davenport of Bromhall.

THIRTEENTH GENERATION.
Issue of John Davenport, (No.
40.

(50.)

I.

Nicholas Davenport,
9,

of

Woodford, who

died intestate before Feb.


garet,
;

1522.

His wife was MarClifton,

daughter of Sir Christopher Savage, of


3,

Kt. feofinient for her j*ointure, Feb.

1490.

Surviving

her husband she made an acquittance to her son John,


16 Henry VIII, (1525.)
1542.
(51.)

Testament dated Dec.

12,

Bui-ied with her ancestors at Macclesfield.


II.

Edmund Davenport had lands


by Christopher
Reginald

in

Wood-

ford, granted
(52).
III.

his grandfather in 1477.

Davenport

had

lands

in

Woodford, granted by Chiistopher his grandfather


1477.

in

34

SUPPLEMENT TO

FOURTEENTH GENERATION.
Issue of Nicholas Davenpokt, (No. 50.)

(53.)

I.

John

Davenj^oi-t of
of

Woodford, Esq., marDavenport,


of

ried Margaret,

daughter

William

Bramhall.*

Feoffment for his jointure

May

12th,

33

Henry VIII.,( 1543.)


eldest son
(

He

died in 1572, sm-viving his

and

heir.

54.

II.

Christopher Davenport, ancestor of the

Davenports of Lowerosse and Coventiy.

He
of

maiTied

Emma

daughter and

heii'ess of

John Blunt,

Benton-

of-Trent,

County

of Stafford

about

midway between
2094.

Woodford and Coventiy.

Harl.

MSS.
18

His

set-

tlement in Coventry must have been about 1500.


(55.)
III.

Nicholas Davenport,

Heniy

VIII.,

(1527.)
(

56.

IV.

Laurence Davenport, named

in a feoff-

ment from

Nicholas, his father, of land in Widford,


life,

[Woodford,] for

July

5,

1519

living in 1553.

FIFTEENTH GENERATION.
Issue of Christopher Davenport, (No.
.54.)

(57.)

I.

Edward Davenport,

of Coventry,

pewter-

*We

will not hei'e repeat the detailed account, given in the

edition of 1851, of the Bramhall mansion, a most interesting


structure, dating back to about 1400, with its curious carvings and furniture. Paradise room, domestic chapel, &c.. which,

since the death of William Davenport, Esq., 1838, has passed

ingloriously from the family of


'sold to a building

its

ancient proprietors, and was

Company

a few

months

since.


THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.
er,

35

who married
of that city.

a davigliter of

John Harford, Alderoffice

man

In 1534 he was chosen to the

of City Chamberlain,

and

in 1540, to that of Sheriff.

In 1550, he was chosen Mayor of Coventry, and during his Mayoralty overruled
all

the

county.*
LIxf.

Led

Book, Nlch^onf< MS. Hixtonj cukJ Emdcr'x


*

Warwickshire

is

in the ijrovince of Canterbiiiy,

and

in the

Diocese of Litchfiehl, Coventry and Worcester.


Ij-^

It is principal-

strong, tine woods with sends six members to Parliament, two from Coventry, two from Warwick and two from the County. The City of Coventry is situated about ten miles north of Warwick, and 90 miles from London, containing about 25,000 inhabitants. It was founded at a very early period, probably while the Romans inhabited Britain.
a feeding

and dairy country

land
It

much

timber, especially oak.

In 1016,
entry
is

when Edric invaded

Mercia, a hoiise of nuns in CovAfter the

said to have fallen a prey to their ferocity.

Norman

conquest, the lordshij) of Coventry became vested in


the
fifth

the Earl of Chester, by the marriage of Leucia, granddaughter


of Leofric, (by Countess Godiva,
)

Earl of Chester,

who

was descended from Leofric, Earl of Chester, in the time of


Ethelbald, 859-860.
favor were constituted

The city and certain villages in its vicinity, as a mark of si:)ecial by Henry VI. in 1451, an entire county l)y

themselves, so that the citizens of Coventry had no political

connection with Warwickshire, and the Maj'or and Aldermen


of Coventry have been justices of the peace for the county, and

held quarter sessions in the same manner, and with the same

powers as counties at even entitled to vote ment.

large.

The

freeholders, as such, are not

for the retuim of

any member

to Parlia-

The

privilege M'as conferred in the 23d of

Edward

I.,

for the

two members to Parliament, the election to be vested in such freeman as have served seven years apprenticeship, to one and the same trade in the city and the suburbs,
city to return

-A. (^' 'A.

,<.

^J> /=Wl_i

36

SUPPLEMENT TO

SIXTEENTH GENEKATION.
Issue of
(58.)

Edward Davenport,

(No. 57.

Henr}^ Davenport, of CoventiT,

who married
His second

for his first Avife Winnifred,


iiabit.

daughter of Richard Barhis issue.

She was the mother of

wife was EHzabeth, daughter of


shire.

Thomas

of Gloucester-

He was

chosen Sheriff of Coventiy in 1602, the

and do not receive alms, having been sworn and enrolled. The voters thus qnalilied amount to about 14()(). Coventry has been frequently the temporary residence of Henry VI was here in 1450, when he made the iirst rojalty. Sheriff. In 1458 a Parliament was held in the Chapter House of the Priory, which passed attainders against the Diike of York, the Eaiis of March, Salsbiiry and Warwick. King Edward IV, and his Queen, kept their Christmas at Coventry in 1465. In 1499, Henry VII, and his Queen visited the citj', and in 1510, Henry VIII and Queen Katharine were there, when there were three pageants put forth. Queen Elizabeth visited the city in 1565; James I in 1617, and in 1687 James II was there. The trade of the city, as early as 1436, was principally in the manufacture of cloths, caps, etc., which continued till 1696, when it was changed to the manufacture of worsteds, and so famous was it for its dj^e, that "true as Coventry blue" became a proverb.

At the beginning of the 18th Centurj', the manufacture

of silk ribbons was introduced.

The most noted churches are St. Michael's and that of the Holy Trinity, both vicarages in the patronage of the Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield. St. Michael's steeple is one of the most beaiitiful in the kingdom. It was begun in the reign of Edward III, in 1372. and was finished in twenty years. The body of the church was erected The height of the steeple and the in the reign of Henry VI. length of the church are the same, 303 feet, and the width of the last 104 feet. The Church of the Holy Trinity would in any other situation be considered a most beaiitiful edifice, but Monies Counties. is eclipsed by its vicinity to St. Michael's.

THE DAVKNPORT FAMILY.

37

same year that

his younj^er brother Christopher

was

chosen to the Mayoralty, and


that office in 1613.

whom

he succeeded to

For many years subsequenth', and even


1624, he

as late as
beinp;^

was Alderman

of the city

that station
who had

tilled for the most part by those

previously

been Mayors

and implying a degree of honor and emoffice in

inence which cannot be said to attach to that

many

of our

American

cities at

the present day.*

The Armorial bearings


3d

of the

Davenport family were

contirmed to Heniy Davenport, of Coventry, Alderman,


in descent
:

from Davenport, County of Chester, as


argent, a chevron
Crest.

follows

"Arms

between three cross

crosslets, fitchee, sable.

a man's head couped


rope round

at the shoulders, face in profile, proper, a

the neck Or.


enport, Esq.,

The same is now borne by Bromley DavM.


P., the

present proj^rietor of the fami-

ly estates in Cheshire,

and whose residence

is

at

Bag-

inton Hall, about three miles from Coventry.

"f"

Heniy Davenport's
to have

ecclesiastical connection

appears

been with the Church

of the

Holy Trinity

building shown in the following engraving


his son

in which

John was baptised and which was erected some

*0f the present Aldermen, six are past Mayors, one the pres.Joseph Edge Banks, Esq., and three only have not served the office of Mayor. Communicated by Wm. Geo. Fretto7\,
ent Mayor,
Jan. 1877.
t

The
I.,

Baginton Hall was long the seat of the Bromley family. estate was purchased by the family in the reign of James and the original Hall was built by Secretary Bromley. This

38

SUPPLEMENT TO

century or two before and has stood a


its

monument

of

founders for about

live

hundred

rears, with

mate-

rial

changes and additions.*


are

We

shown what were the reUgious convictions


from the testimony
of his son

of Mr. Davenport,

John,

subsequently rendered, wherein he declares, as early as


1624, that his father

was puritanically

inclined,

and

was influenced

to conformity

by

liis

own

personal ap-

peal and arguments


" It

thereto.

may be

noted," says Mr. Dexter in his paper on

the Life and Writings of


(while

John Davenpoi-t,

"that in 1611

John was then

a boy of 14,) the city

was deep-

ly stirred

by a discussion

of the question of the pro:

priety of kneeling in receiving the sacrament

through
to

some laxness
be a custom

in the to

Church

authorities,

it

had come
;

commune

in a standing posture

but

now King James heard of the incipient non-conformity,


and sends a
ly the city letter

from his own hand, reproving round-

government, for allowing such a disorderly

gentleman was Speaker of the House of Commons during the Qneen Anne. In proof of the high estimation in which In he was held, the following circnmstance may be cited 1706, the family seat at Baginton was reduced to the ground by fire. Intelligence of this calamity was conveyed to the owner while attending his duty in the Hoiise of Commons, and a considerable sum was immediately voted by Parliament towards a restoration of the edifice. Dugdnlt^'s EmjlamJ and
reign of
:

Wales Delineated.
* The earliest mention of this Church is in 1291, and its first incumbent, wasHenrj'de Harenhale, 1298. Dugdale's Warwick-

shire, p. 110.

"

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


practice.

39
to the

Thus

early

was Davenport brought

knowledge

of the position of the state

on a matter

which in the issue proved the turning

jjoint of his

own

separation from the Church of his fathers.''

ConcuiTent testimony shows that in the years following

many

leading Christian minds, and especially in


at the apj^arent en-

this city,

were seriously disturbed


of Pai:)al
rites

croachment
ceremonies.
ity,

and High Church

liturgical

The

case of the

Church

of the

Holy Trin-

may be

cited in illustration.

In 1635, a high altar piece was set up in the church,


the ground raised, and the

communion

table

removed

or railed

in.

These things gave serious offence to the

Puritan party
Daveni3ort,

among

which we may include Henry


Christopher

and

his brother

and

they
after

availed themselves of the

power which they soon

possessed, to restore things to their original state.

Says a

city annalist,

doubtless in conformity with


:

the sentiment of his puritanical brethren

"The com-

munion

tables were altered,


is

which cost a great deal of


all,

money, and what


to

mont of

three steps were

made

go to the communion table


it

altar

fashion

Grod
it

grant that
It

may

not continue long.

did not continue long, for in 1641, July 15th,


of the

was agreed by the fuU consent

vestrymen then

assembled, being desirous of the reformation and alteration of the

communion

table,

kc, that the money had and that

better have been bestowed on church repairs,

40

SUPPLEMENT TO

the Chancellor of Coventry and Litchfield, Dr. Twisden,

be requested according- to the order

of Parliament,

March
ter the
ly'

1,

1640, to pay back the

money expended,

to al-

ground and place the communion table decentit

where
all

aught to be, and where

it

was 60 years past

of

which was carried out in the ensuing months.*


II.

(59.)

Christoi^her Davenj^oi-t,

who married

daughter of William Hopkins, Alderman of Coventry.

He

is

named

in the records as a draper


of

the manuShei'ifl:'

facture

and dyeing
and Mayor

woolens
city.

being at this time

the leading trade of the


in 1593,

He was

chosen

in 1602.

"On Thursday, about


Mayor Davenpoi-t
land."
Harl.

2 o'clock,

March

24th, 1603,

deceased Queen Elizabeth at Richmond, when Hon.


j)roclaimed

James

I,

King

of

Eng-

MSS.f

This Christopher was the uncle to

whom
father

Rev. John

Davenpori

refers in his letter to Secretary

Conway

in

1624, in which he sjDeaks of his

own

and uncle

who

are

Aldermen

of the city

being influenced by him

to conformity to the ritualism

and ceremonies

of their

church.

Mr. Davenport, while holding municipal


*

offices be-

Sharpe's History of Coventry, Fretton's edition, 18(54. Nickson's MS. History says he "was proclaimed diiring the Mayoralty of Christopher Davenport, at Cross Cheaping, Coventry, by Alderman Rogerson, in the presence of Lord Berkley,
t

and others of good account." Communicated by George Eld, Esq., of Coventry, in 1850, to v/hom the writer was obliged for information gathered from the Leet Book and Annals of the city.

C*^r^-fto^^

JQ~o<-

( v\

5^

Mayor^of Coventry, England,

1602,

THE DAYENPOHT FAMILY.

41

came much

interested in the edneation of the youth of


in-02:)er in-

his native city, especially in ref^^ard to the

struction of the poorer classes, in

whose behalf he

es-

tablished
his

free school,

to

which he contributed of

own funds during

his life time,

and entered

into

an agreement with the May(ir and Corporation

of the

Draj)ers Company, that the school should be continu-

ed

after his death,


6s.

and

to this

end charged

his

estate

with 13,

8d. annually, for its maintenance.


till

This

school continued

1791,

when
to

its

separate establish-

ment

disajDjiears

and seems

have become incorpora-

ted with the English Depai-tment of the Free Grannnar


School.*
(JJiarifi/ C<)m)iiif<f<i<)i)er!<,

28fh

Ji('j)o>i.

The
l)her,

fine outline

engraving here .shown of Christo-

rei)resenting

him

in his official rol)es,

with the

family arms quartered \\dth the Fleece of the Drapers

Company, was kindly forwarded by Mr. Fretton and has been reproduced by the Photo-Engraving Co., of

New

York.

The

original portrait
l)e

is

in St. Mary's Hall,

Coventiy, where also are to

found many ancient

* Communicated by Mr. Wm. Geo. Fretton, who adds, "I have a fine etching by Aklerman Howlette, from a drawing by H. Jeayes, 1793, of the west part of the Free School pulled down in the year following. This shows the room where Davenport's school was carried on. I could possibly get it photographed. I would send you the plate itself, but I have no other and it

is

very rare."

The author was

led,

through misinformation, into

a sorrowful

error in previous edition, in confounding this school with the

Bablake, with which Mr. Davenport had no connection; for which correction Mr. Fretton will please accept hearty thanks.

42

SUPPLEMENT TO
also half length portraits

paintings, figures, arms, &c.


of

Queen

Elizabeth,
II., &c.,

James I., Charles I.; whole lengths


George

of Charles

William and Maiy, (copies) in their


I.,

coronation robes; originals of Anne, George

XL, and Caroline in their coronation robes, &c.

SEVENTEETH GENEEATION.
Issue of

Henky Davenport,

(No. 58.)

(60.

I.

Barnabas Davenport,

of

Coventiy,

who
he

married Mar\', daughter of Simon Glover, by

whom

had two daughters, Anne and Elizabeth, and one son


Christopher.

As we have
this

confidently

shown

in the Introduction to

work that

this Christoi^her, son of Barnabas,

was

the famous Franciscan,

we

will

here introduce a brief


Brittannica,

sketch of his

life

drawn from Biographia

Wood and
many have
-John
:*

others, forbearing the errors into


fallen in

which so

regard to his brotherhood with

Christoj^her

Davenport,

son

of

Barnabas,

and
Cov-

grandson

of

Henry,

was born

in the city of

entry, in the year 1598, and in grammatical learning

there educated.
his

At about

fifteen years of age,

he and

kinsman John were matriculated

at

Merton Colbeginning of

lege, in the University of Oxford, in the


pretixed to

one of his published works, *In a sketch of him now in my hands, reprinted in London in 1872. he is called
the fifth son of Henry whichif possible might make his relation to John so "intimate that each would lose his personality
;

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

43

the year 1613, and became the pupils of Samuel Lane,


fellow
of that house.

Here they were

battlers,

and

took of the cook's commons, but the warden, Savile, havmg received notice of them and
dition, dismissed

Su-

Henry

their con-

them unless they would become comof the

moners or students
relatives

second rank, to which their

would not consent.

John therefore immediwhile

ately

withdrew, and entered Magdalen Hall,

Christopher remained for a time longer, as Sir Henry was recalled to Eaton but upon liis return, he also
;

withdrew,

and by the invitation

of a

Romish
went
to

priest,

under whose inftuence he had

fallen,

Douay,

and

thence going to Ypres, he entered into the order

among the Dutch there, in 1G17. Thence he returned to Douay in 1(518 and joined the
of the Franciscans,

small convent of his order there.

He was
at

afterwards
Spain,

sent to the ancient University of Salamanca, in

where

in a

few years he not only arrived

a consum-

mate knowledge of school divinity but by a constant


application to the Scriptures, and the ancient fathers,

he obtained the reputation of being one


divines of his times.

of the al)lest

He

became chiet reader of Diand


in fine

vinity in the College of St. Bonaventure,

was

made Doctor
University.

of Divinity of his Order,

but not of any

Afterwards he went into England under the name of Frcntci.^cus a Saiicta Clara, and at length was made one
of the chaplains to Henrietta Maria, the royal consort

of Charles

I.,

and became highly honored by

all

of his

44
profession,

SUPPLEMENT TO

and

of

many

scholars, (whether Protestant

or Papist,) for his great learning.

He sometimes

appeared

at Court,

where the comelibrought him ac-

ness of his person, agreeableness of his conversation,

and the reputation


quaintance with

of his learning

many

of the nobility

and distinguished

scholars of the time.

For more than

fifty

years, he

labored incessantly to
disciples,

promote the Papal cause, by gaining many


raising

money among

the English Catholics to


seas, in traveling

carry

on public matters beyond the


one country to another,

from

in printing

books for the adj^erpet-

vancement
ual
ter

of his religion

and order, and by his

and unwearied motion, day and night,

to adminis-

among

his brethren,

and by tending

his services to

counsel and help warping Protestants.

During the

civil

wars
life

of

Cromwell's time, he disapof

peared from public

and spent most


in

those years

beyond the

seas,

sometimes

Loudon,

at times in the

country and then at Oxford.


Charles
II.,

After the restoration of

when

a marriage was celebrated between

that sovereign and Catharine of Portugal, he

became

her theologist or chief chaplain.

He was
greatest
aifairs. 1st,

four times

chosen provincial Minister of his order for the province


of

England and was accounted

its

pillar,

and

the person most consulted in their

Among

his published

works were,

Paraphrastica

Expositio Articulorum Confessionis Anglicje.

For some

THE DA^^NPORT FAMILY.


reason this book was

45
Jesuits,

much censured by
it,

who
2d,

would
at

fain

have burnt
all

but being soon after licensed


it

Rome,

further

rumor about

stoiDjoed,

Deus, Natura, Gratia, sive Tractatus de Predestinatione

de Mentis, kc. This book was dedicated to Charles L, and Prynne contends that the whole scoj^e of it, as
well as the parajDhrastical exposition of the articles re-

printed in 1633, were designed to reconcile the kinothe English Church, and the thirty-nine articles to the
to-'

Church
that

of

Rome.
of the

He was so active in making converts,


principal
articles

one

of

impeachment

against Archbishop

Laud was

his holding conferences

with this Franciscan.*

Says one. "He obviously desired and labored for a


corporate reunion, and practically took one of the most

important steps towards effecting


*

it

that could possi-

Archbishop, "as Bishoi^ Heber, in by his "chaplain, Mr. Augustine Lindsell, as a person engaged in a work on the Operation of God's Grace, and a Defense of Episcopacy. " Laud had some conversation with him about his work, (Deus, Natura, Gratia, ) but denied in his trial that he had more than two or three conferences with Sancta Clara after this, and that he did not give him encouragement in his work, but remarked, "that the bishops of England were able to defend their own cause and calling, without calling in aid from Eome and would in due time." Zaud's Troubles and Trial, page 385. Bishop Heber suggests that the intimacy of Taylor with this
his Life of

"He was introduced

to the

Jeremy Taylor,

tells us.

Franciscan, "whose friendship," he saj's, "could have been no disgrace to Taylor," probably afforded, in those suspicious times, a foundation for the report that Taylor himself had a a concealed attachment for the Romish communion. iee
of Tdijlor.

Life

46

SUPPLEMENT TO

bly have been chosen, by showing-

men on both

sides,

even at that period, that they ah-eady agreed more and


differed less, than the prejudice of

pubhc opinion would

have them beheve

and furthermore, that many points


accidents!

on which they differed were rather of the

than the substance of Divine Truth." The hst of Dr. Davenport's published works, bears
witness to his unwearied labors, and theological knowledoe.

These were collected and reprinted


Douay.

at his

own

cost, in 2 vols, folio in 1665, at

Christopher Davenport, (Sancta Clara,) died early in


the

morning- on the 31st day of May, being Whitat the ripe

Monday, 1680,

age of eighty-two,

at the palac-

ace of the Somerset House,

and was buried, (not

cording- to a wish expressed before his death, in a vault under the chapel of the Somerset House, but in the
)

Church

of St. John, belonging- to the

Savoy Hospital in
he acpriest-

the Strand.

In the MS. Franciscan Register,


complished three jubilees of
the missionthat

it

is said,

religion, of the

hood and
]iimself a

of

to

this

end he proved and


child-

most loving father to

his brethren

ren, a most watchful shepherd, faithful and laborious

during the space of fifty-seven years, making


all

liiniself

to

all,

to gain all to Christ.

(61.)

n.

Edward Davenport,
Sarah,

(2d son of Henry,)

who married

daughter of

John White, Alderissue, Christopher,

man of

Coventry; by

whom

he had

Winifred, Elizabeth and

Phillipa.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(62.)
III.

47

Christopher

Davenport,

who married

Frances, daughter of -John Higginsou.


in the Leet
iff

He

is

named
when

Book

as a clothier.

He was

elected Sher-

of

Coventry in
I.,

1632,

and Mayor

in 1641,

Charles
to the

made his tour through


city,

the country, and sent

Mayor and

Sheriff of Coventry,

demanding an
in-

entrance into the


habitants.

which was refused by the

The accompanying

fac-simile of his

autograph
in

is

tracing from a book of the Fullers

Company,

the

possession of Mr. Fretton, signed on the 13th da}' of

AprU, 1623.

iSriV^mffrt
(63.) (64.)

IV.
V.

Henry Davenport.
John
DaveniDort, born 1597, and
at

pur-

sued

his preparatory studies

the Free

Grammar
After

School of Coventry.
ford,

He

entered Merton College, Oxin

with his nephew Christopher,

1613.

joassing

two years

at

Merton, he removed to Magdalen

Hall, in the

same University, where he remained a


a licensed minister.

short time,

when he became

After

officiating for a
tle,

few months as chaplain at Hilton Cas-

he removed to the metropolis and having jierformfor

ed service

some

five

years in

St.

Lawrence Church,

48

SUPPLEMENT TO
in

Old Jewry, London, he was elected in 1G24, vicar


the neighboring Church of
street,
St. Stejjhen's in

Coleman

where he became a minister

of note.

In 1G25, he returned to Magdalen Hall, and for some


time performed his exercise for the degree of Bachelor
of Divinity,

which he received, June

'28th of

that year,
es-

and soon

after returned to

London, where he was

teemed a person
ed for some years,
ist,

of excellent gifts in preaching

and

other qualities belonging to a divine.


till

Here he

labor-

becoming

a decided non-conform-

he resigned his charge


into

at St.

Stephen's in 1G88,

went

Holland, and after some time returned to

England, and in 1687 sailed for America.

CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY, COVENTRY, ENGLAND.

REV, JOHK DAVENPORT IN AMERICA.

HISTOEICAL SKETCH.

(No. G4.
b}'

John Davenport, the

fifth

son of Hem*y,

Winifred (Barnabit,) his wife, was born in the an-

cient city of Coventry, Warwickshire, England, in 1597;

and baptized

in the

Church

of the

Holy

Trinity, (Rev.

Richard Eaton, rector,)


"

Aj^ril

9th of the same year.

The stone

font which then served for baptisms, though

afterwards banished by Puritanical zeal, has been restor-

ed to

its use,

and

is still

a conspicuous object in the


still

beautiful Gothic church, which

retains

its

almost

unique stone pulpit constructed on one of the


the nave."
like his

pillars of

His father was a merchant (draper,) and


fill

grandfather Edward, was elected to


city.

the

highest municipal offices of that

That the religious convictions

of the father

tended

more strongij' to Puritanism than did those of the son,


for the first years of his public
life, is

evident from the

allusion

by the

son, in a letter to the Secretary of State,


to

in 1624, in

which he speaks of seeking to influence

conformity both his father and uncle,


wise inclined.

who were

other-

His mother was a

woman

of piety, but

was removed

by death, leaving

this

son in his

infancy, after having

50

SUPPLEAIENT TO

service of God. dedicated him to the care and special relying on the divine with great fervor and faith, humbly

and Heaven promises to faithful parental dedication;


this believing pagraciously accepted the offering of early to the dying mother's prayer an
rent,

and gave
first

answer.
"

The

trace of

Jolm Davenport's boyhood,


school for those days,

is

Ins

name among

the scholars of the Free

Grammar School
founded

of Coventry, a

famous

wealthy insome half century before by John Hales, a


habitant,

and

of

which the original building,


is still

of credit-

able sixteenth-centmy arcliitectm-e,

standing and

From a endowment. used for the piu-pose of the hope to almost might glance at the school room, one Davenport, very desk at which the young
identify the
of
is

270 years ago, sat and can-ed his

nameso
by

perfect

the antiquity of the place. Grammar School in those days, though

The usher of Coventry


tradition

a famous scholar, Dr. not a good disciphnarian, was liis translaPhilemon Holland, known even to us by and Plutarch and Xenophon and Livy,
tions of Pliny
it is
;

a pleasant thoiight that from

such an enthusiast,

classical learning, Davenpoi-t imbibed the taste for of the day, fashion which led him in keeping with the

with original citation to load his pages not rarely


reference.

and

head-mastei Dr. Holland was subsequently

of the school,

and hes buried

in Trinity Church."*
years since

Coventry a few *F. B. Dexter-wlio visited Chnrch. Trinity in service Sabbath and attended

THE DAVENPOKT FAMILY.

51
of

In 1613,
lege in
tlie

lie

was admitted

member

Merton Colprevious to

University of Oxford.

little

that event, he

became a subject of the


Divine love

special influences

of God's g-race.

now

possessing- his soul,


in all the conin

seems to have had a governing inflvience


duct of his future
life.

The frequency with which,

after years, he was accustomed to borrow his imagery

and

illustrations

from the Sacred Word, show a

famili-

arity with the same,

which marks him as one who from


"

the

first

blossoming of his Clui.stian life, was

mighty

in

the Scriptures."
of

To him we may apply


:

the reference

Paul to Timothy, and say


.

the faith

which

first

dwelt in his grandmother.


fred,

.and in his mother, "Wini-

was

in

him

also.

While

at the University,

he was characterized by that

close mental application, which he maintained tlrrough-

out his whole


College, he

life.

After j^assing two years at Merton


to
left

removed

Magdalen

Hall, in the

same

University, which he

before the close of that year,

and commenced preaching.


1{)15

This was in November,

few months before he had reached the age of

nineteen years.

The

first

winter after leaving Oxford, he ofiiciated

as private chajDlain at Hilton Castle, the seat of the

noble family of Hilton, a dozen miles north-east of the


city of
*

Durham.*

"The local historians all speak of the state observed at the Castle, and of its Chapel as a domestic place of worship, where The head of the house chaplains were alwaj's in attendance.

52

SUPPLEMENT TO

A good

sized

weU-preserved vohime,

containing

&c., and some Latin notes of lectures on pliHosophy, of sermons, written forty-three sermons, or outlines during his ministry delivered hand, and

with his

own

at the Castle,

his
Ct.,

was preserved by him, and descended to of Stamford, grandson, the Kev. John Davenport, DavenJames and was presented by his son, Hon.
Libraiy of Yale CoUege.
of

port, in 1794, to the

The recent researches


don, and

Mr. F. B. Dexter, in Lonmanuscript vol-

his patient deciphering of the

ume above

referred

to,

throw much light upon young

years previous to his Davenport's history, for the few of which by his permisssettlement in Coleman street
in this narrative. ion I shall avail myself beginning are book, he says: "nearest the

Of

this

two sermons

in

what

is

apparently an earlier hand


is

than the others.

On

the page between these two

paragraph

of personal apology,

beginning thus: 'My

so many, (wherewith occasions of late have been that I have scarcely you have been acquainted,) as
of

some

had any time to employ my study something unto, whereupon growing

for preparation here-

thnoroiis

and

this, so great a work, at last almost afraid to undertake the resolution of an ancient happily I called to mind death should make him break father, that nothing but

in 1615, was a

young bachelor
and

of thirty,

who died in 1641,

alien-

ating the property

deleaving his family in poverty and

cay." i^-

-B.

Dexter.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

53

promise; whereupon I suddenly resolved with myself by the help of God to continue firm, hoping that his

power would appear in my weakness and presuming upon your courteous and kind acceptance, either upon
consideration of the paucity of my years, or the paucity
of of

my

time which I could allot to this business, either


I

which

dpubt not

will sufficiently

excuse me."

[May we not conjecture


thus apologized
for,

that these

two sermons,

might have been delivered by this youthful preacher on a single Sabbath, at the home
of his childhood, in the presence of
his kindred,

and

perhaps in the very churcli in which he was baptized.]


"

Next

is

sermon headed,
1,

'At Hilton Castle,


xxviii
:

Anno
Serto 35,

1615.

Sermon
which are

of J. D.,

upon Deut.

1.'

mons
after

follow in a regularly
five

numbered

series

up

others not numbered.


a sermon

Number

15

of the series is indicated as

preached on

Christmas Day, and between numbers 17 and 18 comes

one headed 'Upon


so connected

New

Year's Day.'
as
'

The sermons
you heard

are

by such references

in the

forenoon,' 'you heard the last Sabbath,' etc. as to


that they

show

were preached consecutively, two a day,

counting backwards and forwards from the Christmas


sermon, from
as

November 1615 to March


fashion,

1616.

They

are,

was then the

and preeminently this jDreacher's


series,

fashion, in the

form of a

from half a dozen to a

iozen on a single text,and the whole set interdependent;


thus he begins the 34th sermon, (from the 1st verse of

54

SUPPLEMENT TO
'

Exodus xs. Then


t'ormed with

Grocl

spaks

all tliess

words,')

and siid
jier-

'Those few sermons, in

number

34,

which I have

much weakness
which most

in niyself

and yet great

strength in respect to the all-sufficient operation of

God's

Spirit,

giorifieth himself

by weak

means, have been but as a preludium unto this


present text, or purjDOse in handling the
ments.'

my

Commandintro-

"I regret to say," adds Mr. Dexter, "that the

discourses which follow do not get

beyond the

ductory verses, and that there

is

reason to fear that the

patient hearers died without ever learning the full conclusion to which this 'preludium' tended."
"

Our

record," continuing the quotation, " carries us


1616,

to

March

when Davenport

is all

but nineteen
at the Castle

years of age.

Probably the engagement

was soon terminated, for we learn incidentally from


one of his later writings that about midsummer of
year he began to preach in the metropolis.
particular chru-ch, or with
this

In what

what success for a year or


his
'it

two we do not hear;

l)ut

by the time he reached


it

majority (we have his word for

a little later)

pleased

God to make

his ministry public

and eminent.'
he comes
in

From

his undistinguished field of labor,

sight in June, 1611),

when
us,

as the records of St.

Law-

rence Jewry

inform

he was elected by the vestry

of that church. Lecturer

and Curate, the Rev. "William


for

Boswell being Vicar.

Here

upwards

of five years

he taught with growing reputation.

The Church

of

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


St.

55

Lawrence Jewry was (and

its

successor, built after

o-reat fire of 1666, is) in

the heart of London, under the

eaves of Guildhall, and but a stone's throw from Davenport's next parochial charge, St. Stephen's, Cole-

man
lies

Street.

Here he g-rew

in favor with the rising-

Puritan party, became intimate with some noble fami-

on that side

(esiDecially,

it

appears, with that of


to

Lord Horatio Vere,) and began


dent destiny."*
"

work out

his evi-

The next step was from the curacy here


i:)arish.

to the vic-

arage in the adjacent


Street,

St.
it is

Stephen's,

Coleman

was notable then,


by which
its

as

now, for the peculiar

privilege

parishioners elected their

own

minister without interference


the parish
5th, all

from outside.

In 1624.

became

vacant, and at an election held Oct.

but three or four of the seventy-three parish-

ioners present, voted for the prominent preacher next

door.
*

But there were reasons why such


Lawrence Jewry. King

a promotion

Street, Chea^jside, is among the London parishes. In the ohl Church, mentioned 1293, was buried Thomas Bolyn, Earl of Wiltshire, (d. 1471,) whose daughter Anne married King Henry VIII., and was the mother of Queen Elizabeth here lay also the remains of RichSt.

oldest of the

ard Eich, mercer

(d. 1469,)

from

whom

descended the Earls of

Warwick.

Church was destroyed by the great tire, 1G66, and the commenced by Sir Christopher Wren, in 1671, upon the same site. It has a tower 130 feet high, with, for a
old

The

present edifice

emblem of St. Lawrence. Here Tillotson was Tuesday lecturer, and here his remains were interred in 1694, three years after he was consecrated Archbishop of Canterbury.
vane, a gilt gridiron, the
I


56
SUPPLEMENT TO
distasteful to the leaders in

was

Church and

State,

and

to those

we owe

the preservation of

some resulting
facts."

documents, and our knowledge of the

We

are

now come

to the time

when Mr. Davenport


and

was made to
ecclesiastical

feel the influence of l)oth the civil

power arraigned against him.


Office,
I.,

In the Record
Domestic, Charles
of several letters

London, from State Papers,


fcc.,

Vol, 173, No. 42,

are copies

from Mr. Davenport to Sir Edward

Conway

the principal Secretary of

King James

I.,

so-

liciting his intercession

with the King, and Dr. George

Montaigne, the Bishop of London, that he might be


permitted to succeed to the charge of the Coleman
Street Church, to which he

had been elected b}' a large


flrst

majority of the voters.

The

begins thus:

May

it

please your Honor,

" It

hath bene the

will of

God

(against

my naturall
ministry,
jjublic

desire of privace

and retiredness)

to

make my
in

for the space of this sixe yeares,

London,

and eminent,

w*"^^

hath caused some to look vpon

me

with a squint eye and hearken to


y least [left] eare,

my

sermons with
to endeavor of

and by

all

means

my

discouragement and disgrace, insomuch that I


I

am

traduced (as
tan, or

hear and feare) to his

Ma*^*" for a

Puii-

one that is puritanically

affected.

If

by a Puri-

tan

is

meant one

opjDosite to y" present

Government^

I profess (as
trary.

my

subscription also testif>^eth) the con-

M}' j)ractice hath been answerable to that pro-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


fession.

57
j)arish

I have

been a Curat,

in St.

Lawrence

in the

Old Jury, above

five yeares,
y**

dimng

w'=^ time,

and

in that place

(as alsoe

ministre doth offer to

testify)

I have baptized

many but never any w^^out

the signe of the Cross, I have monethly administered


y*'

Sacrament

of

y''

Lord's Supper, but at no tyme

vp^^out ye Surplice,
at w*"^

nor to any but those that kneeled,


read the Booke of
is

tymes also

Common

Prayer,

in forme

and manner as

appointed by the Church.


to

many myne own Father and Vncle who


Besides, I have persuaded
Citty of Coventry,

conformity, yea

are

Aldermen
inclined

of the
;

and

w^ere otherwise

yea

my

desire of this pastorall charge sheweth


2.

my

resolu-

cion for conformity.

If

by puritanically affected

be meant one that

secx'etely

encourageth

men

in opjoo-

sition to the present

Government,
;

I profess a hearty

detestion of such hyj^ocrisy


private discourses have ever

my

public sermons and


at this, to

aimed

persuade

men

to give unto

Cesar the things that are Cesar's,


that are God's.

and unto God the things


matters,

As

for other

my

plain

and open appearing

in defense of

y ceremonies hath cavised vnto

me some

opposition

from such

as disaflect them.

My
it

humble
please

request, therefore, to your

Honor is,
on

that

may

you

to

mediate with his

Ma*^*^

my

be-

half, yt

such imputacions

may

not take any impression


of the innocent
y*

in his Loyal Breast to the injuiring

and

to

persuade with the Bishop of London

nothing

58

SUPPLEMENT TO
cause him to discountenance

may
ble

my

person or pro-

ceedings, but that I

may

stand upright in his favorahis Lordsliip


y"^

and good opinion


and

wh'^'^

may

please to

testify

by admitting me

into

place whereunto I

am
be

lawfully

freely chosen, or (in case that cannot

granted) by assuring in the places Avhere I


tinuance, with his favor
to

am my

con-

and Love,

till it

shall please

God

remove me

else whither.

For

w^'^'^

noble favor

(if

my

presumption be pardoned,) I
self

shall

acknowledge my-

ever

bound

to be.
at the

Your Honor's poor remembrancer


Grace.

Throne of

JOHN DAVENPORTE.
(In Dorso.)

Mr. Davenport, his letter for admittance to a benefice


in

London whereunto he
The
aj^peal of

is

chosen.

the Secretary to the Bishop, called

forth the following reply.

May

it

please yr L'ip
of Mr. Davenport of
w'cli

The business
write yr letters to
difficulty in

you were pleased to

me

bearing date 11th of October, hath some

it w'^l' I will be bold to acquaint yr h'i]) vfth all and then I shall be ready to doe the best I can to comply wth ye L'ips advise. Before this bixsiness was afoot, I had on order from his Matie to call Mr. Davenport in question, for some points of doctrine wi-'h he had preached at wcli many yt heard him were scandalized, and some getting so desperate yt they were in dan-

ger of final desperation and the fatal accidents yt usually

fol-

low in siich a case. Besides he was reported to be factious and popular [i. e. favoring the people,] and draw after him great
congregations and assembly's of

common and meane

people.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


After

59

my coming home
duty
to

election to this living in


it

my

make

found that he was chosen by apopular Coleman street, and therefore I thought stay in it until I might farther know his
I

Maties pleasure therein, rather than to admit him whom I not to stand so right as he should do in his Maties favor.

knew

Now I beseech ye L'ip advise me what you would have me doe in this business, and I will give you a true testimony of my Love and service wcli is and shall.be always at yr L'ips commandment, for I am your servant and heartly pray for your
health and happiness.

Yr L'ips
Oct. 14, 1624.

to

doe voure servive.

GEORGE, London.
(In Dorso.

the Eight Honorable Sir Secretary to his Matie at Court.

To

Edward Conway, Rt

Principal

Mr. Davenport again writes to the Secretary, from


his in

house

in

Milk Street, near Cheapside, Oct.


states that
city,

14, 1624,

which he

"my Lord
is

of

London" has

re-

turned to the

and

confident that two words

from him

to

the Bishop would satisfy his Majesty in

his settlement in the place to

which he has been choto

sen,

and urges him

to write

the Bishop with

all

haste and conclude this:

''The things I presume to


at

beg
these

as princijial favors,
:

your Honor's hands are

1st.

That the King (by your

effectual mediation,)

be

satisfied

concerning me, and that his Majesty would


to

be pleased to cause so much


BishojD.
2d.

be signified to the

That

if

the Bishoj) be pleased to confer this

place uj^on the other, that I

may

not suffer any dispar-

60

SUPPLEMENT TO
in

agement thereby

my

reputation, or any

damage

in

the place which I hold.


3d.

In this request,

beseech your Honor to take


his

no denial^ that however


ship would entertain a
as

this place succeed,

Lord-

good conceit of me; and where-

my

adversary [Laud,] objecteth that the


jDlace is

man whom
more wornot lessen

he doth injuriously present to the

thy than myseK, because he hath taken moi-e degress


at the University

than I have, that this

may

the Bishop's esteem of


grace, since I
ister,

my disam a licensed and and conformable Minand that my want of degrees proceedeth not from
nor be divulged to
of

me

my want

time or of willingness or of sufficiency, (as


at Oxford,)

was well known

but from want of means


to

(my friends being unwilling)


University.

keep

me

longer at the

My

hope

is,

after I

am

settled in a certain

competency of means

to recover the degrees,

which

some think I have


portunity.
efitectual

lost for

want

of taking the first op-

I beseech

your Honor to be earnest and

with the Bishop, that for your sake and at

your earnest entreaty, he would spare


so far tender

me

in this,

and

my reputation,

as that in the close of this

business, those that wish

me

hurt

may

not insult, and


to

that for hereafter he

would give audience

none that

traduce

me

unto his Lordship."


day, Oct.
15th, Secretary
:

The next

Conway thus

writes to Bishop Montaigne

May
To

it

please your Lordship

give

me

leave to

make

a suit to you,

which

did hope to

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

61

have done personally, and if I had had the happiness to have found your Lordship here, I Mould have strenthened my suit with the assurance of my Lord Buckingham's request, and with the approbation of his Majesty; which I hope to pursue so
ef-

fectually, as I trust I shall witness his Majesty's allowance, with his great contentment and satisfixction, in any doubts that he shall have of the conformity and orthodox doctrine

enport, for

whom

am an humble

you

will be pleased to take him give allowance, and admittance of don, to which he is chosen.

of Mr. Davsuitor to your Lordship, that into your favor so far as to

him

into a benefice in

Lon-

'

Lord, it would ill become me to countenance or move any that would oppose the ecclesiastical or civil government, in which points there is so little doubt of Mr. Davenport, as your Lordship may be confident. Both his public ministry and private conference would become witness, not
for

My

only of his conformity practiced in his doctrine and behavior, but of his endeavor to conform others, and among others

his

and uncle, who were entangled with the dislike of the ordinances of the Church, and are subject to the practice of
father

own

them now with all contentment. To this I may add, that in his ministry which he exercised in Ht. Lawrence parish in Old Jewry, he used the surplice in baptizing used the cross and administered to none but those kneeling, and this very pretense and desire of acceptation of a
;

may declare his purpose of conformity. I appeal now your Lordship's wisdom, what malicious artifice this is that would stain for a particular end, with the style of puritanibenefice
to

those persons who for singular gifts and graces in them, through the acceptance they have with the people, are able to do the most good, both in teaching the truth and the true duty of conformity to the ordinances of the Supreme Magistrate. I :lesire not that your Lordship should rest upon my bare testimony hear Mr. Davenport, examine his doctrine, his pracL-al,
:

tice,

ry
[

and if all this lift him above the ordinarank and merit of other men and the notice of his enemie,-, am sure they will need no other patronage of him than your goodness, nor no mediation of him but your wisdom, equity and
latural inclination to favor
still

his conversation,

But

good wheresoever yoii find your own knowledge and experience of him have

it.

in-

62
formed yon.

SUPPLEMENT

TO

I beseech you for the good of the Chiirch, for the advantage of his Majestie's service and at the instant request, and for the sake of your humble servant, take him into your favor and into your protection, admit him to the benefice he pretends for, and is chosen to, and countenance and favor him in the things he hath, that his credit and estate maj' not siiflfer by the {)ower of malice or misinformation, and the favor you shall do to him, I shall receive as so great an obligation done to me,

and I shall power my service to you for it forever. And although I will use all oi^portunities to declare my thankfulness, yet I know you will sooner have cause to repent yourself of the courtesy done to me, than of the goodness bestowed upon him. I beseech jonr pardon for my earnestness neglect not my suit, and make yourself master of all the powers and endeavors of your Lordship.
;

(In dorso,

Bishop of London, sent by Mannington.

The

following' day,
tlie

Oct.

17th,

Mr. Davenport ac-

knowledges

earnest and friendly intercession of the

Secretary in his behalf, and adds, " I shall ever bless


the Fountain of
all

good, for joining such a head with

such a heart, and honoring such a person with such a


place,

and blessing

his Majesty with such a Secretary,


suffi-

the State with such a friend, so furnished with


ciency and tender-heartedness.
shall be

My continued

prayers;

for the continuance of

your prosperity, andj


in
all

that

you may be successful and prosperous


your
letter the
nie,

things you undertake, as I hope you have been in this;


for since the receipt of

Bishop hath
finish-

given good words to this parish for


ing of the business
is

but the

respited for fouiteen days, in the

compass of which time, his Lordship expecteth to imderstand the performance of your noble resolution for

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


the satisfpng of his Majesty,
till

63
tiling

which

be assur-

ed him, he professeth that upon

peril of loss of

what

he eujoyeth, he dare not accept me.


I hear that Mr. Sidnam, the King's Page, hath in-

censed his Majesty against me, because above a year


since I reproved

him

for sw^earing at

my Lady

Vere's,

which I marvelled

at,

since at that time he pretended

thankfulness, with a free jDromise of a future reformation;

what other particulars may be objected


suit to

know not.

My

humble

your Honor

is,

that

you would be

pleased to deal so effectually for the discovery of any


prejudice wherewith his Majesty, by misinformation,

may

l)e

possessed against me, that I may, at the

least,

make advantage

of this opportunity to be set right in

the good opinion of

my

Sovereign

and wdien you


will

shall

have notified His Majesty, an easy wa}for the j^ursuits of


especially,
if

be made

your noble intentments for

my good,
will

at

your Honor's request, his Majesty


lines to

command two
sure

be written

to the Bishop, to asthis

him

of his satisfaction

and royal pleasure that


which your Honor
all

place, (which to another

wUl be but

small,) should

be

conferred u])on me;

in all

shall

receive no prejudice, but

hear of
science
cy,

it,

and, which

is

worth

much renown from all, much peace


of such

that

in con-

upon your remembrance

an act of mer-

with the supply of a strong argument whereby to

expect a gracious answer fi'om

God
as

in the time of need,

when you

shall

be able to

sa}^

Nehemiah

did, 'Re-

64

SUPPLEMENT TO
Grocl

member me O my
shall ever

concerning
to

this!'

and myself

be bound and found


servant.

be your Honor's

humble and thankful

JOHN DAVENPOETE.
Dated 17
Oct. 1G24.

The next

day, Secretary

Conway

writes a letter to

Dr. George Abbot, Archbishop of Canterbury, request-

ing him to "hear and and examine Mr. Davenport,


is

who

a candidate for a benefice in London,


Avell

and an emi-

nent and
ly

deserving light in the Church, but false-

accused of being refractory to ecclesiastical ordi-

nances.

He

not only conforms himself, but has prehis father

vailed with

and

uncle, both

Aldermen of

Coventry, to be content with Church government."*


Oct. 19tli, Mr. to Secretaiy
fluence, the

Davenport again remits another

letter

Conway, with thanks that through

his in-

Bishop has become favorable to him, and


to perfect his kindly offices of the King's

entreats
for

him

by obtaining

him an expression

good opinion, urg-

ing that this

may be done
Honor with
whereby
the

speedily and closes thus,

"For your

clear proceeding

wherein, I

am

bold to

trouble your

names

of those that

were

in the Vestry,

it

may appear

that

by unani-

mous

consent, not of

some

factious people as

some have

suggested, but by the chieftest and most worthy I was


*

From Conway's
;

Papers

Letter Book, p. 158 and Calendar of State Domestic, James L, (1624,) p. 357.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


freely chosen;

65

the other
will

named
else I

is

my

competitor.
I

Your judicious eye


desire nothing but

soon discern the difference.

riglit,

were unworthy to use

or enjoy the countenance of so noble a friend.


I beseech

your Honor that your


])e

last

motion toward

the center
let

may

most violent and

efitectual.

Now

your humble servant

feel the fruit of

your interest

in the Court, and the effect of ycnir gracious aspect for

dispersing these

mists, so shall I

with a free heart,

pray for your happiness, and praise your nobleness and


ever rest your Honor's faithful, thankful servant,

JOHN DAVENPORTE.
P. 8.
I shall

have no good success in

this suit,

nor

safety in the things I hold, but shall be obvious to ev-

ery man's malice,

(being

now

suspected,) unless his


to signify so in

Majesty be

satisfied,

and be pleased
so

much.
King,

Your honor hath


with the
success,

good

interest

the

upon his' observation of your fidelity, and

so great

power

Duke
if

of

Buckingham, that
to

doubt not your

you please

undertake the business which

your free promise emboldeneth be pardoned that

me

to effect.

Let

it

I press for a si:)eedy dispatch,

because

delay breeds danger."

Then

follows the certificate of the Church-wardens

of 8t. Stephen's,

Coleman

street, that at a vestry

meet-

ing of that parish, where Mr. Davenport was almost un-

animously elected

vicar, only tliree or four voting for his

66
opponent, Mr.

SUPPLEMENT TO

Wilsonwith

list

of 70 parishioners

who

attended the meeting, Oct. 5th.


this hst are

In

found a few who were afterwards

associated with Mr. Davenport, in the management of the Massachusetts Colony, and several others bear the

names

of those

who subsequently accompanied,

or soon
list

followed him to America.


Sir

The second on the

is

Maurice Abbot, the brother of the Archbishop of Canterbury, to whom Secretary Conway had addressed
on the preceed-

his appeal in behalf of Mr. Davenport,

ing day

Primate w^ho was himself suspected of a

leaning to Puritanism.

The name
list,

of

Theophilus Ea-

ton does not appear upon the

although he was

subsequently enrolled

among

his parishioners.
his final acknowl-

Nov.

8,

(l(i24),Mr.

Davenport sent

edgements to the Secretary

for his successful

aid in

settling this business; informing

him

that after an ex-

amination, both the Bishop and the King, are satisfied,

and that he

is

now inducted

into his charge in Cole-

man

street.*

In the library of the American Antiquarian Society


* Ht. Stephen's (Coleman street, ) Church edifice was destroyed by the Great Fire in 166G, and re-built by Sir Christopher AVren, as we now see it, with a tower and bell turret 65 feet high. Among the monuments, is a marble bas-relief by E. W. Wyon,

parish,

erected in 1847, to the Eev. Josiah Pratt, recent Vicar of the whose missionary labors are personified by the Angel

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


at Worcester, ^Nlass.,
is

67
consisting of

bound volume,
<S:c.,

miscellaneous tracts, pampLlets,

which belonged to

the private library of Mr. Davenport.


at the close of

On

a blank leaf,

one of these pamphlets, containing the


is

Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England,

found

the following declaration, evidently written with his

own

hand, and duly signed in the handwriting of the

Church-wardens.
incident
is

What adds

additional interest to this

the fact that two of the

names which appear


Westminister

as witnesses to this

document are afterwards found


of

among
his

the

members

the celebrated
is

Assembly of Divines.

Its date

four days later than


of the termi-

announcement

to Secretary

Conway,

nation of the euibarrassments, that for four weeks

had

environed him.
"Nov.
7, lfi24:.

John

Davenport,
street,

clerk,"

vicar of St.

Stephen's in Coleman

London,

did, this

day

above written, being Sunday, publicly read this l)ook


of Articles herein contained, sides the ratiticatiou,

bemg

in

number

3i), ])e-

and declared

his full

and unfeign-

ed assent and consent thereunto,

in the

time of morning

prayer, next alter the second lesson, before the whole

congregation; as also the said John did the same day

administer the holy communion, in the said parish, in


of the fTOspel, addressing an African,
der.

Hindoo and New ZealanThe entrance gateway from Coleman street, has a very curious scvilptiire embodying tlie Last Jiidgment. Timbs' Curiosilles of

London.
present vicar (1876, ) to be a
.son of

I believe the

Eev.

J. Pratt.

68
his surplice,

SUPPLEMENT TO
according to the order prescribed by the

Church

of

England, in the presence of those whose

names

are hereunto written.

Henry Wood,
William Spurstowe,
Saiwxtel Aldersey,

Church Wardens,

Richard Symonds, Thomas M.vston, John Wells, William Hill, Robert Holmes.''

calm seems now to have ensued, and the youthful

pastor, not
self to

the

now twenty-seven years of age, devotes himwelfare of the people who had called him to

minister unto them in spiritual things.

In the ensuing spring,the time had evidently arrived,

when Mr. Davenport, may be supposed to have become " settled in a certain competency of means to recover
the degrees," the opportunity for which he had not
availed himself
of,

since his retii-ement from Oxford in

1610.

We

are fortunately in possession, in his

own hand,
to,

through the manuscript volume before referred


only of the exact date
sity for this object,

not

when he repaired to the Univerof the this

but of the precise form, both

tpiestions proposed,

and the responses given on

occasion.

These are as follows, the answers being giv:

en in regular hexameter and pentameter verse

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

69

Questiones in sacra theologia discutiendae


Oxonii Mail die 18

Anno

1625*,

Respondente me Jobanne Davenportio,


Gradiim Baccalaurii
in sacra theologia suscepturo,

1
.

Reconeiliatio per
I

mortem

Christi

sit

singulis

,'

i^

hominibus impetrata ? Vere renati possint gratia


ter excidere
?

finaliter aut totali-

Quaestio 1 ma. Neg.

Uno torquemur morbo


Faucis.

Medicina paratur
Sic voluit medicus.

Cur paucis
:

Uno

Itetamur merito

nee serpit in omnes


noluit hoc medicus.
erat,

Vis morbi.

Cur hoc ?

Culpa quidem communis


Inde malis judex,

non cura

patescit

et pater inde bonis.

Qufestis 2 da.

Quos

sibi

ciim sponsas Christus tiim

membra

vocavit,

Queis aiTham sancti flaminis ipse dedit,

Non

hos

divellit

mundi

satansBve protestas,

Inferni in tales porta valere nequit.

70

SUPPLEMENT TO
Translation.
I

Questions in Sacred Theology, to be discussed at


Oxford, on the 18th of May, 1625,
I,

John Davenport,

candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Divinity, being


the respondent.
1st.

Wliether by the death of

Chi'ist reconciliation

has been obtained for every


2d.

man ?

Whether the

truly regenerate can finally or en-

tirely fall

from grace ?
1st

Question

negative.
:

We

are tormented with one disease

remedy

is

provided for a few.

Why
it.

for

few?

Because so

the physician has willed


joice
:

In his merit alone

we

re-

and the power


all.
it

of the disease doth not extend

over

Wliy

is

this

so?

Because the physician

willed

shoiild not.
;

The

guilt indeed

was common,
j

but not the cure

hence he appears the Judge of the

wicked, and hence the Father of the good.

2d Question Those

negative.

whom

Christ has called his spouse and his


to

members, those
the
Si^ii'it,

whom

he has given the earnest of

neither the power of the world nor of satan

can wrest from him, nor can the gates of hell prevail
against them.*
*

In the Calendar of State Papers,


St.

find the following

"May

22, 1623.

John's, Oxford,

Thomas

Tiu-ner to Bishop Land,

of St. David's. Reports the proceedings of a disiJiitation between Mr. Davenport and Mr. Palmer on the question whether the regenerated could finally fall from grace-"

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

71

With
which

this brief

expose of his theology, the

dogma

of

which, in accord with that of the age and place in


it

was delivered, was deemed orthodox


to

John
labors

Davenport went back

London,

entitled to write

himself Bachelor of Divinity.

On
and

his return to his flock,

new

scenes,

new

trials

were opened before him in his appointed

field of labor.

In the following months of 1625, the

city of

London
oft'

was

visited with a dreadful plague

which swept

35,000 of its inhabitants.

While many pastors deserfrom the wasting pestilence,

ted their

flocks,

and

fled

Mr. Davenport remained firmly at his post, and, planting himself on those promises of divine protection and
security'

amid surrounding judgments, contained

in

the 91st Psalm, courageously passed this season

of

awful visitation in proclaiming to the afflicted and the

dying the consolations and hopes of the Gospel.


Christian fidelity greatl}' endeared

His

him

to

all,

and on

the Parish Records

is

now

to be

found a special vote


Mr. Davenport
of his care and

passed in the spring of 1626.


shalt

" That
refipect

hare of the parish fund in


i^

pdins taken
gratuity, the

in

time of the visitation of sickness, as a

sum of 20."*

Following the Divinity questions in the manuscript

volume are about 65 pages, recording a controversy


*

Of this

parish,

John Hay ward was under sexton during the


to their
Bell, yet

Great
graves,

Plagiie,

when he carried the dead and fetched the bodies with the Dead Cart and
(1665,)

72

SUPPLEMENT TO

carried on between Mr. Dfiveuport

and Dr. Alexander

Leighton, "the famous son of a more famous father,"

Archbishop Leighton, which though undated may be


set

down

as having taken place in the years 1626-7.

Dr. Leighton was a Scotchman, with a slight tinge


of the pertinacity

characteristic of

that people,

and

having heard, incidentally, of the opinions of Mr. Davenport as expressed to a certain Mr.
casion to challenge
f^mitli,

took occere-

him

to a discussion

upon the

mony
the

of kneeling at the Sacrament.

Mr. Davenport
this,

expressed his aversion to entering at


lists

or any time,

of disputants, especially

upon

a subject which
life,

had

so

little

bearing upon practical Christian

and

replied, non stmt Utigandi isfa sed orandi tempora

these
princi-

are not times for disputing, but for praying


less

neverthe-

he accepted the challenge, taking the aftirmative

side of the question, but in

which no important

ple

was involved.
spirit

In what

Mr. Davenport answers the someLeighton,

what

tiery questions of Dr.

may be judged

from the opening correspondence here recorded, to

which we now introduce our readers.*


never had the distemper at all, but lived about twenty years afit. Defoe's Memoirs. In the old Church was buried Master Anthony Munday, (d. 1633) who wrote a continviation of Stow's Survey and for more than forty years arranged the City pagents and shows.
ter

far placed

here be added, that this Dr. Leighton, afterwards, so himself in antagonism with the civil and ecclesiastical power, by his injudicious utterances against his Sovereign,
*

It

may

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


"

'

73

The

true copy of a dispute between Dr. Leigiiton,

(Dr. of Physic,) sometimes a preacher,


port, Bachelor of Divinity,
in

andJohu Davenof St. Stephen's

and Pastor

Coleman

street,

about kneeling

at the

Sacrament.

DE.

LEIGHTtN

LETTER.

To Mr. Davenport.
Sik:

Whereas

am
;

informed that you are willing

to

enter

the

lists

of a friendly dispute, about the controversy of kneel-

ing at the Sacrament the law requires that you should be the disputant because it is your practice. Affirmanti eifacienti hicumhit prohalio, the which being answered, I shall be ready to turn disputant but if you will have me to begin iirst, be pleased to answer these questions. Nam licet dispidantem inler;

rogari.
1.

or man, or whether
2.

Whether kneeling at Sacrament be the ordinance of God, it had not its first institution from Antichrist?
Whether kneeling
at

Sacrament be a thing

indifferent, or

no?
a religious worship, or no ? be a religious worship, whether the elements in the Sacrament be not objective a quo the motive of the worship ? Whether Christ and his Apostles after him, did not sit at 5. the Sacrament, as they did at their ordinary meals ? An answer to these shall facilitate the dispute and much clear 'the controversy, for the truth should be our aim, and not the
3.

Whether kneeling be
it

4.

If

answer any question, concerning the controversy, so I will desire nothing to be done biit what I will do. Lastly, I do expect that you will take your course in the dispute, and let me have arguments for arguments, and you shall have answers for answers,
victory.
If

you

will first dispute, I will

(as well as I can)

and the ceremonies and practices of the Church, as to suft'er a torture and mutilation almost too fearful to relate, and too disgraceful for the records of any civilized nation. See Neal's
Puritans, Vol.
I,

pp. 301, 2; 359.

74

SUPPLEMENT TO
propounded
to

as I take the conditions

be

legal, so I

expect an

answerable answer.

ALEXANDER LEIGHTON.
MR. Davenport's answer.

To

Dr. Leighton

Sir: When we

duly consider the distresses of the


in

Eeformed Church,

these days,

we

shall

soon conisfa
seel

clude with him that said, non sunt litigandi


andi fempora.
lists of

or-

Neither was

it

my
it
?

purpose
less

to enter the

dispute at any time,


;

much

now, about such

questions as these

for

is

not work
Or,
if

enough to
dispute,

preach unless we dispute also

we must

were

it

not better to unite our forces against those

who

oppose us in fundamentals, than to be divided amongst


ourselves about ceremonials
?

Who

can ^^dthout sor-

row and

how Atheism, Libertinism, Papism and Arminianism, both at home and abroad, have stolen in and taken possession of the house, whilst we are
fear observe
at strife

about the hangings and paintings of


strikes at the heart, whilst

it ?

and
better

the
in

enemy

we busy

ourselves

washing the face


it

of to

this body.

How much
in

would

beseem

us,

combine together

an holy

league, against the

common

adversaiy, according to
:

Joab's agreement with Abishai

(2

Sam. x
I,

11,) If the

Aramits [Syrians,] be stronger than


me, and
I'll
if

thou shalt help

the children of Amnion be too strong for thee,


thee, than thus to

come and succor

resemble those

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


servants of Saul and David, under the

75

command
his fellow

of

Abner and Joab, each


so they both

of

which caught

by

the head, and thrust his sword into his fellow's side and
fell

down

together.

For Mr. Smith's private

satisfaction,

(whose

scrui:)les

about this and some other particulars hindered his


public ministry,) I offered to communicate with him, in
a friendly conference, those grounds which

moved me

to conformity, herein being persuaded that the same

right

would

also jDrevail with him.

He, beyond

my

thought

at the time,

acquainted you w^th the motion.


to this issue, that I

You have brought the matter


answer, or else
whilst
it

must

my

ministry will suffer by

my

silence,

is

undoubtedly ascribed by some, that either

out of ignorance in these particulars,


las

we

take things
or,

they are imposed without examining them,

out

of a corrupt mind,

we dispense with

ourselves in those

things against our knowledge for worldly expectations.

Make good
our report
fore that I
?

either of these,

and then who

will believe
?

Who
fire

will

regard our ministry

Where-

may

in time

quench

this spark,

and so pre-

sent a greater

being thus called, I accept your

challenge, and proceed to answer your questions.

Id

Question.

Whether kneeling at the Sacrament be


it

the ordinance of God, or man, or whether


first institution

had

its

from Antichrist ?

Ans.

This question seemeth to be somewhat con-

76

SUPPLEMENT TO

fusedly propounded, which, that I


tinctly,
1st

may answer

it

dis-

must be divided
Ques.

into

two questions.

"Whether kneeling at the Sacrament be


'?

of

God, or man
Ans.
1st.

If

it

were an ordinance of man, yet


ii
:

it

must

be obeyed

(1

Peter

13) so long as neither expressly,


it

nor

b}^

necessary consequence,
of

crosseth any

com-

mandment
of
his

God.

But,

2dly. I take kneeling in the general, to

be an ordinance

God, a gesture appointed of God, and sanctified by

Word

for external adoration, to testify the

inward
use in

adoration of the mind, which a Christian

may

any lawful worship of God, as in prayer, thanksgiving,


hearing of the Word, receiving of baptism, and the
Lord's Supper,
etc.

For

I take
:

it,

that

what the Holy

Ghost sayth by David, Ps. xcv

6,

(Let us worship and

bow down and


this gesture to

kneel before the Lord,) doth signify


to be used in any lawful worship of
in receiving the

me

God

and

so,

by consequence,

Lord's

Supper.

2d Ques.

Whether kneeling
had
;

at
?

Sacrament had not

its first institution

from Antichrist
it

Ans.

1st.

If

it

matters not so long as

it is

agreeable to the rule


2dly.
I

but
all

deny

it.

For

the hand that the Popes

had

in the institution hereof, for

aught I can

find,

was

for the
vit

worship of the elevated host.

Honorias decre-

ut

cum

elevatur hostia salidaris quisqae se reverenter

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


inelinet.
tivts,

77

This invention is ascribed by some to Inoeento Honorius.

by others
it,

Whosoever invented

it,

we

disclaim

in respect of the use

whereunto they inten-

ded
2.

it.

(Jaes.

Whether kneeHng
no
'?

at the

Sacrament be a

tiling-

indifferent or

Am.

In

its

own nature

it is,

but being-

commanded
it is

by authority and allowed by the Word, I think ter done than omitted.
3.

bet-

Ques.
'?

Whether kneeling be
properly, kneeling
it

religious worship

or

no

Ann.

To speak

is

not

i^jse

cuUus,

is but an adjunct, an appurtenance of worship, not the worship of God, nor

but quiddani annex io cultas;

iny essential part of worship, but an accessory complenent,


lie
4.

ordained for the more convenient discharge of necessary worship of Grod.


Ques.

Whether the elements


(i

in the

Sacrament
?

)e

not objective

(/uo the

motive of this worship

An.^.

ive,

The elements are ohjectm a quo scil. signiticathe signs moving us to lift up our minds from the
bread and wine, to the
spirit-

larthly object of sense,


lal

object of faith,
is

the

body and blood


shall

of

Christ,
if

i^hich

far

from

idolatry, as

appear

you

bject.
5.
'f

(Jue.^.

Whether God
?

or Christ, be not the object

that worship

Ans.

These two questions seem coincident, and for

78
that cause, the
this also,
6.
till

SUPPLEMENT TO

answer to the former

shall serve for

you demand another.

Ques.

Whether
sit at
?

Christ

and

his Apostles after

him did not


Ans.

the Sacrament as they did at their

ordinary meals
1.

We find

what gesture they used


at the

at supper,

but what gesture they used

Sacrament doth not

appear, for aught I know, in any

of the four Evangelists,

which,
tion.

it

may

be,

was concealed

to prevent this objec-i

2d

If the gesture did appear, yet, I think, Christ's


rule, es-

example doth not bind us withovit an express


pecially in ceremonials.

XV "I.

t.

--

'y^

'

''^

9-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

79

To show
sowing,

that others besides Mr.

Davenport's con-

gregation were permitted to reap the harvest of his

may be mentioned
who became
of

the circumstance, that about

this time,

he was the means of the conversion of Wilham


a

Kiffen,

distinguished minister of the

Baptist denomination.
"

One

the

members

of

his

church in Coleman
six

street,

was Theophilus Eaton, with whom, though

years older than himself, he had been intimate in child-

hood, the father of Eaton being one of the ministers


of Coventry'.* to see
It

had been thehoi^e


;

of Eaton's friends

him
all

in the ministry

but the Providence that


;

controls

things had other designs concerning him

and therefore, the pious ambition of his friends was defeated.


ces,

Being permitted

to follow his

own

preferen-

he became a merchant, and in that employment


successful.
It

was eminent and


*

may be presumed

'

His father was Rev. Richard Eaton, who was descended from an ancient family in the County of Chester, near the original seat of the Davenports. He became vicar of the Church

Holy Trinity, Coventry, Jan. 12, 1590, and was the incumbent at the baptism of Christopher Davenport, Oct. 1, 1590, and of his brother, John Davenport, April 9, 1597.
of the

In the City Council Book, is the following note entry, " April 1598, Richard Eaton to have 6, 13s. 4d., anniially at Michpelmas in augmentation of his living during pleasure." He left several children Theophilus, a London merchant, who was for some time engaged in trade with Denmark and the ports of the Baltic Samuel, who also became a non-conformed minister, and came to America, and whose son, Nathaniel, was the first rector of what is now Harvard College, Cambridge. Mass.
14,
:

80

SUPPLEMENT TO

that Eaton's friendship for Davenport

had something

to do with bringing the young preacher to London,

and

fixing

him

there.

Thenceforward the two hved in


;

uninterrupted intimacy

they were rarely separated

from each other


their

their

history runs in one channel

names

are inseparably associated."*

Durmg

his ministry in

London, Mr. Davenport en-

joyed the acquaintance, and esteem, of the most distingviished persons belonging to

the Puritan party in


these

the Church of England.

Among

tioned Dr. John Preston, Master of

may be menEmmanuel College,

Cambridge.

This man's iDopularity as a teacher was so

great, that Fuller calls

him the
"

greatest pupil-monger

ever

known
deep

in

England.

He

was," says Mr. M'Clure,

a learned theologian, a most eloquent preacher, and


also a
politician.

James

I.

made him
himself,

chaplain to

the Prince of "Wales, and also to

and urged

upon him the

rich bishopric of Gloucester.

On

the

death of King James, Dr. Preston rode up to London,


in a close carriage, with the
of

young

king,

and the Duke

Buckingham.
office of

He was
office

again oftered a bishopric,


j

and the

Lord Keeper

of the

Great Seal, which


j

was the highest

in the State,

and

entitled the

holder to preside in the house of peers.

These tempt-

ing lures were offered, in the hopes of bringing over


the Puritan party to the king's side, by
Preston's vast influence.
*

means

of

Dr.

But the good man had a


Di-.

Historical Discourses, Rev.

Bacon,

New Haven,

1838-

THE DAVENPOKT FAMILY.

81

conscience, and could not be bought. He declined the proffered honors, and tirnily adhered to his principle.s.

Before he died, which was in 1628, this celebrahis confidence in the

ted
St.

man showed
Stephen's,

young

vicar

of

by leaving

his writings to be
care,

published

under Mr. Davenport's


they were edited."*

by

whom

accordingly

In April 1627, we have, dated from his study in Cole-

man street, an admirable preface from his pen ume of sermons of Rev. Henry Scudder, a
minister,
editions.

to a vol-

country
several

and which rapidly passed through

This Prefatory Epistle will appear in the

ajDi^endix to this work.

In the same year an association was formed in London, the design of which was, by certain measures in
connection with the Established Church, to promote throughout England an able and evangelical ministry,

and

its

measures seem

to have

gained much favor with


It was,

Ithe people,

and

to have

promised usefulness.

in fact, a sort of

Home

Missionary Society.

Funds,

to

a considerable amount, were raised by voluntary con-

John Davenport, by Eev. J. W. M'Chire. copy of one of Dr. Preston's works printed in 1633, with a preface jointly signed by Kichard Sibbs and John Davenport,
*

Life of

now in the hands of the writer. This Mr. Davenport and descended to the library of his grandson, the Rev John Davenport of Stamford, Conn. and is now owned by Mr. Henry F. Taylor, of that
volume belonged
to

his literary execiitors, is

place!

who

descendant of Elizabeth Davenport, the youngest daughter of the Stamford minister, who became the wife of Rev. William Gaylord of Wilton, Conn.
is

82

SUPPLEMENT TO

tributions to support able

and

faithful lecturers.

The
were

trustees who conducted the business of the association

were called "feoffees


twelve in

in trust."

These

feoffees of

number

four of
;

them clergymen,
four
;

whom
of
citi-

Mr. Davenport was one

of

them

laywers,
of

whom
zens,

one was a king's sergeant

and four
of

them

one of

whom was

the

Lord Mayor

London.

In the latter part of this jeax, the See of London,

became

vacant,

and the King

at

once appointed Dr.


This was a severe

William Laud to the bishopric.

blow to the evangelical party and especially to Mr.


Davenport, for reasons which are clearly hinted at in
his letter to

Lady Mary Vere, under date

of

June

30th,

1628.*
"I
or,

have had divers purpose

of writing to

your Hon-

only I delayed in hopes to write

somewhat concernGommission

ing the
troubles.

event and success of our High

But

have hoped

in vain, for to this

day we

are in the

same condition

as before delayed to the fin-

ishing of this session in Parliament, which

now

is

in-

happily concluded without any satisfying contentment


to the

King or commonwealth.

Threatenings were
of

speedily revived against us

by the new bishop

Lon-

don, Dr. Laud, even the next day after the conclusion
of their
session.
spirit

We

expect a fierce storm from the

enraged

of the

two bishops.

Ours, as I

am

in-

formed, hath a particular aim at me, upon a former


*

Printed in Edition of 1851,

p. 314.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


quarrel, so that I expect ere long to be deprived of

83

my

pastoral charge in

Coleman

street.

But

am

in

God's

hand, not in theirs, to whose good pleasure I do contentedly and cheerfully commit myself.
will to

If it

be his
use,

have

me

laid aside as a

broken vessel of no

his will

be done, and blessed be his name that he hath

served himself of

ciously pleased to continue


istry,

me hitherto. me

If

otherwise he be gra-

in

my

station

and min-

he

is

able to keep that which I have committed


I will wait
If

to him,

and

on his goodness, however things


he
will

succeed on earth.

not deliver

mouth
evil

of the lions, yet

he wiU deliver

me out of the me from every

work, and wiU preserve

me

to his heavenly king-

dom.
left

In the midst of these troubles the Lord had not


without
of

me

many

comforts,

among

which, the reof

membrance

your former

favors,

and the assurance

the present help of your prayers which I

know

prevail

much

with God, through Jesus Christ our Lord, doth

exceedingly comfort me."

What were
alluded to

the details of the " former quarrel


are not advised, but
this
it

"

here

we

could not have

been long before

time that Mr.

Davenport had
as a noto-

been convened before the


rious delinquent,

High Commission

because he had united with some

other worthy persons in promoting a private subscription in behalf of the poor distressed ministers of the

Palatinate of the Rhine.

These ministers had been driven into

exile

by the

84

SUPPLEMENT TO

'

J i I

religious persecutions of

Ferdinand
of

II.,

the papist

Em-

peror of Germany.
of Frederic V.,)

The Queen

Bohemia, (the wife


Charles
I.,

who was

sister to

desired

that aid might be rendered

them from England.

The

king was disposed to grant her request, and the brief

was prepared authorizing the coUectious.


were
at

Objections

once raised against these proceedings by Laud,

because these impoverished ministers, suffering as they

were for the


terians.

faith of Christ,

were Calvinists or Presby-

Swayed by these and other arguments, the


collections soon ceas-

brief

was altered and the public

ed.

Sibbs,

Upon this, Mr. Davenj)ort Gouge and other Puritan

united with Doctors


divines in promoting
to afford relief

a private subscription,

and thus sought

through their individual


ren.

efforts to their aftiicted breth-

This was the

sum

of his offence,

and for so no-

toriovis

an exhibition of the broad principle of charity,


of the

the

arm

devout bishop was raised against him.


shall

These very proceedings, however, as we

see in
all-

the end, were h\it working out the designs of an

wise Providence for

still

greater good.*

* Under date, March 2d, 1627, is found a "circular letter of Thomas Taylor, Eichard Sibbs, John Davenport, and William Gouge setting forth the lamentable distress of 240 godly preach-

ers and several thousand private persons, cast out of their houses by the fury of merciless papists in the Upper Palatinate, and calling upon all godly Christians, to unite their hearts, and hands, for some present supply for them until some public means may be raised for their relief. " Copy endorsed by Bishop Laud. See Calendar of State Papers Letters and Papers Foreign

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

85

From

copies of MSS., from the State Paper Office,

obligingly furnished

by Mr. Dexter, we

will

here

stop and

make

a brief record,

from an elaborate an-

against

swer of Mr. Davenport, " to certain objections devised him by Timothy Hood, sometime his curate."

Tim Hood,

as Mr.

Davenport

calls

him, was evidently

one who cared more for the

fleece

than the

flock,

and

being a factious person and disposed to shirk his duties was dismissed by Mr. Davenport from office.

Whereupon he formulated sundry charges


vicar to the effect that he
practices,

against the

was addicted

to Puritanical

such as not reading the Litany on Sundays, not wearing the surpHce, and also administering the

Sacrament
wife of said

to those that

did not kneel, includino- the

John Davenport.

He

complains, also, that


in his

Mr. Davenport had not employed him to preach


absence,
et sic

de cmterh.

that "it
plice

To these complaints, Mr. Davenport makes defense: was the practice of his church to have the surworn
at least

once a month, and sometimes oftenin his

er

and that the Litany was read

church on
;

Wednesday and
churches."

Fridays, and sometimes on Sundays

although that was not the usual custom in his or other

and Domestic Published by the British Government, in 82 Vohimes. A set of these Volumes is found in the Library of the Long Island Historical Society, Brooklyn, N. Y., presented by the British Government, under the direction of the Master of Rolls, London, 1874.

86

SUPPLEMENT TO

He

states that "his parish containethinit

about 1400

communicants, and by reason of the smallness of tht


church,so

many

as usually resort to the Sacrament, can-

not receive at the communion table, for which causo

he

is

constrained to administer to them, from

pew

pew, throughout the body of the church, as well as


the chancel.
is

in

impossible

Many of these pews are so filled that it that many should receive it kneeling
it in,

whereby he

is

constrained to administer to them in


neither can he

such gestures as they can receive


take notice of every one's gestures
ol:)served

but when he hath

some

to

sit,

that might

conveniently kneel,

he hath advised them to kneel, and they have obeyed,

and then he hath administered

to

them.

Con-

cerning his wife, he saith, that upon his

own knowledge,

she had receieved the Sacrament at his hands kneeling,

many

times, neither

had the

said

Tim Hood acquainted


charged
in this ar-

him, the said John Davenporte, that he observed any

such thing concerning his wife, as


ticle.

is

To what

is

added concerning non-conforming


all

ministers, he saith, that

not conforming, do not

hold

it

unlawful to receive the Sacrament kneeling, as

he

is

able to declare in

some with
;

whom

he has had

discourse about the matter


rate infoi-med the said

neither hath the said cuat

John Davenporte,
the contraiy

any time

whilst he was with

hiin, of

j^^'^ctice in

any

of them, et sic de cceteris.

He

then goes on to complain that Hood, for a whole

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


year,

87

had stood

aloof

from

his rector,

seldom

calling-

upon him except


engaging him

to collect his qHarteraye,

and that he
at his first

refused to comj)ly with the stipulation


;

made

that " the curate must necessarily have a

chamber

in his parish,

because there
;

is

a daily use of

him

in so large a parish

but that the said Tim


is

Hood

took a chamber in Duke's Place, which

about half a

mile from the parish, whereuj^on great inconveniences

foUowed,

viz

that

some who brought

their children

to be baptized, and their dead to be buried,

had

re-

turned home with the loss of their labors and expectations,


if

the said John Davenporte had not been ready


to

at

hand

do these

offices;

and

I told

hmi "he that


if

is

curate in this place must dwell in the parish;


will not, I

you
so he

must

of necessity
full for

have one that

A^-ill;''

agreed to pay him in

the quarter which was befull liberty to

gun, and that "he should have

follow his

opportunities for his future settling, without interruption.

When

the curate heard this he was very well


ac-

content,

and seemed very thankful, and signed an

quittance, wherein he released the said


porte,

John Davenhad much

from

all

promises and engagements to him, and

prayed

God

to bless him, aftirming that he

cause to speak nothing but good of him in every place,


or to that purpose, so they
witnesses."

made

a final conclusion before


to

Mr.

Hood appears
it

have so

iar fallen

from

grace, as

afterwards to bring forward these " Objec-

tions;"

although

does not appear that judgment


OS SUPPLEMENT TO
in the case,

was rendered

and

it

has been reasonably

hinted that " this

may

quite possibly be the occasion

subsequently referred to by Laud, as one in which he

had used great moderation with Mr. Davenport, thinking that he had persuaded him and settled his judg-

ment."

But now
early part

to return to our narrative, of

we

find in the

1632, that proceedings were

renewed

against the measures of Church reform, which were


clearly developing themselves into the principle of vol-

untary association, so distasteful to


herents.

Laud and

his ad-

Through the

influence of

Laud with

the king, the

trustees,or feoffees,

were soon

after arraigned before the

Court of the Exchequer, where the association was con-

demned

as

dangerous and
six

illegal

the whole of the

funds collected, (about

thousands pounds,) Avere con;

fiscated to the king's use

and the

feoffees

were

refer-

red for punishment to that infamovis tribunal, the Star

Chamber.
ever,

The unpopularity

of the proceedings,

how-

caused the matter to be dropt, and the fines and

penalties with whicli these excellent

men were

threat-

ened, in their pious and laudable undertaking, were

never executed.
It

was on

this aftlictive occasion, that

Mr. Davenport
:

wrote the following passages in his great Bible


"

Feb. 11, 1632.

The business

of the feoffees

being

to be heard the third time at the Exchequer, I prayed


THE DAVENPOKT FAMILY.
earnestly that

89

God would

assist

our counselors in open-

ing the case, and be pleased to grant, that they

may

get no advantage against us to punish us^ as evil doers;

promising to observe what answer he gave.

Which see-

ing he hath graciously done, and delivered me from


the thing I feared, I record to these ends
:

"1.
"

To be more indudrious To quicken myself


to

in

my

family.

To check my unthaukfnbtess.
to thankfubtess.

" 3.

"To awaken myself


"

more

ivatchfulness

for

the

time to come, in remembrance of his mercy.

Which

beseech the Lord to grant

upon whose

faithfulness in
faithful in

Ms

covenant, I cast myself to be more

my

covenant.

Amid
his

the constant cares of so large a communion,


efforts,

frequent literary

and instant watchful-

ness against the enemies by which he was beset, in

high and low places,

it

is

interesting to note the loyalfind


:

ty of the people to their

overworked pastor, and to

on the parish records, the following


"It
is

entry, April 1633

agreed that Mr. Davenport, shall have out of

the parish stock 20, toward his charge in going and

coming from the Bath."


Until now, Mr. Davenport had adhered to the Es-

90

SUPPLEMENT

TO

tablished Church, although there were raauy things in


its

communion which he could not

apj)rove,

and which

he sought to have reformed.

About this time

his personal friend, Rev.

John Coton a

ton of Boston, in Lincolnshire, resigned his charge,

having become a non-conformist.


visit

He was now

to

London.

Mr.

Davenport, and some others,

sought an interview with him for the purpose of convincing

him that he ought not

to leave

his flock,

but

retain his connection with the English Church,

The

result of this interview was, that instead of bringing

Mr. Cotton over to

liis

views,

Mr. Davenport, before

somewhat "staggered

in his conformity"

became

fully

convinced by the strong reasonings of his pious and


erudite
friend,

and was brought over

to his

side.

Before, however, he openly declared his intentions,

he had several intei-views with Laud.

The

bishoj),
all

(whose most weighty argument in meeting


ples of

scru-

conscience

in

these

mattei's,

was the Star


D.," / thought

Chamber,) said

in reference to
his

Mr.
but

had

settled

judgment

;"

found

himself

greatly mistaken

when he discovered
judgment

that he

had

openly

" declared his

against conformity

with the Church of England," that he had resigned his


benefice,

and even made


oiit

his escape

from the warrant

which was

against him, by fleeing into Holland.

And

yet this was the

man who

afterwards, in a sj)eech

before the

House

of Lords, spoke of Mr.

Davenport as

thp:

davenport family
fled to

91
for the

a most religious man, who

New England

sake of a good conscience."*

One
Abbot,

principal

event

wliich

undoubtedly brought
of

matters to a

crisis,

was the sudden death


Canterbury,

George

Archbishop of
as

who had been


jiarty.

known

favorable to the Puritan

This oc6th, the

cun'ed Aug. 4th,

1633, and on Tuesday, the

king announced his intention to advance


primac}'.

Laud

to the

Mr. Davenport well knew what he had to

expect from Laud's elevation, and at once sought to


seclude himself from one,

whose

increased

power

would only be used


*

to crush him.

Answer

to

Lord Say's speech.

Prynne as given by Neal,l will throw on some points of history to which allusion has now been made. In describing the subsequent trial of Archbishop Laud, he says "The managers went on to charge the Archbishop with his severe persecution of those clergymen who had dared to preach against the dangerous increase of Arminianism and Popery, or the late innovations they instanced Mr. Chauncey, Mr. Workman, Mr. Davenport, and others some of whom were punished in the High Commission, for not railing in the communion table, and for preaching against images, and when Mr. Davenport fled to New England to avoid the storm, the Archbishop said his arm should reach him there They objected further, his suppressing afternoon sermons on the Lord's day. and the laudable design of luiying in impropriations which
brief extract from
light
: :

encourage such lectures, Laud replied that upon these men was the act of the High Commission and not his, and if he did say his arm should reach Mr. Davenport in New England, he sees no harm in it, for off'ences against good order should be dealt with by law. He [Laud] confessed that he overthrew the design of buying

was designed

to

the censtires passed

Neal's Puritans, vol.

ii.,

p. 282.

92

SUPPLEMENT TO

Previous to his embarkation for Holland, Mr. Davenport called together the principal people of his charge,
desiring their opinion and advice, v^^hen he acknowledg-

ed their right to him as their pastor, and declared


that,

"

No danger

should drive him

'which

they should expect or

from any service demand at his hands."


of soul, w^hich reflected

With a noble disinterestedness


great honor
tion for their pastor

upon them, and demonstrated


and
their respect for

their affec-

what he con-

sidered the rights of conscience, and yet thoroughly

God that he had destroyed be a plot against the Church, for if it had succeeded, more clergymen would have depended on the feoffees than on the king, and on all the peers and bishops besides, and he proceeded against them according to law, and if the sentence was not just, it must be the judges' fault and not
u])
it,

impropriations, and he thanked

for

he conceived

it

to

was notorious to all men who had dared to take a stand against his proceedings, and put him in mind of many who had been forced into Holland and America, to avoid the ruin of themselves and family As to the imi^ropriations, there was no design in the feoffees to render the clergy independent of the bishops, for none were presented but conformable men, nor did any preach but such as were licensed by the bishop indeed the design being to encourage the preaching of the Word of God, the feoffees were careful to employ such persons as would not be idle and when they perceived the Archbishop was bent on their ruin, Mr. White went to his gracel and promised to rectify anj^thing that was amiss, if the thing itself might stand. But he was determined to destroy it, and by his mighty influence obtained a decree that the money should be paid into the Exchequer, by which an end was put to one of the most charitable designs for the good of the Church that has been formed these many years."
his.

The Commons

replied that

it

how

cruel he had been toward all those

'

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

'

93

aware of their

loss,

they advised him for his

own

safe-

ty to resign his ofiice.

"In the Library of the American Antiquarian Society,


in Worcester,
is

a manuscript of

some
hand

seventy-five
;

pages, beheved to be in Davenjjort's


as I have
it

and so
it,

far

had an opportunity
:

to

examine

I think

unquestionably his

if

so, it St.

must have been adStephen's, just before


subject
it.'

dressed to his parishioners at


I

his

fleeing

the

country.

The

is

'Christ's
is

Church, and his government of


'Epistle,'

Prefaced

an

beginning thus

'To his beloved brethren and

Christian friends, which love the

Lord and
after a

his t[ruth],

grace and peace. Beloved, there are many

of

you that

know
some

the reason

why

now am

sort [di-iven]

to speak to

you by

writing.

The earnest

desires of

of yovi [have]

been the greatest inducements to

me

to leave

behind

me
to

these notes in yo[ur keeping],


as a point of duty

some

of

you charging

it

and conabovit

science

upon [me]
'
. .

do wdiat now I am going

in this treatise

Later, after opening his subject,

the writer says,

'

I never

had the
:

light

nor liberty to
the

preach to you about these things

now
be

Lord hath
if

shown me

his truth, I

declare
cast
'

it
ofi",

unto you, which


it

you vdllfuUy or carelessly


free

known
said

am

from the blood

of

you
:

One very

curious passage
;

helps to

mark the date

in one place

it is

'hence

some

Jesuits, especially

he that writ

lately yet
St.

most

subtHy and hypocritically, Franciscus de

Clare that

"

94

SUPPLEMENT TO

our English Church cannot lawfully be called heretics

but schismatics.'
"It is our old friend, Francis de St. Clare, otherwise

Christopher Davenport (though o/ a Jesuit)


lished in 1638,
treatise

who pub-

(not until after September) a famous


of the Ang-lican

on the Articles

Church paraa tract which


cele-

phrastically considered

and explained

two centuries

later

formed the basis of the more

brated 'Tract No. 90' by Dr. Newman, and which has

been reprinted with a translation by one

of the

most adIn

vanced Anglican Churchmen, of our own decade.


it

the author considers the Thirty-nine Articles from a


view, with the proselyting aim

Roman Catholic point of


of

showing that they are consistent with the decrees

of the Council of Trent."

"In a subsequent publication


1636, p. 107) he gives
'

('Apologeticall Reply,'
aftair

tliis

account of the

That I may not be altogether wanting to myself,

nor injurious to the reader, in suffering him to be


guilty of the sin of evil surmises or of slander in heart,
for

want

of information,

do seriously and sincerely


heart) I did

protest, that (so far as I

know mine own

not withdraw myself.

1,

out of any disloyal affection

or undutiful thought towards his Majesty of Great Britain,

my

dread Sovereign, for

whom my
his

hearty prayer
be

shall be,

day and

night, that his souJ

may

hound

in

the bundle

of

life

imth the

Lord

God, and that the

soids of his enemies,

may

be flung out, as out

of the mid-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


die of a ding.

95

And

that the

Lord

will clothe his ene-

mies with shame, but upon himself let his crown Jfour ish.
2,

nor out of any schismatical propension to forsake


if

the church assemblies of England, as

thought there
the

were no true Churches of Christ in the land, as

manner of some
that I might

is.

3,

nor out of idleness, or weari4,


5,

ness of the Lord's i^lough; nor

out of love of ease,

pamper

the Hesh.

nor out of any un6,

lighteous aim to defraud any one by any means.

not as one ashamed of the Gospel, to avoid witness bearing to the truth.
7,

nor for any trouble I was


civil

in,

or

feared" [^frightened] "by the


fore

Magistrate,

beex-

whom

was never questioned,

in all

my

life,

cept for the good and pious business about redeeming


impropriations, wherein our righteous dealing was pab-

Hcly cleared even by his Majesty's Attorney General,

who prosecuted

against us.

But the truth is, that hav-

ing about 17 years exercised a public ministry in London, (about 9 or 10 years whereof I was in a pastoral

charge in Coleman street)


time I was

in

the latter part of that

much perplexed

with doubts about the law-

fulness of that conformity which I

had formerly used,

without scruple, in respect of some defects and corruptions


to I

and unwarrantable human impositions, whereun-

found myself thereby subjected."*


of

About three months now elapsed, most


*

which was

See Paper of F. B. Dexter on Life and Writings of John Davenport in Collections of New Haven Colony Historical Society,

Vol.

ii

p. 221-2.

96

SUPPLEMENT TO
districts,

passed in seclusion, in the suburban

when

Mr. Davenport finding that the messengers of Laud

were upon his from several

track, uj)on the receipt of

an invitation
in

of his

countrymen residing

Holland,

passed over to that country, landing at Haarlem in

November

1633.

Here he was met by the representaChurch


of English Christians in

tives of a Presbyterian

the City of Amsterdam, about twelve

miles distant,

under the

i^astoral

charge of Rev John Paget, with


evi-

whom
by

he became associated as a colleague, but

dently with the hope that the


his friends in Court, for
;

way might
to

yet be

opened

him

resume

his labors in

the metropolis

l^ut in

the next

month we

find the folto the


18,

lowing record
vicarage
of

"

John Godwin was admitted


John Davenport."

St.

Stephen's Coleman street, Dec.

1633, per resignation of

letter,

written apparently about the time of his arto

rival in

Amsterdam, and addressed


light

Lady Vere

at the

Hague, throws

upon the
afflictive

state,

both of his mind

and

heart,

amid the
is

circumstances

now

sur-

rounding him, and


it

well worthy of record here.

In

he recommends a very godly and worthy man, (Mr.

Harris,)

though not
;

in

much

favor with the bishops,

as her chaplain

the right

and power to employ which,

he To

assiu'es
the

her were guaranteed by


Veri/

Magna

Charta.
the

Right Honorable and

Noble Lady,

Lady

Vere, these be delivered at the

Hague

Most Noble and much Honored Lady,


In the midst
of

my

disappointments and tossings to

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

97

and fro,

it is

some comfort

that

have assurance of the

continuance of your favor towards me, and of your re-

membrance

of

me
all

in prayer.

know

that love which

you have been pleased so


quicken you to

freely to cast

upon me

will

diligence and industry in any


to the procuring- of

way

and cause which may conduce


liberty,

but hitherto

it

hath pleased Clod to leave

my me

in

much darkness and many difficulties, to unbottom me wholly of the creature, and to reveal himself now
and events that
befall me.

fullv in all issues

Be
at

not

troubled,

much

less discouraged,

good minds,

any

rumors you meet with concerning

my

present way.

The persecution
of both

of the

tongue

is

more

fierce

and

terri-

ble than that of the hand.


;

At
it is

this time I

have sense

but I can say that

for thy name's sake,


;

Lord, that I bear this reproach


mises of those by
supported,

but the injurious sur-

whom

should be comforted and

many that

profess religion in a higher strain

than some

other, doth

most

afflict

me.

I pray
is,

God

it

be not

laid to their charge.

The truth
resigned

have not

forsaken

my

ministry, nor

my
am

place,

much

less separated

from the Church, but

only absent a
cjuieting of
lie

while to wait upon

God
if

in the settling

and

things for light to discern

my

way, being willing to

and
it,

die in prison,

the cause

may be advantaged by

but choosing rather to preserve the liberty of

my
else-

person and ministry for the service of the Church


where,
if all

doors are shut against

me

here.

What

98

SUPPLEMENT TO
or suffer,
is

now do
expose

not caused by any guilt of any


nie,

practice or action

done or intended by

which may

me

to

any just censure

of aiithority, out,

much

less

by a

desii'e of ease, as

some give
all,

having gotten a
to

great estate; least of

by referring

my own
trust, for

pri-

vate benefit any thing committed to

my

the

public good.

My

estate,

although not in any present

want,

is

not able to maintain

me without

a calling.

In
ac-

the business of the feoffees, I have given

up my

count on oath. The Lord

God knoweth

that I

am

so far

my outward estate that my own particular, for the advanceI am ment of it. The only cause of all my sufferings is the alteration of my judgment in matters of confonnity to
from gaining by the business in
out of purse on
the ceremonies established,
these, as formerly I

whereby

cannot practice

have done, wherein I do not cen;

sure those

who do conform
I did

nay, I account
of

many

of

them

faithful

and worthy instruments

God's glory,

and I know that


peace as

conform with as much inward


In both,

now

do forbear.

my

uiirightness

was the same, but


I

my

light different.

In this action,

walk by that hght which shineth unto me.

Let no

man

say the matters be small, and what need I be

scrupulous in these things.


speaketh,
see

That which the apostle


;

Rom

xiv.,

was but a small matter

yet

you
it,

how heavy a doom he

passeth upon him that doth


I have

doubting of the lawfulness of it.

been taught by
of the

my God

and Saviour to allow no commandment


THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.
99
is

Lord

small,

and

to despise a

man's way, that

too des-

picable and slight a thing to be stood upon.

You know

what an

evil it is;

but these things are not small, neith-

er in themselves, nor in the consequences of them; but


I

have not time to be large, only thus mvich I thought


to present to

good

your Honor, in way


if

of account for

the present, hoping,


ty, to

Clod will give


full

me

an opportvmi-

make
men.

a large

and

apology for the satisfaction

of

all

Any

that

know me, might have suspended


till

their

opinions and censures

they had heard from

myself the reason of


of

my

actions.

With much

advice,

many
all

ministers of eminent weight and worth, I have

done

which I have done hitherto, and with desire

of j)itcliing on that
glorified.

way wherein God might be most


will

In his due time, he

manifest

it

Mr.

Harris, I

know

fully,
;

and

do heartily

love.

He

is

very worthy

man

of a very gracious heart, humble,


;

mild and gentle

spiiit

man
is

not at

all

taken notice

of by the bishops.

He

weak and

sickly,

but you

need not be discouraged by

that, for it is a lingering


;

weakness where he might hold out long


is

but his

spirit

very active in good.


respects.

He
shall

is

veiy

fit

for your occasions


if

in all

You
for

be veiy happy in him,


one of a thousand.

you can have him,

he

is

It is
is set-

not in the bishop's power to take from you what


tled on your nobility

and others

b}^

Magna Charta
The

the right and power of entertaining chaplains.

100

SUPPLEMENT TO
witJi the joys

good Lord strengthen your inward man


of his
sj^irit.

Your Honorable Ladyship's* most

obliged,
.

John Davenporte.

"He now begins preaching


first)

(twice each

Sunday

at

in Mr. Paget's Church,

but soon tinds a stumbadministering baptism

ling-block in the loose

way

of

which Paget had practised.

The

result

was a

little

controversy, on Davenport's side, purely on account of


his scruples

about baptizing

all infants,

without assur-

ance of the church-membership and Christian walk of


the parents
;

on Paget

s side,

other considerations had


I

weight, a jealousy of the fervor and eloquence of this

new-comer, and perhaps a willingness to serve his

own

ends by taking advantage of the iU-favor shown to

Davenport by the home-authorities.


"

The controversy sped


Dutch

so fast that Paget brought the

case before the

Classis of city ministers,

who

named
of

a committee to propose a basis of settlement.


five of the

This committee of

most eminent theologians

Amsterdam
of

delivered their judgment in January (a


in-

copy

which was transmitted to Laud, and so was

sured preservation in English arcliives,f) in which,


*

See sketch of Lady Mary Vere, (with likeness) prefixed to

Letters in Appendix.
t

In Calendar of State Papers, Domestic, 1634-5,

p.

469

the
of

document is wrongly calendared (as of 1634-5, instead 1633-4,) owing to the confusion of the Old and New Styles.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


while

101
piety,

commending Davenport's
his

erudition and

and approving-

zeal in urging the

examination of

parents presenting children for baptism, they yet leave


a large looji-hole for doubtful cases, in which on the

whole they would administer the ordinance.


port remonstrated, but Paget prevailed,

Daven-

and Daven-

port desisted from preaching after less than six month's


service.

"Meantime another

side-light

is

thrown on these

events by the letters of a certain Stephen Goffe, at this

time chaplain of an Enghsh Regiment at the Hague,


a busybody angling tor preferment, and so heartily in

sympathy with Laudian tendencies that he found


true

his

home

in the

Roman Church

before

many

years.

parallel instance to the divergencies in Davenj^ort's

own

family manifests

itself here, for

this Gofie

was a
curi-

l)rother of the Regicide

whose

later life

was

so

ously dependent on Daveni^ort.


port's landing at
I

This man, on Davenoff the

Haarlem, sends

news

to a

Lonfol-

don

friend, to be laid before the Archbishop,

and

lows up his victim with a succession of venomous episties

which

still

remain, labeled by Laud's

own hand.

From

this witness

we

learn that he himself shared in

I-

the successful effort to thwart Davenport's chance of

preaching

in

the

English

Church

at

Amsterdam.

Goffe says in a letter of

December

Kith, that he has

been

to see

Paget and also Gerard Vossius, a Profesof

sor at

Amsterdam and

the magistracy of the

city,

102

SUPPLEMENT TO
in our day as one of

remembered
Dutch

the most learned of


visitor to

philologists,

and then a recent

Eng-

land and guest of Archbishop Laud.*


that he has told Vossius that Davenport

Goffe reports
'

is

Yerj dan-

gerous in dealing in secular


places in which he dwelt.'

affairs, to

the troubling of

He

urges that Vossius

should have letters from London to encourage him,

and which
excellent

shall not

omit to tickle him by praising [the]

lectures which
clear,

he has just published.


it

He

makes

it

however, that

will

not do to accuse

Davenjoort in Holland of neglect of ceremonies, as that

would be agreeable
wise, but that stress

in that quarter rather than other-

must be

laid rather

on his carriage

towards the king as the head of the State, in stealing


In Goffe's letter from the Hague, Dec. 16, (1632,) we find "We have another Bishop come, who will take it ill, if he have not more than absolute primacy and to be short it is Mr. Davenport, who landed here above a month ago. He came over in one Humphrey his ships, by the conduct and contrivance of Mr. Stone, a merchant in Coleman street. He was disgiiised in a gray suit and an overgrown beard, and at his landing with his complices, put a horseback, and before all were well landed, was got to Rotterdam, where they had a supper, (Peter being there to make verses, ) and all the discoiirse was the wonderful Providence of God. His errand was to Amsterdam to be chosen minister there."
*

the following passages

tell the story of Hooker, who was not and asks Paget that the same questions may be propoiinded to Mr. Davenport for his embarrassment,and adds, that he (Mr. Davenport,) was a runaway out of the land, and that (as the Puritans themselves do glory,) many pursuivants and public writs being out against them." In this way, he

Goffe then goes on to

accejited there,

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


out of England

103

when

writs

were issued against him,

and not reporting himself to his Majesty's agent at the


Hague.

Another of Goffe's letters,

in

February, claims

that his plan has succeeded,

and that Davenport can-

not be elected to a position at Amsterdam, because

he

is

known

as a deserter,

and has preached


government
of

(since

coming over) against the


he hopes that
'

civil

England

we

shall for

be delivered from
England.'

this plague,

and he

Avill

make

New

On

the strength

of this information, apparently, DavenjDort

was sum-

moned by

the king's agent, resident at the Hague, to

clear himself

by answers

to certain

questions of the

charge of preaching against the English government

and

his reply

is

dated March

18,

1634,

is

preserved
It

among

the Agent's papers in the British


:

Museum.

begins thus
'

Honorable

Sir,

When

I first

came

into these parts,

my purpose was
native country,

to stay here but three or four months, to return for

and that time being expired, had not the

England my
in-

sinister

and slanderous
in

formation,
hopes
to

whereof I complained

[my]

last,

exasif

defeat the intentions of Mr. Davenport

"who

he

fasten here will be

more troublesome than Mr. Forbes." He then goes on to say that "My Lord Vere hath resigned

his regiment to Mr. Goring,

who

tells

me

that he will maintain

and advise whatever I begin." G-oflfe then sends this letter, full of vanity as to himself, and bitterness towards Mr. Davenport, to William Brough, in London, who requests a Mr. Bray to
pass so
op,

much

of the letter as he

may

and "

especiallj' the jsassages

think tit to the Archbishabout Mr. Davenport and Mr.

Vossius."

104

SUPPLEMENT TO

perated the Archbishop of Canterbury to reproachful


invectives,

and

bitter

mena[ces]

against
is

me

in the

High Commission, whereby my return


more The
difficult,

made much

and hazardous than

I could suspect ....

particulars,

wherein I have changed, are no other

than the same, for which


lights

many worthy

ministers,

and

eminent for godliness and learning have suffered


:

the loss of their ministry and liberty


are

some whereof
England as
and
faithful

now

in perfect peace

and

rest,

others are dispersed


live

in several countries,

and yet some

in

private persons,

who were and

are loyal

subjects to their sovereign, and have witnessed against


heresies
lists,

and schism, and against

all sectaries,

as

Fami-

Anabaptists and Brownists, against

all of

which I

also witness, in this place,


if

whereunto I had not come,

I could

have been

seciire of a safe

and quiet abode

in
'

my

dear native country.

If that

way

of questioning should j^ass


in this

upon

all

men,

which your wisdom judgeth meet

case (as will

appear upon your review of the second question) I


think, they that judge
ticulars,

me

will

be found,

in

some par-

to have

spoken against the government of

England.
of sitting,

All that I spake

was concerning the gesture


which I approved and pre-

used in

this

country in receiving the sacra-

ment

of the Lord's Supper,

ferred before kneeling, grounding what I said

upon

Luke

22: 27 to 31

wherein I named not England nor

the government thereof, and so carried the discourse


THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.
that
it

105

might be appHed as well to the Popish or Luthit

eran custom here as to any other, and passed


so briefly, that all I said
lines,

over

may be

written in a very few

nor did I ever hear that any

man

took offence

thereat,

but

this informer,

who was

discontented the
er-

week before

at a

sermon wherein some Arminian

rors were touched


to

upon by me, which quickened him


"*

watch for some advantage whereupon he might


N. H. C. His.
Coll.

ground an accusation.'
It

pp. 224-5.

now became

apj^arent that the difference between

Mr. Paget and Mr. Davenport, on the subject of administering baptism to the children of irreligious parents,

could not be reconciled.

He

therefore in April,

1634, ceased to ofKciate in that church,


catechetical exercise at his

and opened a

own

lodgings, every Lord's


city

day evening after the public services of the


over.

were

The popularity
numbers

of his talents

soon collected

great

of hearers,

which increased the jealousy


his

and opposition of the adverse party, and


were
sy
finally

meetings

broken up.

A warm tractarian

controver-

ensued on the subject of promiscuous baptism.

First,

we have

the publication, without the author's

knowledge, by one
the

Wm.

Best, of his

arguments before

Dutch

classis

on the subject now agitating the


This brought out a reply
"

goodly city of Amsterdam.

from Paget, followed by a " Protestation


*

from Mr.

In this work, the ancient orthography and pnnctuation, for

;he
,jO

most

part,

have been modernized as being more accei3table

the general reader.

106

SUPPLEMENT TO

Davenport, printed at Rotterdam, in January, 1635,

complaining of the unauthorized pubhcation of his


views,

and disclaiming controversy.

In this connection comes in a letter to his old friend

Lady

Vere,
at

who had now gone back

to her

suburban
she wel-

home

Hackney, where, a few months

after,

comed and entertained the wife of Mr. Davenport, who returned to England nearly a year before her husband.
In this
also
letter

he refers to Mr. Paget thus

"

Myself

being in some distractions by the unjust

spirit of

the old man,


this
;

who

to

all

his former injuries,

addeth

that he hath

now

published a tedious book in

English, full of reproaches and slanders against me,

wherein he doeth

also injur}'^ to

Mr. Parker, Dr. Ames,

and Mr. Forbes, who are


far

at rest,

and Mr. Hooker, who

is

absent, and

to the best members of his

own

church,

whom

he brandeth several ways, which

will give the

prelates too

much

advantage, and open the mouths of


;

enemies against the truth

this I

am now
is

constrained
all my whom I

to answer for the truth's sake, notwithstanding

former weakness
trust that

but our Clod


strengthen

strong, in

he

will

me

to write with such a

spirit as I ought.

Help me with your


let

prayers,

and

if

any speak

of

Mr. Paget's book,


it.

them know
good

that I

am

about to answer

It
if

may be
Lady

of

to j)revent

prejudice in the Queen,

your Honor, when you are


Leicester take notice
to

pleased to write to her and


of

their favor to me,

and pray them not

be preju-

THE DAVENPOKT FAMILY.


diced by any
or otherwise,
ask, not for

107

suggestions against
till

they

may

peruse

me from that book, my answer. This I


favor,

any use I have of the Queen's

but

that she

may

not be hindered from receiving good

from

my

ministry, which yet she well esteemeth."*


five

At Rotterdam,

months
as "

later,

(Dec.

2.5th,

1635,)

he writes to Lady Vere,

one cast down but not


:

destroyed" and pathetically asks

"But what can

poor Pilgrim, a banished man do


in 1636, a

?"

Here he

jDublishes

volume of 350 pages, entitled


J.

" Apologetical

Reply to an answer [by


plaint of

Paget,] to the unjust com-

W.

B[est]."

In proof that this protracted

controversy was conducted, at least on the part of Mr.

Davenport, with a kind and Christian


cite a

spii'it

we may
touching

few remarks introductory to


all

this work,

the spirit which should govern


sies.

religious controver-

Addressing

the

Chnstian
of a

reader,

he

remarks
is

"Though the testimony

good conscience
all

of itself

a sufficient cause of rejoicing in

the tribulations of

* The reference here is, undoubtedly, to Elizabeth, dowager Queen of Bohemia, (sister of Charles I.,) whose solicitation for

aid from England,

in behalf of the suflering ministers of the

we have before siJoken of. As the time at or near the Hague, it would seem that Mr. Daveni^ort had removed to that city, and that she was an attendant on his temporary ministry there.
Palatinate of the Rhine,

Queen resided

at this

The Lady
aged
ert,

Leicester, (if the

name

is

rightly

decij^hered,)

take to be Alice, Dutchess Dudley,


90,

who

died in

London

1669,

who was

the

widow

of Sir Robert Dudley, son of

Rob-

Earl of Leicester.

108
this pilgrimage,

SUPPLEMENT TO

and

of confidence in all

our apologies

against false accusers, in which respect, blessed Paul,

according to the wisdom given unto him, did 'exercise


himself to have always a conscience void of
offence

both towards Grod and


science, a
it

man

;'

yet,

next to good con'

man

is

bound

to provide for

a good name,'

being in Solomon's judgment 'better than precious,

ointment.'

But the regard

to

our good name must be


self-respect, else it

exercised
is

upon higher ground than

but vain glory.

God's name must be dearer to us


be, not so

than our

own

and our care must


;

much

to

shun our duty, as his dishonor


glory, therefore,

our esteem for his


to

ought in some propertion

answer to

his dignity
"

and eminency."
it is

Again,

enjoined that our speech be well


It is well tilled
;

tilled

and well seasoned.


tlie

when

it

exjctresseth

sanctifying graces of the Spirit


fvilly rijDC

as the fruits of the to the

earth are then

when they have attained


The best
rise of a
is

|)erfection of their kind.

good con-

science

is

from a gracious heart, which

declared to

he a 'good treasure,' which seadeth forth good thinga, and


to be full

of goodness.

When good

speeches flow from

the abimdance within, and are tilled with the Spirit, then

the words will express the delightful and amiable sweetness of those
'fruits of

the Spirit, which are love, joy,


faith,'

peace, long-suftering, gentleness, goodness,


fruits are well pleasing to Clirist,

which

and

delightful to
]\Iarv

good

men, as the savor of that ointment which

poured

on the head of Christ was to those that were in the house.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


"

109
it

Thus an answer

is

well filled

when

exiDressetli

Godly wisdom, and Christian prudence and


which enable a

discretion,

man

to observe a

due proportion

to the

causes, persons, times, places,

and whatever circum-

stances are considerable

as that harsh speech be for;

borne when a
friend be not

soft

answer should be given


as an

that a

wounded

enemy, nor be reviled as

a brother, and that the answer which should serve to

mend
Such

the garment, doth not


principles, for the

make

the rent w^orse."


of a controversy

government

are well worthy of imitation in

modern

times.

Thus

closes the eventful career of

Mr. Davenport in

Holland

land where, for a short time, so

many

of

the Puritans had found refuge


year, or with the

and

at the

end

of this

opening

of the next (1G37,)

he rejoinof

ed his family in England, probably as the guest

Lady Vere
For some

at

Hackney, with the matured purpose of

emigrating to America.
years, he

had been familiar,

chiefly throvigh

his joersonal iriend, Eev.

John Cotton, with the weigh-

ty affairs that were going on in

New England.

He had

taken an early interest in the formation of the Massachusetts colony,

and contributed 50 towards the pro-

curement

of its charter.

He was

present at the meet-

ing of the company in London, March 23, 1629, and


also at those of

March

30, April 8,

August

28, 29,

and

those of
*

November and December


15

following.*

Prince's Annals.

110
Preparations
if

SUPPLEMENT TO
not previously commenced, were at
set-

once entered upon for the formation of a colony to


tle in

New

England, with Tlieopbilus Eaton as

tlieir

civil leader.

The
the

organization

of the

company, among

whom

were included some who had enjoyed the ministry of

Coleman

street j^astor,

and others from the neigh-

boring congregations, was so far advanced that within


the
first

two months of that year, they had matured their

plans, chartered a vessel

" the

good ship Hector "


fitting

made ready

their provisions

and passengers,

both for the said voyage and plantation, most of them having thereupon engaged their whole estate.*

"While these jjreparations were

in progress,

Mr. Da-

venport, doubtless kept himself out of sight, as


as

much
allu-

he conveniently could, both on

his

own account and


after,

for the sake of the expedition.

Years

Laud,

ding to him and his escape to

New England, exclaimed


there.'
'

'My arm

shall reach

him even

If

it

had been
ship

known
gaged

that those

who had
to

chartered

the good

Hector,' to carry
their

them

New

England, and had en-

whole estate in preparing for the voyage,


St.

were to have the former rector of


leader, their undertaking

Stephen's as their

might have been extinguish-

ed with as

little

regard to the rights of property as

that of the feoffees


"It
*

had been.
at last, that

had indeed become known

Davenport

State Papers, Colonial p. 245.

"

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

Ill
the

had returned.
London,

The

vicar general
his
visitations

of
of
'

Bishop of
diocese,

rejiorting

the

writes from Braintree,

March

6th.

Mr. Davenport

hath hitely been in these parts, and at Hackney not long


since.

am

told that

he goeth in gray
infer

like a
tliis

country gentleman.'*

We may

from what

reporter relates, that Mr. Davenport had not

shown

himself

much

in public,

and from his

silence in refer-

ence to the expedition to

New

England, that he had


it.f

heard nothing of Davenj^ort's connection with

As the names

of those

who embarked

in the Hector,

are not found in the register of the emigrants from

Loudon
sailed

in that year,

we conclude
port.

that they

may have

from some other

We know
latter

that several

ships sailed from Bristol


briel

among others, the Angel Gabrought the Rev.


Daniel Maude, to
the Eev.

and the James, (which

llichard

Mather

and

Boston,) but no record of that port remains.

Mr. At-

water however

says,

"T

am

confident that she sailed

from

London.

The correspondence between Capt.


it."

Femes and

the Admiralty sufficiently proves


left

The
of

company doubtless
April,for soon after,
this,

England about the middle

and perhaps to meet

cases similar to
disor-

a proclamation

was issued restraining the

derly passing out of the

kingdom

into

America, and

commanding that none


*
t

of the king's subjects

be permit-

Calendar State Papers, 1637, p. 545. From paper of Eev. E. E. Atwater, on the Voyage of the

Hector, &c.

112

SUPPLEMENT

TO

ted to go without license from the Commissioners of


Plantations,

and a

certificate that

they have taken the

oath of allegiance and of conformity to the discipline


of

England; returns to be made eveiy half year to the

commissioners. *

"He who divided


gave this
ocean.
little

the

Red Sea
as

before the Israelites,

company
at

safe a passage across the


in the

They arrived

Boston

Hector and

another ship, on the 26th of June, 1687.


er passengers

Among

oth-

who came

with this expedition was Ed-

ward Hopkins, son-in-law of Governor Eaton, and himself for

many

years Governor of Connecticu.t colony.

By his will,
in

he became a distinguished benefactor of Har-

vard College and several other institutions of learning

New

England,

With

these

came

also

Lord Leigh,

son and heir of the Earl of Marlborough, a youth of


nineteen,

humble and

jdIous,

who came merely

to see

the country, and returned to England a few weeks after, in

Henry Vane."f Mr. Davenport was heartily welcomed by Mr. Cotton


company with
Sir his associates,

and

and more

particularly as his assis-

tance was

now

required in helping to stay the preva-

lence of Antinomian error, which

seemed

at this time,

through the fanaticism

of

Ann Hutchinson and


and purity

others,

to have threatened the peace


*

of the churcli-

State Papers, Colonial, 1637, p. 261.

Lives of the Chief Fathers of

New

England, by Rev. A. W.

M'Clure.

VoL

ii.

p. 270.

THE DAVENPOKT FAMILY.


es.

113

His preaching, and

also his counsels in the

Synod
in the

of that year, evidently

had a favorable influence

suppression of those dangerous errors.


of the Synod,

At the request

he closed the proceedings by a sermon


iii.

on the
have

text, Phil.

Ki

"Nevertheless,

whereto we
rule
;

attained, let

us walk by the

same

let

us

imind the same thing."


:

In

this discourse,

he declared

the result of the assembly, and "with

much wisdom
and harmony.
it

and sound argument," urged


These
difficulties

to unity

being in a good degree removed,

became an object with Mr. Davenport and his company


to
fix

upon

a place of settlement.
intellectual

The

wealth,
this

endowments and moral


of

worth of

newly arrived company

emigrants,

made

it

very desiral)le

with the already organized colto retain

onies of

Plymouth and Massachusetts,


:

them

among them and to this end, very hberal offers were made them. But reasons existed in their own minds why these urgent invitations could not be comphed
with, "the refusal to accept which," says Mr. M'Clure,

" was regarded as almost an untindness by those

who

coveted this accession to their strength."

was thought that Mr. Davenport's residence in Massachusetts might draw down upon that colony the
It

speedier wrath of Laud,

who loved them not


fled to

before.

When

he heard Mr. Davenport had

New Eng''My arm

land, to avoid the storm

of prelatical indignation, the

persecuting archbishop had boldly said,

114
shall

SUPPLEMENT TO
reach

him

there."

It

was supposed that the


to

scat-

tering of those

who were obnoxious


arm against them.

Laud

into dif-

ferent places might lessen the motives for

stretching

out his potent

Although he ob-

tained a commission from the king to carry out these


designs, yet the political excitements

by which they
his

were surrounded
arch (Charles
I.)

at

home, obliged him and

mon-

to confine their activity to resisting a

revolution which eventually resulted in the overthrow


of

their

own power.
some

As John Cotton expressed

it,

"Clod rocked three nations with shaking dispensations


to procure
rest for these infant churches."

Another probable reason why Mr. Davenport and

Eaton wished to form an independent colon}^ beyond


the limits of any existing grant or patent,
was, that

they might carry out their peculiar views in regard to


a civil state.
tion of a

They seemed
in

to have desired the formadifferent

community
existed

some respects
;

from

any

that

elsewhere

one more thorouglily

sc7-iptural

more in accordance with the ancient Jewish


in the strictest

system

one fashioned throughout

con-

formity to the rules of the Bible.

In the Fall of 1637, Mr. Eaton and others of the

company, made a journey

to Connecticut, to explore

the lands and harbors on the coast.

They came

to a

place lying at the head of a harbor, which sets

up about

four miles from

Long

Island Sound.

Its

Indian name

was Quinnipiac.

The explorers were much taken with

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


the beavity

115
countiy, and

and

fertility of this tract of

most of them being Londoners, and accustomed to


commercial pursuits, they deemed
for
it

a desirable site

the establishment of a
was, therefore, fixed

commercial town.

This

place

upon

for

the location of

their colony.

On what is now the south corner of Church and Meadow streets, they erected a hut, in which a few men remained for the winter to make
commencement
of the settlement,

preparations for the

while the rest returned to Massachusetts.*

Early in the Spring the colonists prepared to remove


to their

new home

in the wilderness.

After taking an
acre-

affectionate leave of

their friends

and gratefully

knowledging the many kindnesses they had there


ceived, the

company

sailed

from Boston for the place


18tli of

of their destination
" This

on the

March, 1638.

band

of pilgrims reached Quinnipiac, the fuApril,


1(538.

ture

New
is

Haven, on the 14th of

Mr.

Davenport was then forty-one years


day
the

of age.

The next

Sabbath.

A drum

beats in the rude and


their wives

hasty encampment.
*

The armed men with


left

Seven

men were
(from

by Eaton, one of

Beacher,

whom

the late venerable Dr.

whom was John Lyman Beecher

was Joseph Atwater. One of the party Mr. Atwater was a gentleman of distinction and opulence, and built himself a house on what is aow Fleet street, which has stood for more than two hundred years, and was occuiiied till lately by descendants of its origidescended)
died dni'ing the winter.
nal proprietor.

another

116

SUPPLEMENT TO
at this signal

and children gather


oak.*

under a branching

They meet to consecrate to Grod a new region reclaimed from heathen darkness. For the first time the
aisles

of

that

forest-temple

resounded

mth

the

praises of the

Most High.

Here are men who were


;

nurtured in the halls of Oxford and Cambridge

and

women used
tree.

to

all

the elegant refinements of the Brit-

ish metropolis.

They are gathered under the oaken


V

Why
?

are they here

Why

this

change in their

condition

Why

are they here, far from the haunts of

civihzation, confronting privation


*

and suffering

in every

This tree stood near the present corner of George and College streets, and was standing till after the revolutionary war, when it is said to have been cut down by Mr. David Beech er (the grandfather of Rev. Henry Ward Beecher,) and to have been burnt in his shop which stood in College street, near
George. On the 25th of April, 1838, was celebrated the second CenA protennial Anniversary of the settlement of New Haven. cession was formed at the State House, comprising the various classes of citizens and strangers, which proceeded to the intersection of College and George streets, at which place Mr. Davfore.

enport preached his first sermon, just two hundred years beHere the procession halted for religious exercises. The number of persons assembled around this spot was variously estimated from four to five thousand. Many roofs of the houses

were covered with people, and some had taken their station in the trees. After singing, an appropriate and impressive prayer; was offered on a stage which had been erected near the spotj

where the oak

tree is sixpposed to

have stood by the venerable;

Eev. Frederick

W. Hotchkiss

(since deceased,) of Saybrook,

whose mother was a

direct descendant of Gov. Jones, the son-

in-law of Gov. Eaton.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY

117

form

It is

for conscience, to
it is

keep that sacred tlimg


!

unspotted;

for posterity

for eternity: for God

["What sought they thus afar? Bright jewels of the mine ? The wealth of seas ? the spoils of war ? They sought a faith's pure shrine
!

holy ground, The soil where tirst they trod They have left unstained what there they found, Freedom to loorship GOD!"]
Ay, call
it
!

Surely angels rejoiced while Infinite Love smiled ujDon


the scene.

Mr. Davenport preached from the

text,

After the religious exercises were closed the jsrocession again

formed, and moving through George and State streets passed the place in Elm street where the houses of Gov. Eaton and

Mr. Davenport formerly stood, and then


jjastor

down Temple street

to

the First Congregational Church, where the society, whose

first

was Mr. Davenport, worship, and near which the first house of worship was erected. Here after singing and reading a portion of Scripture, prayer was offered by the present jjastor, Rev. Leonard Bacon, after which an historical discourse was delivered by Professor Jamas L. Kingsley, of Yale College, and the services were concluded by prayer, singing, and the See Appendix to Kingsley's Discoiirse 109 115. benediction. At this time there was a medal struck representing on the one side Mr. Davenport preaching under the oak, and on the other New Haven as it then appeared. There was in the possession of Mr. James Brewster, of that city, a large oil painting by Rossiter, giving the landing of Davenport and his followers, and representing him under the oak preaching his first sermon. Communicated by William A. Rey-

nolds of

New Haven,

in 1851.

During the same year (1638,) the eloquent pastor of the First Church (Rev. Dr. Bacon, delivered a series of Historical Discourses, which were published in a quarto volume of 400 pages, containing a mine of valuable information in regard to the To "first settlers," and the history of New Haven generally.
)

16

118

SUPPLEMENT TO
iv.

Matthew

'Then was

Jesus led np into the wil-

derness to be tempted of the devil';

and

his subject
place,

was, 'the temptations of the wilderness.'

Every

however sequestered, has

its trials.

In every place,

we have need

to

watch and pray."*

At the

close of

these services Mr.


enjoyed a good day."

DavenjDort remarked that "he Imd

We

here present a rude cut of this historic scene

with a sketch from the graphic pen of Rev. Dr. Bacon. "In 1638, on the 15th of April, (Old Style,) that being the Lord's day, there was heard upon this spot
the voice of one crying- in the wilderness, Prepare ye the

way

of the

Lord

and under the open

sky, bright

with the promise of a new era of light and liberty, a


Christian congregation, led by a devoted, learned and

eloquent minister of Christ, raised their hearts to


in prayer,

God

and mingled

their voices in praise.

How easily may the imagination, acquainted with these


localites

and with the characters and circumstances

of

the men the

who were present on that occasion,run back over two centuries that have passed, and bring up the
Sabbath
!

jjicture of the first

Look out upon

the smooth
in a wilder-

harbor of Quinnipiack.
ness.

It lies

embosomed

Two or three small vessels, having in their


John Davenport bj^ Rev. Mr. M'Clure,

appear-

ance nothing of the characteristic grace,lightness and life


*

Life of

p. 276.

that

work and the admirable discourse

of Professor Kingsley,

the writer is greatly indebted for copious extracts made in preparing the present sketch of the Rev. John Davenport.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY HISTORY AND GENEALOGY By A. B. Davenport.


NOTICES OF THE PRESS OF EDITION OF
1876.

entitled "

(From the Stamford Advocate, Sept. 21st, 1677.) have just completed the printing of an interesting genealogical work The Davenport Family Supplementary Edition," edited by A. B. Davenport, Esq of Brooklyn. N. Y., and of Davenisort Ridge, Stamford, Ct. It is a volume of nearly four hundred and fifty images handsomely jirinted on highly finished tinted paper, and, we think, as a specimen of the "art preservative," is creditable to Stamford. It is the most extensive and inti'icate woik that has ever been attempted in this town, and it gives us pleasure to be assured that its mechanical execution is entirely satisfactory to the author and publisher. The book contains a vast amount of matter that must prove highly interesting and instructive to the numerous members of the Davenport famThe author has given its publication faithful and patient attention, ily. and has spared neither pains nor exi)ense to produce a history worthy of the honored family he represents a family, indeed, whose history is largely interwoven with the early history of our state. The research and correspondence necessary to get together the contents of this large volume cannot be understood or appreciated by the general public, and, in fact, is known only to those who have attempted similar tasks. It is a work that knows no remuneration, and must be performed, as in the present instance,

We

as ''a labor of love," or be left undone altogether. It is fortunate that the Davenports have had an historian in their ranks who has so faithfully devoted his time and given of his means to this work of putting into an abiding form a record of the family history for nearly eight hundred years. The book just issued is embellished by numerous illustraticms, and in the Appendix has a pedigree of the family from the time the Davenport name was assumed, A. D., 1086.

ily

(From the N. Y. Evening Mail, Oct. 17th, 1877.) Twenty-five years ago, the history and genealogy of the Davenport famwere compiled by Mr. A. B. Davenisort, of Brooklyn, N. Y. Such an undertaking, at that early day, was qTiite a iirogressive enterprise, although of late years the examiale has had a numerous following. In the interval between the original publication and the present time, there have been family changes and offshoots which seem to have justified the issue of a supplemental volume. Accordingly the saine compiler has continued the work, with all his con amore devotion and painstaking accuracy, and now sends it forth from the press of W. W. fiillespie & Co., of Stamford, Conn. As respects the mechanical execution and ajipearance of the book, it is simple justice to say that Messrs. Gillespie have turned out a piece of work which is a credit to Connecticut. Although, at first sight, it would appear as if the subject matter of this work cotild have btit a limited family interest, the fact is far otherwise, in that the Davenport family is closely linked with our earliest New England history. From the day of John Davenjjort. in the colonial period, the family tree has been frtiitful of patriots and liberty-lovers, whose jiraise is not only in the churches but in the high places of politics and legislation and society. It is such a family whose genealogy is in this volume traced

down from A. D., 1086 to 1876, and in a manner which combines graceful style and interesting incident, so daftly as to avoid the dry prolixity usual in such compilations. The author is to be congratulated on the successful completion of his labor of love, and the Davenport family and its connections may well take pride in having furnished materials for so honorable a record.
(From the Congregaiionalist, Boston, Jan. 23d, 1878.) Supplement to the Histor;/ and Genealogy of the Davenport Family in England and America, from A. D., 1086 to 1850, and continued to 1876, is the title of a neat 8vo. of 432 pages, which bears marks of good taste and tireless enthusiasm in its author, Mr. Amzi Benedict Davenport (of the 24th generation), and which has been printed lor the family at Stamford, Conn. As its name imports, it succeeds and supplements a former volume upon the same honorable and fruitful theme, garnering facts which have come to knowledge since the publication of its predecessor in 1851, or which were of necessity excluded from that. The central figure of the book is, of course, the great and noble man who had so vital a connection with the planting of the New Haven Colony, and whose fame is dear to all New England and a large amount of fresh and valuable detail has herein been added to what had become matter of record in the previous volume. Few American families can securely run a pedigree back nearly 800 years, but we see no reason to doubt the statement that Ormus de Dauneporte, born in 1086, was the ancestor of John, of New Haven and the first fifty pages are given mainly to the links between the two. One hundred and thirty-lour pages are next devoted to details of the life and history of the good isastor at New Haven and Boston, and the remainder of the volume is filled with memoranda of succeeding generations. It is a rich and reverent contribution to a kind of literature which exalts Qod while it honors good men, and stimulates a genuine patriotism.

(From the Magazine of American History, Jan.

1878.)

An exhaustive account of this well known family, the American branch of which is descended from the Reverend John Davenport, the editor styles the Founder and Patriarch of New Haven. Its completeness seems to leave nothing to be desired, and it is Well printed and illustrated in a pleasing manner. Its arrangement also is excellent, and we cheerfully commend it as a model to genealogists.

whom

(From the Xew England Historical and Genealogical Register, Jan. 1878.) This book on the Davenport Family is a reprint of a portion of the work issued in 1851 and noticed in the Register for October of that year. The quarter of a century which elapsed between the publication of the two books brought to the knowledge of Mr. Davenport many new facts and unpublished documents, which he has incorporated here, making the supplementary volume larger than the original work. Though called a " Supplement," the boek is comislete in itself, the omissions not effecting the continuity of the genealogy. It is embellished with numerous engravings, and is well printed and indexed. (From the New Haven Palladium, Feh. C. 1878.) Mr. Amzi Benedict Davenport, of Stamford, has published a supplement to his History and Genealogy of the Davenport Family, bringing the record down twenty-five years further, or to 1876, and embodying such corrections as have come to his hands. A steel-engraved portrait of Rev. John Davenport (1597-1670) serves as a frontispiece. Other ilhistrations are an outline engraving of a portrait of Christopher Davenport, Mayor of Coventry

a picture of the Church of the Holy Trinity, Coventry; cut repin 1602 resenting the service under the old oak, corner of George and College streets, this city, April 15, 1638 view of the Green in this city; view of the Davenport jjlace on Elm street steel portrait of Hon. Abraham Davenport (1715-1789) heliotype of Hon. John Davenport (1752-1830); view of Davenport Ridge, Stamford portrait of John A. Davenport of this city, (1783-1864); views of Congregational Church, Stamford; Church Hill, Kew Canaan; and summer residence of the author and portraits of Lady Mary Vere and William Davenport (1781- 1860). The Davenport family is one of the most prominent of the old New England stock, marked from the day it was transplanted by a large proportion of able, well-educated, and influential men as one can see by even a cursory examination of this book. The close connection of this family with this city, and the large space devoted by the author to a consideration of the life of Rev. John Davenport, both in England and after he had founded a colony on this spot with Theophilus Eaton, give the book a strong local character: and it is to residents of this city that the author is indebted lor the results of much research.
;
; ; ; ;

(From the London

Genealogist, Sept. 1878.)

A Supplement to the History and Genealogy of the Davenport Family IN England and America. By Amzi Benedict Davenport. Printed
for the family.

Stamford. Conn., 1876, 8vo.

This work is rather the history of the Davenports re-written than a supplement properly so called. Since the publication of the first edition, five and twenty years ago, not only has the family greatly multiplied, but much new and original information has been gathered by the able and industrious author. Commencing with Ormus de Dauneport, 1086, the Davenport genealogy is traced for twenty-six generations to the present time; and this not after the manner usual with American genealogists of accepting any statements they find in print, but with a due regard to evidence, and reference to the authorities for the information produced. More than this, there is a carefully prepared tabular pedigree, in which each individual is numbered, the numbers referring to his name in the body of the work, so that a full account may be easily found of him without the trouble of wading through the whole contents of the volume. This is a clear and ingenious plan, well worth the imitation of writers of family histories. The Davenports are conspicuous among the early settlers in America, in that they can prove themselves descended from a family in this country of whose title to rank as noble there can be no question. Their first ancestor who left England to found a family in the new world was the Rev. John Davenport, founder of Newhaven, a pious, learned, and eminent divine. He was born at Coventry, and baptized there 9 April 1597, being fifth and youngest son of Henry Davenport. Mayor of that city 1613, by Winifred, daughter of Richard Barnabit, and grandson of Edward Davenport, also Mayor of Coventry in 1550, who descended from the Davenports of Woodford. He was educated at Oxford, where he ijroceeded to the degree of B. D. Was curate of St. Lawrence Jewry, and after vicar of St. Stephen's, Coleman street. In 1633 he fled to Holland to escape the opposition of the intolerant Laud, and resigned the living of St. Stephen's. Having in the meantime become a Puritan and Nonconformist, he sailed lor New England, and arrived in Boston in the Hector,' June 26, 1637. and in the following year settled at New Haven. Here he remained till 1667, when he removed to Boston, where he ended his days as pastor of the First Church, March 15, 1669-70. Eminent, alike for his piety and learning, the life of this good man, which is very ably written by his descendant the editor of this family history, cannot be read without pleasure and profit, especially by those fortunate enough to number so good a man among their ancestors, " whose grace chalks successors their way."
'

'

example of the founder of the American family has by no its influence on the lives and characters of his dewhom have been ornaments to the land of their adoption, and an honour to the country from whence it sprung. Colonel the Hon. Abraham Davenport, great grandson of the Eev. John Davenport, represented Stamford in the State Legislature for twenty-five sessions. He was State Senator from 176(5 to 1781. Judge of Probate for several years, and at his death Judge of the County Court. In 1776 he was sent to the army under Washington to assist in arranging it into companies and regiments. In 1777 he was one of the Committee of Safety for the State, and was always consulted by Governor Trumbull and General Washington as one of the wisest counsellors in those trying days. He was a man of vigorous understanding and invincible firmness of mind, of integrity, and justice unquestioned even by his enemies. Two instances of his firmness deserve to be mentioned "The 19th of May, 1780 was a remarkably dark day. Candles were lighted in many houses the birds were silent and disappeared the fowls retired to roost. The legislature of Connecticut was then in session at Hartford. A very genei-al opinion prevailed that the day of judgment was at hand. The House of Representatives being unable to transact their business, adjourned. A proposal to adjourn the Council was under consideration. When the opinion of Colonel Davenport was asked, he answered, I am against an adjournment. The day of judgment is approaching, or it is not. If it is not, there is no cause for an adjournment, if it is, I choose to be found doing my duty. I wish therefore that candles may be brought.' " Whittier has chosen this incident as the subject of one of his most pleasing poems, which he concludes, speaking of Colonel Davenport, thus
'Wie bright

means been without

scendants, several of

'

"

And there he stands in memory to this day. Erect, self-poised, a rugged face, half seen Against the background of unnatural dark, A witness to the ages as they pass. That simple duty hath no place for fear."

"The other instance took place at Danbury, at the Court of Common which he was Chief Justice. This venerable man, after he was struck with death, heard a considerable part of a trial, gave the charge to the jury, and took notice of an article in the testimony which had escaped the attention of the counsel on both sides. He then retired from the bench, and was soon after found dead in his bed He died as he had long wished to die, in the immediate performance of his duty, November " 20th, 1789, in the seventy-fourth year of his age His sons, the Hon. John Davenport aud the Hon. James Davenport were both representative members of the American Congress, the latter during the Presidency of General Washington. Mr. Amzi Benedict Davenport, the author of this interesting volume, who is seventh in descent from the Rev. John Davenport, the emigrant ancestor, still possesses lands at Davenport Eidge, which have never been alienated from the family since they came into possession of the Rev. John Davenport, of Stamford, 170 years ago here he resides during a portion of the year, in a house erected by himself on the site of the old one pulled down some years ago. The book is well illustrated, and the Appendix contains several interesting letters from the Rev. John Davenport to Mary, Lady Vere (not " Lady Mary Vere " as she is miscalled by the editor), and others. Apart from its value as a genealogical book, interesting only to those who are members of the Davenport family, this History and Genealogy may be read with pleasure and profit by a far wider circle. It contains the lives of a remarkable number of good and wise men, whose actions will always remain a shining light to future generations.
Pleas, of
; '

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


of the

119

well-known American vessels which are in these


sea, lie

days found shooting over every


the distance.

anchored

in

Here, along the margin of a creek, are a


huts, with the

few

tents,

and some two or three rude

boxes and luggage that were landed yesterday, piled

up around them
of smoke, going

and here and there a


in the
still

little

column

up

morning
all

air,

shows that
;

the inmates are in motion.


the sun
is

Yet

is

quiet

though

up, there
it is

is

no appearance of labor or busi-

ness

for

the Sabbath.
of a

broken by the beating

By and by the stillness is drum and from the tents


;

and from the

vessels, a

congregation comes gathering

around a spreading oak.

The aged and the honored


;

are seated near the ministers


of inferior

the younger, and those


farther back
;

condition, find their places


all,

for the defense of

there are

men

in armor,

each

with his heavy unwieldy gun, and one and another


with a smoking matchlock.
this, to

What

a congregation

is

be gathered

in the

wilds of

New
and

England.

Here are men and women who have been accustomed


to the luxuries of wealth in a metropolis,
to refinedisjiu-

ments

of a court.

Here are ministers who have

ted in the universities, and preached under Gothic ar-

ches in London.

These

into a wilderness, to

men and women have come face new dangers, to encounter


to

new
the

temptations.

They look

God; and words


to the

of
of

solemn prayer go up, responding

murmurs

woods and

of the waves.

They look

to

God whose

120

SUPPLEMENT TO
faithfulness have

mercy and
of promise,

brought them to their land

and

for the first time since the creation,

the echoes of these hills and waters are the voice of praise.
their faith

wakened by
opened; and

The word

of

God

is

and hope are strengthened

for the conflicts

before them, by contemplating the conflict and the victory of Him, who, in
ple,
all

things the example of his peo-

was once

like

them, " led forth by the Spirit into

the wilderness to be tempted of the Devil."*

Soon

after their arrival at Quinnipiac, at the close of

a "day of fasting and prayer," these exiles formed and

subscribed what they denominated a "plantation covenant."

By

this instrument they

engaged "that

as in

matters that concern the gathering and ordering of a


church, so also in
il

all

public

offices,

which concei-n
officers,

civ-

order, as choice of magistrates

and

making

and repealing and


all

laws, dividing allotments of inheritance,


all

things of like nature, they would

of

them be

ordered by the rules which the Scripture held forth to


them."
This

may be

considered the original


colony.

civil

con-

stitution of the
It

New Haven

may

here be stated that the planters of this colothe immortal Penn, did not disregard the

ny, like

rights of the Indians.

On this

point Dr.

Bacon says

"The most ancient record


ven
is,

in existence at

New Ha-

as

it

ought to

be, the record of

two treaties with

the aboriginal proprietors, by which the soil was pur*

Historical Discourses, pp. 12-13.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

121

subsist bechased, and the relations thenceforward to detween the Indians and the Enghsh were distinctly
fined."

These

treaties

commenced

thus: " Articles of

Agreement between Theophilus Eaton and John DaQuinopiocke, venport, and others, English planters at

Sachem on the one party, and Momaugin, the Indian Caroughood, Wesauof Quinopiocke, and Sugcogisin,

made and Thomas Stanton being

other party, cucke, and others of his council, on the concluded the 24th day of November, 1638,
interpreter," &c.

Here follow

and Dathe treaties, which are dvily signed by Eaton sister, by venport, and by the Sachem, his council and
their respective marks.*

These treaties were held


ties,

in

good

faith,

by both parsecurity

and the colony

lived in

much peace and

tribes. from the hostile attacks of the surrounding By these treaties the Indians considered themselves under the protection of the Enghsh, whUe they retain-

ed the right

to

hunt

in their forests, to fish in their

corn-fields streams, with the pledge not to disturb the trade. their interrupt or pastures of the English, or to
His"Copies of these Indian marks may be seen in Barber's first is a rude The 27. Haven, p. New of Antiqnities tory and The third resemblance of a bow the second of a fish hook. curve known to any nor of straight neither line, horizontal is a
*
;

-he

fifth may mathematicians. The fourth is a small block. The is imagined to stand for a war club. And the squaw's mark Hamwhich cloud the as pipe tobacco perhaps as much like a

let

showed

to Polonius,

was

'like a

whale.'" Baco7i's Discour-

ses, p. 335.

122

SUPPLEMENT TO
colonists

The
tives

showed themselves the friends


their unlimited confidence

of the na-

and enjoyed

a confi-

dence which

history forbids us to think in this case

was ever

violated.

More than

a year, after their arrival,

was spent

in

erecting their dwellings and in clearing their lands,

while they were often together praying and consulting


in reference

to

the

fundamental

principles which

should form their system

of civil polity.

During

this

period, Mr. Davenport prepared his " Discoiu'se about


Civil

Government

in a

New Plantation, whose Design


many
of

is

Religion."
after, in

This treatise was published


It

years

1B73.

was a vindication

the practice

long maintained by our fathers of allowing the rights of


voting and holding
bers of the Church.
office to

only such as were

mem-

Having given themselves time


tion

for

mature delibera-

and wise counsel, and

practically recognizing the

principle that "governments are instituted

among men,

deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed,"


all

"all the free planters"

by

which was meant

who were engaged


June,
16;}9,

in planting the colony

on the
or-

foui-th of

convened ia a large barn of Mr.

Newman, and

in formal
civil

manner proceeded

to the

ganization of a

government.

"No

reference, di-

rect or indirect,"

says Professor Kingsley,

"was made

by those concerned
country
;

in this transaction to their native

as at the time the colonists signed their plan-

"

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


tation covenant, so

123

now they seem

to have

supposed

that since they were in fact beyond the actual control


of

any existing sovereignty, they had a perfect right to

constitute a

government

for themselves."

The

busi-

ness of the occasion, in conformity to the views of

those assembled and the projjriety of the case,

was
have

opened with prayer, and Mr. Davenport is


preached a sermon from Prov.
ix. 1
:

said to

"Wisdom hath
jdII-

builded her house, she hath hewn out her seven


lars.

Mr. Davenport then projjosed several queries to the


planters,

and urged them

" to

consider seriousl}^ in the

presence and fear of God, the weight of the business they met about, and not to be rash or slight in giving
their votes to things they understood not; but to digest
fully

and thorougiy what should be propounded

to
sat-

them, and without respect to men, as they should be


isfied

and persuaded

in their

own minds,

to give their

answers in such

sort, as

they should be willing should

stand upon record for posterity.

They then unania

mously resolved "that the Scriptures do hold forth


perfect nile
for the direction

and government
to

of all

men

in all duties,

which they are

perform to

God
in

and men

as well in families

and commonwealth as

matters of the Church."


After
tion
this,

they renewed

theii'

assent to their planta-

covenant, and mutually

bound themselves, not

only in their ecclesiastical proceedings, but also " in

124

SUPPLEMENT TO

the choice of magistrates, the making and repealing of


laws, the dividing of inheritances,
ters, to

and

in all civil

mat-

submit themselves to the rules held forth in


of Grod."
.

the
"

Word

Then," as the record informs

us,

"Mr. Davenport

declared to them by the Scripture what kind of persons

might best be trusted with matters

of

government

and by sundry arguments from Scripture, j^roved that


such
i.

men

as were described in Exod.

xviii.

21; Deut.
7

13: with Deut. xvii. 15;

and

1
;

Cor.

vi. 1. 6,

[viz.:

"Able men, such as fear


covetousness;"

God

men
;"

of truth,

hating

"men

of

wisdom and understanding,


tribes

and known among your


brethren, and those

"not strangers, but


shall

whom

the

Lord your God

choose;" "not the unjust or the unbelieving, but the


holy'"]

ought to be intrusted by them, seeing they were


mould and form
for

free to cast themselves into that

of

commonwealth which appeared best

them

in refer-

ence to the securing the peace and peaceable enjoy-

ment

of all Christ's ordinances in the Chui'ch."

After some further

consideration,

the

comjpany,
:

among

other fundamental regvilations, adoj^ted this

"that church

members

only should be free burgesses,


offi-

and that they only should choose magistrates and


cers

among
all

themselves, to have the power of transactcivil

ing

the public

aftairs
;

of the plantation

of
;

making and repealing laws


deciding
differences that

dividing inheritances
arise
;

may

and doing

all

things and business of like nature."

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

125

Such was the


of

civil

New Haven

poHty estabHshed by the colonists and whatever may have been its im-

perfection, the history of


to

mankind may be challenged


fa-

show a State community organized under more


auspices, or a

vorable

settlement that for so

many

years has enjoyed a greater share of social happiness.

Having founded

their civil

commonwealth, they pro-

ceeded to the organization of their church.


twenty-second of August,
out of their number,
1G39,

On

the

seven persons chosen

among whom Mr. Davenport was


and
first

one, entered into a covenant with one another,

with Christ, and thus was constituted the


of

Church

New

Haven.

Being thus organized, they proceed-

ed to admit others of the company to their fellowship.


Shortly after the church was instituted, Mr. Daven-

port was chosen pastor.

ordained by the two or three of the lay brethren, though Mr. Hooker, and Mr. Stone, the reverend pastors of the

He was

hands

of

church

in Hartford,

were present, and one of them

made

the prayer.

Tliis

ceremony was not used be-

cause the vahdity of his ordination in the Church of

England was doubted,


tion or

it

being, in fact, but an insfaUa-

solemn recognition of his new relation to a par-

ticular church.

With an organization
a
minister,

so simj^le

and

scriptural

with
en-

whose genius, wisdom

and

piety

abled him to bring forth from the word of

God

things

new and

old,

it is

not a matter of wonder that success

126

SUPPLEMENT TO
enterpi'ise.

should have crowned their


emi^haticaUy the case.

And such was


of their pastor

The ministry

was

abundantly blessed.

His church continued in

great unity during the whole period of his pastoral relation of nearly thirty years,

and often received addi-

tions of those

who were

"heirs of the grace of life."

He was
to
larg'e,

strict in his

examination of those

who were

be admitted to membership, yet his church was

and they walked together

prayer and love.

But few instances


flock,

of public censure occurred in his

though seldom has one had a deeper sense of the

importance of the discipline of Christ's house than he.

About two months


was termed

after the organization


KJoi),

of the

church, on the 25th of October,


Court, as
it

the (leneral the "sev-

consisting at

first of

en

pillars"

chosen to form the church, but afterAvards

of all the free burgesses

proceeded to
civil

constitute the

bod}' of freemen,

and

to elect their officers.

Mr. Da-

venport expounded several passages of Scripture to


them, describing the character of
magistrates giv-

en in the Sacred Oracles.


tion of officers.

To

this

succeeded the elec-

Theophilus Eaton, Esq., was chosen

Governor
iel

Robert Newman, Matthew Gilbert, Nathan-

Turner, and

Thomas

Fugill were

chosen Magis-

trates.

Mr. Fugill was also chosen Secretary, and

Robert Seely, Marshal.


Mr. Davenport gave Governor Eaton a charge in

open

court,

from Deut.

i.

16,

17

"And

charged

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

127

your judges

at that time, saying,

Hear the causes be-

tween your brethren, and judge righteously between every man and his brother, and the stranger that is
with him.

Ye

shall not respect persons in

judgment,
;

but ye shall hear the small as well as the great


shall not be afraid of the face of
is
it

ye

man, for the judgment


too hard for vou, brino-

God's

and the cause that


will

is

unto me, and I

hear

it."*

Governor Eaton was annually chosen


over the colony, as
ty years,
till

to

j^reside

its

chief magistrate, for nearly twen-

his death,

which occurred

in

January,

1658.

This good
it

man was accustomed


;

to say:

"Some
sure
it

count
is

a great matter to die well

but I

am

a greater matter to live well.

All our care should be,


it

while

we have our

life,

to use
it

well

and so when
all

death puts an end to


cares."

that,

will

be an end to

our

"And God would have him


for

die well," says the

quaint historian Mather, "without any room or time

then given to care at

all;

he enjoyed a death sud-

den

to every

one but himself."


7tli of

On

the evening of the

January, after family

worship, as usual, "he took a turn or two abroad, for his


meditations," and then

came

to bid his wife good-night,

who was
"The
sad."
*

confined by sickness in another apartment.

She said to him, "Methinks you look sad."

He

repHed,

differences in the church of Hartford

make me

She then, discontented as she long had been,

Kecords of the Colonv of

New Haven.

128
said, "

SUPPLEMENT TO

Let us go back to our native country."

To

which he answered, "You may, but I


This was the
retired to his
last

shall die here."

word she ever heard him


:

speak.

He
came
ill,"

chamber
:

and about midnight, he was

heard to groan
in to inquire

and

to

some

one,

who

instantly

how he

did,

he answered only, "Very

and immediately
just

fell

asleep in Jesus.

His grave

is

behind the

joulpit
is

window

of the First Church.*

So intimately

the history of Governor Eaton con-

nected with that of

Mr

Davenport, that one or two

brief extracts in reference to

him may not be deemed

wholly out of place.

Mather, in writing the


the

life

of Eaton,

Moses

of

New

Haven, says

"He

whom

he

calls

carried in his

very countenance, a majesty which cannot be describ-

ed

and in

his dispensations of justice

he was a mirror

for the

most inimitable

impartiality, but ungainsayable

authority of his jDroceedings, being awfully sensible of

the obligations which the oath of a judge lays

upon

him.

Hence he who would most

patiently bear hard

things offered to his person in private cases, would

never pass by any public affronts or neglects, when he

appeared under the character of a magistrate. he


still

But

was the guide

of the blind, the

statt"

of the lame,
all

the helper of the


distressed.

widow and
that

the orphan, and

the

None

had a good cause was afraid of


the one side, in his days did

coming before him.


*

On

Bacon His.

DLs.

110.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


righteous flourish

129

;lie

on the other

side,

he was the

;error of evil doers."

Hubbard, who was partly 'This man [Gov. Eaton] had

his
in

cotemporary, says
gifts

him great

and

as
;

nany excellencies

as are usually found in any one

man

command16 had an excellent princely face and port, scholar, a good was a he .ng respect from all others
;

traveler,

a great reader, of an exceeding

steady and

spirit, not easily lushaken in his principles when once fixed upon, of

3ven

moved

to passion,

and standmg
:i.

profound judgment,
ais

full of
it

majesty and authority

judicatures, so that
out,

was

a vain thing to offer to

orave him

and yet in
such

his ordinary conversation,

and
and

imong

friends, of

pleasantness of behavior,

such felicity
ly

and fecundity
;

of harmless wit as can hardall,

be paralleled

but above

he was seasoned

witli

religion, close in closet duties,


in

solemn and substantial

family worship, a diligent


all

and constant attender up-

3n

public ordinances, talcing notes of the sermons


exactly,

be heard

and improving them accordingly

in
life

short, approving himself in the whole course of his


in faithfulness,

wisdom, and inoffensiveness before

God

and man."*
*

Coventry,
of

Governor Eaton, by will, disposed of his estates, both in this and "in the parish of Great Budworth, in the coiinty Chester, England:" and among other small legacies, gives "to
wife's son,
:

Thomas Yale, five pounds to my dear son-inMr. Hopkins, and to my revei'end pastor, Mr. John Davenport, to each of them ten i^ounds, as a small token of my love and respect"

my

law,

130

SUPPLEMENT TO
the day arrived for the election of a

When

new Gov
a^

ernor, Mr.

Davenport preached an election sermon,

was usual on such occasions, taking for his text th(


first

words

in

the book of Joshua:

"Now

after
it

th<
t(

death of Moses, the servant of the Lord,


pass that the

came

Lord spake

to Joshua, the son of

Nun
dead
al

Moses' minister, saying, Moses,

my

servant

is

now, therefore
this people."
fell

arise,

go over

this Jordan,

thou and

The unanimous choice

of

the electors
of
th(

upon Francis Newman, who had been one


for

bench of magistrates, and


the colony.*

many

years Secretary o

Deeply did Mr. Davenport

feel the loss of his

belov

land, taking her children,

Mrs. Eaton, soon after her husbancVs death, returned to Eng and also her grandchild, Elihu Yale
old,

then about ten years wards named.

from

whom

Yale College was after

The Rev. Samuel Eaton came to America with his brothe: Theophilus, and for a year two was Mr. Davenport's assistant He returned to England in 1640, with a view of collecting company of emigrants to settle Branford that tract of countrj having been granted him for such friends as he should brin^

over from England. But the temporary peace which he founc enjoyed by those who had before suffered from the persecu
ting spirit of the times, induced
a Congregational

him

to settle as a

teacher ovei

church in Duckenfield, in Cheshire, his na tive county, whence he removed, probably with some of his congregation, to the neighboring borough of Stockport. He was one of the two thousand ministers who, in 1662, were silencec He died on the 9th o; in one day, by the act of uniformity. June, 1665, at Denton, Lancashire, and was buried in th(
chapel there.
*

Historical Discourses, page 114.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


3d Eaton,
his

131

who

for

more than twenty years had been

copartner in the work of rearing a republic, and

from childhood his most intimate friend and companion.

The

following- eloquent passage is


:

from Dr.

Bacon's invaluable Historical Discourses


"

Davenport, and his friend Eaton,

bviilt their

dwel-

lings over against

each other on the same street,* and

the

intimacy begun

when they were


in a

children,
is

and

strengthened in their earlier manhood,


without interruption,
arates
till

prolonged

good old age death sepmeet again


in heaven.
;

them

for a little season, to

They were never out


rarely could a

of

each other's thoughts


in

and

day pass by

which they did not see

each other, and take counsel together.

The

voice of

prayer, or the evening psalm, in one of their dwellings,

might be heard

in the other.

"Whatever changes came


to partake

upon one

family, the other

was sure

imme-

diately in the sorrow or the joy.

In such neighbortheir days


the^'

hood and intimacy, these two friends passed


,here, till

the

full

strength of

manhood

in

which

These

houses

Eaton's stood
It
it

Governor were large and commodious. upon the north corner of Ehii and Orange streets.
a capital E,

was built in the form of and nineteen fire-places.

had many apartments in

Mr. Davenport's house, on the op-

Elm street, near State street, was built in the form of a cross, with the chimney in the centre. "That Mr. Davenport's house had also many apartments, and thirteen
posite side of
fire-jilaces,"
*'I

says President Stiles, in his History of the Judges,

very well remember, having frequently,


over the house,"

when

a boy, been

all

132

SUPPLEMENT TO
to venerable
;

came had gradually turned


saw
trials

age.

They

many and

various

trials

such as weigh
faint
;

heaviest

upon the

spirit,

and cause the heart to


men, in such

but in
tion
;

all

their trials, they

had one hope, one consolato such


vicissi-

and how refreshing


is

tudes,
true.

the sympathy

of

kindred

souls, well-tried

and

Strong in themselves, with the


of education
;

gifts of nature,

the

endowments

and experience, and the

unction of Almighty grace


reliance

strong in their individual

upon

Clod, their help

and Saviour

they were

the stronger for their friendship, the stronger for their

mutual counsels, the stronger for the sympathy by


which each drew the other towards the great fountain
of strength,

and

love,

and

life.

"Such are the friendships

of

good men.

Their

inti-

macies make them better, hoher, happier, more patient


for endurance,

wiser for counsel,

stronger for every

Godlike action."

The
so

fathers of

New England were

not professedly

separatists,

but non-conformists.

They did not design

much

to

withdraw themselves from the church of

England, as to promote a reformation from what they


considered to be the errors that had crept into their

communion.
and

But the reformation which they sought,


system of church

effected, laid the foixndation for a


its

poHty which, both in


tions,

simplicity

and practical opera-

was most nearly

allied to that of the ajDostles of

Christ.

They

still felt

themselves in communion

witli

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


the truly good

133
of
;

and

pious,

whether in the Church

England, or in any other Christian denomination

and especially

in

the former,
still

there

were many to

whom

their hearts

clung with the warmest Chris-

tian attachment.

A work
lished in

written by Mr. Davenport, in 1639, and pubin 1G41, entitled

London,

"An Answer

of the

Elders of the Several Churches in


nine Positions sent over to

New

England, unto

them by divers reverend

and Godly ministers in England," exhibits most clearly his

views,

and those

of the first ministers of

New

England, in regard to this work of reformation.

In the preface to this


country,

epistle,
first

he says, "In our native


called to the ministry,
indifferent,

where we were

many
ful,

of us took

some things to be

and law-

which in time we saw to be

sinful,

and could not


Afterwards,
is,

continue in the practice of them there.

some things that we bare as burdens

that

as things

inexpedient, though not utterly unlawful,

we had no

cause to retain and prescribe the same things here,

which would have been not only inexpedient, bat unlawful

such
it

things as a
;

man may
to

tolerate

when he
practiced
grief,)

cannot remove them


there, which,

besides some things


it

we

(we speak

our shame and

we

Qever took

into serious consideration

whether they

were lawful and expedient, or no, but took them for


granted,

and generally received not only by the most


18

iceformed churches, but by the most judicious servants

184
of

SUPPLEMENT TO
tliem, which, nevertheless,

God amongst

when we

came to weigh them in the balance of the sanctuary, we could not find sufficient warrant in the Word to receive them as established there."
In closing this oj)ening address of the work, he says
;

"If anything [in this answer] appears to be unsound,

and dissonant

to

the

Word, (which we,

for

our part,

cannot discern,) we shall willingly attend to what further light

God may send


we

unto us by you.

In the
sufi'er

mean

time,

entreat you in the Lord, not to

such apprehensions to lodge in your minds, which you


intimate in your letters, as
id separation which,
if

we

justified the

ways of

rigfor-

sometimes amongst you, we

merly bore witness against,


things which

and so build again the

we

destroyed, as those

who

separate from

your congregations as no churches, from the ordinances


as dispensed

by you

as

mere antic hristian, and from

yourselves as no Christians.
ly,

But we profess unfeigned-

we separate from the corruptions which we conand from such


ordi-

ceive to be left in your churches,

nances administered therein, as we fear are not of God,

but of

men

and

for ourselves,

we

are so far from

sej)-

arating, as

from no
in

visible Christians, as that


(if

you are
it)

under God
to live as

our hearts

the Loi'd would suffer


at

and die together, and we look


of that

sundry of you
if

men

eminent growth in Christianity, that

there be any visible Christians under heaven,

amongst

you are the men who

for these

many

years have had

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

135

written in your foreheads, 'holiness to the Lord,' which

we

speak, not to prejudice any truth which ourselves

are here taught


lieve,

and

called to profess, but

we

still

bein

though personal Christians may be eminent


growth
of Christianity,

their

yet

churches have
j)urity,

still

need to grow from apparent defects to

and
till

from reformation to reformation, from age to age,


the

Lord have

utterly abolished Antichrist with the

breath of his mouth, and the brightness of his coming


to the full

and clear revelation

of all his holy truth, es-

pecially touching the ordering of his house,

and public
of you,

worship.

As a pledge
sent

of this, our estimation


to

we have
shall

you these answers

your demands, and

be ready, by the help of Christ, to receive back

fi'om you, Avise

and

just

and holy advertisements

in

the Lord.

Now, the Lord God, and Father


Christ, lead

of our

Lord Jesus
purge
all

you and us into

all truth,

and

leaven out of his churches,

and keep us

blameless and harmless in his holy faith and fear to


his heavenly
us, in

kingdom, through
rest."

Him

that hath loved

whom we

During the year 1642,

letters

were received, signed


of

by Oliver Cromwell and several members

both

houses of parliament, and also from some ministers in

England, inviting Mr. Davenport, with Mr. Hooker of


Hartford, and Mr. Cotton of Boston, to return to their
native country, to assist in settling the affau's of the
'great revolution,

which was then

in

progress there.

136

SUPPLEMENT TO
particularly with reference to securing the

''

and more

independency of the churches.


they,

"The condition," say


this

"wherein the state of things in

kingdom
rela-

doth now stand, we suppose you have from the


tion of others
;

whereby you cannot but understand


is

how

great need there


of all

of the help of prayer,


all

and imfor the

provement
settling

good means, from

parts,

and composing the

affairs of the

Church.
of

We,
all.

therefore, present to

you our earnest desires

you

To show wherein,
ful,

or

how many
us.

Avays,

you may be use-

would

easily

be done by us and found by you,


In
forth
all

were you present with


find opportunity
to

likelihood you will


that

draw

all

helpfulness
not,
all

which God

shall afford

by you.

And we doubt

these advantages will be such as will fully answer

inconveniences

yourselves,
this

churches or plantations,

may

sustain

in

your short A^oyage and absence


better."

from them.

Only the sooner you come the

Upon
ing
call

the receipt of this invitation the subject

was

duly weighed by the several ministers and other lead-

men
of

of the colonies,

and while many deemed


that

it

"a

Grod," yet

it

apjjears

Mr.
it

Hooker was
any
sufficient

averse to the proposal, " nor thought


call for

them

to

go a thousand leagues to confer with a


in the

few persons that differed from the rest


of

matter

church government."

Mr. Davenport, on the conto go,

trary,

was strongly inclined

but his church con-

sidering the case,

came

to the conclusion, "that in re-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY


garcl they

137

had but one

officer,

they could not see the

way

clear to spare

him

for so long a time as such a

journey reciuired."

Mr. Cotton was in fay or of acceptif

ing the invitation, and would have gone

the others

had not declined.*


In the cause of popular education, Mr. Davenport
has justly been styled a leader.
ter of
"It has

been a mat-

some

curiosity," says Professor Kingsley, in his

Historical Discourse,
class of

"to ascertain, to
of

what

mati,

or

men, the honor

having

originated our

system of schools belongs.

distinguished citizen of
fort)'

Connecticut remarked more than


I

years ago
first

'Did

know

the

name

of the legislator,
[of

who

conceived
I should

and suggested the idea pay to


his

Common Schools,]

memory the

highest tribute of reverence and

regard.
tion

I should feel for


I

him a much higher veneraAthens.

and respect than

do for Lycurgus and Solon,


I

the celebrated legislators of Sparta and

should revere him as the greatest benefactor of the

human
tiT,

race

because he
if it

has been the author of a

provision which

should be adopted in every counin-

would produce a hapj^ier and more important

fluence on the

which the wisdom

human character than any of man hath devised. 'f

institution

* It is said that letters were also received during the same year probably not official, but private inviting the above ministers to come over, that they might have seats in the famous Assembly of Divines at Westminister. His. Discoia-ses, 103, 104.

'I.

Swift's system, 159.'

138

SUPPLEMENT TO

"Perhaps the honor of devising the scheme of pojDular education,

which has prevailed

in

New

England,

belongs exclusively to no individual.


rather in the general wish to bring
all

It originated

directly to the

Scriptures for religious knowledge and in a regard for

popular rights, both of which were


traits of Puritanism,

distinguishing

than in the sagacity and benevo-

lent efforts of any one

man.

But

if

the inquiry should

be to

whom
easily

is

to be ascribed the

honor of establishing
Colony, the ques-

the school system of the


tion
lus
is

New Haven
;

answered.

It is the just

due
if

of Theophi-

Eaton and John Davenport


here,

or

a distinction
exists in the

must be made

abundant evidence

colony records that the pre-eminence belongs to the


latter.

In John Davenport was that deep conviction


general intelligence, especially, in his

of the value of

view of the subject, as the means of diffusing sound


religious instruction, that energy,

and that

resolution,

which are essential

to the

successful introduction into

a community, of a practical

Common

School System; should be

and

it is

to

men

like him, that the credit

given of having by their influence carried this system

forward to

its full

execution."

In 1654, Mr. Davenpoi't brought forward the plan of


establishing a

College in

New

Haven, for which the

town made a donation


500
was
also

of land.

Through the
a

corres-

pondence of Daven^Dort and Eaton,


sterling

donation of

made by

Grovernor Hopkins,

THE DAVENPOKT FAMILY.

139

who soon

after died in

England.

With these funds

the General Court erected the college school into a Col-

lege for teaching the three learned languages, Latin,

Greek and Hel^rew, and


good
literature to
fit

for the education of

youth in

them

for the

public service in

church and commonwealth, and settled 40 a year out


of the colony treasury,

upon the preceptor or

rector,

besides the salary from


for a library.*

New Haven

School, with

100

Mr. Davenport took the care of the colony school


for several years,

but in 1660, the Rev. Jeremiah Peck

was appointed

to that post.

The convulsions

of the

time in 1664, the small


colony,

number

of inhabitants in the

and the subsequent removal of Mr. Davenport

to Boston, prevented the carrying out of their designs


for a CoUege,

and

left

the institution to terminate in a

Grammar
*

School, which continued to hold the

Hop-

kins' fund.f
Stiles'

History of the Jiadges.

was in 1660, that Mr. Davenport appeared before the General Court reinforced with the legacy of Gov. Hopkins, and entreated them "not to suffer this gift to be lost from the Colony, but as it becometh fathers of the Commonwealth, to use all good endeavors to get it into their hands and to assert their right in it for the common good that posterity might reap the good fruit of their labors and wisdom and faithfulness and that Jesus Christ might have the service and honor of such proIt
;
;

vision

made
hands

for his people."

The
to the

letter of

of the General Court of

Mr. Davenport resigning the Hopkins' fund inNew Haven, may be found
1, p.

in Trumbull's History of Connecticut, vol.


t

532.

This was not the origin of Yale College.

In the year 1700,


140

SUPPLEMENT TO
extract from the record of " a

The following
meeting, held in

town

New

Haven, Feb.

7,

16G8," affords a

sjDecimen of the early proceedings, in reference to this


subject
:

"Mr. John Davenport, senior, came into the meeting,

and desired and


first

to speak

something concerning the school,


to the town,

propounded

whether they would

send their children to the school, to be taught for the


several individvials

met

in

New Haven and

foi-med themselves

into a Society, to consist of eleven ministers including a rector,

and agreed to found a College in the Colony of Connecticut. At a subseqiient meeting, the same year, at Branford, each of the trustees brought a number of books, and presented them to the Association, using words to this effect, as he laid them on the table, '^ I give thesebooks for founding a College in Connecticut." About forty folio volumes were contributed on this occasion. This act of depositing the books has ever been considered the
origin of Yale College.

Quarterly Register,

Vol.

8, p. 14.

The College
year 1717,
it

some time was located at Saybrook, till in the was removed to New Haven, "where," says Presifor

dent Woolsey, "from being almost an airj' nothing, it received a local habitation and was also in the course of the year 1718, destined to have that name given to it, by which, since the charter of 1745, the whole institution has been designated." The following extract from a manuscrijjt written at this time by one of the College officers, the Rev. Samuel Johnson, D. D. afterwards first President of King's [Columbia] College, New
York, will not be uninteresting "The building went forward apace, so that the hall and library were finished by Commencement. A few days before
:

Commencement, came the news

of the good siiccess of

some

gentlemen's endeavors to procure some donations from Great For at Boston, arrived a large box of books, the picBritain.
tiire

ling worth of English goods,

and arms of King George, and two hundred pounds sterall to the value of eight hundred pounds in our money, from Governor Yale of London, which

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


fitting

141

them

for the service of


If they would,
.

God

in church

and com-

monwealth.

then, he said that the grant of that part of Mr. Hopkins his estate formerly

made
void
;

to this

town stands good, but


it

if

not,

then

it

is

because

attains

not the end of the donor.

Therefore, he desired that they would express themselves.

Upon which Roger

Ailing declared his purpose


;

of

bringing up one of his sons to learning

also

Henry

and disheartened our opposers. [We favored and honored with the presence of his Honor Grovernor Saltonstall and his lady, and the Hon. Col. Taylor, of Boston, and the Lieutenant Governor, dfnd the whole Superior ^ourt at our Commencement, Sept. 10, 1718, where the trusgreatly revived our hearts
svere]

present those gentlemen being present, in the hall of our first most solemnly named our College, by the name DfYale College, toperpetuatethememory of theHon. Gov. Elihu 5fale, Esq., of London, who had granted so liberal and bountiful I donation for the perfecting and adorning of it. Upon which :he Hon. Col. Taylor represented Gov. Yale in a speech ex;ees

^Tew College,

pressing his great satisfaction,

which ended, we passed


carried

to the

In an oration was lad by the saluting orator, James Pierpont, and then the disDutations as usual, which concluded, the Rev. Mr. Davenport ;one of the Trustees and Minister of Stamford] offered an ex-.ellent oration in Latin, expressing their thanks to Almighty jod and Mr. Yale under him for so public a favor, and so great egard to our languishing School. After which, were graduated :en young men whereupon the Hon. Gov. Saltonstall, in a Latin ipeech, congratulated the Trustees on their success, and in the :omfortable appearance of things with relation to their School. LU which ended, the gentlemen returned to the College Hall, vhere they were entertained with a splendid dinner, and the adies at the same time were also entertained in the Library, iter which they sung the four first verses in the 65th Psalm, nd so the day ended."
on.
.vhich
affair in

3hurch, and there the

Commencement was

the

first

place, after prayer,

142

SUPPLEMENT TO

Glover, one of Mr. William Russell's,

John Winston
said that he

Mr. Hoclslion, Thomas Trowbridge, David Atwatei^

Thomas Meeks [Mix] and Mr. Augur


;

inJ

tended to send for a kinsman from England.

Mr

Samuel Street declared that there were eight


ent in Latin, and three more would

at pres

come

in

summer

and two more before next winter.


Davenport seemed
that he
to

Upon which Mr
;

be

satisfied

but yet declarec


voice,

must

always reserve

a negative

tha

nothing be done contrary to the true intent of the donor

and

it

[the donatioti]

be improved only for that use


it

and, therefore, while


shall

can be so improved here,


if

be settled here.

But,

New Haven

will

neglec

their

own good
it

herein, he

must improve

it

otherwise
Hii'
th<|

unto that end


desire was,

may answer tlie will of the dead. that a farm may be purchased, that
it

revenues of

may

ease the

town

and therefore

pro:

pounded, that if any knew of any farm to be purchased


they would acquaint the committee with
desired to
it
;

and

thei,
t

know whether

the town would grant this

be recorded, with

this condition.
it,

The town

fell intc

some debate about


er at this time."

and so nothing was done furth

A
*

goodly number of pupils were


Hopkins'

fitted for

Collegi

at this

Grammar School*

Says Professo

This school

is still

kept on the corner of Temple and Crowi

streets.

Mr. Ezekiel Cheever (or Cheevers, ) who came to New Havei with Mr. Davenport, taught a Grammar School there for nuiir

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

143

Kingsley, "Of the graduates of Harvard College, from


its

foundation [1638] to the year 1700, as

many

as one

in thirty, at least,

were from the town of

New

Haven.

When
the

it is

considered that so late as the year 1700,


of inhabitants in

number

New Haven
is

could have

eery

little if at all

exceeded

five

hundred, this fact de-

serves notice.

The

exj^lanation

found

in

the exer-

tions of Mr. Davenport,


(their efitect

which continued to produce


Indeed, his influence

long after his death.


liberal education has

in favor of

never ceased

but

:commeucing

in the infancy of the colony, has with the

progress of time, and the increase of population, been


[more
ed."
(years.

and more strengthened and more widely

diffus-

"How

aptly,"

adds Dr. Bacon, "might that beau-

He was the father of New England school teachers. He was born in London, in 1G15, and was one of those who signed the Plantation Covenant in Mr. Newman's barn in 1639. Of "He was a pious and learned divine this man, Mather wrote He wore his beard to the day of his death. |as well as preceptor. He much formed and established the New England pronunciaHe printed an English Accidence tion of Latin and Greek. The hair of his head and beard were white as (Still in use. 'He died, leaning like old Jacob upon a staff; the sac[snow. |rifice and the righteousness of a glorious Christ, he let us know, 'He woi'e a long white [was the staff which he leaned vipon.' beard terminating in a point, and when he stroked his beard He died to the point, it was a sign to the boys to stand clear.' !in Boston, August 21, 1708. in the ninety-foiirth yearof his age tafter he had been a skillful, painful, faithful schoolmaster for iseventy years and had the singular favor of Heaven, that though he had usefully spent his life among cJdldren, yet he had not become hoice a cMld, but held his abilities, with his usefulness in an unusual degree to the very last."
: ;

144
tiful

SUPPLEMENT TO
I

apostrophe of one of our poets have been ad:

dressed to him

'The good begun by thee shall onward flow In many a branching stream, and wider grow The seed that in these few and fleeting hours Thy hands, unsj^aring and unwearied, sow, Shall deck thy grave with Amaranthine flowers. And yield thee fruit divine in Heaven's immortal bowers
;

!'

"

The name

of

Mr. Davenport, more than that of

al-

most any other man, has been associated with the


tory of those individuals,
regicide^.''

his-

commonly known

as "the

These were

men who had consjjired


I.,

against

the tyrannical rule of Charles

the result of which

was the overthrow


ned
to the scaffold.

of that

monarch who was condemsome who

On

the restoration of Charles

II.,

in 1660,

had been

active in the times of the

Commonwealth, unCourt that


jjursued
at

der Cromwell, were put to death, and others fled for


their lives.

The surviving members


the king to the

of the

condemned
with
least

scafibld,

were

si^ecial fury.

Of these regicide judges, four

escaped to this country, two of whom, Edward


to

Whalley and William Goffe, came

New

Haven.

These two were among the most prominent of those

who signed

the death-warrant of the king.

They

ar-

rived in Boston, on the 27tli of July, 1660, in the

same

ship that brought the


tion.

first

news

of the king's restora-

"Whalley was closely connected with Cromwell by

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


kindred, as well as by
est.

145
political inter-

tie of a

common

He was

the colonel of that regiment of cavaliy in

the Parliament's army, in which Richard Baxter was


chajDlain,

and between him and the author

of

the

Saint's Rest, there

was an intimate friendship, not only


the Protectorate of
of

while Baxter continued in the army, but afterwards,

when Whalley had become, under


empire.

his cousin Cromwell, one of the chief officers

the

To him,

in

token of their continued friendship,


epistle,

Baxter dedicated one of his works in an


is

which

among

the most beautiful examples of that kind of

composition.

"Goffe was the son-in-law of Whalley, and Hke hinj,

having distinguished himself in the army, in which he


rose to the rank of Major-General, he
of Croinwell's

became a member
of the prin-

House

of Lords,

and was one

cipal supporters of the

Cromwell dynasty.

So eminent
in

was

he, that

it

was thought by some, that he might,


of the empire.

time,

become the head


these

"When

men

arrived in Boston, with the news

of the king's restoration, they

were

at

first

received

with undisguised attention by the Governor of that

Colony and the principal inhabitants.

For some

time,

they resided openly at Cambridge, where they atten-

ded public worship, and were

active in

private reli-

gious meetings, and were received to occasional com-

munion

in the church,

by

virtue of letters

which they

brought from

the churches in

England, with which

146

SUPPLEMENT TO

they had been previously connected.


personally known,

As they became
and

they were gi'eatly respected for


intelligence.

their piety, as well as for their talents


It

was hoped that

in so distant a part of the

world as
;

this,

they would escape the notice of their enemies


first

and the

rumors that followed them from England,

gave some confirmation to the hope.


ber, the act of

But

in

Novemall,

indemnity arrived, which secured

with certain exceptions, against being called in question for anything they

had done against the govern;

ment

since the beginning of the civil wars

and

it

ap-

peared that these two men, with many others, were excepted from the general i^ardon
j)assion
;

still,

however, com-

and friendship prevented the government of

Massachusetts from taking any measures to arrest them.

"On

the 22d of February, 1661, the Governor called

his council together, to consult about seizing them, but

the council not having yet received any special order

on that subject, refused to do anything.


after this, the

Four days

two regicide judges, foreseeing that a

warrant or order for their arrest must soon arrive from

England, and that Governor Endicott, and their other


friends there, would, in that case, be unable to protect

them,

left

Cambridge, and passing through Hartford,


hospitably received by Governor

where they were

Winthrop, arrived at

New Haven on

the 7th of March."*

Hei'e, the minds of the people were well prepared to


*

His. Discourses, 123, 124.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


receive them.

147

Mr. Davenport at once espoused their

cause with great courage and boldness.


to

There seems

be no e\'idence that Mr. Davenport ever preached


is

a special discourse, as he

usually i epresented to have

done, with reference to the cause of the regicides.

That he alluded to them in terms which were not


ly to

like-

be misunderstood, in a series of sermons which

were preached just before their coming to

New

Haven,

and which were afterwards published


chor Hold,"
is

in his " Saint's

An-

quite evident. In speaking of the general

state of the church,

both in

this

and other lands, and

of

the persecutions and trials to which God's people have

been subject in
"Brethren,

all

ages, he vises the following

language

it is

a weighty matter to read

letters,

and

receive intelligence in

them concerning the


to
lift

state of the

churches.

You had need

up your hearts

to

God,

when you
tive

are about to read your letters from our naaf-

country, to give you wisdom, and hearts duly

fected, that

you may receive such intelligences as you

ought

for

God

looks

upon every man

in such "cases,

with a jealous eye, observing with what workings of bowels

they read or speak of the concernments of his

church.

You

see, in

incensed against
their

Amos those who

vi. 6,

how

his

wrath was

solaced themselves with

private

jirosperity,

but

were

not sick

their

hearts asked not for the afflictions of Joseph.

"Again

let

such know that

if

they withdraw from


will

being helpful to the church,

God

do good

to

148
his church, without

SUPPLEMENT TO

them

but he

will

be avenged up-

on them that desert or neglect

his

cause and people.


iv.

This argument, Mordecai used to Esther (Esther


13, 14
;)

and

it

prevailed mightily with her, to run the

utmost hazard of her own person when there might be

hope of some good

to the church thereby (verse 16.)

For the
the

contrary,

Meroz was cursed by the angel


'

of

the Lord, because they

came not up

to the
v.

help of

Lord against the mighty.'

(Judges

23.)

"Though men cannot help the Lord


personally, yet they
his cause

essentially or

may be said to
;

help him relatively in


his cause

and people

when they own


side,

and
his

people,

and appear on that

when Satan and

instruments raise persecutions and reproaches against

them.

cases
16)
stand.

Though
'

the

Lord needs not men's help

in such
inter'

for

cessor, his
li.

when he saw there was no man, no own arm brought salvation unto liim
it

(Isa.

yet

is

our duty to show on whose side


will look

we
he

For Christ
'He that
'

upon us
at

as his enemies,
;

that disown his cause


saith
xii.
:

and people
is

such times

as

is

not with me,

against me.'
of

(Matt,
re|
;

30. )

Ai'e the peoj^le

and ways
in

God under

proach?

Christ

is

reproached

them, and with them.'


j

(Rom.

XV. 3.)
it is

"But
This
is

objected,

we

are called fools


title

and

fanatics

the reproachful
of

put by profane

men
is

up-

on the people

God,

in all ages.
coat,

But

if

he

a fool a

who

will

be laughed out of his

much more is he

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


fool

149
that, will

who

will

be laughed out of heaven

haz-

ard the loss of his soul, and salvation, to free himself

from the mocks and


" If

scoffs of a

profane and sinful world.


cross,

Christ

had

not, for

our sakes, endured the

despising the shame,

we could never have been


'

re-

deemed and

saved.

Let us go

forth, therefore,

unto

him without the camp, bearing


xiii.

his reproach.'

(Heb.

18.)

In the same
'

epistle, the Christian

Hebrews

are exhorted to

call to

in which, after they

remembrance the former days were illuminated, they endured a

great tight of afflictions, partly whilst they were

made
and
that

a gazingstock, both by reproaches and afflictions,


partly whilst they

became companions
x.

of

them

were so used.'

(Heb.

82, 38.)

Let us do likewise,

and own the reproached and persecuted people, and


cause of Christ, in suffering times
"

tection

Withhold not countenance, entertainment and profrom such, if they come to us from France
place.

Germany, [England,] or any other

getful to entertain strangers, for thereby

Be not forsome have en'

tertained angels unawares."


in bonds, as bovxnd with
versity, as
xiii. 2, 3.
'

'

Remember them that


who suffer
Moab,
of

are

them, and them

ad-

being yourselves also in the body.'

(Heb.
sa>'in":

The Lord required

this

of

Make

day

thy xhadoir as the ni</ht in the midst


i.

the noon-

e.,

provide safe and comfortable shelter, and

refreshment, for

my

people, in the heat of persecution

and opposition raised against them

'

Hide

the out-

150
casts

SUPPLEMENT TO

hewray not him

t!:af loanderetJi.
;

Let mine outto

casts dwell with thee,

Moab

he thou

a covert

them

from

the face

of
it

the S))oiler.'

(Isa. xvi. 3.)


sliall

" But, again,

may be

objected, so I
?

expose

myself to be

siDoilecl

or troubled

He

tlierefore, to
is

remove

this objection, addetli, 'for

the danger

at

an end, the spoiler ceaseth, the treaders down are con-

sumed out
oiu'

of the land.'

"\Miile

we

are attending to

duty in owning and harboring Christ's witnesses,


will

God
"

be j^roviding for their and our safety by des-

troying those that would destroy' his j)eople.

Two

helps I shaU propound to

arm you

against

those fears of reproach, or danger, whereby

men

are

apt to be drawn to flinch from the cause and witnesses


of Christ in suffering times.
"First, strengthen

your

faith.

A sight of

the invisible

God and an

eye to the recompense of reward so quickfaith

ened and strengthened the


chose rather to suffer

of Moses,

that he

affliction

with the people of God,

than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season, esteeming the reproach of 'Christ greater riches than the
treasures in Egy^^t.'

(Heb.

xi.

25, 26.)

"Secondly, exalt
fear.
all.

God

as the highest object of your


fear

Fear God as he ought to be feared,

him above
Therefore,

The greater fear

will expel the lesser.

the

Lord prescribes

this fearing

him

aright, as the best

remedy against

all fears,

whereby men are wont

to

be

hindered from obeying

God

in those duties that will

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


expose
13.)

151
(Isa. viiL 12,

men

to

hurt fi'om the creature.

The balking of nny duty which God cornniandready way


to

eih is the

bring upon you, by the wrath

of God,

tJtat

very evil lohieh you fear that the doing


lolll

of your duty

expose yoxi to by the wrath of men."

With such a

state of feeling in the public

mind

at

New

Haven, the two Colonels, as they were

called,

met
had

with that kind reception which was considered due at


least to
left

uncondemned

criminals.

Soon

after they

Massachusetts, the king's proclamation denouncing


as traitors of
this

them
news

was received

at Boston.

Before the

reached

New

Haven, they had showed

themselves openly there as at Boston.

Now

they were
a

obhged

to

secrete

themselves.

For more than

month they were hid

in Mr. Davenport's house,

when

they removed across the street to Governor Eaton's,

then occupied by Mr. Jones.

Near the

last of April, the royal

mandate arrived

re-

quiring the Grovernor of Massachusetts to cause the

two Colonels
*

to

be arrested.*
is

The whole community

The following

copy of this mandate found in Mass.


vii., p. 123.

His. Col. 3d Series, Vol.

"CiOVEENOB

OF

NEW-ENGLAND

TO

APPKEHEND WHALLEY AND

GOFEE.

"To

our- trusty

and

well-beloved, the present Governor, or other

Ma-

gistrate or Magistrates, of

our Plantation of New-England.

Chaeles R.
Trusty arid well-beloved, Wee greete you well. Wee being given to understand that Colonell Whalley and Colonell Goffe,

152

SrrpPLEMENT TO

was now alarmed, and the Governor and Council of Massachusetts seem to have set about in earnest to apprehend and dehver up the

two zealous

royalists,

victims. They deputized Thomas Kellond and Thomas

Kirk, just from Eno-land, to go through the


in pursuit of them.

Colonies

They came

into the

jurisdiction

the

New Haven

Leete, at

Colony and caUed upon Governor Guilford, then acting magistrate. He assur-

ed them that he had not seen the

men in

several weeks,

and
tion.

that they

had j)robably gone out of the jurisdicThey came to New Haven two days after, with
Governor
to the magistrate of

a letter from the

the

town, advising the town court to be called together,

and search to be made.

Various hindrances for some

days prevented any further progress in the matter.

Governor Leete, who had now arrived


their search, because the king's

at

New

Haven,

objected to giving them a special wan-ant authorizing

mandate which they

for the execrable murder of our KoyFather of glorious memory, are lately arrived at New England, where they hope to shroud themselves securely from the justice of our laws ;Our will and pleasure is, and wee do hereby expressly require and command you forthwith, upon the
all

who stand here convicted

receipt of these our letters, to cause both the said persons to be apprehended, and with the first opportunity sent over hither, under a strict care to receive according to their demerits. Wee are confident of your readiness and diligence to perform your duty and so bid you farewell. " Cxiven at our Court at Whitehall, the fifth day of March. 161.
;

"By
Tno.

his Majesty's

command,
'Edw. Nicholas.

Endeoott, Governor."

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

153

brought with them was addressed

to the

Governor

of

New

England, and he would not recognize any such

officer.

When

they asked the magistrates

if

they

would honor and obey the king


ernor replied, "

in this affair, the

Gov-

We

honor his Majesty, but we have

tender consciences."
they would
they would

When

further

asked,

whether

own
first

his Majesty or not, they replied,

"That

know whether

his Majesty

would own

them."

The

jjursuers insisted that


in the town,

the regicides were hid


to the

somewhere

and pointed
Jones.
at

houses of

Mr. Davenport
that they
tlu'eatened

and

Mr.

They had proof

had been seen

Mr. Davenport's, and


penalties for concealing
also offered

him with severe


traitors.

and comforting

They

great rexlfter

wards to any who should aid in their

arrests,

various delays the court gave them authority to proceed.

diligent

search was

made throughout

the colony,

but the fugitives were not to be found.

During most

of this time the Colonels

were

in the im-

mediate vicinity of

New

Haven.

On

the day in which

their pursuers arrived at Guilford, they

had

left their

concealment

at

New

Haven, and escaped

to a mill at

West Rock, where they spent


days, they were secreted
bj'

the Sabbath.

For two

some

friends at

Woodin-

bridge,

and on the 15th of May took up

their residence

in a cave at

West Rock,

mountainous and almost

accessible

wild in the vicinity of

New

Haven.

Here

154

SUPPLEMENT TO
till

they were concealed

the 11th of June, while the

whole colony was

seai'ched.

"Once, when they ven-

tured out of the cave for provisions, they hid themselver

under a bridge, while

their pursuers

passed

over

it.

At another time, they met the

sheriff,

who
but

had the warrant

for their execution, in his pocket,


lives,

they fought for their

and before they could pro-

cure assistance, escaped into the woods."*

While

at the

cave, they

were informed

of all that

was going

on,

and stood ready

to surrender themselves

rather than that any one should suffer through theu'

concealment.

At

last,

finding that Mr. Davenport was

in danger of suffering on theii' account, they

came

into

the

town

for the

purpose of surrendering themselves.


for

Here they remained


concealing them.

two days, and were seen so


Davenport from the charge
of

publicly, as to clear Mr.


still

On
trates

the second day, while the Governor

and Magis-

were consulting

in reference to their case, the

two Colonels suddenly disappeared, and when the


search for them was renewed, they coidd not be found.

Where

they put themselves, for that day,

we know

not,

but soon, undoubtedly, the cave became their asylum,

where some friendly hands ministered


ties.

to their necessi-

As

their hiding place continued undisclosed, the

zeal of their pursuers gradually died away, the fugitives

retired to Hadley,
*

Mass.,

where they

lived for

some

Stiles'

History of the Judges.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

155

years in devout seclusion, and at last died in peace.*

In reference to the matter of the regicides, it may be remarked, that while the magistrates wished to

show

their loyalty to the king,


efforts to aid the

and as we have

seen,

made some
still

pursuers
to

in their arrest, their hiding-

but few knew or desired

know

places,

and these could not be tempted either by the


to betray

fear of punishment, or the hope of reward,

them.

The

overruling providence of

God

preserved

them

in the midst of their threatened danger,


:

and

as

Davenport afterwards wrote

"The same Providence

could have done the same, in the same circumstances,


if

they had been in London, or in the Tower." f

* James Dixwell, another of the regicide Judges resided for some years at New Haven, where he was known by the name of James Davis, Esq. He died in 1689, and was buried in the

rear of the First (Centre) Church, close to the graves of Governor Eaton and Governor Jones. An ancient stone, in the old burying ground, marked the spot, with this charged inscription:

"J. D. Esq., DECEASED,

March

YB 18th, in ye 82d

year

;or HIS AGE, 1688-9."


'

It is said that the

I'conveyed to

New Haven, and


is

the tradition

bodies of Whalley and Goffe were secretly also buried near this spot and strongly confirmed by the two stones there
;

standing, on one of which are the initials "E. W., 1678," and on the other "M. G., 80," the Mof which, with a line drawn under (evidently intentional,) may be taken for an inverted W.,

and the number,


t

as fixing the date of his death, 1680.

See letter of Mr.

Davenport, given in edition of

IS.'Jl,

p.

356.

Some handling has recently been made of this letter of Mr. Davenport addressed to Sir Thomas Temple, the Boston Agent of King Charles II., printed, first, in Mass. His. CoUecHon. 'tions, 3 Series, Vol. viii, p. 327, and "which," says

156
President

SUPPLEMENT TO
Stiles, in his "

History of the Judges," at:

tributes thus

much

to Mr. Davenport,

"

While these

matters were going on, everything depended upon Mr.

Davenport's firmness.

If

he gave out

all

was gone

;"

and

adds, "

Mr. Davenport was a

man

of intrepid res-

olution
affairs,

and firmness,

of greater discernment in public

and

in every
all

way superior

in abilities to the

Governor and
He,
like

concerned.

He saw

they

all

gave up.

Mount
upon

Atlas stood firm and alone, and took


himself.

the whole
selors,

Better than any of the coun-

he knew that aU that had been done before the mandate, could be vindicated by

arrival of the royal

James Savage, "tends to inculpate, or exculpate, Mr. D. according to the eyes with which it is read."
It is

evident the magistrates were not in haste to execute


its

the royal mandate, wnich, by an error that of itself well nigh

rendered

execution void, was addressed to "the Governor of

officer was known. This, and proved a source of embarrassment to the General Court, when at last, they were called together. I see no evidence that Mr. Davenport exceeded the bounds of truth in any of his statements, as has been dexterously intimated. He thus writes "The Colonels hearing that some who entertained them at their houses, were in extreme danger upon that account, to prevent the same, came from another colony where they were, and had been some time, to New Haven, professing that their true intention, in their coming at that time, was to yield themselves to be apprehended for the aforesaid jjurpose, and accordingly they stayed two days. This was known in the town. The De^juty Governor waited for the coming of the Governor and other magistrates to this town, on the second day, which they also did, according to the former agreement. Immediately iipon their coming together, they fell into a consultation, being out of any fear of that which followed. Before they had issued their consultation, which was not long, the

New England." when no such


other objections,

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


the laws of liosiDitality to

157

unconvicted criminals, and

could not, in a court of law, be construed into even a


susjaicion of treason.
It

might subject him

to

some

in-

conveniences, perhaps j)rosecutions, but could not be fatal a thing which, perhaps, the others doubted.

Supported by
he therefore

his

good

sense,

and deep discernment,

felt

himself secure.

What

staggered Govother

ernor Endicott, a
hearts of
enport.

man

of

heroic fortitude, and

oak

at

Boston, never staggered Mr. Dav-

Great minds display themselves on trying and

Colonels were gone away; no

man knowing how or whither. search was renewed and many sent forth on foot and horseback to recover them into their hands. But all in vain. I believe if his Majesty rightly understood the circumstances of this case, he would not be displeased with our Magistrates, but acquiesce in the Providence of the Most High, knowing that the way of man is not in himself; but God worketh all things according to the counsel of his own will. " Thus in the absence of contrary proof, we are bound to believe the truthfulness of that which the author herein
Whereupon
a diligent
iffi

riueth.

That the two Colonels may have beenout side the Colony is Plausible, for they were within a few hours of the confines of
Vlanhadoes, or nearer
still to

the lines of the Connecticut Colony.

The
lolony,

"sometime"

in

may have been

were outside of the "the very indefinite period" as quali-

which they

ied in the story of Rutherford Trowbridge and Capt. Thomas aice, in a paper by Rev. Chauncey Goodrich, on the Invasion of vfew Haven by the British. (New Haven Historical Society

Papers pp.
PFith

aart of Elisha,

That Mr. Davenport may have acted the led the forces of King Benhadad, smitten partial blindness, into the city of Samaria, while they
173, 4.)

who

vere yet seeking the captivity of the very

ng them, we do not deny (2 Kings,


)roof.
21

6,

man who was guid19) but we call for

158
great occasions.
sion.

SUPPLEMENT TO

He was

man

for this trying occafidelity

Davenport's enlightened greatness,

and

intrepidity, saved the Judges."

Dr. Bacon, in narrating the history of the Judges,


also says
:

"These details show in a striding light the

character of Mr. Davenport," and adds, "I

know not
fidelity to

what incident

in history exhibits a

more admirable
and

combination of courage and adroitness, of


friendship, of
less,
ty,

magnanimity

in distress,

of the fear-

yet discreet assertion of great jDrinciples of liber-

than can be found in this simple story of the pro-

tection of the regicides

by the men

of

New

Haven.
is

And what
fact,

gives to

all

the rest a higher dignity,

the

that the courage which feared not the wrath of

the king, was not fool hardiness or passion, but faith in

God who bade them


to

hide the outcasts, and be a covert

them from the

face of the spoiler.

The rude mu-

nition of

rocks that sheltered the fugitives

when they
monthe
Till

were chased into dens and caves of the

earth, is a

ument more eloquent than arch or


mountains
shall melt, let
is

obelisk.

position to tyrants

it bear the inscrij^tion, 'Opobedience to God.' "*

In 1GG2, after his restoration, Charles

II.

granted

through the agency of Governor Winthro]:) to the people of Connecticut a charter with the amplest privileges,

which was

also designed to include the colony of


is

New

* This inscription Cave at West Eock.

placed by a modern hand on the Judges

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

159

Haveu.* Great

efforts

were made

at this time to unite

the two colonies.


jority of the

This was warmly opposed by a ma-

people of

New Haven

colony.

They were

attached to their peculiar polity and feared such a

union might have an unfavorable bearing on the purity of their churches,

and on

their general prosperity.

Mr. Davenport took an active part in this resistance.

The people

of

the

Connecticut colony, however,

en-

* Governor John Winthrop, of Connecticut, was the son of Governor John Winthrop, "the father of Massachusetts." He was a man of eminent abilities and commanding influence, learned and jjious. He so far ingratiated himself into the favor of Charles II. and Lord Clarendon, that while in England in 1662, he obtained from the king a charter embracing in its limits all that tract of country which lies between the Narragansett River and the Pacific Ocean, and conferring upon the colonists unqualified powers to govern themselves. Mr. Winthrop, it is said, had "an extraordinary ring," given to his granfather by Charles I., which he presented to the king. This exceedingly pleased his majesty, and perhaps had some infliience in procuring the grant. This was the charter which King James II. in 1686 sent Sir Edmund Andross to take away from the people of Connecticut, but by the adroitness of Capt. Wadsworth, it was hid in a large hollow oak which stood till 1856, in Hartford, and known by the name of Charter Oak.

Pequot,

Gov. Winthrop's principal residence in Connecticut was at now New London. Great efi"orts were made by Mr. Davenport to induce his removal to New Haven and the town
voted to give him a house. H e declined their generous donation but resided there about two years. One reason why the people of New Haven were so anxious to have Mr. Winthrop

make

his residence there


of letters

was his medical knowledge and

skill.

A number

from Mr. Davenport to Governor Win-

throp, were printed in the

Appendix

to edition of 1851.

160

SUPPLEMENT TO
unfaii-

deavored by

means

to bring

them under
t

their

jurisdiction without their consent.

In October, after the arrival of the


of magistrates at

chai'ter,

the court

New

Haven, according to usage, apas

pointed the 23d of that month,

a day of

pubHc

thanksgiving, and at the same time ordered "that the

29th of this month be kept as a day of extraordinaiy


seeking of

God by

fasting

and prayer

for his

guidance

of the colony in this

weighty business about joining


afflicted

with Connecticut colony, and for the


the Church and people of

state of

God

in

our native countiy,

and

in other parts of the world."

"Two
freemen

days after that day of fasting," says Dr. Bacon,

"the records of the town show us a meeting of the


at

which a copy of the charter was exhibited,

together with a writing from some gentlemen of Connecticut, signifying that they looked

upon

New Haven
Mr. Daven-

as being within their bounds.

Mr. Davenport, and his

colleague Mr. Street were both present.

port appears to have addressed the meeting at great


length.

He

stated

some important

facts, illustrating

the haste, unkindness, and arrogance, with which their

brethren of the other colony had proceeded in the


matter.

He showed what

pledges he had received

from Mr. Winthrop that so unrighteous an act should


not be attempted.
first,

that

der

the

He went into an argument to prove, New Haven was not of course included uncharter, and secondly, that New Haven

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


ouglit

161

not voluntarily to enter into such a union

and he

concluded

by

giving-

directions

as

to

the

answer that should be returned to the men of Connecticut,


'that

they

may

see

their

evil

in

what
state,

they have done, and restore us to our former


that so

we and they may

live

together in unity and

amity for the future.'


bate
;

Mr. Street folhnved in the de-

he declared that he looked upon Mr.

Daven-

port's arguments as unanswerable, he thought 'that

both Church and town had cause to bless

God

for the

wisdom held forth in them,' he exhorted the freemen


'to

keep the ends and rules of Christ

in their eye,

and

then

God would
'

stand by them

;'

and he concluded by

seconding Mr. Davenport's directions respecting an


answer,

with

one

sci'ipture

out of Isaiah

xiv.

32

[What
nation
?

shall

one then answer the messengers of the


the

that

Lord hath founded


ti'ust in it
;]

Zion, and the

poor of his people shall

and from thence

did advise that the answer should be of faith and not


of fear.'
bate,
"

The decision
in

of the meeting, alter a full de-

was

accordance with the advice thus given.


of

Four days afterwards, the freemen

the whole

colony were convened at


tion but
in full assembly.

New
To

Haven, not by delegathat convention, Gov-

ernor Leete submitted the communication which had

been received from Connecticut, and the brief reply


which had been made by the committee appointed by
the last General Court.

These writings having been

162

SUPPLEMENT TO

read, together witli the copy of the charter, the Gover-

nor called the attention of the meeting to the two


tinct points

dis-

which the communication from Connecticut

presented for their consideration, namely, the claim


that the charter necessarily included them,

and that they

were therefore bound

to submit,

and the

invitation to a

voluntary and peaceful union.


ple

After

this,

that the peo-

might have time


for

for consideration, the


half,
'

assembly

was dismissed

an hour and a

then to meet
the meeting

again at the beat of the drum.'

When

was again opened, Mr. Davenport was called upon by


the Governor to express his views.
"
,

Mr. Davenport said

'that

according to this occasion


place,'

he should discharge the duty of his

and pro-

read to them his own thoughts, which he down in writing, and which he desired might remain his own till they [the freemen of the colony]

posed to
set

'

had

should be fully satisfied in them, for he would leave


others to walk according to the Hght which
give

God should

them

in this business.'

Accordingly he read some


j

reasons

why

the people of Connecticut ought not to

construe their charter as including

New Haven

colony,

and why

New Haven

might not voluntarily join with


leaving his written

Connecticut

and

then retired,

thoughts for the consideration of the assembly.

The
j

Governor carefully abstained from giving any opinion;


but urged the freemen to speak their minds, that the
substance of the answer might proceed from them.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


After the matter had been 'hxrgely debated
stance of the answer was
a^'reed upon, and
'

163
the
it

sub-

was defirst,

termined that the points of the reply shoukl be,


'due witness-bearing against the
sin'

of Connectic-ut in

invading their independence

next, a

demand

that

till

Mr. Winthrop should return, or till they should otherwise obtain satisfaction, the whole matter should be
deferred and the jurisdiction of

New Haven
;

be perthirdly,

mitted to proceed without interruption

and

a resolution to do nothing without taking advice from the other confederate colonies.

committee incluto

ding

all

the magistrates

and elders was appointed


it

prepare such an answer and to forward


ties of Connecticut.

to the authori-

up
"

into form

The by the committee,'* bears strong marks


'answer of the
of

freemen drawn

of the

workmanship

Mr. Davenport.

The correspondence thus begun between the two

colonies

was continued through several years, while Connecticut was gaining strength by steady encroachment, and New Haven, at first the weaker party, was
gradually weakened by defections, and by the increas-

ing burdens which the controversy occasioned. The great body of the people here loved their indepen-

dence and their own pecuhar


which,'
said
they,
'

polity.

'

The ends

for

we

left

our dear native country,


difficulties

and

were willing to

undergo the

which we

have since met in this wilderness, yet fresh in our re*

Found in Trumbull's History

of Connecticut, vol.

i.,

515.

164

SUPPLEMENT TO

membrance,'

were

'

to

advance the kingdom of our


to

Lord Jesus Christ and


ends we
ence so
his

enjoy the Hberties of the


;'

Gospel in purity with peace


still

and these are

'the only

joursue, having- hitherto

found by experius,

much

of the presence of

God mth

and

of

good and compassion towards us

in so doing, for

these

many

years.

To

these ends their peculiar insti-

tutions

seemed

in their

judgment best adapted.

To

them

their little repviblic of a Christian

seemed

as near a perfect
in

model
this

commonwealth, as could be
Cato

world of imperfection.

in his 'little senate'

at Utica, standing against the j)ower of Caesar, for the

ancient constitution of his country, was actuated by no

sentiment higher or more admirable than that which


actuated them.

In

all

the negotiations of that

crisis,

the influence of Mr. Davenport was conspicuous.

The

numerous
claims of
his mind.

letters

and remonstrances

in

which the

New Haven

Avere argued, bear the

stamp of

Their clearness in the statement of the case,

their cogency in the argument, their dignity of

manner,

with slight occasional manifestation of sarcastic humor,

and the simple

jDiety

that breathes so naturally through


as the author."*

them
It

all,

indicate
till

him

was not

the beginning of 1665, that this con-

troversy w-as ended.


rights of
all

At that time an invasion of the


colonies

the

New England

was threatened
to the

by grants

of large territories

made

Duke

of

*Historical Discourses, pp. 135-138.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

165

York, the brother of the khv^, and a general commission for

him

to settle the peace of the colonies


afifairs.

and su-

perintend their

Fearfiil

not only that their

own

interests but the

common

interests of all the oth-

er colonies, as well as the cause of truth

and hbertj^

might now

suffer,

the

New Haven

colony came to a

unanimous decision
ticut,

to submit to the claims of Connecand Mr. Davenport, yielding with many regrets

to the necessity of the measure,

was chosen one

of the

committee for consumating the union.

In 1651, the second church

in Boston,

then just

formed, had extended a call to Mr. Davenport, to settle

among them, which however, he felt it his duty to decline. Sixteen years had now passed away. Mr. Davenport had become an old man.

His beloved Eaton

and many more of


theii-

his fellow pilgrims

had passed

to

reward

while a

new

generation had risen up

around him.

Great changes had taken place.


grief,

There

were some things that gave him


full of

but others were

hope and promise.

Yet

his zeal

and

activity re-

mained unabated.
eveiy good work.
fection

His heart and hand were ready for

For thirty years he had lived in the afand undiminished confidence of his church.
all

His influence was also lent to

the great questions that

concerned the interest of this as well as the other colonies of New England. But new scenes and trials were

mow opening before

him.

In 1667, the Rev. John Wilson,

who had been

asso-

166

SUPPLEMENT TO

ciated with the distinguished Cotton

and Norton, as
That was

pastor of the First Church in Boston, died.

the oldest church except the one at Plymouth, and the

most considerable one in the


of Mr. Wilson,

colonies.

On

the death
fitted

Mr. Davenport was thought best

to succeed the
there.

eminent characters who had ministered


to this, his influence

In addition
that

seemed

called

for

at

time to resist the introduction into the

churches of that region of Avhat was then called the


"

Half-way covenant," by which the children of parents

not pious, received baptism

an

innovation which Mr.


in Holland.

Davenport had so strenuously opposed


This question was

now

agitating the whole of

New

England.
In 1657, a synod had convened to discuss this question,

and the party

in favor of so

far considering per-

sons not convicted of scandalous practices as church

members, as

to allow

them

to have their children bap-

tized, i^revailed.

The same

decision prevailed at an-

other synod, in 1662.

Mr. Davenport was not a

memwas

ber of this synod, but he sent his written opinion,


which, though the synod refused to hear
" generally transcribed,"
it

read,

and put within reach of the


of concurrence in

members, and a report

the

views

which he presented, was afterwards made


nority.

by the mi-

On
out,

the 27th of September, (1667,) the call was


to

made
Mr.

and a committee sent

New Haven

to invite

THE DAVENPOBT FAMILY.


Davenport's removal to Boston.

167
well

The

known

op-

position of their candidate to the innovation

allowed

by the "Synodists," awakened opposition on the part


of

some

thirty

prominent members of the Boston


Davenport's

church, to Mr.

coming

among them.

This opposition had no effect in leading him to decline


the caU.

He
felt

looked upon the application with favor,

and

felt it his

duty to accept.

His church, on the oth-

er hand,

unwilling to part with one


sjiiritual

who had
guide,

so

long been their counselor and

and

withheld their formal assent to his removal.

The importunities

of the church at Boston, at last

led to the decision, that -^hile they would not take the
responsibility of consenting to his removal, yet,
if it

was
him.

his

determination to go, they would not oppose


this partial acquiescence in his

At

own judgment,

he

felt at liberty to

accept the call to Boston, and his

removal from

New Haven

took place the last of April,

just thirty years after the

commencement
his
son,

of his minis-

try there.

He

arrived with his family at Boston, on

the 2d of May.*

He and

and

their wives,

were received into the church on the 11th of October,

and on the 9th


*

of

December he was

installed.

Diary, "1668, 2d clay, 3cl month [May,] came Mr. John Davenport to towne, with his wife, sonn, and sonn's family was mett by many of A great shower of extraordinary dropps of rain fell the town. as they entered the end of the Town, but Mr. Davenport and his wife were sheltered in a coach of Mrs. Searls', who went to meet them.
Hull's
at 3 or 4 in

From John

afternoon,

168

SUPPLEMENT TO

"His removal, under such circumstances," says Dr.


Bacon, "occasioned

much difficulty. The minority of the

church in Boston charged him and the other elders


with equivocation, because they communicated to the
church, only those parts of the letters from
ven, which

New Hait

seemed

to imply a dismission, whereas,


if

was maintained, that

the whole had been read,

it

would have appeared that there was no dismission.


Several letters were written, and messengers were sent

from that church to


this

this, in

the hope of j^revailing on


'

church

[at

New Haven]

to declare their

owning

of

the letter sent from them, to be a true dismission of

Mr. Davenport.'

Of that correspondence, nothing


of

re-

mains but a fragment

one of the letters from the


is

New Haven

church.

That fragment

so full of rev-

erent affection towards their pastor, even after he

had
of

torn himself away from them, and breathes so

much

the Christian
tion.
'

spirit,

that

it is

well worthy of preservait

Though
9.

you,' say they, 'judge

the last expe-

"Dec.

Mr. Davenijort and Mr. Allen were ordeyned."

Commiinicated by Mr. Henry Davenport of Boston, to whom the writer was indebted for various collections from that city, obtained through him for edition of 1851. This gentleman's first ancestor in this country was Thomas
Davenport,
of

who

settled at Dorchester, Massachusetts, in 1640,

whose numerous descendants he has gathered much informFrom what jjart of England this Thomas Davenport, ation. and also Captain Richard Davenport who arrived in America with Governor Endicott in 1628, came, has not been ascertained. See New England Historical and Genealogical Register, vol. iv., pp. Ill and 351.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


dient for your
relief,

169
of

and

tlie

remedy

some

evils

growing
if

in the country, as also,

we might do

the same,

we had nothing

before our eyes but his accomplish-

ments and

fitness for liigh service to Grod, in his

church
in leav-

but being so much

in the dark about his

way

ing this church and joining to yours, that

we

are not
;

without doubts and fears of some uncomfortable issue

we

cannot, therefore, clearly act in such a

way

as
as

is

ex-

pected and desired.

We are of the
to your

same mind
letter,

when
God,

we returned an answer
pressing ourselves
:

first

thus ex-

We see no cause, nor


It
is

call of

to resign our reverend pastor to the church of Boston

by an immediate

act of ours, therefore, not

by a formgrief,

al dismission under our hands.

our great
for him,

and sore

affliction,

that

we cannot do
us,

whom

we

so highly esteem in love for his works' sake and

profitable labors

among

what

is

desh'ed,

without

wrong

to our consciences.

Anything that we have or

are, beside

our consciences,

we

are ready to lay

down
shall

at his feet

such

is

our honorable respect to him, our

love to peace, our desire of your supply, that

we

go as

far as

we

safely can, in order to his

and your sat-

isfaction in this matter, having before us for our war-

rant. Acts xxi. 14

we

ceased,

saying,

'When he would not persuaded, The will of the Lord be done.' we could
say touching

Therefore, to suppress what


that passage in our

first letter,

whereof such hold hath


said in our last letter to

heen taken, and what we have

170

SUPPLEMENT TO

you, of our reverend pastor's making null the liberty before granted, which,
clearly to demonstrate
;

we doubt
yet, if

not,

we

are

able
(buti
in
siI

this will

satisfy

not otherwise,)
lence,

we

are content to
botli

wave and bury

and leave

yourselves and him to


(w^ithout

make

what improvement you see cause

any clog or

impediment from us upon that account,)


before mentioned.
in

of the liberty

'As he hath been a faithful laborer

God's vineyard at New Haven, for many years, to the

bringing
of

home

of man}' souls to
it is,

God, and building up


be our prayer to

many

others, so

and

shall

God

to lengthen his life

and tranquility in Boston,


assist

to double

his Spirit

upon him,

him
of

in his work,

and make

him a blessed instrument,

much good

to yourselves
all

and many

others.

The good Lord pardon, on

hands, what he hath seen amiss in these actings and


motions, that no sinful malignity

may

obstruct or hin-

der God's blessing upon churches or church administrations.

As himself and

his son have desired,

we do
desir-

dismiss unto your holy fellowship Mr.


junior,

John Davenport,
becometh

and Mrs. Davenport, elder and younger,


as

ing you to receive them in the Lord,


saints,

and imploring Almighty God

for his blessing

upon them from


nion,

his holy ordinances in their

commugrace

and walking with you.


all

The God

of

all

supply

your and our need, according to his riches

in glory

through Jesus Christ.

Thus craving your

prayers for us in our afflicted condition,

we

take our

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


leave,

171

and

rest yours in the fellowship of the gospel.

Nicholas Street,
In the uame, and with the consent of the Church " <= of Christ at New Haven.'

Mr. Davenport was


years of age.

at this

time more than seventy

"What

minister," asks the writer above


life,

quoted, "so far advanced in

would now be caUed


of the

from one church to another, because


of his qualifications for usefulness?

eminency
there

When was

ever another such

instance of competition

and contro-

enjoyment of the minversy between churches for the invahd, had numbered istry of one who, always an

more than three


*

score years

and ten?

How

rarely

His. Discourses, 143-145.

The

date of this letter was 12th

October, 1668.
list of the not be uninteresting in this place to add a as pastors Davenport Mr. succeeded have who estimable men of the First Church in New Haven. short The Kev. Samuel Eaton, and Rev. William Hook, for a Mr. Davenport, acted as teachers during the ministry of

It

may

time after the restoration both of whom returned to England, and succeeded Rev. these To were silenced for non-conformity. assistant. Nicholas Street, who was installed as Mr. Davenport's till Mr. ministry the in associate his in 1659, and continued sole charge of Davenport's removal to Boston, when he had the
the church
till

his death, in 1674,

when

for

eleven years there

was no
pastor

settled pastor.

continued sole Rev. James Pierpont was settled in 1685, and Rev. James Noyes, son of Rev. till his death, in 1714. Noyes, one James Noyes of Stonington, whose father was James July 4, installed was Massachusetts, of the early settlers of his death, in 1761, when 1716, and continued their pastor till
the Rev. Chauncey Whittlesey, who had been and was ceeded as sole pastor. Mr. Whittlesey died 1787,
his associate, sucfol-

172

SUPPLEMENT TO

can you find a church

who when

a minister has

torn

himself away from them, retain for him so strong and

reverent an affection?"

portion of the church in Boston

still

protested

against the views of Mr. Davenport, twenty-eight of

whom
known
happy
es,

withdrew and formed a new organization now


as the "

Old South Church

in Boston."

An un-

feeling long existed

between these two churchall

and the defection spread throughout


It

New Eng-

land.

was not

till

within the last half century that

the views of which Mr. Davenport was so long the

champion triumphed.
Mr. Davenport's ministry, which had lasted nearly

twenty years in England, and thirty in New Haven, was


of short duration in Boston.
al,

At the time
full

of his

remov-

his

mental powers were in

vigor and the church


of his

there anticiiDated the

enjoyment

ministiy for

lowed by Eev. James Dana, D. D., who was settled in 1787, and was dismissed in 1805. The Kev Moses Stiiart was ordained as pastor, March 5, 1805, and was dismissed in 1809, to accept a professorship in the Theological Seminary at Andover, Mass. On the 8th of April, 1812, the vacancy was supplied by the ordination of the Rev, Nathaniel W. Taylor, who was dismissed in 1822, to accept the Dwight professorship of Theology in Yale College. The Rev. Leonard Bacon, D. D. L. L. D., was installed in 1825, and continued in the active pastorate till 1866, since which time he has stood in the relation of Pa.s/o?- Emeritus and is now also Lecturer on Chui'ch Polity and American Church History in the Theological Department of Yale College. The Rev. George L. Walker, D. D., was installed in 1868, and dismissed in 1873. Rev. Frederick Alphonso Noble, D. D., the present pastor was installed November 3, 1875.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

173
fast

many

years.

But

bis services

on earth were

draw-

ing to a close.
Gosjoel

He had

labored

but about two years,

among them in the when on the 15th of

;March, 1670, he was suddenly seized with an apoplexy

which he was dismissed from a life of faithful and unremitted labor, and removed to his eternal rest. He
in

died in the seventy-third year of his age, and was

buried with every testimonial of respect in the tomb of the venerated Cotton.*

Mr. Davenport was a great scholar.

From

his early

youth to his death he was devoted to study.


lucubrations of his which in

"Those

London were protracted


were not discontinued

into the late hours of the night,

when he removed
which
is

into a deeper wilderness than that

now spread around

the base of the


continually

Rocky
in

Mountains. "t

He was

"almost

his

study and family, except some public work or private duty call him forth ;"| and he was so close and bent a student that it excited the attention of the wild
dians in his vicinity,
*This tomb
is

Into

who used to call him, according

in the burying-groiind of the Stone Chapel

Church on Tremont street. A broad slate stone moniiment marks the spot, on which are the following inscriptions: "Here Lye Intombed the Bodyes of the Famous Reverend and Learned Pastors of the First Church of CHELST in Boston, viz. Mr. John Cotton, aged 67 years, Deceased, December 23d, 1652. Mr. John Davenport, aged 72 years, Deceased, March the 15, 1670. Mr. John Oxenbridge, aged 66 years, Deceased, December 28, 1674."
t

Dr. Bacon,
23

Church Records

of

New Haven.

174
their

SUPPLEMENT TO

custom of applying significant or descriptive


I

names, ^'So-big-stHdi/-man."*
"While Mr. Davenpoi-t pursued an extensive range of

study so as justly to merit the appellation of a universal scholar, yet

his favorite

study was Theology, in

which he arrived at great attainments.

The copious

quotations from the Scriptures which abound in his

sermons for proofs

of doctrine

and

illustration of argu-

ment show
out but
his

a familiarity with the

Sacred Writings

al-

most unparalleled. In preparing


jiart of his

for the pulpit he


little

wrote
use of

sermon and made but

manuscript in public.

Says one of his cotempora-

ries,

"He was

a person

beyond exception and compare


and that even
in his latest

for all ministerial abilities,

years he was of that vivacity that the strength of his

memory, profoundness
his elocution

of his

judgment, fioridness of
abated in
him."-j-

were

httle if at all

An-

other (Dr.

Increase Mather,)

who
this

in

his

youth, was
divine, says,

wont
"

to receive counsel

from

aged

He was

a princely preacher.
in his

I have heard

some say

who knew him


ery,

younger years that he was then

very fervent and vehement as to the manner of his deliv-

but in his later years he did very

much
m-

imitate Mr.

Cotton,

whom,

in the gravity of his

countenance he did
ora ferebaf."X

somewhat resemble.
"Let us
*

Sic

ille

manuf^,

call up," says Dr.


III. 56.

Bacon, " the shade of our

Mather, Magnalia,

Hubbard's History of Mass.

602, 603.

Magnalia

III.

10.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


ancient prophet.*
folds of his

175

I see liim rising in his pulpit.

The

gown

conceal in part the slenderness of his

figure, woi'n thin

with years of infirmity.

The broad

white bands falling upon his breast,

starched and

smooth,

the black

round

cap,

from beneath which a

few snowy locks show themselves,

the round face and


dark bright eye,
fire
is

delicate features, which but for the short white beard

might seem almost feminine,

the

which shows that age has not yet dimmed the


in,

withfixed
it,

complete the venerable image.


He names
his text.

Every eye

upon him.
rise to

As he reads

all

show

their reverence for the 'Scripture breath-

ed of God.'
ceeds.

After they have been seated again he pro-

He
'

unfolds his text historically and


it

critically.

He
'

raises

from

some one point

of

'doctrine.'
of

He

proves

that doctrine

by an induction

instances

from Scripture, or by the accumulation of proof-texts.

He
sons

ilhistrates

it,

shows

its

connections with

other

truths,
'

and

justifies it to

the understanding, by 'reaof things,

drawn from the nature

and evolving and applies


his

the philosophy of the subject.

He

closes,

his discourse with 'uses' or inferences

drawn from

doctrine for 'instruction,' or 'comfort,' or 'admonition,' or 'exhortation,'


hour-glass.
till

the last sands are falling in the


listening

the

Meanwhile

congregation

knows no
*

weariness.

The weighty thought, the cogent

See Frontispiece. The original painting is in the Alnmni Hall, Yale College, New Haven, and from a date on the canvass, seems to have been taken the year of his death.

176

SUPPLEMENT TO
illustration, the

argument, the flashing


to affection or

strong appeal

to hope, the

pungent

application, the

flow of soul in the fervid yet dignified utterance


fast

keep

hold on their attention.


of his doctrine,' says

'They

sit

under the shadit

ow

Hubbard,

'as

were with

great delight, and find the fruit thereof sweet to their


taste.'

"*

It

may

further be

added, Mr. Davenport

was a

most

faithful patriot.

interests of the
laid,

He was engaged New England Colonies.

in all the great

His j)lans were

not for the good of the generation then existing

alone

they embodied j)rineij)les


coming
i:)articularly

which were designed


ages.

to develop their fruit for

But his

efforts

were more
colonj^ of

directed to the welfare of the

which he and his associate, Eaton, were styled

the Aaron and Moses.

Professor Kingsley, in speaking of these two men,


says
:

"Mr Davenport was a man


and firmness
of resolve

of

more native ardor


of printo en-

that his associate,


ciple

and possessed that fixedness


which
fitted

him

counter opposition, and to embark in

difficult

and

dangerous enterprises.
he adopted in their
full

The opinions
extent
;

of the Puritans,

and persecution as
of ardent tempera-

usually happens in the case of

men

ment, instead of breaking his

spirit,

forced him to the

extremes of his system.

He

thought that reformers


halt in their course
;

were prone to
*

linger,

and even to

Historical Discourses, p. 149.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

177

and that

after they

bad made a

certain proo-ress, their


It

further improvement was hopeless.


of
his,

was a saying

that as

'

easily

might the ark have been removed


it first

from the mountains of Ararat, where


as a people get

grounded,
after

any ground

in reformation,

and

beyond the

first

remove
as

of the reformers.'*

He was
'

roused, therefore,

we

are told

by Mather,

to

em-

bark in a design of reformation wherein he might

have an opportunity to drive things in their


as near to the precept

first essay,

and pattern of Scripture as they


feelings,

could be driven.

With these views and


If

he

came

to

New

England.
to

a j^art of his plan of a

commonwealth proved
stood the severe
trial

be impracticable, a part has


;

of time

and his success has

been greater than that of most theorists in goverments.

"I am aware that there has been an impression

among some
was fond
trary,

in this
;

community, that Mr. Davenport


that he

of

power

was overbearing and

arbi-

and exercised a kind

of dictatorship in the Col-

ony.

On what

just foundation such an opinion rests,

I have never been able to discover.


extensive

That he had an
all

and commanding
;

influence in

the colonial

transactions

that he possessed those qualities of


to

mind

which

fitted

him

become

a leader of others, and in-

sensibly to

mould them
is

to his views, there can


this

be no

doubt

but there

no evidence that

ascendency

was ever sought by him, or when possessed, was em*

Mather's Magnalia, 111.

53.

178

SUPPLEMENT TO

ployed for unworthy purposes. Whatever pre-eminence

he attained, was voluntarily conceded to long-tried

and acknowledged
" If

intelligence, integrity

and wisdom.
power,

he had been influenced by a


expect to

thirst for

we might

And

traces of
of

it

in the

Colony laws;

some valuable immunities

the clergy,

some share

granted them in the legislative or judicial departments


of the government.
to

But nothing

of

tliis

character

is

be found there.

On

the contrary, by the

New Hacivil

ven code, the clergy so far from having any


er,

pow-

could not even perform the marriage ceremony,

this

being placed exclusively in the hands of the mag-

istrates.

The church which was formed under


indej^endent

his ad-

vice

and superintendence, was organized on principles


;

strictly

a sort of spiritual democracy, in


'lords brethren.'

win ch,if there

were any lords, they were

But what must place the question out

af all

doubt,

whether Mr. Davenport assumed improj)er power in


the colony,
to
is

the single fact that

when he was

invited
j

Boston in 1668, his removal was universallv opposed


of the town.

by the people
the measure,
assent.

As he was determined

to

leave them, they appear to have silently acquiesced

in|

but never to have given


is

it

tlieii'

formal!

This
to

not the

mode

in

which mankind

actl

when about
It is
*

be relieved from even a moderately ex-

ercised tyranny."*

not alone as a scholar, a pulpit orator,

the

Historical Discourse, pp. 62-64.


THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.
foiTiicler of

179

new commonwealth,
It

or a philanthropist,

that

we

are called to admire the character of Mr. Da-

venj^ort

but as a Christian.
who had
a

was the reigning de-

sire of his heart to see a

pure Gospel church


vital,

a church
he deemed
that

composed of those

experimental union
this,

with Christ, their living head, and for

labor and suffering as of small account.

He had

unwavering confidence

in

God which led him


itself to

to under-

take whatever presented

him

as duty, with an

assurance that in the end the right would always succeed.


It

was

this faith in

God, which sustained him

in the midst of the

many
life.

difficulties

and

trials

which
be-

marked

his eventful

The great question ever


and doth God

fore his mind,

was

Is this right,

require it?

That was
troversy.

to

him the beginning and the end


assured of the divine

of all con:

When
;

command

"

Lay

this foundation

God

doth require

it ;"

he was ready
call.

at the loss of

all

things to yield obedience to the

Prayer was

his strong hold

his mightiest
among the
;

weapon.

Cotton Mather relates that "a young minister,* once


receiving wise and good counsels from this good and

wise and great man, received this

rest, 'that

he should be much
ejaculatory prayers

in ejaculatory prayers

for,

indeed,

man
er

so are they, of them.'

as arrows in the hand of a mighty happy the man that hath his quivis

full

And

it

was believed that he himself


'

was well used

to that sacred skill of

walking with

*Siippo.sed to be his father, Dr. Increase Mather.

180

SUPPLEMENT TO
'

God

and, having his eyes ever towards the Lord' and

'being in the fear of the

Lord

all

the day long,' by the

use of ejaculatory prayers on the innumerable occasions

which every turn

of our lives does bring for these

devotions.

He was

not only constant in more settled,


;

whether
midst of
of his

social
all

or secret, prayers

but

also

in

the

besieging incumbrances, tying the wishes

devout soul to the arrows of ejaculatory prayers,

he would shoot them away to the heavens, from whence

he

still

expected

all

his help."*
;

Such was Mr. Davenpoi-t

such were the fathers of


asks the author of the
for

New

England.

"And what,"
Plymouth,

Historical Discourses, "do


for the Pilgrims of

we claim

them

What

what for the stern old Puritans of the Bay, and of Connecticut, what for the
New Haven ?
Nothing, but that you look

founders of

with candor on what they have done for their posterity

and

for the world.

Their labours, their principles,

their institutions,

have made

New

England, with
'

its

hard

soil,

and

its

cold long winters,

the glory of

all

lands.'

The thousand towns and


show but
from the

villages,

the

decent

sanctuaries not for

for use, croAvning the hillvalleys,

tops, or peering out

education

accessible

to every family,

the the
thrift,

means

of

universal

diffusion of knowledge,
eral activity

the order and

the genequality

and

enterprise, the unparalleled

in the distribution of j)roperty, the general happiness


*

Magnalia,

III, 54.


THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.
resulting from the diffusion of education,
religious doctrine,

181

and

of pure

the safety in which more than half


with unbolted doors,
in the

the population sleep nightly the calm, holy sabbaths,


eral silence

when mute nature


praise,

gen-

becomes vocal with

when

the whis-

per of the breeze seems more


terfall

distinct, the distant

wa-

louder and more musical, the carol of the morn-

ing birds clearer and sweeter

this
the

is

New England
where you

and where

will

you

tind the like, save

find

the operation

of

New England
?

principles,

and

New

England influence
and ancient

This

is

work

of our fathers

laAvgivers.

They came

hither, not with

new

theories of government,

from the laboratories of

political alchemists,

not to try wild experiments upon


only to found a

human
God,

nature, but

new empire

for

for truth,

for virtue, for

freedom guarded and


in such

bounded by justice.
had been
" In

To have failed

an attempt

glorious.

Their glory is, that they succeeded.

founding their commonwealths, their highest


of

aim was the glory


all.'

(xod, in the

common

welfare

of

Never before, save when (lod brought

Israel out

of

Egypt, had any government been instituted with

such an aim.

They

had.

no model before them, and no

guidance save the

in-inciples of truth
of

and righteousness

embodied
he
giveth

in the

word

God, and the wisdom which

lil^erally

to
'

them
the

that

ask him.
welfare of

They
all,'

thought that their end,

common

was

to

be secured by founding pure and free churches,


24

182

SUPPLEMENT TO
of universal education,
justice,

by providing the means


laws maintaining perfect
fect liberty.

and by
jier-

which

is

the only
said

'The
'

common
all

welfare of

all,'

Daven-

port, is that

where unto

men

are

bound

principally

to attend, in laying the foundation of a


least posterity

commonwealth,

rue the

first

miscarriages

when

it

will

be too

late to redress

them.

They

that are skillful in

architecture, observe, that the breaking or yielding of

stone in the groundwork

of a

building,

but the
cleft

breadth of the back of a knife, will make a

of

more than
tant, saith

half a foot in the fabric aloft.

So imporerrors.

mine author are fundamental


to look to
it

The

Lord awaken us
light

in time,

and send us his

and truth

to lead us into the safest

ways

in these

beginnings.'*
"

Not

in

vain did that j^rayer go


;

up

to Heaven.

Light and truth were sent

and posterity has had no

occasion to rue the miscarriages of those


*

who

laid the

groundwork

'

of

New England.

On

then- foundations
toils, tears,
it.

has arisen a holy structure.


rifices

Prayers,

sac-

and precious blood, have hallowed

No

un-

seemly fissure deforming


its

'the fabric aloft'

dishonor

founders.

Convulsions that have rocked the world


it.

have not moved


tions,

"When terror has seized the na-

and the

faces of kings have turned pale at the

footsteps of Almighty wrath, peace has been wdthin its


walls,
*

and

still

the pure incense has been fragrant at its


14.

Discourse uijon Civil Government,


THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.
altar.

183

AVise master-builders were they

who
is

laid the

foundations.
"

They

built for eternity.


it

Aniongf those truly noble men,


strongly

not easy to

name one more


in everlasting

marked with bright endow-

ments, and brighter virtues, or more worthy to be had

remembrance, than he
tit

for

whom

the

quaint historian has proposed as his


'

epitaph,

JOHANNES DAVENPORTUS,
In

Portum

delatiis,
;

VIVUS, NOV-ANCtLI^ ET ECOLESI^ ORNAMENTI'M

"* MORTUUS, ITTRIUSQUE TRISTE desiderium.'

Historical Discourses, 152-154.

This epitaph was written by Dr. Cotton Mather, and thus be rendered
:

may

JOHN DAVENPOKT,
Borne into
Living, the Ornament of

Port,
the Church
;

New England and

Dead, an Irreparable Loss to Both.

184

SUPPLEMENT TO

EIGHTEENTH GENEEATION.
Issue of Key. John Davenpout, (No. 64.)

(65.)

I.

John Davenport,

of

New Haven, was born,


liis

possibly, during the residence of

father in

London,

probably, not
land, in 1G85,

till

the return of

liis

mother from Hol-

and was an only


Boston

child.

He

did not ac-

company

his parents to

in 1G37,

but remained

in the care of kind friends in or near

London, and was

probably for the most part of that and the following


year,

under the charge

of

Lady

Yere, whose

kindness

the father thus acknowledges in a letter under date of


Sept. 28th, 1639, expressing "thanks for your helpful-

ness to
Sir

my

little

one, in carrying

him

in your coach to

Theodore Maherne

for advice about his neck, for a coat, of

and

for your cost

upon him

which bounty and


full

labor of love, our servant


to
u.'^.

Ann

hath made

report

The Lord recompense the same


to

to your Lad}'-

ship

and

your noble family an hundred fold."*


to

He was brought
*

America by Mr. Fenwick,


be given in the Appendix.

in

This Letter in

full will

To Lady Mary Vere, who was a Puritan of the Puritans, was assigned by the Long Parliament, the charge of three of the six
surviving children of Charles
I, by his Queen Henrietta Maria, one of whom, the Princess Elizabeth, died in 1050, the next year after the execution of her father. Another was the Duke of ^ork, who was taken prisoner to Fairfax, at the age of thirteen, and who came to the throne after his brother, Charles II. under the title of James 11.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


IG39, in

185

one of the onh^ two ships that ever came to

New Haven from England.


During
his residence
in

New

Haven, the son does


in

aot appear to have


iffairs,

been much engaged


Stiles, in his

public

although Dr.

History of the Regi

3ides, in

speaking of the Courts in

year IGGl, mentions him as one of the judges. admitted a freeman in New Haven, the 15th
1657.
gail,

New Haven about the He was


of

May,

He was

married,

November

27, 1663, to Abi-

daughter of the

Rev. Abraham
a sister of Rev.

Pierson, of Bran-

ford, Conn.,

who was

Abraham

Pierson,

the first Rector of Yale College.

In 1668, he removed

with his family to Boston, taking his letter of recom-

mendation

to

the

church there, from the church in

New
1669.

Haven.

He was

admitted freeman

at Boston, in

After his removal to Boston, with his father, he


of Probate,
;

was Register August


17,

from January

31,

1675,

to

1676

but

at the

time of his death, which


is

took place March

21, 1677, he

called a
at

merchant.

His wdfe survived him, and died


20, 1718.

New

Haven, July
(Center)

Her grave

is

under

the

First

Church.

The

following

is

a fac-simile of his autograph

186

SUPPLEMENT TO

NINETEENTH GENEKATION.
Issue of John Davenport, (No. 65.)

(66.)

I.

John Davenport, born


Elizabeth Davenport,
7,

at

New
at

Haven,

June

7,

1665, and died August 31, aged eleven weeks.


II.

(67.)

born

New Hain

ven, October

1666,

who married Warham Mather

1700.

[Warham Mather was


er of
also

the son of Rev. Eleazar Math-

Northampton, Mass., who died in 1669, leaving


another son

named

Eliakim,

and a daughter

Eunice,
of

who

afterwards married Rev. John Williams

Deerfield, who, with his family,

was carried into

captivity
killed

by the Indians,

in 1704.

Mrs. Williams was


Deerfield.

by the Indians, soon


mother's maiden

after they left

Their

name was Esther Warham,

youngest child of Rev. John

Warham

of

Windsor,
.

Ct.,

who, after the death of Mr. Mather, married Rev Solo-

mon

Stoddard, the maternal grandfather of President

Edwards, by

whom

she had twelve children.


to

Warham
years he
bate. 1
(68.
)

Mather, after his marriage

Elizabeth

Davenport, resided at
filled

New

Haven, where for many


of the

the office of

Judge

Court of Pro'

III.

Rev. John Davenport of Stamford,

who
his

was born

in Boston, Feb. 22, 1668,

and baptized by

grandfather, on the 28th of the same month.

He

grad-.

uated at Harvard College, in 1687, and

commenced


THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.
preacliiiig- in

187
to

1690.

In 1691,

lie

was invited
of

become

an

assistant to the Rev. Mr.

James

East Hampton,

Long- Island.*
" April
16,

1691.

The town voted one hundred


Sixty pounds

pounds

for the support of the ministry.

to Mr. James,

and

forty

pounds

to

Mr. Davenport
East

and Mr. Davenport


ton Tovrn Records.

to have his diet fi-ee."

Hamp-

Mr. Davenport, for a time, waived this


the

call,

which

way not seeming

satisfactorily

open

for his settle-

ment there

was soon after declined.


This

In 1693, Mr. Davenport was called to the work of


the ministry in Stamford, Fairfield County, Ct.

town

originally

belonged to the Colony of

New

Haven,

and was purchased of them by some of the inhabitants of Wethersfield,


Ct.,

who

settled there in

1641,

the purchasers agreeing to join the


in their

New Haven
derived
of

Colony

form

of

government.

It

its

name

from an ancient town in the county


land,

Lincoln, Eng-

from whence probably some

of the first settlers

originated.
*This ancient town was originally purchased by Theophilus Eaton, Governor of the Colony of New Haven, and Edward Hopkins, Governor of the Colony of Connecticut, in behalf of the proprietors, who had emigrated from Maidstone, county of Kent, England, and settled in Salem, Mass. and other towns in the vicinity of Boston, and who came and settled East HampOn the payment of the stipulated sum, the writon, in 1648. tings were transferred from the original purchasers to the proprietors.


188
SUPPLEMENT TO
extracts

The following
town records
in these

are

transcribed from

the

of Stamford,

both as a matter of interest

modern

times,

and as showing the distinctness

with which the people were wont to provide for the

temporal wants of those who ministered unto them in


spiritual things,
"

whether single or "settled

in a family:'

town meeting, orderly warned, the lUth day


1G93.

of

March
of Mr.
trial in

It

having been formally voted our desu'e


to this place for a

John Davenport's coming

the work of the ministry, and a committee ap-

pointed to signify their minds unto him upon that account; and Mr.

Davenport being

come (unto the

Town
also

:)

at a full
fully

meeting being orderly warned, and


;

more

by warrant added
of

therefore,

for

further prosecution
to
their
'

that matter,
of

with

reference
1692,

vote

the

12th

September,

doe

now

fui-ther

order to a settlement in this place as a


if

minister of the Gospel amongst us, and

upon
is

trial

they find his complying in judgment with wliat

men-

tioned in said vote, they have power to agree with him,

and provide
of

for his comfortable settlement, in respect


else is

house and lands, and what

needful for his enfull

couragement, the committee have

power

to

doe

according to their best discretion and the town's ability,

and that the matter be forthwith attended.


of the

"The names

committee are
"Capt. Selleck, "Lieut. Bell,
"

Wm. Ambler,

" Jno. Selleck, &c."


the davenpokt family.
189

"July 17th, 1693.


" 1st.

At town meeting, orderly warned, the town


to Mr.
is

by a unanimous vote doth give and grant

John

Davenport, for his encouragement when he


tled) minister in Stamford, a

sole (set-

hundred pounds a year

per anno, according to the committee's proposal to Mr.

Davenport when he was


" 2d. It is

last in

Stamford.

voted that they give to Mr. Davenport


life,

ten pounds a year during Mr. Bishop's

which
ten

makes seventy pounds a year


pounds
" 3d.
to

that

is
if

to say,

be added to the sixty pounds,

Mr. Daven-

port doth settle in a family before Mr. Bishop's death.

The town per vote doth purpose and


and send what
y

desii'e

their committee to write

town hath

voted to Mr. Davenport, and to send for him when and

how

they see most convenient.

" 4th.

The town per vote doth give and grant


is

to

Mr.

John Davenport, when he


his firewood,

settled here in

a family,

which

is

to be

done in a general way, and

not by rate, and to be done

when

the
it
;

townsmen doe
further,
it is

order a day or two in the year for


derstood that it
all
is to

un-

be done by ye people of the town,

male persons from sixteen years and upwards."

Town Records of Stamford.


In 1694, Mr. Davenport was ordained as pastor of
the church in Stamford, and on the 18th of April, 1695,

he was married to Martha, widow of John Selleck,

for-

merly a Miss Gould, by


25

whom

he had seven children.

190

SUPPLEMENT TO
is

The following
from the records

the minute

of

her death, copied

of the

town

"That Eminently pious and very virtuous Matron, Mrs. Martha Davenport, late wife to the Rev. John Davenport,

Pastor of ye Church of Christ in Stamford, Laid


or

down

Exchanged Her Mortall or Temporall

Life, to

putt on Immortality, and Doubtless was

Crowned with

immortal giory, on the

iirst

day of December, 1712."

She was buried

at

New

Haven.

The fohowing

extracts are given from "

A Sermon
died Fri-

preached at the Funeral of the Eev. John Davenport,


late pastor of the

Church

in Stamford,

who

day, Feb.

5,

1781, in the 62d year of his age,


:

and 36th

of his ministry

And was decently interred on Monday


the Eev.

fohowing

By

Samuel Cooke, pastor

of the

Church
" 2
Israel

in Stratfield
ii.

[now Bridgeport.]
'

Kings
and

12.

My father, my fcdher,

the chariot
J. P.

of

the

horsemen thereof /'


1731, pjx 62."

Printed by

Zen-

ger, in

New York,
of

Speaking
says,

Mr. Davenport, on page 42 the author


the advantage of an

"He had

accurate

know-

ledge of those languages, wherein the Scriptures were


given by Divine Inspiration, probably far beyond the

compass

of

any

of his survivors, within


;

many

scores of

miles every

way

and

so could drink immediately out

of the sacred fountain, those languages being almost

as familiar to

him

as his

mother tongue.

[When he

read his Bible in his family and in the pulpit, he did

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


not

191

make use

of the English
original.]

translation,

but of the
less

Greek and Hebrew

He was no
as the

emthe

inent in what did belong to

him

mouth

of

people unto God.


tion rested

The

spirit of

grace and suj^plica-

uj^on

him beyond the common measure.

He was
that

like Elijah, a

man mighty

in prayer

an Israel

was wont, especially

in cases of peculiar difficulty

and emergency,

to wrestle with
off

God

as a prince that

would not be put


skillful

with a denial

He was
and public

and

faithful vine dresser in the

Lord's vinedis-

yard,

and an able laborer


Witness his

in his private

pensations.
labors,

late painful

and indefatigable
fatal sick-

even in the time of his prevailing and

ness

when nature was

so weakened, that his thoughtit

ful observers
tion, that

could not but look uj)on

with admii-a-

he should appear in the


fervor
;

i^ulpit,

and with so

much engagedness and


service

not without some mis-

giving apj)reheusions within themselves, that his time of

was near expiring.

He was

a cloud

richly

fi-aught with the rains

and dews

of heavenly doctrines,
;

and plentifully
especially

distilling the

same here and there


vineyard.

and

on

this part

of the Lord's
of

He

was a watchman on the walls

God's Jerusalem here


to discern the ap-

and such an one

as

was eagle-eyed

proaches of sin and danger and faithful to give warning thereof


;

whether

men would

hear or whether they

would forbear

.... Tlie

person whose exit

now

calls for

our deep lamentation and mourning,

was both our


192

SUPPLEMENT TO

crown and our bulwark, our gioiy and our defence.

Our crown
is

is fallen

from our heads and our defence


chariot
that

departed.

taken
It

away.

We have our Wo unto us,


since

and horsemen
sinned.
seri-

we have

was many years

looked upon by the

ous and

judicioiis, as a special favor of

Divine Provi-

dence, that a person of such distinction as


lost,

we have now

was seated so near


as a

to the western limits of

New

England

bulwark against any irniptions

of cor-

rupt doctrines and manners.


wall in that respect
is

Wo

to us,
....

our hedgeproof

broken down

He was

against the temptations of the smiles or frowns of others, to

turn him out of the way to the right hand or to

the
to

left.

What was many

times in his mouth seemed


3Iagi.-<

be always in his heart

arnica

cerita!<.

These

things

made him

the object of the admiration of good

men and

the reverence of aU."

Mr. Davenport for some time previous to commencing his labors in Stamford, taught the Hojikins'

Gramof the

mar School
1731.

in

New

Haven.

He was

member
till

Corporation of Yale College from 1707

his death in

The following

is

a fac simile of his autograph

J^<rn. 2f(XV^nph- / (^ /
His second wife was Mrs. Elizabeth Maltby, daughter of

John Morris, by whom he had two


is

children.
"

The

following

the record of her death.

The ancient

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

193
relict
1

Madam, Mrs. Elizabeth Davenport, widow and


of
y**

late

Rev. John Davenport, died January 11,


IV.

758."

(69.)

Abraham Davenport, born


and died young.
Davenport,
Abigail

in Boston,

March
(70.)

18, 1671,

V.

born

in

Boston,

Aug.

20, 1672,

and baptized Sept.


of

15,

and was married

to Eev.

James Pierpont,

New

Haven, (successor of

Rev. John Davenport,) on the 27th of October, 1691.

She

died, Feb. 3, 1692.

Her grave

is

under the First


his Historical

Church.

Of Mr. Pierpont, Dr. Bacon in

Discourses, gives the following account.


"

Mr. Pierpont was the younger branch of a noble


It is believed,

family in England.

though the neces-

sary legal proofs seems to be wanting, that his son was

the heir to the estates and the


earls of Kingston.

now

extinct title of the

In the latter part of 1684, he was

invited to take the charge of the church in

New Haven.
and house

In January,

it

was voted that a home

lot

should be provided for Mr. Pierpont, which his people

agreed to build by voluntary contributions.

The

lot

was purchased and the building was immediately commenced. When it was finished it was one of the most

commodious and
*

stately dwellings in the town.*

For

Eev. James Pierpont (son of John, b. in London 1619, ) was graduated at Harvard "born in Eoxbnry, Mass., Jan. 4tli, 1659 College in 1681; and was settled as the siiccessor of John Da;

'

venport in 1685, where he was pastor for thirty years. He was one of the founders of Yale College, of which institution, two of his descendants, Timothy Dwight, D. D., and Kev. Theodore Dwight Woolsey, D. D., have officiated as Presidents.

194

SUPPLEMENT TO
it

more than a century,


lic spirit

stood a

monument

of the

pub-

of the generation
Avas erected.

by whose voluntary

contri-

butions

it

As the people were bringing


and another, to

in their free-will offerings of one kind

complete and furnish the building, one


to

man

desiring

do something for the object,and having nothing else to

offer,

brought on his shoulder from the farms two

little

elm saplings and planted them before the door of the


minister's house.

Under

their shade

some

foriy years

afterward Jonathan Edwards, then soon to take rank


in the intellectual world, with

Locke and Leibnitz,

spoke words of mingled love and piety in the ear of

Sarah Pierj^ont.*

Under

their shade,

when some

six-

Near the site of this ancient dwelling situated near the north-west corner of the Public Square, on Elm street, was erected another mansion in 1767, in which, on the evening of Dec. 29, of that year, were united in marriage, John Pierpont, (son of Hezekiah and grandson of Rev. James,) and Sarah
Beers.

One hundred years pass


of their descendants,

by,

and in Dec.

1867, the cen-

tennial celebration of this marriage was observed

by a goodly same building, which still presents a very respectable appearance, and the site of which has never been alienated from the family, since its first gift to the pastor of the New Haven Church, nearly two hiin-

number

met

in the

dred years ago. Among the descendants of Kev. James, we find Henry E. Pierrepont, Esq., of Brooklyn, N. Y., and Hon. Edwards PierreIjont, our present representative at the Court of St. James.
* Jonathan Edwards, son of the Rev. Timothy Edwards, was born at East Windsor, Connecticut, October 5, 1703. He graduated at Yale College in 1720, before he was seventeen years of In 1724, he was api^ointed a tiitor in Yale College, in age. which oftice he continued till he was called to settle in tlie min-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


ty
a

195

siimmers had passed over them, Whitfield stood on

platform, and lifted

up

that voice the tones of which

lingered so long in thousands of hearts.


istry at

One

of

them

Northampton,

as

an associate to his grandfather, (the

Rev. Solomon Stoddard,) in 1726, where he continued in the After his dispastoral office for more than twentj'-three years.
missal in 1750, he labored for
LC

some years among the Honsaton-

Berkshire County. In 1758, he was called to the Presidency of New Jersey College, where, soon after having entered upon the duties of his office, he suddenly died, March 22, 1758. His published works are numerous and he has justly been considered the most distinguished metaphysician and divine that America has ever produced. His wife, Sarah, daughter of the Eev. James Pierpont, of New Haven, was born January 9, 1710, married July 28, 1727, in her
Indians,
at Stockbridge, in

18th year, and died in 1758.

The following account

of this interesting person,

when

in her

13th year was written on a blank leaf by Mr. Edwards, at the "They say there is a young lady in New Haage of twenty.
ven,

who

is

beloved of that Great Being,

who made and

riiles

the world, and that there are certain seasons, in which this Great Being, in some way or other, comes to her and fills her mind

with exceeding sweet delight, and that she hardly cares for anything, except to meditate on Him that she expects after a while to be received uj) where he is, to be raised up out of the world, and caught up into Heaven being assured that He loves

her too well, to let her remain at a distance from Him always. There she is to dwell with Him, and to be ravished with His Therefore, if you present all the love and delight forever.

world before her, with the richest of


gards
it,

its

treasures, she disre-

and cares not for it, and is unmindful of any path of She has a strange sweetness in her mind and singuaffliction. is most just and conscientioias in lar purity in her affections all her conduct, and you could not persuade her to do anything wrong and sinful, if jow would give her all this world, lest she should offend this Great Being. She is of a wonderful sweetespecially ness, calmness, and universal benevolence of mind She after this Great God has manifested himself to her mind.
;

"

196
is

SUPPLEMENT TO
still

said to be

standing before the mansion of the


in

late

Judge Bristol,
all

Elm

street; the tallest


'

and most

venerable of
ever the
of

the trees in this

City of Elms,'
at the

and

first to

be tinged with green

return

Spring
"

The ordination

of Mr. Piei-pont took place


after

on

the!

2d day of July, 1685,


pie eleven

he had been with the peo-!

months as a candidate.

On

the 27th

ofl

October, 1691, he married Abigail Davenjioi-t, a grand-

daughter of his predecessor


little

in the pastoral

office.

of

more than three months afterwards, on the 3d February, she was taken from him by death. She

consumption caused by exposure to the cold on the Sabbath after her wedding, going to meeting according to the fashion of the;
time, in her bridal dress.*
"
will

died, as tradition tells us, of a

Two

years afterwards he was married at Hartford,


;

sometimes go about from place to place, singing sweetly and seems to be always full of joy and pleasure, and no one' knows for what. She loves to be alone, walking in the fields and groves, and seems to have some one invisible always conversing with her.
' In Rev. James Pierpont's Almanac, of 1692, the following notes were inserted by himself on blank leaves. "Jan. 14, wift had fitts." "Feb. 1, we sent to Mr. Chauncey, of Straflfor'd. to press him to come over, but he came not till 2 at

'

night.

ordered friction of the lower parts which were utterly cold, whereupon her speech went away he lodged in the house he and I were called up between 2 and 3 o'clock in the night. Mr. Chauncey supposed no great hazard -I declared I thought it was our du'ty to resign
;

gave

much encouragement and

He

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


to Sarah Haynes, a

197

granddaughter of Gov. Haynes, 'by

Lieutenant-Colonel Allen, Assistant, the 30th of May,


1694.'

On

the 7th of October, 1696, he was again beleft

reaved.

His second wife


of his first wife.
of Rev.

one daughter, who bore

the

name

This daughter afterwards


Josei^h Noyes, pastor of the

became the wife


same church.

His third wife was Mary Hooker, a


first

granddaughter of the Rev. Thomas HooJier, the


pastor of the church in Hartford, to
ried on the 26th of July, 1698.

whom

he was mar-

This lady

who

surviv-

ed him

till

November, 1740, was the mother

of sever-

al children,

one of whom, Sarah, became at an early age


'a

the wife of Jonathan Edwards, and was truly

help

meet

for him.'

"

(71.)
23,

VI.

Mar\' Davenport, born in Boston, Aug.


of Sej^tember,

and baptized the 17th


first
is

1676.

She

was

married to Nathaniel Weed, of

New
;

Haven,
sec-

who
ond

spoken of as a

i3ractitioner of j^hysic

and

to a Mr.

Wade

of the

same place.*

this relation to the

ere

Lord whilst we had time, and to beg pardon which I endeavored in prayer. "3d, between 3 and 4, morning, my dear wife, Abigail, died

we

parted,

ofHisteric

fitts.
!"
!

"4th, at night buried

Communicated by Kev. Stephen Dodd,


*

of East

Haven

in 1851.

New Haven

received

its

present

name

in 1640, two years

after

Mr. Eaton and Davenport began their settlement.

De-

signing the town for a commercial city, they laid out the place in a regular manner, dividing it into nine squares, the streets crossing each other at right angles. These squares were fifty-

two rods on a
26

side, separated

by

streets four rods in breadth.

198

SUPPLEMENT TO

TWENTIETH GENERATION.
Issue or Rev. John Davenport, (No. 68.)

(72.)

I.

Abigail Davenport,
to the Rev.

born July

14,

1696,
D., of

and mariied

Stephen Williams, D.

Spring-field, Mass.,

children, three of

July 3, 1718, by whom whom became ministers,

she had eight


the aggregate
fifty

period of whose ministry was over a hundred and


years.

Of these children, some further account


under

will

be

given,
ration.

their appropriate head, in the next gene26, 1766.

She died August


is

The following
drawn from

ac-

count of Mr. Williams

principally

Allen's

Biographical Dictionaiy, and " The Williams Family


Histoiy."

was reserved for public i^urposes, and grounds of any city in the country. surroitnding squares have been divided into four, by streets running crosswise in the direction of the original ones. Besides these thirty-two squares, the town extends over considerable ti-acts beyond, already covered with villas and houses. The city is much admired for its elegant ai>pearance. Its beautiful elms and shade trees have a very striking effect. On the Center Square or Green, represented in the accompanycentral square
vie vidth the public

The may The

ing engraving, are located three chiirches of various architec-

one time, were not excelled by any similar edifiFirst, on the right hand, stands the North Congregational Church, (Rev. Dr. Hawes'. ) The building in the center with a tall spire, is the First Chui-ch, (Rev. Dr. Noture, which, at

ces in

New England.

ble's,

which

occuf)ies nearly the site of the original building,

constructed for Mr. Davenport's society.

Near this

at

the west,

stands what was formerly the State House, an edifice of the

Doric order of architecture after the model of the Parthenon at Athens. On the left of the picture stands Trinity Church,
(.Episcopal,
)

a structure of

much architectixral

taste

and

beaiity.

s^-j-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

199

[Rev. Stephen Williams, D. D., minister of Springfield,

Mass., and son of Rev.

John Williams

of Deerfield,

Mass., was born

May

14, 1693.

In the night of Febnine years of age,


of

ruary 28, 1704,

when he was about

his father's house

was attacked by a party

Indians

from Canada.

The family were made


set out

captives.

He,

with his brothers (except Eleazar) and two


the

sisters, in

company

of their parents,

on a long and
In wading

tedious march to the

home

of the Indians.

a river, on the second day, Mrs. Williams, his mother,

who had
with the
her,

scarcely recovered from

a recent sickness,
keej)

became nearh^ exhausted.


rest.

She was unable to

up

Her husband was not allowed


of

to assist

and she seemed on the point


fatigue.

fainting from

weakness and

At

this time,

one of the Indi-

ans cajne up to her, and killed her with his hatchet.

This

woman was
of

the granddaughter of the Rev. Rich-

ard Mather of Dorchester, the daughter of Rev. Eleazar

Mather

Northampton, and

sister of Rev. Dr. Increase

Mather, President of Harvard College, and afterwards


minister of Boston,
of Rev.

who married

Maria, the daughter

John Cotton, whose son was Rev. Cotton Math-

er of Boston.

After the

death of Mrs.

Williams,

the

surviving

members
hundred

of the family continued their journey of three


miles,
till

they reached Canada.

Here they
The

The buildings seen

in the rear, pertain to Yale College.


is

present population of the city

over 50,000.

^^^

SUPPLEMENT TO
in captivity, amid scenes of suffering, two years, when they were redeemed. Mr.

were retained
for about

Wilhams, the

father,

then returned to Deerfield, and


tUl his death,

was minister

of that

town

June

12,

1729.

His son, Stephen, graduated at Harvard CoUege in 1713, and was ordained over the second church of
Springfield,

now Long Meadow,

in the year 1718.

He
Dav'

was married soon


ford, Ct.

after his ordination, to Abigail

enport, daughter of the Rev.

John Davenport

of

Stam-

In 1745, he went to Louisburg as a chaplain under Sir William PeppereU, and in 1755 to

Lake

his age, and His funeral was attended by his seven surviving children. His brother. Rev. Eleazar

Champlain, in the same capacity, under Sir William Johnson, and in 1756, under Major-General Winslow. He died June 10, 1782, in the 90th year of
66th of his ministry.

Williams, graduated at Harvard in 1708, and was settied at Mansfield, Ct. Another brother, Rev.

Warham

man-ied his maternal grandmother (Mrs. Esther Mather,) relict of the Rev. Eleazar Mather, and daughter of the Rev.

who was also taken capCanada when but four years of age, gi-aduated at Hai-vard College, and studied divinity with the Rev. Solomon Stoddard of Northampton, who
tive to

Williams of Waltham, Mass.,

John Warham.
(73.)

He

died June 22, 1751.]

uary

21,

John Davenpoi-t, born in Stamford, Jan1698, and was married by his fiither to Sarah

IL

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


'Bishop,*

201
to
"

September 6, 1722.
is
still,

He removed
the

what was

then, and

known by
site

name
five

of

Davenport

Ridge,"

a beautiful

about

miles north by

east from
i

what

is

now

the center of

Stamford

village,

upon lands conveyed


*

to

him by

vnll of his father.f

He
who

Siipposed to be a granddaugliter of Kev. John Bishop,

was Mr. Davenport's predecessor.

'

The following
call to

Stamford, aboi;t 1644

circiimstances are connected with Mr. Bishop's "The church there hearing that
:

he was in the neighborhood of Boston, two brethren, George Slason and Francis Bell were deputed to go to Boston, and if he was to be found, to make known to him the wishes of the church. Although the country was full of hostile Indians, they went on foot, carrying their provisions, and succeeded at
length in finding Mr. Bishop, to the eastward of Boston.' He accepted the call, and returned with them on foot, bringing his Bible under his arm, through the wildnerness to Stamford. (This Bible is still in the possession of Mr. Noah Bishop, one of
'

his descendimts." Historical Address by Eev. J.

W. Alvord,

1841.

Published by Silas Davenport.


This will is dated Jan. 20, 1729, in which he apportions "my which I call dividable among my eight children to be divided into twelve equal parts in value eight of which equal parts to be to my four sons, to say, John, Deodate, Abraham, and James, but the remaining four equal parts, to be to my four daughtei-s, to say, Abigail, Martha, Sarah and Elizabeth. "Item. I give and bequeath to my loving and eldest son John,
t

estate

two parts of said equal parts of my dividable estate, and over and above that, I give said son the sum of thirty-one pounds and ten shillings. Also my mind is that said John have my land on Davenport Ridge, so-called, as may appear by the note of laying out and seized to me, signed by Deacon Samuel Halt, [Hoyt,] Stephen Bishop and John Holly, and extending to Ponasses Path, [now called Ponus street,] and the house and barn thereon further my meaning is that the said house, to say mansion
;

house and barn be appraised according

to their value at the said

"

202

SUPPLEMENT TO

of the original twenty four members who were organized into a Congregational Church in New Canaan, on the 20th of June, 1733.* He deceased No-

was one

vember
of

17, 1742, leaving fourteen children, the oldest

whom had
(74.)
III.

not reached the age of nineteen Avhen

their father died,

aged 44 years.
10,

Martha Davenport, born February


to the Rev.

1700,

was married
6,

Thomas Goodsell

of

Branford, October
Sarah,

1731,

by

whom

she had one child,

who married about

1760, Jeremiah Wolcott of

time of appraising, only I would have all the land improved by my said son John, by the plough, or for pasture, and inclosed to be valued at no higher price than if they had been wholly waste to said time of appraising, to be to my said John, to him, his
heirs

and assigns

forever.

his son Deodate, he gives two of said parts of his dividable estate, with "the choice of lands at Noroton Hill in said Stamford, or at my farm at New Haven long known by the name of Mr. Davenport's farm.

To

To each of his sons Abraham and James he gives two equal parts of the said twelve equal parts of his dividable estate, "also about my books my mind is my loving wife choose two of them, and my children, to say, John, Deodate. Abigail, Martha, Sarah.'
and Elizabeth, shall have, each of them, two of my English, if they have not had already, and all the rest of my books to belong to my said sons Abraham and James in an equal proportion.'" Szc.

A
p.

full copy, of this very lengthy and minute 380-388 of previous edition.

will, is

given on

* The parish of Canaan was situated within the townships of Stamford and Norwalk, and was first incorporated in 1731. The church, in 1733, was orgainized with thirteen members from the

Norwalk side, and eleven from the Stamford side. New Canaan was not incorporated into a township till 1801. It has now a population of about 2,500 and is connected by railroad with the
village of Stamford, eight miles distant.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

203

Windsor, whose eldest daughter, Martha Davenport


Wolcott, married Hezekiah Reynolds in 1778,
the father of

who was
until his

John Davenport Reynolds

of

WaUingford,

and

also of

William Augustus Reynolds,

who

death

(1874,)

owned and resided upon


street,

the old Dav-

enport Place
sell

m Elm

New Haven.*

Mrs. Grood-

died in 179G.
IV.

(75.)

Sarah Davenport, born July, 1702, and


first,

was married,
Haven, by

to Captain

William Maltby of

New

whom

she

had three children a son and


son.

two daughters.

The

Rev. John Maltby, gradua-

ted at Yale College in 1747, and for a number of years

was the much loved pastor

of

a church in

Bermuda,

West

Indies.

He

afterwards removed to

Charleston,

South Carolina,

till,

from impaired health, he removed

to Hanover, N. H.,

where he died in 1771.


of that of

His mon-

ument

is

by the side

his step-father. Dr.

Wheelock.

One

of the daughters died in youth,

an

example

of patience

and

piety,

and the other, Elizabeth,

was married May

15, 1754, to Dr.

Thaddeus

Betts, a

highly respected physician of

Norwalk, Ci, who was

*Tbe accompanying engraving presents a view of the " DavenElm street. The house occupied by its original proprietor was principally taken down, and rebuilt in its present form by the late .Judge Pierpont Edwards, the father of
port Place," in

Judge Ogden Edwards

of New York, about seventy years ago. Jiome parts of the ancient dwelling appear in this mansion, and the cellar in which the regicides were concealed by Mr. Davenport, yet remains under the present building, still inhabited by

the family of Mr. Reynolds.

204

SUPPLEMENT TO

the father of Judge William Maltby Betts,

and the

grandfather of Hon. Thaddeus Betts, Lieutenant-Go v-i


ernor of Connecticut,
in the Senate of the

who represented
United
States,

his uatiA^e state

and who died at

Washington

in 1840,

aged 52 years.

After the death of Captain Maltby, his -^-idow


ried, in 1735, the
Ct.

mar-

Rev. Eleazar Wheelock, of Lebanon,

[Dr. Wlieelock

was

bom

in 1711,

and graduated at
at

Yale College in 1733.


in

He was settled

Lebanon,
of

Ct.,

1735,

where his labors were j^roductive

much

good.

He was

one of the most eloquent and success-

ful ministers in

New England.

Dr.

TnimbuU describes
and winning
as-

him

as " of a comely figure, of a mild

pect; his voice


I ever heard.

smooth and harmonious, the best by

far

He had

the entire

command

of

it.

His

gestures were natural and not redundant.

His preach3'et

ing and addresses were close and pungent,

winning

beyond

all

comparison; so that his audience would be


tears,

melted into

even before they were aware of


of "

it."

He became
moved
of to

the founder

Moor's Charity School for

Christianizing the Indians;"

which he afterwards re-

Hanover, N. H., where he became the founder


College, of which he

Daiimouth

was the

first

Presi-

dent, in 1770.

After being at the head of the college

for about nine years,


24, 1779.]
"

he died in Christian peace, April

Mrs. Sarah Wheelock was a

woman

of a

meek and

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


quiet spirit, active in duty, patient in
liosi^itality.
trial,

205
given to

So endeared was she

to her

husband by

her natural and moral qualities, that her grave-stone bears the inscription, that her character was too estimable for an epitaph."* 3Ie?uoir
Patteji.

of her

dau<//iter,

Mrs.

(76.)

V.

Theodora Davenport, born Nov.


15, 1712.

2,

1703,

and died Feb.


(77.
)

VI.

Dea. Deodate Davenport, of East Haven,

born in Stamford, Oct.

23, 1706. He was married in 1730 to Lydia Woodward, daughter of the Rev. John

Woodward.f
(78.)

He

died December

3,

1761.

VII.

Elizabeth Davenport, born in Stamford,

August

28, 1708,

and was married

to the Rev.

William

Gaylord, of Wilton,
'

Ctl

The following
at

burying-ground
the

inscription is from her monument, in the Columbia, formerly Lebanon "Sacred to


:

memory of Sarah, the who died November 13, A.


ige,

Eieazar Wheelock, D., 1746, and in the 44th year of her

wife of ye Rev.

and of
to

a character too great

and good to have anything

said,

worthy

be inscribed here."

On

the grave-stone are also found the arms of Davenport.

Communicated by Rev.
t

Wm.

Allen, D. D. in 1850.

at Harvard College, in and was ordained Pastor of the church at Norwich, in 1699. He assisted in the Council that compiled the Saybrook Platform in 1708, and removed to East Haven in 1716, where he lied the same j^ear.

The Eev. John Woodward graduated


;

1693

VVest Hartford, Ct.,

Rev. William Gaylord, was born in what is now known as Nov. 24, 1709. He was a great-grandson of Dea. William Gaylord who came from England to Dorchester,
t

Mass., in 1631.
27

The church

of

which he was deacon was organ-

20()

SUPPLEMENT TO
the church records of the parish
is

On
"

the following
:

entry in the

hand
:

writing- of her

husband

July

6,

1747

died,

my own

dear wife, Elizabeth,


fif-

after

about twelve months indisposition and about

teen weeks confinement to the house, aged 38 years, 10

months and

8 days.

She was the youngest daughter

of the late Rev. Mr.

John Davenport

of Stamford, de-

ceased.

Religiously disposed (as I understand,) from

childhood, and since by her owai consent, I trust, savingly converted, I took her in marriage, Jan 24, 1733.
I

have had by her seven children,

six of

whom

are

alive.

good God has made her a good wife


;

to me,

both in temporals and spirituals


ized in Plymouth, England, Jan. 1630,

prudent,
after

faithful,
five

and

remaining
its

years at Dorchester,
tor,

it

removed

to Windsoi',

Conn., with

pas-

Eev. John Warham, in Sept., 1636.

Mr. Gaylord gradua-

ted at Yale College in 1730 and was installed over the Wilton Church, Feb. 14th, 1733, three weeks after his marriage to Eliz-

abeth Davenport.*

/
The
original autographs are preserved in a
father, the

^-^

iCj/LutJ
volume which

belonged to her

Stamford minister, and to her great grandfather, Rev. John Davenport, of New Haven, and is now held by Mr. Henry F. Taylor, one other descendants, residing
at the l.'SOth
187(i.

in Stamford.
* Historical Address of Samuel G. Willard, Congregatioual Church in Wiltou, Juuo 22,

Auuiversary of the

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


loving, loyal

207
rea-

and very

respectful,
all

and I have great

son to hope the Clod of


Christian.

grace,

made her

good

Her death

is

a sore loss to

me and my dear

who in great wisdom has according to the exceeding great and precious promise of the Covenant of Grace, to turn it to my
children, but I trust in God,

ordered

it,

gain, that I
tion,

may understand his


to glorify

voice in the dispensain the present cir-

and be enabled

Him
(Jt.,

cumstances."*

Commanicated
and graduated
at

by Bev. John
in 1877.

Gay-

lord iJacenport, of Bridgeport,


(79.

VIII.
1715,

Hon. Abraham Dav.enport, of Stamford,


Yale College in 1732.

born

in

He was

married at Windhanj,

Ct.,

by the Rev. Stephen

White, on the IGth day of November, 1750, to Miss Elizabeth Huntington, whose mother was a daughter
of Rev.

Timothy Edwards,

of East

Windsor, and the

sister of Pres.

Jonathan Edwards.

His

first

wife died

December

17, 1773.

He was

re8,

married in Stamford, by the Rev. Dr. Wells, August


177(), to "
*

Mrs. Martha Fitch.


after

Soon

he graduated, we find him at home

fillino-

Mr. Gaylord's second wife was Elizabeth Bishop, to whom he was married in 1752, and by whom he had six children, namely Aaron, b. Jan. 7, 1753 Elizabeth, b. Oct. 24, 1754 Samuel, b. Oct, 28, 1756 Sarah, b. June 18, 1758, and who became the second wife of Dea. John Davenport, of Davenport Eidge
:

Deodate gift

July 20, 1760, (just before the death who died at Fort Herkimer, returning from the expedition against Montreal ;) and, lastly, another Moses, b. May 4, 1762. Mr. G. died Jan. 2, 1767.
of

God b.

of his brother Moses,


208
such
offices in
tlie

SUPPLEMENT TO
gift of his

townsmen

as the

most

promising young
hold.
his

men

of the times

were allowed to

Our town

records, from that date to the


life,

end

of

eminent and honored

are full of witnesses to

the esteem with which the people regarded him, and


the universal trust reposed in him.

In the most

try-

ing period of our history, that of our Kevolution, he

seems

whom the town looked No man has ever served the for counsel and defense. town, as one of its Selectmen, as long as he. He also
to

have been the one to

represented the town in the State Legislature for twenty-live sessions,

and

at several of

them was Clerk

of the

House.

He was
of
of the

State Senator from 1766 to 1784; was

Judge

Probate for several years, and at his death

was Judge

County Court.
and held the

He

was, also,
of

very
in the

active in religion,

office

deacon

Congregational Church
"

fi'om 1759 to 1789.

In 1776, he and his son John and Thaddeus Burr,


assist in

were sent to the army under Washington, to


'

arranging

it

into

companies and regiments,' and


appointed by the assembly
state.

to

commission the

officers,

for the battalions raised

by the

He was likewise

empowered to

arrest

and bring

to trial persons suspec-

ted of irresolution or disloyalty.


" In 1777, he

was one

of the

Committee

of safety foi

the

State,

and was always consulted by Governoi


as one of the wises!

TrumbuU and General Washington


counselors in our

most trying

days."

History

oj

Stamford, by Eev. E. B. Huntington, 1868.


THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.
209
in his Travels,
:

Of Colonel Davenport, Dr. Dwight


(Vol. 3d, p. 497,) gives the following
"

account

In this town [Stamford,] lived the Hon. Abraham

Davenport, for a long time one of the Councillors of


the State, and before that, of the Colony of Connecticut.

This gentleman was the

son of the Rev. John

Davenport, and the great-grandson of the Eev. John

Davenport, the father of the

New Haven

Colony.

Col-

onel Davenport was possessed

of a vigorous

under-

standing and invincible firmness of mind, of integrity

and

justice,

unquestioned even by his enemies


singular
;

of ver-

acity

exact in a degree, nearty

and

of a

weight of character which for


this

many

years decided in

County almost every

cjiuestion to

which

it

was

lent.
;

He was early
adorned
its its

a professor of the Christian religion

and

doctrines by an exemplary conformity to

precepts.

He was

often styled a rough

diamond

and the appellation was, perhaps, never given with

more
kind
;

propriety.
less soft,
;

His virtues were

all of

the masculine

graceful and alluring, than his friends

wished
to

but more extensively productive of real good

mankind, than those of almost any

man who
if

has been

distinguished for gentleness of character.

It

would

be happy for

this or

any other country,


its

the magis-

tracy should execute

laws with the exactness, for


Colonel Davenport acit

which he was distinguished.

quired property with diligence, and preserved


frugality
;

with

and hence was by many persons supposed

210
to regard
ever,
it

SUPPLEMENT TO
with an improper attachment.
This,

how-

was a very

erroneous opinion.

Of what was
;

merely ornamental, he was, I think, too reoardless

but the poor found nowhere a more liberal benefactor, nor the stranger a more hospitable
host.

say this

from personal knowledge, acquired by a long continued and intimate acquaintance with him and his family.

While the war had

its

principal seat in the State of

New

York, he took the entire superintendence of the

sick soldiers

who were returning home


;

filled his

houses with them


time,

and devoted
;

to their relief his

own own

and that

of his family

while he provided elsefor such as he could

where the best accommodations


not receive.

In a season when an expectation of ap-

proaching scarcity had raised the price of bi'ead-corn


to

an enormous height, he not only sold the produce

of his
price,

own farms
had sold

to the

poor

at the

former customary
also,

but bought corn extensively, and sold this


his own.

as he

His alms were

at the

same

time rarely rivalled in their extent.


"

Two

instances of Colonel Davenport's firmness de-

serve to be mentioned.

The lOth

of

May, 178U, was a

remarkably dark day.


houses
;

Candles were lighted in many


;

the birds were silent and disajopeared

the

fowls retired to roost.

The Legislature

of Connecti-

cut was then in session at Hartford.

very general

opinion prevailed that the day of Judgment was at

hand.

The House

of Kepresentatives being unable to

C/^6t '^

'^ tit-OC-Pi l*^ y/>

"

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


transact their business, adjourned.

211
proposal to ad-

journ the Council was under consideration.

"When the

opinion of Colonel Davenport was asked, he answered,


I

am

against an adjournment.

The day
not.
:

of
is

Judgment
not, there

s either
is

approaching, or

it is

If

it

no cause for an adjournment

if it is,

I choose to be

found doing

my

duty.

wish therefore that candles

may be

brought.'

This incident, so characteristic of this noble man, has

been pleasingly rendered


Whittier,

in verse

by John Greenleaf

and

is

here copied, by his jiermission, from


:

'The Tent on the Beach," pp. 98-102

ABRAHAM DAVENPORT.
In the old days (a custom laid aside

With breeches and cocked


Their wisest

hats) the people sent

men

to

make

the public laws.

And

80

from a brown homestead, where the Sound

Drinks the small tribute of the Mianas,

Waved

over

l)y

the

woods

of

Rippowams,

And hallowed by pure

lives

and tranquil deaths,

Stamford sent up to the councils of the State

Wisdom and

grace in

Abraham Davenport


212
'T

SUPPLEMENT TO

was on a May-day

of the far old year


fell

Seventeen hundred eighty, that there

Over the bloom and sweet

life

of the Spring, of noon,

Over the fresh earth and the heaven

horror of great darkness, like the night


tell,

In day of which the Norland sagas

The Twilight

of the

Gods.

The low-hung sky


its

Was black

with ominous clouds, save where

rim

Was
The

fringed with a dull glow, like that which


crater's sides

chmbs

from the red


all

hell below.

Birds ceased to sing, and

the barn-yard fowls

Roosted

the cattle at the pasture bars


;

Lowed, and looked homeward bats on leathern wings


Flitted abroad
;

the sounds of labor died

Men

prayed, and

women wept
of the

all

ears

grew sharp

To hear the doom-blast


The black

trumpet shatter

sky, that the dreadful face of Christ

Might look from the rent-clouds, not

as he looked

loving guest at Bethany, but stern

As Justice and inexorable Law.

Meanwhile

in the old State-House,

dim

as ghosts.

Sat the lawgivers of Connecticut,

Trembhng beneath
"It
is

their legislative robes.

the Lord's Great

Day

Let us adjourn,"


THE DAVENPOKT FAMILY. 213

Some
A.11

said

and then,

as

if

with one accord,

eyes were turned to


rose, slow cleaving

Abraham Davenport.

He

with his steady voice


"

The intolerable hush.

This well

may be
;

The Day
But be
it

of

Judgment which the world awaits

so or not, I only

know
Lord's

M}' present duty,

and

my

command

To occupy

till

he come.

So

at the post

Where he
[

hatli set

me

in his providence,

choose, for one, to meet

him

face to face,^

N"o faithless

servant frightened from

my

task,
calls

But ready when the Lord of the harvest

ind
Let

therefore, with

all

reverence, I would say,


will see to ours.

God do

his work,

we

Bring in the candles."

And

they brought them

in.

Then by the
ilbeit with
'^n

flaring

hghts the Speaker read,

husky voice and shaking hands,


act to regulate
fisheries.

act to

amend an

jEhe

shad and alewive

Whereupon

Wisely and well spake

Abraham Davenport,
no figures of speech

straight to the question, with

^ave the ten

Arab

signs, yet not without

The shrewd dry

humor

natural to the
all

man

His awe-struck colleagues listening


28

the while,

214

SUPPLEMENT TO
of his argument,

Between the pauses

To hear

the thunder of the wrath of

God

Break from the hollow trumpet

of the cloud.

And

there he stands

memory

to this day.

Erect, self-poised, a

rugged

face, half

seen

Against the background of unnatural dark,

witness to the ages as they pass.


for fear.*

That simple duty hath no place

Grace Greenwood, (Mrs. L. K. Lippincott, in her " Sketches Yankee Character," writes of him thus: '! have often heard my father refer most affectionately to his uncle by marriage, Colonel Davenport, of Stamford, the 'Abraham Davenport' of one of Whittier's noblest poems, and the great-grandson of Rev. John
*
)

of

Davenport, the distinguished minister of

New Haven,

the brave

friend and protector of the regicide judges.

of

"Col. Davenport was distinguished for talent, culture, grace manner and that most rare and admirable good sense which
j

on great occasions and in sudden emergencies, shows itself as My father, who only in hisi wisdom and masterly sagacity childhood knew his uncle, remembered him less for his 'wisdom and grace than for the remarkably liberal way in which he bestowed bright sixpences and even shillings on his yoiang nephIn his later years the Colonel was very stout and had someews. So what of Falstaff's difficulty in contemplating his 'own knee.
'
]

'

he liked to have the great silver buckles of his shoes fastened He would emerge from his by other hands than his own. chamber in the morning, and call out cheerily to my father: and the little lad would kneel as One, two, buckle my shoe proudly to perform the service as ever hero knelt to receive the stroke of Knighthood. And it was no empty honor -the shin'

!'

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


"

215

The other

instance," continues Dr. Dwight, " took


at the

place at

Danbury,

Court of

Common

Pleas of
after

which he was Chief-Justice.

This venerable

man

he was struck with death, heard a considerable part of


a
of
trial
;

gave the charge to the jury


the testimony which

and took notice

an

article in

had escaped the

attention of the counsel on both sides.

He

then

retir-

ed from the bench


his bed.
"

and was soon

after

found dead in

To

his friends Col.


if

Davenport extended

his acts of
I say this

kindness, as

they had been his children.

from experience.
interests he

Of

his country

and

of all its great

was a

pillar of granite.

Nothing impaired,

nothing moved his resolution and firmness, while destined to support in his own station this valuable edifice.
"

He was educated

at Yale College in

which he took

the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1782.

He

died as

he had long wished to


ance of his duty,
year of his age."
(80.)

die, in the

immediate performin the 74th

November

20th, 1789,

IX.

Rev. James Davenport,

born

in

Stam-

ford, 1716.

He was

educated

at

Yale College, where

ing silver piece was sure to follow.


his stout uncle as a far greater

Indeed,

man

my father regarded than Governor Trumbull,

who was
deal of

lean enough to buckle his


in boys,

was a would have adored, for he not on Ij' tipped' a fellow royally, but was free and easy with him and with all young people."
'

human nature man whom the

own shoes. There is a vast and Colonel Abraham Davenport school boys of Thackeray and Dickens

21G

SUPPLEMENT TO

be graduated in 1732.
Island, in 1738.

He

settled

at Southold,

Lour

[Southold was the

first settled

town on Long Island


to Oyster-

and

originally extended from


all

Brookhaven

pond-Point, including

the islands in

that vicinity

and extending thence in a direct


miles of the Connecticut shore.
it

line to within a fev

Like East HamiDtor


of th(
i

was

originally purchased

by the magistrates

New Haven
number
England

Colony, and after being held by them for

of years,

was transferred

to the actual settlers

who were
;

principally

emigrants from Norfolkshire

who had

sjient

about two years in the Nevs


Isl-

Haven Colony, and


and in 1640.
vice

established themselves on this


left

Before they
of Grovernor

New

Haven, by the

ad-

and aid

Eaton and John Davenport


a

they were organized into a regular Church under


j)astor.

Rev. John Young,

who accompanied them

tc

the Island.]

Mr. James Davenport was the fourth pastor of

this

church, and remained such about two years, and was

esteemed a pious, sound, and


in 1740, at the time Whitfield

faithful minister.

But

came

to this country,

and a season

of

great religious excitement prevailed.

Mr. Davenport became carried away with enthusiastic


impulses,

and without asking the approbation

of his

people, set out on

an itineracy among the churches,


particular charge

leaving his
*

own

unprovided

for.*

Bacon's His. Discourses.


THE DAVENPORT FAMILY. 217

He

believed, that the

Lord was about

to arise

and have

mercy upon Zion,

for the time to favor her, yea, the set

time was come, and that he was especially called to

prepare the way of the Lord by calling the people to


repentance.

Before leaving Southold, he assembled the people at


his lodgings,

and addressed them


effort

for twenty-four hours

together
fined

The
for

overcame his strength and conto his

him

some days

chamber.

He commenIn the

ced his travels about the 1st of June, 1740.

same month during the session


Synod,
lie

of the Presbyterian
at

was foimd

at

Philadelphia, preaching

Society Hill with the Tennents and others.

In the autumn, he joined Whitfield, who wrote in


his journal,
"

October

80,

on arriving

To add

to

my

comfort, the

New York Lord brought my dear


at
:

brother Davenport, from

Long Island, by whose hands


Hav-

the blessed Jesus has of late done great things."

ing parted, they met again

November 5,

at Baskiuridge,

New

Jersey,

where Davenport had been preaching

to

about three thousand j^eople in the parish of the Rev. Mr. Cross.
days,

Here Whitfield remained


set out

for

one or two
to

and

accompanied by Mr. Davenport

Philadelphia.

After a perilous journey, in which they

twice narrowly escaped drowning, they arrived in Philadelphia, on


*

Saturday eve, the 8th.*

Mr. Davenport
Tracy.

The Great Awakening, by Rev. Joseph

218

SUPPLEMENT TO
particularly a favorite with Whitfield,

was

and

alsc

with the Tennents.


"

The Rev. Andrew Cross well


for

in a

pamphlet

in hit

defence, says Tracy, "produced


in his favor
;

example

Mr.
'

numerous

testimoniei

AYhitfield declared
i

in conversation that he

never knew one keep so close

walk with

God as Mr.

Davenport.

Mr. Tennent, in mj

hearing affirmed Mr. Davenj^ort to be one of the mosi

heavenly
eroy,

men he ever was acquainted


is

with.

Mr. Pom-

who

acquainted with both, thinks he doth noj


Whitfield, but rather goes

come one whit behind Mr.


beyond him,
for heavenly

communion and

fellowshij

with the Father and with the Son, Jesus Christ.

Mr

Parsons of

Lyme

told

me the

other day, [this was July

16, 1742,] that not

one minister

whom

he had seen wag


tc

to

be compared to Mr. Davenport, for hving near

God, and having his conversation always in Heaven.*


Mr. Owen,
also, of

Groton, said that the idea he had

oi

the Apostles themselves scarcely exceeded what he saw


in Mr. Davenport.

In

brief, there is

not one minister

in all Connecticut, that is zealously affected in the

good

cause of
is

God

at this day,

but instead of slighting him


of

apt to think

more highly

him than we ought


as
if

to

think of men, and to receive

him almost

he wag

an angel from Heaven. "f "This is the statement/' adds Mr. Tracy, " of an honest partisan so far as a

"Parsons, however, did not approve of a^jpears by his own statements."


*

all

his measures, as

Great Awakening, pp. 230-231.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


mrtisau can be honest
)re(l.
;

219
eol-

not

false,

but too highly

Davenport had certainly iDroduced wonderful

and collected a large tribute of veneration. .o(je to use language of a more modern date
(fleets,

'on
More

He

:he

very top wave of the spirit of the age.'

;han any other

man, he embodied in himself and proall

moted

in

others,

the

unsafe extravagances into


;

Iwhich the revival


^outran their

was running

knowledge, saw in

and those whose zeal him what they proudly

ihoped soon to become."


,

After leaving Mr. Davenport at Philadelphia,


sight of

we

ilose

him

till

the next Spring or

Summer, when

we find him again pursuing his travels in Connecticut,


and
i

in other parts of

New

England,

Among
Island.

other places he visited East Hampton,

Long

Eev. Dr. Beecher, in giving the history of that

town

in a

sermon.in 1805, remarks


1741-2, was the
It
first

"The

revival of

Ireligion in

general revival ever

witnessed in the town.

the instrumentality of the

commenced apparently by famous Mr. Davenport, who


evil.

iwas the means of doing both good and


elty of his
i

The nov-

conduct thoroughly aroused the attention of

the people and brought them within the reach of those

alarming truths, which

like a torrent

he poured upon

them. The effect was great. They were pricked in Men and brethren, what the heart, and cried out,
'
I

shall

we do

to be saved

?"

But

his rashness in
:

some

degree obscured the glory of his work

but notwith-

220

SUPPLEMENT TO

standing the unpleasant circumstances attending the


revival, there

were about one hundred persons who to


life,

appearance were made partakers of a new

in con-

sequence of which, about sixty joersons were added to


the church, soon after the settlement of Dr. Buel."

His proceedings were constantly of the most extravagant character.

"Endowed," says Dr. Bacon,


from a heart

"

with

some
tire,

sort

of eloquence, speaking

all

ou

and accustomed

to yield himself without reserve

to every enthusiastic impulse,

he was able to produce

a powerful effect uj^on

minds prepared by constitution

or by prejudice to sympathize with him.


"

New Haven
his

seems to have been one

of the princi-

pal theaters of his efforts.

The

celebrity of his father,

and

more

illustrious ancestor,

and

his

numerous

connections here, his mother being a native of

New

Haven, afforded him of course a favorable introduction."*

He came

to that place during the year 1741,

and commenced preaching.


influence

He

gained considerable
while

among many members

occupying the

pulpit there.

He was
and

censorious and uncharitable in

public addresses,

even

publicly

declared

his

belief that the pastor of

the church,

the

Eev. Mr.

Noyes, was an unconverted man.

The

result of his

measures was unhappy upon the church, as many led away by the extraordinary excitement of the times be-

came
*

dissatisfied with

their pastor

and

theii-

former

Historical Discourses, pp. 212-214.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


connection,
effected a

221

and withdrew from the old church and


organization, which
is

new

known

as the

North Church.
In the
visited

Summer

of the

same

year, Mr.
"

Davenport
it

Stonington, Connecticut.

Here

was

said,

near one hundred persons were struck under conviction by his first sermon, and about that number convei-ted in eight days, including

about twenty Indians

and that many were

left

under 'hopeful

convictions.'*

From
seph

Stonington he visited Westerley, Rhode Island,


according
Park,
to

where,

the

accoiant of the Rev.

Jo-

then

laboring

there

as

missionary
of

from the

London

Society, a large

number

conver-

sions took

Indians,

place, and among the number who connected themselves with

wei'e

many

the church,

and by
of the

their subsequent lives evinced the genuineness

change that had been wrought in them.f


religious zeal hith-

Throughout the whole country a


erto

unknown was

spreading, and
.

many were

led into

various extravagancies

Among

these,

Mr. Davenport

was foremost.

He

adopted the method of calling in

question the piety of ministers, and his measures gen* t

The Great Awakening,

p. 235.
la-

Among

the Indians converted through Mr. Davenport's

was one afterwards known by the name of Eev. Peter John, who was for many years a faithful and successful preacher of the Gospel, among the Shinnecock tribe on Long Island. Through his zeal and piety, several churches of the native Indians were gathered. He died about the beginning of the present century, at the advanced age of 88, and was succeeded in the ministry by his grandson.
bors,


222
erally

SUPPLEMENT TO

tended to produce disaffection in many churches.


"

He

gave himself up to "impulses


proceedings,
till

and the most enthuexcitein-

siastic

carried

away with the

ment

of the times,

he seems to have become almost

sane and was so treated by his oj^posers, although as has

been observed,

it

would be

difficult to

teU which was


of

most bewildered, he or the General Assembly


necticut, that sought to restrain him,
late session,

Con-

and

that, at theiri

had passed a

law, in

most flagrant

violacivil

tion of the rights of

conscience, repressing,

by

penalties, the practices of itinerants

and exhorters.

The

last

and most extravagant

of these public pro-

ceedings of Mr. Davenport, was at

New London, where

he was invited in the Spring of 1743, to organize a


church.

To cure the people

there of their idolatrous

love of worldly things, he called on

them to collect their


&c.,

ornaments, consisting of jewels, rings,


their flame,
clothes,

and

also

that they might be


to the list a

committed to the

and even added

number

of

books

the works of Beveridge, Flavel, &c.

From

this time,

Mr. Daveni^oi-t seems to have with-

drawn from

his public career,

and through the

efforts

of his personal friends, the Rev.

Drs. Williams

and
mar-

Wheelock, of Lebanon
ried his sister

the

latter of

whom had

he became convinced
errors,

tliat in his

course

he had committed many


lished a full

and voluntarily pubof the ex-

and most ingenuous confession

travagances into which he had been led.*


*

This confession

is

found in edition of

18-51.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

223

Mr. Davenport was formally dismissed from South3ld,

L.

I.

in 1746,
lie

and afterwards

settled at Hopewell,

N. J.,

where

usefully labored for

some

years,

and

iied in 1755.

TWENTY-FIEST GENERATION.
Issue of Abigail Davenport, (No. 72.)
(Who married Rev. Stephen Williams, D.
D.)

(81.)

I.

John, born March


22, 1747, to

8,

1720,

and was mar-

ried

January

Ann

Colton, by

whom
1722,

he

lad nine children, died March, 1772.


(82.)
II.

Stephen,

born

January

26,

was

graduated at Yale College in 1742, and ordained at

Woodstock, Second Society, Nov, 1747.


Dctober 18,
1748, Miss Martha Hunt,

He

married,

sister of the Rev.

John Williams, of Deerfield, by


ren.

whom

he had

six child-

He
)

died April 1795, having been in the ministry

aearly fifty years.


(83.

III.
1,

Eunice, born September

1,

1723,

and marshe

ried

May
6,

1753, Mr. William Stebbins,

by

whom

dad one
lune

child,

Stephen William Stebbins, who was born

1758,

who graduated
Street,

at

Yale College, and was a

settled minister at Stratford, for 29 years.

He

married

Miss Eunice
Street, of

daughter of the Rev. Nicholas


b}^

East Haven,

whom

he had a sou. Rev.

William Stebbins,
i

who was

settled at

West Haven, and

daughter, Ann,

who was

the 3d wife of the late Rev.

224

SUPPLEMENT TO
Mrs. StebJ

Eicliard S. Storrs, D.D., Braintree, Mass.

bins died in 1805.


(84.)

IV.

Warliam, born January

7,

1726, gradu-'

ated at Yale College in 1745, was ordained at Northford, a i:)arish in Branford, Connecticut,

June
Hall,

30, 1750,

and was married Nov.


of the Rev.

13,

1752 to

Ann

daughter
i

Samuel

Hall, of Cheshire.

Their children
;

were,
Hall,

Warham, who married Ann Wilford Samuel Jonathan Law, Davenport who married Mary At;

water

Ann, who married

first

the Rev. Jason Atwater,

second Rev. Lynde Huntington, and after his death,


Rev. Mr. Barker
;

William Augustus, Lucy, Abigail,


Abigail,

who

died young

by, Eunice K. Cooke, Samuel,

who married Stephen Maltand Sarah who married!


father of the

Dr. Pynchon.

The Rev. Dr. Williams,

above, married again to Mrs. Whiting, onel William Whiting, of

widow

of Col-

died

AjDril,

1788.
for

years,

and

New Haven. Dr. Williams He was in the ministry about forty many years a member of the CorpoMay
31,

ration of Yale College.


(85.)

V.

Samuel, born

1729,

and was

married February
ter of

14, 1760, to

Miss Lucy Burt, daugh-

Deacon Nathaniel Burt.

One

of their daughters,

Sarah, born 1765, was married to the Rev. Richard


Salter Storrs,

who succeeded her

grandfather.

Rev.

Dr. Williams, as pastor of the Church at

Long Meadow.
S.

Mr. Storrs was the father of the

late

Rev. Richard

Storrs, D. D., of Braintree, Mass.,

who was

the father

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


)f

225
pastor of the

the

Rev. Richard

S.

Storrs, D. D.,

3hurch of the Pilgrims, Brooklyn, N. Y.


ions,

One
1774,

of

the
in

Samuel Williams, born


on the old place
his
at

Sept. 23,

and

L851, lived

Long Meadow, fomierly


Rev.

)ccupied
^alliams.
(8G.)
it

by

grandfather,

Dr.

Stephen

VI.

Davenport, born May

11, 1731,

and died

Sheffield, Oct. 8, 1758, as

he was returning from the

irmy

in

which he held a lieutenant's commission.


VII.
4,

(87.)

Martha, born May, 1733, and was mar1759, to Mr. Reynolds, a son of

ried

January

Rev.

Peter Reynolds, of Enfield, Ct.,


ral children.

by

whom

she had sev-

She was afterwards married to Deacon

Ely, of
(88.)

Long Meadow.
VIII.

Nathan, born Oct.

28, 1735,

was grad-

uated at Yale College, in 1756, and ordained at Tolland, April 30, 1760.

He

married, Oct. 20, 1760, Miss

Mary

Hall,

daughter of Captain Eliakim HaU, of WalDr.

lingford, Ct.

Wmiams

died April 15, 1829 in the

94th year of his age, and 66th of his ministry.


wife,

His

Mrs.

Mary

Williams,

died March

9,

1838, aged

95 years and 4 months.

TWENTY-FIRST GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of John Davenport, (No. 73.)

(89.)

I.

John Davenport

of Stamford,
at

born Janu-

arv 15, 1724.

He

resided

Davenport Ridge on

226

SUPPLEMENT TO

lands which he inherited from his grandfather, the


Rev. John Davenport of Stamford, and which continvie
in the family to the present day.

At the age

of eight-

een, he became a professor of the Christian religion, by

uniting with the church at


1742. 1748,

New

Canaan, March

7, 2,

He was

married to Deborah Amblar, June

"by Jonathan

Maltbie, Esq., one of his Majesty's


of Fairfield.'

Justices for the

County

Died June

23,

1756, aged 32 years.


(90.)
II.

Joseph Davenport, born August


to

9,

1725,

and was married


enport,
Esq.,

Hannah Amblar, by Abraham Dav5,

July

1753.

Mrs.

Davenport,

died

March
(91.)

15, 1769.
III.

Nathan Davenport, born January

15,

1727.
(92.)

IV.

Gould Davenport, born

Sept.

6,

1728,

died Jan 26, 1752.


(93.)

V.

Deodate Davenport, born Jan.


to

5,

1730,

and was married

Lydia Raymond, by Abraham DaMrs.

venport, Esq., June 16, 1757.

Davenport died

March
aged 78
(94.)

19, 1773.

Married again to Mrs. Elizabeth

Jones, September 28, 1774.


years.

He

died March 10, 1808,


'

VI.

Martha Davenport, born Feb.


to

20, 1731,

and manned
Esq.,

John

Crissey,

by Abraham Davenport,

AprH

7,

1757.

(95.)

VII.

Eleazar Davenport,

born March

15,

1732.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(96.)
3,

227

VIII.

Thaddeus Davenport, born February


Davenport,

1734.
(97.)

IX.

Elizabeth

born

April

1,

IL735.

(98.)

X.

Silas

Davenport, born

May

13, 1736,

and

Harried to Miss
V\'ells,

Mary Webb,
1765.

in Stamford,

by Rev. Mr.

March
XI.

7,

(99.)

Hezekiah

Davenport,
at the

born

Jan.

14,

L738,

and was married

Cramp Ponds, (Yorkarmy


on
Mrs.
in the

own,) by the Rev. Mr. Sackett, to Ruth Ketchams,


Dec.
7,

1763.

He was

a Lieutenant in the
fell

svar of

the Revolution, and

at Ridgefield,

his re-

turn from the battle of Danbury, in 1777.

Dav-

nport died in 1775.


(100.)

XII.

Josiah

Davenport, born August

6,

1739. (101.) L741.

XIIL
XIV.

Stephen Davenport born April

9,

(102.)

Sarah Davenport.

TWENT Y-FIEST GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of Sakah Davenpokt, (No. (Who married Rev. Eleazar Wlieelock, D.
75.

D.*)

(103.)

I.

Theodora,

who married

Alexander

Phelps, of Hebron, Connecticut, afterwards of Oxford,


N. H.,

whose son Rev. Davenport Phelps, an Episcoa

The children by

former husband are given under No.

75.

228

SUPPLEMENT TO

pal minister, died at Pultneyville, N. Y., 1818, aged 58


years.
(104.)
ten,
II.

Ruth,

who married

Rev. William Pat

D. D., of Halifax, Mass.


notice of Mrs. Patten and her descen-

The following
dants,
l)y
is

princijiaUy

drawn from her memoir

writtei

her

son, the Rev. William Patten,

D. D., of Hart

ford, Ct.

Ruth Wheelock, daughter


Sarah, and
port, of

of the above

mentioned

granddaughter

of the Rev.

John Daven4,

Stamford,

Connecticut,

was born March

1740.
child,

When

young, she was an intelligent and docilf


to her education.

and great attention was paid


early

Her mind

and rapidly matured.

At the age

o1

eighteen, she

was considered one

of the

most accom
At
this

plished and interesting of


age, (June
9,

young women.

earh

1758,) she became the wife of the Rev,

William Patten, pastor of a church in Halifax, Ply-

mouth County, Mass.


[Mr. Patten's early developments w^ere not less re-

markable that those of his


age, he is

wife.

When

five

years

oi

said to have composed a sermon on the

first}

verse in the Bible, the sentiment and connection

ol

which excited the surprise of his

friends.

He

enteredi
of
age.

Harvard College, when about twelve years


graduated at sixteen
;

taught school and studied The-

ology under Rev. Mr. Havens, of Dedham, Massachm


setts
;

was licensed

to preach,

engaged to supply

the

pulpit in Halifax, for two or three Sabbaths,

and

be-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


fore
settle

229
call to
2,

that time

expired, received a

unanimous

over them as a pastor, and was installed Feb.

1757, seven

weeks before he was nineteen years

of age,

and married Ruth Wheelock, before he had reached


the age of twenty years.

Dr. Patten died January 16,

1775, in the 37th year of his age.]

Mrs. Patten survived her husband for a long time,

and

lived an

example

of

devoted

piety, usefully

enga-

ging herself in the work of her Master.

She died De-

cember

5,

1831, aged

91 years and 9 months, having

been a professor

of the faith of the

Gospel for 77 years.

Their son. Rev. William Patten, graduated at Harvard


College in 1780, and received the honorary degree
of

D. D., at

Brown

University.
I.,

He was

settled

in

the

ministry at Newport, R.

in 1786,

where he preach-

ed about 48 years.

He

married Hannah Hurlbutt, of


several
Esq.,
children,

New London. They had whom was William Patten,


dence, R.
I.

one of

a lawyer of Provi-

Ruth W. who married Frederick W.


Joseph, a lawyer in
C.
S.

Hotchkiss, of Hartford.

New York,
;

Mary Ann, who married


N. Y.
Floride.
(105.)

Halsted, of Brooklyn,
S.

George W. a Captain
in.

in the U.

Army
at

and

Rev.

Ralph,

who graduated
was

Yale

College in 1765, and was an assistant of his father, but


in consequence of feeble health
disqualified

from

becoming
*

a pastor,

and

finally for

any useful labors.*

There were two or three other children who died youncr.


30

230

SUPPLEMENT TO

TWENTY-FIRST GENERATION -Continued.


Issue of Deacon Deodate Davenpoet, (No. 77.)

(106.)

I.

Sarah Davenport, of East Haven, born


;

July

7,

1731
II.

who married John


to

Mix.
2(j,

(107.)

Martha Davenport, born May

1733,

and was married

Gold

S. Silliman, of Faii'field,

by

whom
ter
of

she had one son, William,


Dr. Allen,

who married

daugh-

and afterwards a Miss Jennings.

[Mr. Silliman graduated at Yale College in 1752.

He

was
tion,

a General in the

army
b}'

in the

war

of

the Eevolu-

and was taken


of Fairfield,

the British, just before the


to Long-

burning
Island.

and carried a prisoner

His second wife was Mrs.


of the Rev.

Rebecca Noyes,
by

(widow

Joseph Noyes,

whom
D.,

he was
Y.,

the father of Mr. Gold

S. Silliman, of

Brooklyn N.

and

also of Professor

Benjamin SiUiman, M.

LL.D.

of Yale CoUeg-e.] (108.)


III.

William Davenport, born in 1734, and

died Sept. 17, 1742.


a subsequent marriage. Dr. Wheelock had several childone of whom, Hon. John Wheelock, LL. D., was born at Lebanon, Ct., January 28, 1754, entered Yale College, but graduated with the first class of four persons, at Dartmouth, in He succeeded his father as President of Dartmoiith Col1771. He married lege in 1779, which office he held for 36 years. Maria, the daughter of Gov. Suhm, of St. Thomas, whose only daughtei', Maria Malleville, married the Rev. William Allen, D. D., of Northampton, Mass., formerly President of Bowdoin College, and author of the American Biographical Dictionary. Two other daiighters of Dr. Wheelock married Messrs. Woodward and Ripley, both Professors in Dartmoiith College.
ren,

By

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(109.)

231

IV.

Jolm Davenport

of East

Haven, born

1738, and Avas married to

Anna

Pierpont, in 1780, and

afterwards to Mrs. Pliebe Todd, but had no children.

Died January
(110.)

9,

1820,

aged 82

years.

V.

Deacon Samuel Davenport


and was married
9,

of East
to

Ha-

ven, born 1740,


Street.

in 17()6,

Mary

He

died July

1810.

Mrs. Davenport died

December
(111.)

21, 1803,

aged GO

years.

VI.

Roswell Davenport, born 1742, died

September
(112.)

19, 1749.

VII.
Holt.

Lydia Davenport, born 174G, married

Samuel

T WENT Y-FIEST GENERATION. Contixued.


Issue of Elizabeth Davenpoet, (No.
(Who
(113.)
I.

78.

Marrieil Rev. William Gaylord.)

William, born Nov. 1733, married Sarah

Eiley of Wethersfield, Ct., Nov. 1757,

when he removin

ed to

New

Hartford,

Ct.,

where he died

Sept 1777,

aged 44

years.

He

cultivated a farm in

New Hartford,

given him by his grandfather, Deacon William Gaylord,


of

West Hartford.*

His wife died May, 1826, aged 88

years. (114.)
II.

EHzabeth, born in Wilton,

Ct.,

1736,

died
*

May

29, 1749.

All his direct ancestors, for six generations, bore the

name

His oldest son, also William, was killed at the batIn this connection we find tle of Long Island, August 27, 1776. the descent of Rev. William L. Gaylord, (now of Chicopee, Mass.,) born at Woodstock, Conn., Oct. 14, 1831.
of William.

232
(115.)
III.

SUPPLEMENT TO
|

Sarah, born Oct.

3,

1737, died

May

8,
|

1751.
(IIG.)

IV.

Moses, born in Wilton, Nov. 24, 1739.


\

His father, who for thirty-three years, kept the church


records of this town with remarkable accuracy and

minuteness, under date of Oct.


list,

7,

1760, in the obituary

writes'
:

"Moses Gaylord. aged twenty-one


"

years,"

'

and adds

He

died at Fort Herkimer on his

way

from Oswego to Alban}^, after he had been from home


in the expedition against Montreal, a little

more than

'

four months, and after four months of sore sickness at

Oswego, on his way towards Albany."


(117.)

V.

Theodosia, born March

6,

1742, died

June

6,

1742.

(118.)

VI.

Martha, born April

14, 1743.

Married

Seth Taylor, of Norwalk, (now Westport,)


1763,

March

7,

whose son was Seth Taylor, the grandfather


Taylor,

of

Henry F.
(119.)

now

of Stamford.

VII.

John, born

May

11, 1746.

TWENTY-FIRST GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of Hon.
(120.)
I.

Abraham Davenport,

(No. 79.

Hon. John Davenport

of Stamford,

born

Jan. 16, 1752,


"

and graduated
is

at

Yale College in 1770.

His scholarship

indicated in his appointment to a

tutorship in 1773.

Entering on the legal profession,

he was soon called to take an important place among


the Revolutionary patriots of that day.
riot

When the

pat-

cause was suffering for the want of a suitable pub-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


ic interest

233
nation, he

in the welfare of

the

new

was

appointed by the Assembly of the Siate as one of a

3ommission to

visit

the principal towns and arouse the

people to a just sense of their dangers,

and

to

move

them

to corresponding exertions."*

He was
Noah

married to Mary
(by

S.

Wells, daughter of Eev.


Esq.,)

Wells, D.D.,
7,

Abraham Davenport,
of the Revolution.

May

1780.

He was Major
war

of the Militia, in this sec-

tion of the State, in the

In 1799, the year of General Washington's death, he

was chosen a Representative Member


Congress to
his
fill

of the

American

the vacancy occasioned by the death of

yovinger brother, (Hon.

James Davenport,)

of

which he was continued for 18 years a member, during


the Presidency of the elder Adams, and also of Presi-

dents Jefferson and Monroe.

He was punctually
to his

at his

post from the opening to the adjournment of each session of Congress,

and answered

name when

call-

ed to vote on aU subjects, and, we may add, always voted on the same side with his co-representative from
Connecticut, Hon.

John Cotton Smith.

We

also find

him occopying a position on important committees


the

of

House

but was more prominent as a worker than


Having declined
a re-election in 1817, he

a debater.
sjDent the

remainder of his days in the quiet retirement

of his country

home, where he was greatly respected


all.f
.

and honored by
*
f

Huntington's History of Stamford, p 369. The fine mansion built bj' Mr. Davenport in 1807,

is still

^^*

SUPPLEMENT TO

He was a member of the Congregational Churcli in Stamford, of which he was chosen Deacon in 1795,i
In this
office

his

eminent worth was ever showr

in the character of a benevolent, active

and exemplary

Christian.

He

died
is

November

28, 1830.
:

The following

the fac-simile of his autograph

fuJi^-pu-/24:^. '^^iV:

His wife survived him and died in Brooklyn, N. Y.

June

28, 1847, at the


11.

advanced age of 93 years.


21,

(121.)

Abraham Davenport, born October

1753, died October 25, 1754.


(122.)
K), 175G,

III.

Elizabeth Davenport, born Sei^tember

and was married by the Rev. Dr. Wells, to James Cogswell, M. D., of Preston, August 8, 177G. They had one daughter Alice, who became the wife of
the Rev. Samuel Fisher, D.D.,
of Greenbush, N. Y.,

who was

the father of the Rev.

Samuel Ware Fisher,

street, and until recently was occupied by Deacon Theodore Davenport, its present owner. Here Major Davenport on the 23d of August, 1824, welcomed General Lafayette, (then on his way to New Haven and Boston,) and, where he received the congratulations of hundreds of persons who had assembled from this and the neighboring towns to pay

standing in Main

his son,

their respects to the distinguished visitor.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


vlio

285
Beeclier, as pas-

succeeded the Rev. Dr.

Lyman

or of the 2d Presbyterian Church, Cincinnati, Ohio,

md who was
oUef^e, at

for

many

years President of Hamilton

Chnton, N. Y.

" Ehzabeth, wife of


,his hfe,

James Cogswell, M.

D., departed

Nov.
IV.

15, 1779.*

(123.)

Hon. James Davenport, born in Stam12, 1758,

ord,

October

and gradnated

at

Yale College

n 1779.

Like his father and brother John, he early

espoused the national cause and during the Revolution

was employed
Government.

in the

Commissary Department

of

}he

He was

married to Abigail Fitch by

-Abraham Davenport, Esquire,

May

7,

1780.

Mrs.

Davenport died November, 1782, aged 22 years.


ried, 2d, to

Mar-

Mehitabel Coggshall, by the Rev. William


of Milford, Ct.,

Lockwood,

November

6,

1790.

"

Be-

3finning his professional life

as a lawyer, with literary

James Cogswell, D, D., of 6, 1720, and died January having been for sixty years a laborious and faithful I, 1807, He had also a brother. Mason F. Cogsminister of the Gospel. well, M. D., who died in 1830, aged 69 years, who had a daughter named Alice, who though deprived of hearing and speech, was distinguished for her intellectual attainments and loveliShe died December 30, 1830, aged 25 years. aess of character. The American Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb at Hartford, tinier Providence owes its origin to the father's tenderness toards his child, and his sympathy for her fellow-sufferers, and Conwill long stand an enduring monument to his memory.
Dr. Cogswell was the son of Eev.
,

Hartford, Ct.

who was born

-Jannary

riectjr.iii

Historical Collections.

Dr. James Cogswell afterwards married Mrs. Abigail Loyd, and had several children, James, John, Sarah and Harriet.

236

SUPPLEMENT TO

tastes of a high order, Mr.

Davenport was soon

called
oi

to

fill

important public

offices.

He was

member

the State Legislature, of

both Houses, and Judge

of the
ai

Court of

Common

Pleas.

In 1796, he was chosen


of the

Representative

Member
3,

American Congress,!
and)

during the Presidency of General Washington,


died suddenly August
1797.

He was

member

oi

the Corporation of Yale College from 1793, to the time,


of his death.

Of Mr. Davenport, President Dwight, in


vol.
iii.

his Travels,

p.

500, says

"

Few

persons in this country!


thanj

have been more, or more deservedly, esteemed


the Hon.

James Davenport.

His mind was of a strucinfirm constitution


preclu--

ture almost singular.

An

ded him

to a considerable extent,
;

from laborious study,;

during his early years


of his
jects,
life.

and, indeed, throughout mosti


ob-|

Yet an unwearied attention to useful

a critical observation of everything important


fell

which

under

his eye,

and a strong attachment

to
a,

intelligent conversation,

enabled him by the aid of

discernment almost
of valuable

intuitive, to

accumulate a rich fundi


to conversation;
i

knowledge.

With respect

he was peculiar. The company of intelligent persons he


sought with the same eagerness and constancy, as the
student his books.^

Here he always started

topics

of|

investigation, fitted to

improve the mind, as well as

to!

please

and

in this way, gathered

knowledge with the

industry,

and

success, with

which the bee makes every

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


flower increase the treasures of
its hive.

237
I

never knew

the value of intelHgent conversation, and the extent of

the contributions, which


the stock of

it

is

capable of furnishing to
ex-

knowledge possessed by an individual,


clearly,

hibited
ple.

more

and

decisively,

than in his exam-

At the same time,

his

own

conversation was so

agreeable,

and

intelligent,

and

his

manners
all

so enga-

ging, that his

company was coveted by


His
life, also,

his

numerstain
;

ous acquaintance.

was without a
justice, his

and on

his integrity, candor,

and

countryqualifi-

men
eai'ly

placed an absolute reliance.


it

With these

cations,

will not be a matter of wonder, that at an


life,

period of his

he was employed by the public


;

in

an almost continual succession of public business

or

that he executed every commission of this nature hon-

orably to himself,

and usefully

to

his

country.

He
se-

died in the thirty-ninth year of his age, of a paralytic


stroke,
vere,

brought on by a long continued, and very

chronic rheumatism.

Few

persons have been

more

universally, or deeply, lamented."

(124.)

V.
"

Huntington Davenport, born April


life

18,

1761,

and

departed this

on the evening following

the 22d of October, 1769."

TWENTY-FIRST GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of Rev. James Davenport, (No. 80.)

(125.)

I.

Rev. John Davenport, born at Freehold,


11,

N.

J.,

August

1752,

and graduated

at

Piinceton


238
SUPPLEMENT TO

College iu 1769, and received the honorary degree of


A. M., at Yale College in 1785.

He

studied Theology

with Drs. Bellamy and Buel, and was ordained at Mattatuck, a parish in the

town

of Southold, L.

I.,

June

4,

1775,

and served the congregation there

as a

stated

supply for two years.


lent

He was
for

an amiable and excelin different j^arts

man, and labored

some time

of the Island,

and was dismissed from the Presbytery


1786.

of Suffolk, April 12,

WhUe

at Mattatuck.

he
of

was married
his

to Mrs. Elizabeth

Barker, the

widow

predecessor,

the Rev. Nathaniel Barker,

by the

Rev.

John

Storrs,

December
years.

18, 1775,

with whom,

notwithstanding the great disparity in their ages, he


lived happily for
ister

many

He was

the

first

minis-

upon Long

Island, that

refused to administer

baptism upon the indulgent plan.

He was

settled at
J.,

Bedford, N. Y., and afterwards at Deertield, N.

August
1805.

12,

1795, and dismissed from feeble health

in

In 1809 he returned to the State of


at Lj'sander,

New

York,

and died
children.
(126.
)

July 13,
I.,

1825.

He had no

Prime a His. L.
II.

Aliens Bio. Die.

James Davenport.

No

children.

(127.)

III.

Elizabeth Davenport,

married a Mr.

Kelsey, of Princeton, but had no children.

TWENTY-SECOND GENERATION.
Issue of John Davenport, (No. 89.)

(128.)

Dea.

John Davenport, born

at

Davenport


THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.
Ridfre, Stamford,

239

May

24, 1749,

and was married by the


Bell,

Rev.

Noah

Wells, D. D., to
of

Prudence

daughter of
23,

Jesse Bell,

Stamford.*

She died December


to

1794, aged 43 years.

Married 2d,

Sarah Gaylord,

daughter of Rev. WilHam Gay lord, of Wilton, August,


1795.

Mr. Davenport was both a carpenter and farmer


cultivating the lauds of his native Ridge,

and erecting

dwellings, some of which, with the lapse of nearly a

century, are

still

standing in a

fair state of preservation.

He was
al

one of the
of

early members
of

of the

Congregation-

Church

North Stamford,t
8,

which he was chosen


in that office
till

deacon.

May

1796,

and continued
6,

his death,

February

1820.

Mrs. D. survived him


years.

and died February


*

11, 1846,

aged 87

lather of

Another daughter of Mr. Bell married Mr. Waterbury, the Gideon Waterbury, of New York, who was the father of the Eev. J. B. Waterbury, D. D., formerly of Boston, and who died in Brooklyn, N. Y.. 1877. One of Dr. Waterbury's sisof ters, Harriet, married the Kev. John Scudder, M. D.,(the father
Kev. Henry Martin Scudder, D. D.,

now

of Brooklyn, N.

Y.,)

and another, Catharine, became the wife of the Rev. Myron


Winslow, both Missionaries
at

Madras, in India.

organized June 4, 1782, with twenty-two t This church was members. Previous to the settlement of the first pastor, Rev. Solomon Wolcot, in 1784, the Rev. Samuel Hopkins, after-

wards Rev. Dr. Hopkins, (understood to be the venerable personage on whom Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe, has founded her story of "The Minister's Wooing,") preached in this parish, about a year and a half, during his absence from the church in Newport, R. I. that town having been taken possession of by the British. Rev. John Shepherd was ordained as second pas;

240
(129.)
II.

SirpPLEMENT TO

Sarah Davenport, born Jan.


to

7,

1751,

and was married by the Rev. Dr. Wells

Monmouth
died

Lounsbmy,
about 1819.
(130.)

of

Stamford, April

16,

1770, and

III.

Stephen

Davenpoi-t,

born Mach

9,

1752; was a school-teacher.


1777.
(131.)

Not married.

Died about

IV.

Rhoda Davenport, born


to

Jan.

4,

1754,

and was married

Thaddeus Huested, Nov.

19, 1775.

TWENTY-SECOND GENERATION -Continued.


Issue of Joseph Davenpoet, (No. 90.)

(132.)
(133.)

I.

Hannah Davenport, born May


DeborahDavenport, born Jan.

19, 1755.

II.

30, 1757.
18, 1759.

(134.)

III.

Martha Davenport, born Oct.


Scofield.

Married a Mr.
(135.)

IV.

Gould Davenport,
Joseph

bom

Oct.

5,

1762;

was a school-teacher.
(136.)

Married and removed to Ohio.


Davenport,

V.

born March

28,

1765, died Oct. 28, 17(56.


Issue of Deodate Davenport, (No. 93.)

(137.)

I.

Lydia Davenport, born April

3,

1758.

Married Peter Bishop.


year of her age.
tor,

Died Jan.

7,

1837, in the 80th

in 1787, followed
his death,

by Rev. Amzi Lewis,

in 1795,

who remainHenry
till

ed

till

when two

years after, in 1821, Rev.

Fuller,
1844.

was installed and continued in the pastoral

office

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(138.)
II.

241
13, 1760.

Sarali

Davenport, born Feb.

Married David Webb, of Ohio, by


Nathan, and others.
(139.)
III.

whom

she had a son

Samuel Davenport, born April


30, 1775.

3,

1762,

and died December


(140.)

IV.

Mary Davenport, born June


to Dea. Isaac Benedict,* of
;

2,

1764,

and was married

New

Ca-

naan, August 19, 1794

by

whom

she had one child,

Lorana, born Dec.

7,

1795, who married E. Whitlock,

Nov. 23, 1843, and died Dec. 1868.


[Dea. Isaac Benedict, was born in Norwalk, Ct., June
26, 1751.

Soon

after his first

marriage he removed to
cul-

New

Canaan, and

settled

upon a farm, which he


for sixty years.

tivated with his

own hands

For some

time he was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, (pensioner;) held offices in the

community, and,

for fifty-nine

years,

was

a member of the Congregational Church,

and

an

efficient

deacon

in the same, for thirty-six years.

He

possessed great meekness and gentleness of disposition.

His deep interest in the welfare of his country,


in all that appertained to the prosperity of the cause

and

of the

Redeemer, led him

to

make

willing contributions,

both
*

of his

money and

services, to the cause of Chris-

Dea. Benedict's
Isaac,

had

first wife was Jane Raymond, by whom he who married Fanny Hopkins Gould married
;

Betsey

Foot: Samuel R.. (died young); Abigail married T^illiam Davenport Obadiah married Clarissa Bingham LewLorana (died young) and Rev. is married Mary Scribner Amzi who graduated at Yale College, in 1814, and married Martha, daughter of General Solomon Cowles, of Farmington.
; ; ;
;

242
tian benevolence.
friend,

SUPPLEMENT TO

The poor found

in

him a steadfast

and

to the

church he was both an ornament and

a pillar.

Both

his corporeal
till

and mental powers

re-

mained
ble

uninipaii'ed
life,

almost the close of his honorahis

and useful

and

end was peace.

He
An

died

May

17,1840, in his 90th year

having reached exactly


ap-

the age of both his father

and grandfather.

propriate discourse was delivered upon the occasion ol


his funeral,

by his
."

j^astor,

Rev. Theophilus Smith, from

Gen. XXXV, 29

And

Isaac gave

up the ghost and

died,
full

and was gathered unto


of days.'"]*

his people, being old

and

* Dea. Benedict was descended from Thomas Benedict, who came from Nottinghamshire, England, to Massachtisetts, 1638, and who finally settled with his family in Norwalk, ConAll his direct ancestors, for one hundred necticut in 1665. and fifty years, held the office of Deacon in the Chnrch of Nor-

walk.

His father was Dea. Nathaniel Benedict of Norwalk, who died in 1806, in the 90th year of his age, and whose character is thus described in an article written by the Hon. Roger Minot Sherman, and piiblished in a newspaper at the time of his death
Dea. Nathaniel Benedict died in Norwalk, of the 2d of April, 1806, after a shock of the palsy, with

on the morning which

he lingered about twelve days, in the 90th year of his age. On the 3d, his reinains. were followed to the grave by a large concourse of friends and relatives, among whom were his twelve surviving children, and many of his more remote posterity. He has left ninety-one grandchildren, and eighty-eight greatgrandchildren, the whole member of his descendants, now living, being 191. " For about thirty-two years he sustained the office of Deacon Deacon Benof the First Congregational Church in that town. edict was one of those venerable personages by whom what re-

THE DAVENPOKT FAMILY.


(141).

243
Stamford, born

V.
1766,

Deodate Davenport

of

June

2,

and married
2iJ,

to Abigail

Handford,

Sei:t.

25, 1788.

Died Oct.

1839.

Mrs. D. died Sept.

6,

L848, in lier 80tli year.


(142.)

VI.
to

and married
18, 1817.

Nathan Davenport, born Aug. 8,1768, Died May Polly Smith, Sept. 14, 1800.

(143.)

VII.

John Davenport, born Jan.


where he

11, 1771,
2,

and married Elizabeth Keeler, of Wilton, April

1795.

He removed
1834.
(144.)

to Charlton, N. Y.,

died, Jan. 4,

VIII.)

Elizabeth Davenport, born

March

20, 1773, (145.)

and died
IX.

May

30, 1792.

Abigail Davenport, born July 28, 1775.


Oct., 1795.

Married to Lebbeus Keed,

Mr. Reed died

at Spencertown, N. Y., April 22, 1851. (146.)

X.

Betsey Davenport, born Oct.


Knaj-ip.

12,

1777.

Married Charles
(147.)

Died

July 28, 1825.


14, 1779.

XL Ann

Davenport, born Nov.

Married Thomas Warren.


mains

Died Sept.

22, 1831.

of the pious habits of our forefathers have been transmitted to the present generation. His long life has been eminently exemplary, and years to come will feel its happy influEvery morning and evening witnessed his devotions. ence. His Sabbaths M'ere faithfully appropriated to public worship

and

religious family instructions.

An

amiable, cheerful dispo-

sition, a

soimd mind improved by a good degree of reading and miich reflection, and adorned with a bright constellation of Christian graces, comprised his character. At his funeral, an appropriate sermon was delivered by the Eev. Dr. Burnett, from The wicked is driven away in his wickedness Prov. xiv. 32
: ' ;

but the righteous haUi hope in his death.'"

244
148.)

SUPPLEMENT TO
XII.
Clarissa
to

Davenport,

born April

2.5,

1782.

Married

Samuel

Raj^mond,

June

1804.

(There were two other children

who

died in infancy.

TWENTY-SECOND GENERATION. ^Continued.


Issue of Silas Davenport, (No. 98.)

(149.)

I.

Nancy Davenport, born Dec.


of

21, 1765,
bj'

and married to David Maltby,

Stamford,

Hon.

James Davenport, Nov.


(150.)
II.

19, 1786.

Died

in 1815.

Dea.

Abraham
Died

Davenj^oi-t of Stamford,
to Polly

born October
October
(151.)

30, 1767,

and married
in 1845.

Brown,

26, 1793.
III.

Mar^' Davenport, born

March
born

17, 1770.

Died March
(152.)

21, 1848.

IV.

Ebenezer

Davenport,

May

9,

1773.

Man-ied Jerusha Aulstine.

Died

at Flatbush,

N. Y., 1833.
(153.)

No

issue.

V.

Rufus Davenport

of

New

York, born in

Stamford, October 18, 1775, and married to Antoinette


Cable, October 23, 1827.
28, 1832.

Mrs. Davenport- died April

The

following- notice of

Mr. D. appeared in
:

"

The

Sailors Magazine," N. Y., September, 1857

"We
years.

have to record the death on the 3d


at

inst. ol

Rufus Davenport, Esq.,

the advanced

age of 81

He was one
of

of

the earliest, most active, and

most persevering

the friends

and advocates

of

the

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

245

Seamen's Cause.

He was
June

one of the founders of the


its first

New York
Board
af)iJoiiited

Port Society, and was chosen on


5,

of Directors

1818.

Soon

after,

he was

treasurer of that society, in which capacity


ability

he served with great


thirty years.

and acceptance

for about

In the

effort to build the first


street,

Mariner's

Church

in Eoosevelt

he was
for the

ver}'

prominent,

being- one

of

the committee

purchase of the

land and the erection of the building.

When

the

American Seaman's Friend Society was reorganized in 1828, he was one of its first Board of Trustees, and
continued to serve as such
of the chief
till

his death.

He was

one

movers

in the

establishment of the Seare-

men's Savings' Bank, and held an honorable and

sponsible station therein during the remainder of his


life

"

Mr. D. was a

man

of great purity of principle

and

character,

and great amiability

of disposition.

Barely

does a

man go through Hfe making so few enemies, and winning so many friends. He was a member of
the

Presbyterian Church in Fifth Avenue, of Avhich


is jjastor."

Bev. Dr. Alexander


(154:.)

VI.

Charles

Webb

Davenport, born FebruFitch.

ary

9,

1778.

Married

Ameha

Died

in Illinois

in 1843.
(155.)
24, 1783.

VII.

Catherine Davenport, born February

Married James Palmer.

Died in 1813.

246

SUPPLEMENT TO

TWENTY- SECOND GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of Lieut. Hezekiah Davenport, (No. 99.)

(156.)

I.

Priiella DaveniDort,

born August

25, 1764.

Married a Mr. Dikem.


(157.)
II.
3,

Died February

28, 1809.

Martha
1807.

Davenport, born 1766.

Died

November
(158.)

III.

Abigail Davenport, born 1768.

Mar-

ried

Samuel Buxton, and had three

children, Harvey,
24, 1798.

Harriet and William.


(159.)

Died November

IV.

AVilliam Davenport, born in

Stamford

September

17, 1770.

Married,

1st,

by the Rev. Amzi


17, 1799.

Lewis, to Theodora Davenport,

November

Mrs. Davenport died October 29, 1809.


to

Married, 2d,

Nancy Hoyt, June


Married,

17, 1810.

She died September


of

28, 1838.

3d,

by the Rev. Dr. Todd,


September
13, 26,

Stamford, to

Anna

Tuttle,

1840.

Mr,

Davenport died November


(160.)
(161.) (162.)

1850, aged 80 years.

V.

Elizabeth Davenport, died young.

VI.

James DavenjDort, died young.


Isaac Davenport, died young.

VII.

TWENTY-SECOND GENERATION Continued.


Issue of Dea. Samuel Davenpoet, (No. 110.)

(163.)

I.

Sarah Davenport, born in East Haven,


INIarried Ira Smith, in 1784.

January
(164.)

31, 1767.
II.

Roswell Davenport, born in East Ha-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


ven, April 28, 1768,

247

and married

to Esther

Heminway,
Mrs.

1793.

Kenioved

to Erie, Pa.,

and died

ni 1852.

D. died in 1839.
(165.)
III.

Hezekiah Davenj^ort, born in East Ha1769, and married Pbilena Pierpont,

ven,

December 11,

who

died October 29, 1827.

Mr. D. died December

11, 1854.

(166.)
16, 1771.

IV.

Martha Davenport, born

December
in

Married to
in 1841.

EH

Potter, of East Haven,

1793.

Died
V.

(167.)

1771. 1794.

Married

Mary Davenport, born December 16, to John Woodward, of East Haven, in


Street Davenport, born in East Haven,

He

died August 26, 1819.


VI.

(168.)

JanuaiT

28, 1775,

and married

to

Nancy Maria

Shults,

April 19, 1827.

Removed to Townsend,

Ohio, and died

TWENTY-SECOND GENEEATION-Continued.
Issue of

Majok John Davenport,

(No. 120.)

(169.)

I.

Ehzabeth Huntington Davenjjort, born


Married
to the

March
cliffe

4,

1781.

Hon. Peter W. PtadY.,

(Judge) of Brooklyn, N.

October

1,

1799.

Died

May
June

28, 1850.
II.

No

issue.
in

(170.)
ford,

John Alfred Davenport, born

Stam-

24, 1783.
is i:)rincipally

The following record

drawn from

"

Memorial Discourse," delivered

in

New Haven

on the

248
the occasion of
liis

SUPPLEMENT TO
funeral,

by Eev. Elisba

L. Cleave-

land, D. D., pastor of the Thh-d Congregational Church,

of that city, October 17, 18(54.


"

Mr. Davenport sprang from a stock thoroughly Puriblood rich in manly virtues, educated

tan, inheriting

in a

home pervaded with chiistian influences. He thus commenced his career under circumstances most aus-

picious for his future development.

He

fitted for col-

lege partly "with Dr. Dwight, then residing at Greenfield Hill,

and was a member


of

of his family

when he
entered
class

was elected President

Yale College.
It

He

Yale, Freshman, in the class of 1802.


of Bates,

was the
Perrit,

and Evaiis, and Hubbard, and

and

Tomlinson,

class that

has

made

for itself a

most

honorable name in the histoiy of the country.

There

was but one professor

of religion in the class at the


it

time of entering, but a great change came over


fore they graduated.

be-

The year

1802, will ever be re-

membered in
upon the

the history of the College and of this class,


of the of the

for the extraordinary out-pouring


institution.
facts, that

Holy

Spirit

The j^ower

work may be
was not a

seen in the

while at the administration of


1,

the Lord's Svipper, September


single undergraduate

1801, there

among
of the

the communicants, one

year

later,

on

the Sabbath before commencement,

twenty-five large

members

graduating

class,

with a

number from

the three lower classes, sat

down

at the table of

the Lord.

Seven others joined the

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

249
of the

clmrcli soon after,

making thirty-two subjects


fifty-six.

great awakening, in a class of


this

As a

result of

work

of grace, one-third of the class

became minin this

isters of the gospel.

Among

those

who shared

blessed work of salvation, was

John

A. Davenj^ort.

He
still

had always been a moral and amiable youth, but


worldly and gay
ties of time.
;

seeking his chief good in the vanifelt

But from the moment he

the renew-

ing power of the Holy Spirit, he became another man.

In happy accordance with the natural decision and directness of his mind, he went fully over to the Lord's
side,

and consecrated himself

for all

coming time

to

the service of his Redeemer.

The hope

of gloiy then
jjath-

formed

in his soul
life.

never ceased to irradiate his

way
on

in

The principles of

Christianity, then graven

his heart,

governed him henceforth even to the end

of his mortal career.

The pleasures

of sense lost their

charm before the new found joys


ence.
Christ,
It

of christian experiof his first love for

was

in the

warm glow

and

of his first

enjoyment of divine communion,

that he took leave of the pleasant scenes of College and

entered on the practical work of


"

life.

Immediately

after

graduation, Mr. Davenport en-

gaged

in mercantile pursuits in the city of

New

York,

and

for fifty years

was

a well-known

and prosperous

merchant

of that city.

To

this

honorable and useful

calling he applied himself with characteristic energy

and enthusiasm, guided by strong common

sense,

and

250

SUPPLEMENT TO

regulated by unbending principle, incorruptible integrity,

and a becoming

christian moderation in his de-

sires for

temporal wealth.

His practical sagacity, how-

ever,

did not altogether save him from unfortunate


;

enterprises

and during the disturbed

state of

affairs

Britain, he experienced reverses and discouragements, which tried his faith and patience, and christian princiijles. It was a

incident to the last

war with Great

salutaiy discipline

it

furnislied

him a new

illustration

of the value of that rehgion

he had embraced, and of

the superior worth of those treasures which hajDiiily he

had

laid

up where no
It

fluctuations of time could en-

danger them.
to wait

taught him

how

wise and safe

it is

on the Lord for success

in a faithful

adherence

to christian principle,

divine

will.

and cheerful obedience to the These rough and narrow straits, not the

least profitable part of his earthly voyage,

were pass-

ed

at

length,
;

and he emerged

into a

broader and

smoother sea and from that time onward, was favored with the steady flow of a healthful and generous
prosperity.

Mr. Davenport was married in 1806, to Miss Eliza Maria Wheeler, daughter of Dr. William Wheeler, of Ked Hook, N. Y., and grand-daughter of Rev. Cotton
"

Mather Smith,
excellent

of Sharon, Connecticut.

With

this

most

and lovely woman, he


fifty-three

lived in

happy wedin

lock

more than

years.

She died

New

Haven on

the 13th of July,

1859 sustained

in her last

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


sickness

251

by the same christian


Hfe.
first

faith

by which she had

walked througli

When
went
Christ.

Mr. Davenport

went to

New

York, he
gosi:)el of

in the fuhiess of

the blessing of the

With the

zeal of a

young

convert, he sought

at once the

most eminent religious privileges afforded


Attracted by the fame and

by the

city at that time.


gifts of

eminent

Rev. Dr. John Mason, he soon put

himself under the ministry of that truly great


prince of pulpit orators.

man and
and

The

faithful instructions

elevating influence of Dr. Mason's j^reaching contribu-

ted largely to nourish and develojie that sturdy growth


of christian principle

and character

for

which he be-

came distinguished.
from

After the removal of Dr.

Mason

New

York,

Mr. Davenport connected himself

with the church under the pastoral care of the venerable Dr. McElroy,
still

living

and

active in the ministry,

where he
join the

remained, until the desire to promote the

greater progress of religion in the city induced

him

to

Bowery church, then

recently organized

un-

der the pastorate of the Eev.

Mr.'

Christmas, and after-

wards

of Rev. Dr.

John Woodbridge.
in connection with

Here he was an
an active and de-

office-bearer,

and

voted band of christians, exerted a wide and energetic

influence for good.


life.

This was one of the most useful

periods of his

Subsequently he joined the BleekAfter

er street church, where he served as an elder.

he removed his residence to Brooklyn, he became one

252

SUPPLEMENT TO

of the founders of the Presbyterian church of wliich

the
first,

Rev. Dr. Spear

is

the

pastor,
this

and was, from the

one of

its

elders.

In

new

enterprise

he

took the deepest interest, and contributing liberally to


its

j)ecuniary support, and gave

it

the full benefit of his

ripe experience

and

practical wisdom.

He was

looked

up

to,

and well he might be, as a strong


Nor did
his aftections for that
to

pillar in the
of

church.

brotherhood

christians cease,

when he ceased

be a member.

He

had a sort of parental love for that particular household


of faith, Avliich "

he never

lost.

In 1852, Mr. Davenport removed to


built

New

Haven,

where he had previously

up a manufacturing estab-

lishment, and here he spent the remainder of his days,

enjoying a tranqu.il old age."*

In the month of May, disease began to undermine


that strong physical form which

had stood the wear

of

fourscore years, and after a few


ing,

months of painful

sufter-

which he bore with true christian


for the

fortitude, his;

mind

most part peaceful and joyous, he depar-

ted to the heavenly rest, October 14, 1864.


Fac-simile of his autograph
:

* His residence occupied a site near the head of Hillhonse avenue, in the city founded by his ancestor nearly two hundred and forty years before, (and now occupied by his daui^h-

ter Miss Elizabeth W. Davenport,) almost adjoining the sulmrban seat of the late poet Hillhouse, which gave name to tli( most beautiful Avenue in the City of Elms.

JOHN ALFRED DAVENPORT,


BORN, 1783 DIED,
1804.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(171.)
ford,
III.

253

Mary

"Wells DaveniDort,

born

in

Stam-

September
of

12, 1785,

and married
10,

to

James BoorShe died


of Mr. B.

man,

New

York, November

1810.

lOctober 26, 1869.

The following account


January

appeared
"

in the N. Y. Time,^ of

26, 1866.

James Boorman,
at the

Esq., one of our wealthiest

and

most respectable
linst.,

citizens,

died in this city on the 24th

advanced age of eighty-one.

Mr. B. was
his

born in Kent, England, in 1785.

Commencing

business career as an apprentice with Divie Bethune,


in 1805, he, at the
'ship.

age of

22,

was admitted

to a partner-

This was dissolved in 1813, and shortly after

Mr. Boorman, in connection with Mr. John Johnson,

now many years


cessful firm of

deceased, founded the eminently suc-

Boorman, Johnson & Co.


entire

For many

years the firm controlled the

trade between

Dundee and

this city; they

introduced the Swedish iron


article

into the market, in

which

they did an immense


years at the head

business.
of

The

firm stood for

many
It

the mercantile community.

was dissolved

in

1855, Mr.

Boorman

retiring after half a

century of

business
"

life.

Mr. Boorman was the prime mover in the organiza-

tion of the

Hudson River Railroad Company,


1863.

of

which

he was President, and he continued his connection with


the

company
of

till

He was also

the founder of the


first

Bank
the

Commerce

in 1839, his

name standing

on
of

list

of the first

Board

of Directors,

and was one

254
the origiual
"

SUPPLEMENT TO

As a

Chamber of Commerce. business man, Mr. Boorman was energetic and


of the

members

and indomitable.
his business career,

He

acquired a large fortune during


of

and a large portion


to

the income
of
cliarity.

derived therefrom was devoted

acts

Scarcely a benevolent institution existing in the city to

which he was not a subscriber."


(172.)

IV.

TheodosiaDavenport, born January


8,

ol,

1789.

Died February
V.

1810.

(173.)

Dea. Theodore Davenpoi-t of Stamford,


26, 1792,

born January

and married by the Rev.

(Gardi-

ner Spring, to Harriet Grant Chesebrough, of

New

York,

May

9,

1833.

For nearly

sixty years

Mr. Da-

venport resided in the mansion erected by his father


in 1807,

on Main

street,

and now, except

in the winter,

resides with his son John, at

Bay Point,

a beautiful site

fringing the waters of

Long

Island Sound.
pu1)lic

Mr. Davenport has taken an active part in the


affairs of his native

town, and been an etWcient

memoffice

ber and

officer of the

Congregational Clnu'ch, of which

both his father and grandfather were deacons, an

now

held both by the father and his son,


of

who bear the

name
*

Theodore

gift of

God.*
Church in Stanit'ord. is c.iwas organized in Wether.stieM.

The

date of the Congregational


It

eval with that of the town.

with a membership of seven, four of whom, including the K.v.

Kichard Denton, who became the first pastor, came to Stamfor.l. in 1641. Mr. Denton was succeeded by Kev. John Bishop. Rev. John Davenport, Rev. Ebenezer Wright and Rev. No^ih

'

'x

*A

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, STAMP^ORD,

CT., (EiiKt

ted

1858.)

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(174.)

255
7,

VI.

Rebecca Ann Davenport, born July


15, 1817.

1795.

Died January
VII.
17*.)S,

(175.)

Matilda Davenport, born in Stamford,

April 17,

and married

to the

Rev.

Peter Lock-

wood, now of Bingliamton. N. Y.*

TWENTY-SECOND GENERATION. Continued.


IsHUK OF Hon. James Davenport, (No. 123.)

(17(j.)

I.

Betsey Coggshall Davenport, born

in

Stamford, January 27, 1781, and married to Charles

W.

Apthorp, of Boston.
(177.)
II.

Abigail Fitch Davenport, born

Novem-

ber

17,

17!*1.

Married to Rev.
F^irst

Philii^

Melancthon

Whelpley, Pastor of the

Presbyterian Church,

New York.
[Rev. Mr.

Died Tune, 1864.

Whelpley was the son

of the Rev.

Samuel

Whelpley, formerly of Berkshire county,


setts,

Massachu-

but sul>se(piently of

New

York.

At about the

age of eighteen, he publicly professed his faith in


Christ by uniting with the

Presbyterian Church in

Newai'k,

New

Jersey, under the j^astoral

charge of

Wells. D. D, The ministry of these five persons extended down to the year 1776, in which year Dr. Wells died. The tirst simple church structiire was replaced in 1705, by one more coiumodions, which again gave way for the one

shown
tenilier

in the
2:5,

accompanying view, which was dedicated SepRev. G.

18.58.

Buckingham

Willcox. the present

pastor,
*

was installed in

1876.

Rev. Mr. I^ockwood graduated at Yale College in 1817.

256

SUPPLEMENT TO
Dr.

Rev

Eichards.

Having-

pursued a course

of

study with bis father, he was licensed to preach by the

Presbytery of

New

Jersey, at

the age

of

nineteen.

Before he was twenty years of age, he was chosen Pastor of the First Presbyterian Chnrch in New
York.
"

Mr. Whelpley possessed pulpit qualifications of

the highest order.

He was

gifted with a very pleasing


;

countenance, aspect and figure


ous,
clear,

his voice

was sonorwas

and

flexible in its tones,

his gesture
it is

simple, grave,
to

and aj^propriate

Indeed

not easy

conceive of one naturally better qualified for the


Wliile he did not discountenance these

pulpit orator.

advantages by neglect, his heart was too truly touched by the love of souls to value them if separated from a
simple declaration of the glorious Gospel of
Savior
feel
;

God

our

'but for

mere oratory

in the inilpit

none could

more

entire compassion than he."*

In the month
vessel,

of

March, 1824, he suddenly ruptured a blood


his life

and the hemorrhage was so great that


sidered in imminent danger
ally
;

was con-

from

this

he but parti-

recovered

till

on the 17th

of the following July of

(1824,)

he was called from a station

eminent useful-

ness to his crown and reward in Heaven.


the 30th year of his age.]
(178.)
*

He

died in

III.

Mary Ann Davenport, born

in

Stam-

Memoirs

of the Rev. Mr. Bruen, p. 181.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


fortl,

257
to tlie Kev.

November

11, 1793,

and was married


York, January
2,

Matthias Brueu, of

New

1823.

[The Rev. Mr. Bruen was descended from John


Bruen, Esquire, of Bruen Stapleford, (near the original
seat of the Davenports,) in the
of

County

of Chester,

one

whose

sons,

Obadiah Bruen, was among the

earliest

Puritan emigrants to

New

England, his family having


I.,

been
Itheir

much
of

persecuted in the reign of Charles

for

friendship to the celebrated Mr. Prynne, at the


his

|time

imprisonment

in the

castle

of

Chester.

iHe

was a patentee of the Colony


II.

of Connecticut, of

from

Charles

in

1062,

and was Recorder

New LonAbra-

don

until the year 16G7,

when

he, with the Rev.

iham Pierson, of Branford, bought of the Indians for


ilthemselves
city of

and their associates, the now

flourishing-

Newark, then called New-work, in

New

Jersey.

In this place his


reside.

descendants have since continued to

The Rev. Mr. Bruen, whose


iJBruen,
I'He

father
J.,

was Matthias

was born
at

in

Newark, N.

April 11, 1793.

graduated

Columbia College

in 1812, soon after

Iwhich he

commenced

the study of Theology, with Dr.

ijohn M. Mason, of

New

York.

In 1816, he traveled
In the

in Europe with his distinguished preceptor.


'^beginning
of 1819,

being invited to preach in the


at

^American Chapel of the Oratoire

Paris,
six

he was
in

ordained
i|

in

London, and then passed

months

Paris.

258

SUPPLEMENT TO
in thecib York, but refused to receive any compensa

In 1822, he was employed as a missionary


of

New

tion.

During

his labors in

New York,
Of

he collected
this

th

Bleecker street Congregation.

people h(
till

became the stated


death,

pastor,
6,

and continued such

his

September

1829, aged 36 years.

Mr. Bruen engaged earnestly in various benevolent


institutions.

He was

agent and corresponding secre-

tary of the
it

Domestic Missionary Society, and when


into the
assisted

was changed
still

American by

Home

Missionary
Bible, SabSocieties,

Society, he

his counsels.

bath-School,

Tract,
eftbrts,

and Foreign Mission and


in the G-reek cause

engaged

his

he cheer-

fully co-operated.

He was
in

accomplished in manners,
of

in

literature,

and

the knowledge

mankind.
felt it

Though possessed
his

of

eminent quahfications, he
all

highest honor to lay


feet,

his distinctions at his

Master's

and devote
of

his life to the glory of

God

and the good

mankind.

published a Sermon at Paris on the death of a young lady from New York, and sketches of Italy.

He

Memoirs of Bruen and Am. Bio. Dictionary.^ Mrs. Bruen now resides at Newport, K. I.*
Mrs. Bruen's present residence at Newport stands upon the occupied by her maternal ancestors, two hundred years ago her mother being a direct descendant of the Hon. John
*

site

who was first President of the Colony of Rhode Island under the patent granted to Eoger Williams, by the Earl of Warwick.
Coggshall,
in 1647,

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(179.)

259

IV.
10,

Francis Louisa Davenport, born No-

vember

1795,

and married the Rev. Thomas H.

Skinner, D. D., formerly pastor of the Mercer street

Presbyterian Church,

New
same

York, and subsequently

Professor of Pastoral Theology in the Union Theological

Seminary

in the

city.

[" Rev.

Thomas Harvey

Skinner, D. D., LL. D., was


7,

born

at

Harvey's Neck, North Carolina, March


in

1791,

He

prepared for College

Edenton, North Carolina,


J.,

and entered Princeton College, N.


fourteen, graduating thence
in

at

the

age of

1809.

Returning to

Edenton, he commenced the study of the law, with an


older brother, then a distinguished lawyer
;

but when

nearly ready for the bar,


convictions
brother, he

a change in his religious

taking place, against the protests of his


resolved to enter the Christian Ministry.
1812.

He was
in

licensed to preach in December,

In

1813 he was ordained as co-pastor with Dr. .Taneway,


the Second

Presbyterian

Church, Philadelphia.
the Fifth

Three years
Presb;\iierian

after

he became pastor of
of that city,

Church
1832
in
;

where he remained
to Boston, he of

in charge until

removing thence

was appointed

the

following year Professor


at

Sacred Rhetoric in the Theological Seminary


dover, Mass.
"

An-

In 1835 he received a

call

from the Mercer Street

Presbytei-ian Church, in the city of

New

York, where

he enjoyed a successful pastorate for twelve years.

260

SUPPLEMENT TO
of Sacred Ehetori(

"In 1848 he was elected Professor


and Pastoral Theology,
inary,
in the

Union Theological Sem

New York a
Esq.,

professorship

endowed by James
in

Boorman,
called 'The

by

a gift of

$20,000 and which wai

Davenport Professorship,'

honor of
In

tin
this

name which Mr. Boorman's


office

wife also bore.

he continued during the remainder of his


first

life.

"Dr. Skinner was

known

as

an author
'

in

1839
oJ

when he put
the Bible,'

forth

two volumes
to

entitled,

Religion

and 'Aids

Preaching and

Hearino

After that time

numerous theological works proceeded


last

from

his

pen, including essays, discourses

cussions.

His

and diswork was Discourses on Theology,


'

published in 1868.
of D. D.,

He

received the honoraiy degree


oi

from Williams' College, in 1826, and that


in 1855.

LL.D., from Marietta College, Ohio,


"

His career as a Christian preacher began in times


controversy.

of sharj) theological

His mind was too

eager and active, and his logical habits of thought

were too exact to allow him to be indifferent


questions then in debate
self to
;

to the

but never did he suffer himhis one

be diverted from
'

great work as a

preacher of the

glorious gospel of the blessed God.'


all

His nicest metaphysical distinctions

came

into play,

not as arid learning, but as practical helps.


the pulpit, he

W hen
human

in

commended

the truth to the

con-

science in the sight of God.


"

The period

in

which the best part of

his ministeri-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


al life

261

was

spent,

was

distingiiished by those extraor-

iiiiary effusions of the

Holy

Spirit,

which were hardly


last

ess remarkable than 'the great awakening,' in the


;entury, as associated with the

pen and preaching of


instinct

fonathan Edwards.
terpreted,

With the quickest

he

in-

and with wannest sympathy he entered into

hat great

work

of

God.

It

gave a peculiar point and

iharacter to all his preaching

through

life.

So thor-

Dugh was

his self-conviction as to the truth, that he

eemed always
ed
also.

to expect that others

would be convinc-

He

unfolded and enforced the truth as with


success.

the utmost confidence of

He

cherished an

attachment for his profession which amounted to a noble

and fervent enthusiasm.


in

Like

George Herbert,

whom,

many

points he resembled, he regarded his

pulpit as his joy

and throne.. So earnest was

his

manner,
the im-

and glowing

his discourse, that he always

made

pression on his hearers that he expected, and with


reason, an immediate verdict,
it

good
if

and was disappointed

was not given.

Those memorable scenes

in Phila-

delphia, in

New

Haven, in

New

York,

when preaching

with such demonstrations of the Spirit and of power,


inquirers

and converts were computed by hundreds

and thousands, and a whole audience bent towards

him hke a

field of

grain

Then was

it

that he plied

his sickle well,

and

filled his

bosom with many

sheaves.
of

How many

are

already garnered in the


still

kingdom

Heaven, how many

living in these churches

and

262
pulpits,

SUPPLEMENT TO

who

will

always hail him as the chosen means

of their lasting spiritual


" Dr.

good

Skinner was, to use an expression which in old

English bore a peculiar sense, a perfect Christian Gentleman.


gentle,

He was
how
all

a specimen of spiritual beautj'.

How
how!

guileless,

how
of

kind,

how

coui'teous,
!

free

from

suspicion

worldly ambition
!

How
been

sweet his latest experience


said of

How
'

often has
fast

it

him by

his

friends,
fruit

He

is

ripening for
de-

heaven.'

Like ripe

has he

fallen, in its time,

tached by no violence.
faculties,

Age had

imj^aired none of his


serenity
to his!

only

imparted additional

countenance, sweetness to his manners, and beauty to


his character, as the disc of the setting

sun seems to be
at its

larger and
idian.

its

luster to be softer than

when

mer-

How

calmly has he been sitting in his state in


life

the cathedral of

with the banner of Christ's love

over his head, waiting for the service to be over, that

he might say with


fruitful

all

his heart,
life,

Amen."*

Thus ended a
join
1,

and well spent

and he passed away to

the glorious multitude of the redeemed, February

1871.

TWENTY-THIRD GENERATION.
Issue of Dea. John Davenport, (No
128.)

(180.)

I.

John Davenport, born October


by a
fall

27. 1778,

and was
years.
*

killed

from a horse,

at the age of 11

The Christian Weekly,

Vol.

1,

No.

1,

April

15, 1871.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(181.)
II.

263

Ealph Davenport, born 1775, died 1779.

(182.)

III.

Theodora Davenport, born Sept.


to William

27,

1770,

and married

Davenport, son of Lieu-

tenant Hezekiah, Nov. 17,


(183.)

179!).

Died

Oct. 29, 1809.

IV.

William Davenport, born at Davenport

Ridge, Stamford, March 25, 1781, and was married, by


the Rev. Justus Mitchell, to

Abigail Benedict, daugh-

ter of Dea. Isaac Benedict, of


12, 1802.

New

Canaan, September

She died Oct.

9,

1839, aged 59 years.


of

Mrs. Davenport was a

woman

much

native enerof

gy, blended with great mildness and gentleness

character.

Her

piety

was

of a cheerful cast, lighten-

ing every burden of


trial,

life,

sustaining the heart under

sanctifying

affliction,

and rendering the future

ever bright and joyous through the power of divine


faith

and

love.

Precluded by feeble health for the


from public
efforts of charity,

most part

of her life

her

benevolence often exhibited

itself

in

plans of doing-

good

to those

around her and who came under her im-

mediate influence.

But

it

was

in the private circle of

home that her virtues shone most brightly, and where


the

happy influence

of her serene

and cheerful piety


faith in the jDrom-

was most apparent.


ises of

With a strong

God
and

to parental faithfulness,
praA'erfulh'

she labored

dili-

gently

to

inspire her children Avith


uji

honorable and right impulses, and to train them


for usefulness

and

for heaven.
life

The

closing scene of her

showed most

strikingly

264

SUPPLEMENT TO

the power of Divine grace to imjiart peace and joy to

the dying beUever.

After weeks of painful sufiering,


i

which she bore with Christian resignation, she sank to


rest while reclining in the

arms

of the writer.

To her
-i

may

aptly be applied the lines of one of our sweetest


:

female poets

" And thus she stood, Clad in that panoplj' of faith and prayer, Serenely on the verge of three score years

Prompt at her Master's call, and ripe for heaven Then leaning on the breast of filial love Took her last peaceful sleep.
So
beaiitiful.

The pure

in heart go forth to

meet their God."

He was
arine

again married July 28, 1842, to Mrs. CathIsaacs, of Brooklyn, N. Y.,

M.

who died July

21, 1862.

Mr. Davenpoi-t,

in 1801,

became connected with the

Congregational Church in Norih Stamford, but soon


after his first marriage,

removed

to

New

Canaan, and

purchased a farm adjoining that of his father-in-law,


Dea. Benedict. This he cultivated with his
for nearly forty years,

own hands

when he

retired from active laof

bor,

and passed the remainder

his life in Brooklyn,

N. Y., where he died January 16, 1860, in the 7!Hh

year of his age.

On

his settlement in

New

Canaan,

he removed his ecclesiastical connection to the church


thei'e,

but at the time of his death was a me:nber of


All his direct ancestors

Plymouth Church, Brooklyn.


for six generations bore the

name

of John,

were

all

William Davenport,
BoKN
17S1

Died

18G0.

THE DAVENPORT

FASriEY.

265

members
by

of

tlie

cliurch of Christ,

and

like this lionored

father, sustained their profession of the Christian faith


lives of

exemplary and consistent


V.

loiety.
5,

(184.)

Sarah Davenport, born March

1783,
24,

and married to Jonathan Bates, of Darien, June


1804.

She died February


VI.

17, 1839.

(185.)

James Davenport, born


2,

at

Davenport
to

Eidye, Stamford, February

1787,

and married

Martha Warren,
ary
6,

of Norwalk,

(now Westport,) Febru-

1810.

He, together with his wife, made a public

profession of religion by uniting with the Congregational

Church

in

North Stamford, -in 1815,

of

which he

was

for thirty years a


list

member, and

his

name appears
there.

on the

of

Sabbath School Superintendents

He was

a farmer,

and died October

27, 1845.

His wife survived him, and, after a peaceful old age

retaining her
herd "

mental faculties so clearly that on the

evening preceding her death, she repeated from


oiy the Twenty-third Psalm,

memSliep-

" The.

Lord

/.s

my

with great

distinctness

and pathos

retired to
ninety-

her bed March 28, 1875, and amid the slumbers of that
night the pulse of
to the
life

ceased to beat, and she passed

heavenly fold of the

Good Shepherd aged

two years, eight months and twenty-two days.


"Of no disaster, no disease she died, But hnng like autumn fruit that mellowed long, Even wondered at because it falls no sooner. Fate seemed to wind her up for fourscore years, Yet freshly ran she on twelve winters more 'Till like a clock, worn out with eating time, The wheels of weary life at last stood still."
;

266

SUPPLEMENT TO

[The following account of an improvised celebration


of her ninetieth birthday,
vocate, of

appeared

in the Stamford

Ad-

July 25th, 1873.


j

very pleasing occurrence took place at Daveninst.


j

port Ridge, in this town, on Saturday the 19th

The occasion w^as no

less

than that of a Surprise Tea


j

Party given to Mrs Martha Davenport, (widow of the


late

James Davenport,)
birthday.

on the celebration
a

of

her

ninetieth

About

dozen members of the

family of her son George, and


port, (both living within

nephew

A. B.

Daven-

speaking distance of the old


)

mansion where the lady resided, took sudden possession of her parlor, and in about live minutes while the

good woman was attending was wholly

to her

kitchen duties-

spread a table bounteously laden with necessities and


luxuries.
It

a matter of surprise,

and when
on

the old lady

came to look

after the strange noise going

in her house, her feelings almost

overcame

her.

But
\

soon recovering her usual serenity and self-possession,


she enjoyed the occasion almo.st as

much

as

if

it

had
|
j

been a marriage ceremony.

Mrs. D. (whose maidenjust seven years after


I

name was Warren,) was born


the

Declaration

of

Independence,

and about
his

live

months before Washington resigned


at the close of the war.

commission
j

What

vast
full

and mighty chauperiod of ninety

ges have been wrought in this


years
!

Mrs.

still

lives

in the

house to which she


built b}^ her

came when married in 1810, and which was

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

267

husband's father, Dea. John Davenport, about ninety


years ago.

Her

hair can liardly be said to be frosted

with age, her hearing is ahnost perfect, and she gives and
takes a repartee with the quickness and mental
of one yet

acumen

young and

gay.

But

for a spinal weakness,

her physical and mental powers could be said to be but


slightly impaired.

Living alone with her oldest son,

now
daily

over threescore, and unmarried, she attends to her

domestic duties, meekly and patiently waiting

for the call of the

Master to

sit

down

at " the

Marriage

Supper
(186.
30,
)

of the

Lamb."]
Julia

VII.

Ann Davenport, born November


to

1794,

and married
2,

Jotham Hoyt, January

4,

1817, and died July


(187.)
6,

1868.

VIIL JohnCiaylord Davenport, born March


1,

1799, died April


(188.)

1799.
4,

IX.

Elizabeth Davenport, born October

1802, died April 12, 1818.

TWENTY-THIRD GENER ATIOX. Continued.


Issue of Sarah Davenpoet, (No. 129. (Who Married Monmouth Lounsbury.)

(189.)

268

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


of
Col.

269

Enoch

St.

John, September 10, 1817, and

who

died April 27, 1875, in his 85th year.

Mrs. D. died

November
(210.)

24, 1874.
III.

Polly

Davenport,

born

August

31,

1793.

Died March
IV.

18, 1796.

(211.)

Polly Davenport, born June 19, 1796.


25,

Married to Amzi Scotield, November


S.

1819.

Mr.

died February 20, 1863.


(212
)

V.

Abigail Davenport, born


1,

May

21, 1798.

Died November
(213.)
ford,

1825.
of

VI.

Thaddeus Davenport,

North Stam-

born April 2, 1800.


9,

Married Belinda Lyon, Feb-

ruary
year.

1831,

who

died September 22, 1875, in her 73d

(214.)

Vn.
3,

Joseph Davenport, of
1803.

New

Canaan,

born January

Married to Julia Young, Sep-

tember
(215.)

15, 1824.

VIII.

Darius Davenport of
8,

New

Canaan,

born in Stamford, December

1805.
9,

Married to Su-

san Betts, of Wilton, January

1832,

who died No-

vember
(216.)

7,

1876.

IX.

William Henry Davenport, of Brooklyn


27, 1807,

N.

Y.,

born in Stamford, October


Maria Burdett,
1,

and married,

to Ellen

May

6,

1835.

Mrs. D. died
at

October

1846, aged 29,

and was buried


Mr. D.

Greenwood
of the

Cemetery, Brooklyn, N. Y.
earliest settlers in the
'

was one

new

state of California,

where he

died

December
35

4,

1865.

270

SUPPLEMENT TO

TWENTY-THIRD GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of

Nathan Daa'enpokt,

(No. 142.)

(217.)

I.

George

A. Davenport, of

V/ilton,
Sturg'es.

born

January
filled

31, 1808,

and married to Mary

Has

the office of

Judge

of ^

Probate of Norwalk, for

nearly thirty years.


(218.
)

II.
5,

James Smith Davenpoii,


1811.

of Wilton,

born
G,

September
1840.
(219.)
16, 1813.

Married

^Nlary

Olmstead, April

III.

Mary Ann Davenport, born December


to

Married
1,

Matthew Smith, October 8,

1833.

Mr.

S.

died July

1841, in the 32d year of his age


11.3.

Issue of John Davenpoet, (No.

(220.)

I.

Elizabeth Davenport, born September


5,

7,

1796, and married to William Wheeler, March

1822.

Died September 1872.


(221.)
II.

Mr. W. died April

8,

1871.

Sally

Davenport, born December 27,


^Marcli 20,

1799, and

was married to Jeremiah Ward,


19, 1826.

1824.

Died August
III.

(222.)

Lewis Davenport, born September


to

18,

1803,

and man-ied
Died

Griswold Maxwell, January

20,

1826

Jan., 1872.

Mrs. D. died Feb. 25, 1852.


Y.,

(223.)

Arazi
1807,

Davenport, of Charlton, N.
to

born,

April
9,

9,

and was married


D. died

Mary
7,

E. Hall, April
^Married,

1833.

Mrs.

February

1842.

2d, to

Thirza Redfield, September 15, 1842.

Mr. D.

died February 27, 1871.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

271

TWENTY-THIRD GENERATION^ Continued.


Issue OF Abigail Davenport, (No. 145.)

(Who Married Lebbeus Keed.)

(224.)
(225.)
(22G.)

I.

Darius.
Eliza.

II.

III.

William.

Issue of Betsey Davenport, (No. 146.)

(Who Married Charles

Knapii.)

(227.)

I.

Samuel, married Eliza Bureliard.


Eliza,

(228.)
(229.

II.

married Isaac Sterling.

III.

Betsey.

Issue of
J

Ann Davenport,

(No. 147.)

(Who Married Thomas Warren.)

(230.)

I.

Ephraim Chauncey, born


Warner.

in Stamford,

March
lor,

13, 1808.

Married Elmira Burr, 2d, Louisa Tay-

and 3d

wife, Julia B.

Died March

15, 1865.

(231.)

II.

Joseph Davenjoort, born October 2, 1809.


13,

Married Maria Jessup, November

1831.

He

has

been for some years the senior partner


J.

in the firm of

D. Warren
as the

&

Co.,

conducting the extensive works In the winter

known
of

Stamford Foundry Co.

1867-8,

Mr. Warren united with Mr. Joseph B.

Hoyt, and obtaining control of the old Stamford Canal,

purchased the land on both sides of the canal bed, and

by excavating the same, and extending


about eighty
feet,

it

to a width of

opened a channel

for sloop

and steam-

boat navigation from the harbor to about

sixty rods be-

low the depot of the

New

York,

New Haven &

Hart-

272

SUPPLEMENT TO
facili-

ford Railroad, thus affording the town increased


ties for transportation.

(232.)

III.

John, born February


Hoyt, November 13,

19, 1813.

Mardied

ried

Caroline

1836.

He

September
(233.)

22, 1857.

IV.

Elizabeth,

born

May
7,

16,

1818.

Mar-

ried Charles N. Olmstead, April

1839.

TWENTY-THIED GENEKATION Continued.


Issue of Clarissa Da\-enpokt, (No. 148.

(Who Married Samuel Raymond,)

(234)

I.

Ann, born Februaiy

12. 1805.

Married

Charles Raymond, of Norwalk.


(235.)
II.

Clarissa,

born March

26, 1806.

Marri-

ed Nathan
(236.)

Com stock,
Sally,

of Wilton.

III.

born November

25, 1807.

Mar-

ried

John Webb,
IV.

of Stamford.

(237.)

John,

born July

17,

1809.

Married

Eliza

Raymond,
V.

of Norwalk.

(238.)

Harriet, born

November

4,

1812.

(239.)

VI.

William, born July 26, 1814.

Married

Joanna Morton.
Issue of

Nancy Davenport,

(No. 149.)

(Who Married David

Maltb}-.)

(240.) (241.)

I.

William Davenport.

II.

Mary

Catharine.

(242.)
(243.) (244.)

III.

James Rufus.
John Robert.
Rev. Ebenezer Davenport.

IV.
V.

(245.)

VI.

Albert Silvester.

) )

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

273

TWENTY-THIRD GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of
(24:(j.)
I.

Abeaham Davenpokt,

(No. 150.

Julia Davenport, born


Burrall, of Norwalk,

June
by

5,

1795, and

married to

John

whom

she had

one son, Samuel Davenport Burrall, born September


16, 1834.

(247.)
3,

II.

James

Silas

Davenport, born November

1797, and died 1840.


(248.)

HI.

Samuel

Abraham Davenport, born


28, 1821.
5,

December
(249.)

24, 1799,

and died December

IV.

Elizabeth Davenport, born January


of

1802,

and married Charles Burrall,


3,

New
14,

York.

She died December


(250.) (251.)

182G.
1804.

V.

Mary Davenport, born March


1827.

VI.

Harriet Davenport, born February 28,


6,

1806.

Died February
VII.
9,

(252.)

Ebenezer

Charles

Davenport, born
15, 1841.

October
(253.)

1809.

Diod September
Catherine

VIII.
6,

Brown Davenport, born


25, 1814.

January
(254.)
27, 1822.
Pi. I.,

1812.

Died January

IX.

William Brown Davenport, born June

Married Fi-ances A. Potter, of Providence,


6,

March

1845.

Died

in Dorchester, Mass.

Au-

gust 27, 1865.


Issue of

Rufus Davenport,
C.

(No.

1.53.

(255.)
11, 1828.

I.

Rufus

Davenport, born September


9,

Died January
II.

1832.

(256.)

George

F. Davenport,

born Febi-uaiy

274
26, 1830,

SUPPLEMENT TO

and graduated

at the University of

in 1847.

Was

for

some time a lawyer

in

New York, New York.

(257.)
4,

Antoinette Cable Davenport, born January

1832.

Died August

15, 1832.

TWENTY-THIED GENEEATION-Continued.
Issue of Charles

Webb Davenport,

(No. 154.)

(258.)
Illinois,

I.

Charles

Webb

Davenport

of Cambridge,.
to Electa

born March

22, 1818,

and married

Moore,

May

21, 1843.

She died March


to

28, 1860.

His

2d wife was Ellen E. Teachout,


ried April 26, 1861.
(259.)
ford,
II.

whom

he was mar-

Thomas Fitch Davenport, born in Stam6,

Conn., February

1820,

and married June

22,

1848 to Elizabeth Lloyd,

who was born


1833

in Wakefield,

Bucks

Co., Pa.,

January

31,

He

settled in

Cam-

bridge, Henry

Co., Illinois,

where he now

resides.

In August 1862, he enlisted in the war and was commissioned as 1st Lieutenant, Co. H, 112th Volunteer
Infantry, U. S.

Army.

He

served in the western cam-

paigns under Generals Schofield,


in Knoxville

Thomas and
and

others,
also in

and

Nashville, Tennessee;

Georgia, Alabama, Kentucky, Virginia and North Carolina,

and was honorably discharged

at the close of

the war, July 1865, at Greensboro, North Carolina.


(260.)
18, 1822,
III.

Amelia Lewis Davenport, born


to

May

and married
IV.

Mahlon Lloyd, Dec.

30, 1844.

(261.)

Mar}' Elizabeth Davenport, born Dec-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

275

Smber

16, 1824,

and married

to J.

Hannainan, Decem-

ber 11, 1844.


(262.)

V.

Rufus Adolphus Davenport, born JanDied September


5,

uary 28, 1826.


(263.)
29, 1830.

1833.

VI.

Theodore Silas Davenport, born March


;

Lives in Silver City, Nevada


VII.

not married.

(264.)

Edward Adolphus Davenport, born


Married and resides in Chicag-o,
Illi-

April 11, 1833.


nois.

Issue or Catharine Davenport, (No.

15.5.)

(Who Married .James Palmer.)

(265.)

I.

James, born July 18, 1812, w^ho was adop-

ted by his uncle Ebenezer Davenport,* and bears the

name
1874.

of

James Davenport.

He

married Catharine

Eliza Bennett, October

23, 1843,

who

died in August,

Mr.

was

for a

number

of years

engaged

as a

book publisher in the city of

New

York, and, in

185(5,

removed
resided.

to St.

Paul, Minnesota, where he has since

TWENTY-THIED GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of William Davenport, (No. 159.)

(266.)
lyn, N. Y.,

I.

Hezekiah Ealsea Davenport of Brookin Stamford,

born

February

24,

1801, and
of N.Y., to

was married by the Rev. James Milnor, D.D.,


*

Hon. Ebenezer Davenport, (No.

152,)

was a native of Stam-

ford, Ct., a lawyer of eminence, holding the ofSce of Judge of District Court, Judge of Probate, &c., a gentleman of literary

'

He resided during the latter culture and christian character. part of his life in the State of New York.

276

SUPPLEMENT TO
22, 1834.

Mary Rapelyea, September


tain
City,

Died

at

Mounin;

Nevada, August, 1870.


Y.,

Mrs.

D. died

Brooklyn, N.
(267.)
II.

March

22, 1877.

Mary Ann
1803,

DavenjDort, born in Stam-'


Ful-i
Jer-i
28,1
'

ford, April 23,


ler,

and married by Eev. Heniy


28, 1827.

to

Ralph Hoyt, February


7,

Died

at

sey City, August


1839.
(268.)
9,

1876.

Mr. H. died October

III.

Adolphus Davenport, born Februaryj


15, 1826.
I

1805.
(269.)

Died October
IV.
Silas

Davenport, of Brooklyn, N.
16,

Y.,|

born

at

Davenport Ridge, Stamford, March


in

1811,!

and married

New
Ann

Haven, by the Rev. Elisha CleaveSt.

land, to Betsey
St.

John, daughter of Matthias


28, 1836.

John, of

New

Canaan, March

In 1833, Mr. Davenport purchased the property


north of the Congregational Church, in

New

Canaan,
till

and erected a new academy, where he conducted,


1836, a Boarding and Dtiy School,
as
(for a

while
at the

known
latter

the Philopciedian Seminary)

which,

date,

passed into other hands, and, after 1866, was

wholly discontinued.

For many years Mr. D. was engaged


life,

in mercantile
;

in the city of

New York, and


original

residing in Brooklyn
of the

was one

of the

members

Clinton

Avenue Congregational Chxu'ch


active labors, especially in the

of that city,

where his

work of sustaining Mission


remembered.

Sabbath Schools, are

still

For many

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


years his

277

Lome was
Y.

in Elizabeth, N.

J.,

but he

is

now

residing in Pittsburgh, Pa.


(270.)

Dea.

Wilham
1834.

Davenport

of

North

Staniiord, born April 22, 1818,

and married

to Clarissa

Rockwell, February

3,

In 18GC, he was ordained

Deacon, of the North Stamford Church, and has been for

many

years

its

Chorister and Sabbath School Superin-

tendent.
(271.)

VI.
to

Sarah Davenport, born June

10, 1815,

and married

John

F.

Randall, June 10, 1838, by

whom

she had one son,


S,

John Edward, who died young.

She died August


1

1808.
7,

(272.)

VII.

Emily Davenport, born September


to

11817,
,4,

was married
Died

Harvey D. Sanderson, February


October
27, 1870.

183(3.

at Galveston, Texas,

TWENTY-THIRD GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of Sabah Davenpokt, (No. 1G3.

(Who Married (273.) (274.)


I.

Ira Sruitli.)

Polly, married Urial Lindsley,

M. D.

II.

Enos, married Asena Thompson. John, died young.

(275.)
(276.)
(277.)

III.

IV. V. VI.

Davenport, died young.


Hezekiah, died aged 19 years.

{21 HA
(279.)

Nancy, married Levi Thompson.


Lorinda, married P. A. Williams, M.D.

VII.

(280.)
(281.) (282.)

VIII.

Fanny, married George Dudley.


Sarah, married

IX.

John StoneU.

X.
3(3

Isaac,

married Polly Williams.

278
(283

SUPPLEMENT TO
XI.

Lura, married Dr. AVillianis.*

(Issue of

Eoswell Da\-enpoet,

(No. 164.)
5,

(284.)

I.

John Davenport,
1815.

born April

1794.

Died June
(285.)

G,

II.

William Davenport, of Erie, Pa., born

November
October
(286.)

28, 1796,

and married
Died June

to Piiylance Tracey,

16, 1823.

17, 1865.
26,

III.

Mary Davenport, born August


Nancy Davenport, born December
Enos Lyon
in 1836.
165.)

1803, and mai-ried to


(287.)

Aaron "Waldo, November, 1819.

IV.

24,1

1815, and married to


(Issue or

Hezekiah Davenpoet, (No.

(288.)

I.

Perlina Street Davenport, born July 31,

1804, and married to


in 1829.

Warren Parker,

in 1827,

and died

(289.)

II.

James Percival Davenport, born Noand removed


to

vember
(290.)

22, 1807,
III.
4,

South America.
born

Henrietta Edwards Davenport,


of

January

1810, and married Lucius Walker,


9,

New

York, January
(291.)

1837.
in

IV.
15,

Nancy Vere Davenport, born


1812,

New
Bond
Ha-

Haven,

May
V.

and married
14, 1836.

to Jacob T.

of Brooklyn, N. Y.,
(292.)

March

Augusta Davenport, born

in Ifew

ven,

June

22, 1814,

married to Leonard Currier, Sep6,

tember
(293.)
'

10, 1834,

and died Augnast

1866.
5,

VI.

Frances A. Davenport, born January

There were two others who died young.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


1817,

279

and married
23,

to

Edward

B. Hayes, of

New

York,

f^ovember
(294.)

1839.

VII.

Samuel Breck Davenport,


5,

born

in

New
Hunt

Haven, April

1819 and married to Mary Ophelia

of Alexandria, Va.,

May

6,

1841.
to

In 1860, Mr. Davenport removed with his family

Nevada

City, California,

where he has since resided.


position,

For nine years he has held the


S.

under the U.

Government, of Internal Revenue Assessor.


(295.)

VIII.

John Grould Davenport, born June


to

16, 1822,

and married
in 1863.

Roxanna Wilcox, August

28,

1844.

Died

IX. Jane Davenport, born May (296.) and died February 23, 1837.
Issue of

17, 1825,

Maetha Davenport,
(Who married
Eli Potter.)

(No. 166.)

(297.)

I.

Charlotte, born 1796.


Eliza,

(298.)
(299.)
(300.)
(301.)

II.

born 1799.

III.

Edward, born 1802.

IV.
V.

Lyman, born

1805.

Issue of

Amanda, born 1809. Mary Davenport,


born

Died 1836.
(No. 167.1

(Who Married John Woodward.)

(302.)
(303.) (304.)

I.
II.

Eliza,

May

9,

1802.

John, born August 18, 1807.

Died 1821.

Ill
IV.
V.

Lyman, born January


Laura, born January
Roswell, born January

12, 1810.

(305.)
(306.)
(307.)

12, 1810.
2,

1811.

VL

Emeline, born

May

5,

1814.

280

SUPPLEMENT TO
Issue of Street Davenpoet, (No. 168.)
j

(308.)

I.

Sullivan

Shults Davenport,

of

Town-

send, Sandusky Co., Ohio, born February 14, 1828.

Married January
(309.)
II.

1,

1862, to Lavinia Twiss.


8,

Mary Hetty Davenport, born June


Townsend, Ohio.

1835, and

married to Benjamin L. White, March

22,

1870, resides at

TWENTY-THIRD GENEEATION. Continued.


Issue of John A. Davenpobt, (No. 170.)

(310.)

I.

Julia Matilda Davenport, born

Decem-

ber

26, 1806.
II.

Died June

22. 1836.

(311.)

Rev. John Sidney Davenport, born in

Stamford, September 26, 1808, and was early under


the tuition of Rev. Daniel Smith, pastor of the Congregational Church of that town, (who was the grandfather of Rev.
"

John Cotton Smith, now

of

New New

York.)

At

the age of 14 years he was placed in the countingof his uncle, Mr.

room

James Boorman,
left

of

York.

After serving there eight years, he


a strong conviction that he

business,

under

was

called to the sacred

ministry, and having completed his preparatory studies,

entered the Junior class of Yale College, where he

graduated in 1833, with a respectable standing.


about three years study of Theology, at

After

New

Haven,

and elsewhere, he was married


beth
S.

in July, 1836, to Eliza-

Leverett, and settled over a recently organized

Congregational Church in Bolton, Mass.


tinued about three vears and a
half,

Here he conafter

and

an inter-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


yal of

281

a few

months became

settled over a Congreg'a-

tiona] society in

Gorliam, Maine.
long-

While here, convichis

:ions

which had

been growing in

mind

in re-

gard to the nature of the Church, the Sacraments and


the Christian Priesthood,

as the results of

study and
to

Dxperience, reached their culmination,

and led him

renounce the Congregational and Presbyterian systems


and to seek ordination anew in the Protestant Ej^iscopal

Church.

In this l)ody he continued to render a

iiligent

service for about twelve years, for the latter

part of that time in the parish of Christ

Church

in

Os-

wego, N. Y., which charge he resigned in 1852.

During

his ministry in

Oswego, Mr. Davenport was

led to recognize the divine authority of a spiritual

move-

ment going on in Great Britain and elsewhere, involving


the restoration of the ministries

which were given to

the

Church

at the beginning, especially the ministry of

A.postles

and the

belief of

the Second

Coming

of

the
ac-

Lord Jesus

Christ.

These convictions not being

ceptable to his Diocesan, Bishop Delancey of Western

New

York, although they involved no departure from

the faith

and order

of the Episcopal

Church

he

was

by him removed from the ministry of that Church

and found himself under a necessity of engaging


secular business for
a livelihood.
years, he

in

After being thus

engaged for about ten

was again separat-

ed for the work of the ministry in the

Communion
" of

known

as the

"

Catholic Apostolic Church

which

an accurate account

may be found

in AjD^Dleton's

New

282

SUPPLEMENT TO

Cyclopedia, Vol. IX, p. 617-620, in an article entitled


"

Edward

Irving," of which Mr. DavenjDort

is

under-

stood to be the author.

He

has also written other


his faith

works relating to the subject of

and hope.

Mr. D. has his present residence in Hartford, Conn.


(312.)
8,

III.

Theodosia Davenport, born November


Wheeler, October

1810, and married to Russell C.

23, 1833.

Mr.
IV.

W.

died August 13, 1847.

(313.)

Kev. James Radcliffe Davenj^ort, was

born November 15, 1812, in Stamford, Conn., during the


temporary residence there of his parents.
returned to
"

The family

New York

in his early

childhood, where
Forrest's School,

he prepared for college at Borland


his

&

mother having commenced

his instruction in Latinj

when he was at the early age of eight years. He spent the Freshman year at Columbia College, where he was within one or two numbers of leading his
class.

He

entered Sophomore year at Yale and grad3-ear,

uated in 1830, in his eighteenth


ors in his class.

taking high hon-

Among
of

his classmates,

were the
Court,
'

late

Judge

Woodruff

the

U.

S.

Circuit

and

Professor Loomis of Yale.

In the famous

Bread and

Butter Rebellion' during his Sophomore


college rose in

3'ear,

when

all

mutiny against the meagre


of his class,

fare of col-

lege
its

commons, he alone

though perhaps
refused to

youngest member, remained in

HaU and

take part in the

movement, thus risking the displeas-

ure of his mates, but in fact commanding their respect

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


for

283

his

independence and moral courage.


at Yale,

In 1833
his tui-

and 1834, he was Tutor


tion the

having-

under
.Justice

class of 1837, of

which Chief

Waite,
Pierre-

Secretary of State Evarts, Minister


pont,

Edwards

and Professor

Sillinian

were members.

In 183(5

he was ordained to the Presbyterian ministry, and acted as temporary supply for the Presbyterian Congre-

gation at Rye, N. Y.

Afterwards he resided at Fran-

cistown N. H. and Cazenovia, N. Y., at each of which


places he was pastor of large and flourishing congregations.

During

his residence at Cazenovia,


of

doubts

and uncertainties
questions,
ihis

long standing, on ecclesiastical

became
office,

so decided as to lead

him

to resign

pastoral

and

in the

year 1847, to enter the


Orders, he

Episcopal church.

After

admission to

was caUed
to

to

Grace Church, Albany, and continued

be

its

rector for nine years, from 1848 to 1857.


his exertions, a
for.

Through

new church

edifice

was erec-

ted and entirely paid

He

subsequently accepted

a call to St. Anne's Church, Annapolis, Mel., where he

remained
the war,

till

the close of the war.

During the period of


of

which was so trying to the 'loyal residents

the border states, Mr. Davenj^ort was an avowed and


earnest su importer of the Government, and his house

was always open


of his

to

its

officers

and
of

soldiers.

Most

leading parishioners

and

his

co-presby-

ters

in

the Diocese, strongly favored the


this

Southern
diffi-

movement, and

rendered his position a very

284
cult one.

SUPPLEMENT TO

His sense of duty, however, supported by

the personal attachment of his parishioners, and the


earnest advice and solicitations of his Bishop, with

whom

he was in

full

sympathy, kept him at his post

until after the close of the war.

In 18()5,he resigned his position and spent the next two


years and a half with his family abroad.

Since his

re-

turn he has resided in

New
7,

York, with an interval of

two years

of foreign travel.

He was
Whiting,

married Sept.

1836, to Miss Mehitabel

W.
j

Newell, of Boston, a granddaughter of Colonel Daniel

who was

a soldier in the French and Indian

wars, and served with distinction as an officer of the rev-

olutionary army, from the battles of Lexington and

Bunker

Hill, in

which he took

part, until after the close

of the revolutionary struggle.

Mr. Davenport has preserved the freshness of his


classical scholarship, resorting

to the original

tongues

in his professional (314.)

and other reading."


7,

V.

Mary Davenport, born August

1814.

Married to Josiah W. Wheeler, of


15, 1835.

New

York, October

(315.)

VI.

Elizabeth

W. Davenport.

TWENTY-THIRD GENEEATION Continued.


Issue of Dea. Theodoke Davenport, (No. 173.) (31G.) ford,
*

I.

Dea. Theodore Davenport,

Jr.,* of

Stam,

born

in the city of

New

York, February 25, 1834,


1851.

Omitted by error in edition of

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

285

md married at Stamford, August 6,


iVaters,

1862, to Georgia E.

daughter of William H. Williams, of Savannah,

jeorgia.

Mr. Davenport has for many years been associated

nth

his father in

what has long been known


;

as the

)tillwater

and Koxbury Rolling Mills


and that

the former be-

ng employed as a
ron and
steel,

rolling mill for the


at

manufacture of

Roxbury

for

making

wire.

Chese operations have been carried on for over forty


j^ears,

under the name

of

the Stillwater

Company,

heir

works being situated about three miles north of


In 1874, Mr. Davenport was
Congregational Church, which

he

village of Stamford.

shosen a
)ffice
)f

Deacon

in the

has

now been

filled

by four successive generations

the descendants of Rev. John Davenport,

who was

;hosen to the pastorate of that church in 1698.


(317.)
II.

daughter born in Stamford, August

9,

835, died August 10, 1835.


(318.)
III.

Mary
9,

Caroline
1836,

Davenport,

born

in
9,

Hamford, November
853, to
.871,
)f

and married November

Hon. Galen A. Carter, of Stamford, who in

represented the 12th District in the State Senate

Connecticut.
(319.)

rV.

Robert Chesebrough Davenport, born

September
(320.)

23, 1838.

Died May

2,

1843.
in Stamford,

V.

John Davenport, born


and married
of in

Au-

,mst 28, 1840,


.0

New York, May

28, 1872,

Helen D. Gautier,

that city.

Resides at

Bay

286

SUPPLEMENT TO

Point, Stamford, about two miles from the village, anc!

about the same distance from

"Where
VI.

the

Sound

Drinks the small tribute of the Mianas."


(321.)

James Boorman Davenport, born in Stam


19, 1842,

ford,

December
1,

and married

in

New

York;

November
city.

1871, to

Maiy Cornell Freeborn

of thai
left
hii,

He

entered Yale College in 1861, but

class at the

end

of the Junior year to

go into business born


8,
ii

(322.)

VII.

Richard Tighe Davenport,

Stamford, February 27, 1846.


(323.)

Died February

1847
ii

VIII.

Helen Matilda Davenport, born


9,

Stamford, March

1849, and married at

Bay
of

Point

June

26, 1873,

to

Hon. Samuel Fessenden,


C.

Stam

ford, son of Rev.

Samuel

Fessenden, and nephew o


S.

the late Hon. William Pitt Fessenden, U.


of Maine.
(324.)

Senate

IX.

Sophia
8,

Moen

Davenpoii,

born

i]

Stamford, March

1851,

and died July, 1851.

Issue OF Matilda Davenport, (No. 175.)

(Who Married Eev. Peter Lockwood.*)


(325.
)

I.

John Davenport, born October

9,

1825

Died December 20, 1844.


of Norwalk,

*Rev. Peter Lockwood, (son of Lambert Lockwood, a nativ and one of the first settlers of Stratfield, no' Bridgeport, Conn.,) was born in Bridgeport, Conn., Febri
ary
9,

1798.

He

gradiiated

at

Yale

College in 1817,

(th

h\st class

taught by Pres. Dwight who died in that year. ) H studied Divinity at Andover Theological Seminary for thre years, and was ordained as an Evangelist in 1821, by the Ass(

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

287

[John Davenport Lockwood was born in Stamford,


it

the house of

liis

maternal grandfather, Hon. John


of seven years

davenport.
>f

At the age

he gave evidence
of

a change of heart, and

made

pubHc profession

church under the lis faith inhrist, by uniting with the He was remarkable from the sharge of his father.
irst

dawning

of

his

boyhood

for

an early maturity of
with his manifest

alent,
3iety,

from which,

in connection

his friends indulged the hope that he might be-

;ome a minister of the Clospel, and an ornament to the


Ihurch.

In the Fall of 1844, he became a

member

of

Yale College, where


L844,

he suddenly died,
in the

December

20,

and was interred

burying ground of
to
liis

New

Haven.
'erected

A
by

marble

monument

memory was

his classmates "ieiou>v/e/o/i/t B. Lovk-

vood, by his Father.]


(326.)
II.

Theodore, born June

30,

1827.

Died

May
now

8,

1831.
III.

(327.)

Radcliffe

Boorman, born May

6,

1829;

living in Boulder, Colorado.

(328.)

IV.
3,

James Boorman, born May


1831.

31, 1831.

Died June

Western District of Fairfield County. After six and teaching, he became settled over the Presbyterian Church in Binghampton, N. Y., where his After about fourteen years of pastorate continued till 1833.
elation of the
year's labor, in in-eaching

ministerial labor in other places, Mr. L. returned to the people of his former charge at Binghampton, where he has since

continued

to reside, in the

same dwelling erected by him in

1828, nearly fifty years ago.

288
(329.)
(330.)

SUPPLEMENT TO
V.
VI.

Mary Elizabeth, born February


Annie Matilda, born October

28, 1835.
1,

1837

and married, May


of

18, 186-5, Josiah Salisbury Leverett.

New York

city,

a descendant of Sir

John

Leverett.

Gov. of the Colony of Massachusetts, from 1670 to 1679.

Mr. Leverett's residence


.

is at

East Orange, N.

J.

(331.)

VII.

Theodosia Davenport, born July

28,

1839.

TWENTY-THIRD GENEEATION- Continued.


Is.suE

OF Betsey C. Dayenpoet, (No. 176.)


(Who Married Charles W.
Apthori^.)

(332.)

I.

ace Bushnell,

Mary Mehetabel, who married Rev, HorD.D., of Hartford Ct., who died FebruEhzabeth
Cog-swell.

ary 17, 1876.*


(333.)
II.

(331.)
(33.").)

III.

Frances Louisa.

IV.

son of
1870.
*

New
Mr.

Emily Sophia, married Joseph SampYork, January 2, 1846, and died May 21,
died

S.

May

21, 1872, in

the

79th year

Eev. Horace Bushnell, D.D., was born in 1802, in the town of Preston, Conn., where his father was a farmer in easy circum-

He graduated at Yale College, in 1827, after whichi he was engaged for a while on the literary staff of the Journali of Commerce, New York, and afterward taught for a short time the Academy, in Norwich,Conn. In 1829, he was appointed Tutor at Yale, and at the same time studied Law, and afterwardiTheology. In 1833. he became pastor of the North Congrega-| tional Church in Hartford, where he continued with eminent, ability and usefulness till 1859 -when ill-health compelled him to resign. In 1837, he delivered at Yale College, the Phi Beta Kappa Oration on "The Principles of National Greatness,"
stances.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


of :o

289

his age, leaving

one daughter, by a former wife,

whom
(336.)

his

ample fortune descended, and who mar-

ried

Frederick "W. Stephens, of


V.

New York.
Dr. Head.

Catharine,

who married

Issue of Abigail F. Davenpoet, (No. 177.)

(Who Married Rev. Philip M. Whelpley.)

(337.)

I.

James Davenport Whelpley, M.


scientist
;

D.,

an

eminent johysician and


Jan. 23, 1817.

born

He was
Y'ale

educated in

New York city, New Haven, and


in

graduated from
tion
3f

College in 1837.

"After gradua-

he acted as assistant in Rogers' Greological Survey

Pennsylvania for two years, and then, returning to

New

Haven, entered the medical department of Yale

College,

where he graduated M. D.
in

in

1842.

He

re-

mained

New Haven,
and

until 1846,

engaged

in the study

of the sciences,

in literary pursuits.

He then went to
;

Brooklyn, N. Y., and began to practice his profession

but was soon obliged to relinquish it from ill-health.


and in
1847,

In

published bis work on " Christian Nnrtnre." Sever-

al (^ther

theological works soon followed.

an address

At the Litchfield Centennial Celebration, in 1851, he delivered entitled " The Age of Romespun," replete with pleasantry and good sense a graphic picture of "ye olden time." His published works jirinciijally on Theological questions are marked with great originality of thought, with pleasing diction, and with poetic genius. Dr. B. was a frequent contribiitor to The Xew Englnnder, and other religious periodicals. His interest in all the public affairs, civil, educa-

tional

and

religioiis, of

the city of Hartford, was so notable that

and on which the elegant State House of Connecticut is now being erected, were named in honor. of him " Bnshnell Park."

the beautiful grounds reserved in that city of wealth,

290
1847 he removed to
editor

SUPPLEMENT TO

New York

cit}',

and became the

and one

of the

owners of the American Whig Re-

view, to

which he had been a frequent contributor

since 1845.

While thus engaged,

in 1849,

he formed a

project of estabhshing a commercial colony in


ras,

Hondu'

and, in furtherance of this enterprise, spent two

years in San Francisco, purchasing and editing one of


the daily papers there.

His arrangements were

dis-

turbed by the presence of the fiUibuster Walker in Honduras, and

on going thither he was detained by Walker


j

for nearly a year, enduring great privation,

and being
j

impressed into service as a surgeon.

Escaping to San

Francisco, he returned early in 1857 to the East, and

again devoted himself to literature, and to scientific


ies.

stvid-

For the

last ten

years of his Hfe he was a great sufj

ferer

from asthma, which gradually develoj^ed into pulof

monary consumption,
15, 1872,

which disease he died, April

aged 55

years.

Dr.Whelpley's publications shoW;a most original mind,

and

his unj)ublished papers are even

more remarkable.
His

He

was a member of the American Academy.


were
chiefly in physics

scientific researches

and metal(Jyclopediay

urgy."

Appletons

American

Annual

1872, p. 613.
(338.)
(339.)
II.

Philip Melancthon, died young.

III.

Phihp Melancthon.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


Issue or

291

Maey Ann Davenport,

(No. 178.)

(Who

Married Rev. Matthias Bruen.)

(340.) (341.)
C.

I.

Mary Ann Lundie, died young.


Frances Davenport, married to Charles
12, 1855,
;

II.

Perkins of Boston, June

by

whom

she has
Clifford,

Mary
ary 24,

Eleanor, born June 28, 1856


17, 1858,

Edward

born January
18()0.
)

and Charles Bruen, born Febru-

(342.

III.

son, died young.

(843.)

IV.

Mary Lundie.

Issue of Frances L. Davenport, (No. 179.)


I

(Who Married Rev. Thomas H. Skinner, D.

D.)

(344.
(345.

I.

INIary

Ann Davenport.

II.

Frances Davenport.

(34G.)
(347.)

III.

James Davenport.
Helen.

IV.

TWENTY-FOUKTH GENERATION.
Issue of William Davenport, (No. 183.

(348.)

I.

Isaac

Gould Davenport, born January


to

17, 1804,

and married
in

Hannah Wilson, October

12,

1831.

Died
II.

New
New

York, April 28, 1839.


22,

(349.)

John William Davenport, born July


at

1807.

Died

Canaan,

May

26, 1826.
1.5,

(350.)

III.

Theodore Davenport, born January


20, 1830.

1810, and died August


(351.)

rV.

Lewis Benedict Davenport, born .June


years.

24,

1812.
at

Died

Was a school-teacher for several New Canaan, December 17, 1836.

292
(352.)

SUPPLEMENT TO
V.

Mary Jane Davenport, born March

7,

1814.

Miss Davenport was a person of much benevolence


of character.
of Christ.

She early devoted herself

to the service
in the cause

Her heart was warmly enlisted


For

of

Sabbath Schools and Missions.

several years

she was engaj^ed in the profession of teaching, to which she devoted herself with a perseverance and zeal
sel-

dom

witnessed.

She sought not only

to train the in-

tellect of

her pupils, but also to bring them to the knowl-

edge of Christ.
fare

These labors for their

spiritual wel;

were long and gratefully remembered by some who


In the Spring of 1836, while

enjoyed her instructions.

teaching in Darien, the scarlet fever broke out

among

her pupils.
day,

She continued her labors in the school by


sick at night. in

and watched with some who were


disease,

She took the

came

to her

home

New

Ca-

naan, where in less than a week she passed to her eternal rest,

April 25, 1836.


VI.

(353.)

Amzi Benedict

Davenpoi't, was born in


Ct.,

New
*

Canaan, Fairfield County,


at the village

October

30,

1817,

and studied
nnmber

Academy of

his native

town.*

This classical school was established in 1815. Among the of those, who, for a short time after their gradiaation at Yale College, taught at this Institution, and who have since become eminent, may be mentioned Rev. Milton Badger, D. D., for many years Secretary of the American Home Missionary S< >ciety; Rev. Julian M. Stxirtevant, D.D., for thirty years President of Illinois College; Rev. Theophilus Smith, afterwards settled Pastor at New Canaan, for '2'2 years, till 1853: Rev. Flavel

*WsSf:

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

293

lu the

spniio-

of 1835, liefore

he was 18 years of age,


Canaan, and through

he comineueed teaching in

Xew

the ensuing Avinter taught a school in the village of

Stamford.

In 183G he removed to Brooklyn, N.

Y.,

where he established a private Academy, which he conducted for sixteen years, since which time he has been

engaged

in the general business of Real Estate

and

Insurance, and in Agricultural pursuits.

In 1834, he united with the Congregational Church


in

New

Canaan, and after his removal to Brooklyn,

(forty years ago,) joined the

3d Presbyterian Church,
for

Bascom
the
3(1

Rev.

"Wm.

B.

Lewis,

many

years

Pastor of
;

Presbyterian Church, Jay Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (a buikling now occupied by the May Flower Mission of Plymouth

Ebenezer A. Johnson, for now about thirty years New York University Rev. William I. Bridington, D.D., now Pastor of the Clinton Avenue Congregational Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., and Professor Thomas A. Thacher, of Yale College, the last four of whom were the writer's honored Instnrctors.

Church

;)

professor in the

In 1833, previous to the tutorship of Messrs.

Biadingtou
a private

and Thacher,

this

institution

became merged in

boarding school, established by Mr. Silas Davenport, who erected the School Room shown in the accompanying view between the two churches. After 1836 it passed into other hands, when the youth of the town were excluded from its privileges, as day
pupils,

and the

institution,

many

of the yoiith

of that place,

which had fitted for College so became lost to the town,

miich to the regret of its inhabitants. In 186<i, the school room, with the wing attached, was removed and the mansion enlarged and titted up for the summer residence of

Dr. Willard Parker, of

New

York,

The building shown on


left

the

right

is

the Episcopal Church, that on the

the Congrega-

tional Chiirch,
leaf.

now

iinder the Pastorate of Rev. Joseph Green-

38

294
which, soon

SUPPLEMENT TO-

after, caiiie

under the pastoral care of

hiV

former preceptor. Rev. William B. Lewis.

In 1841
in

he

embarked with a number

of

others

the

ei

tablishment of a Free Mission (Presbyterian) Churc)

which was afterwards changed into the 2d Congrej:


tional Church, of Brooklyn, in

which churches he

-w

successively ordained to the office of Ruling Elder an

Deacon.

He was a lay member of the council that met to

organize the Clinton Avenue Congregational Church,

Brooklyn, Nov. 18th, 1847, and also of that which or-

ganized Plymouth Church, June 12th of the same year.

With

the latter church, under the eminent ministrations

of Rev.

H.

W.

Beecher, he has been connected for the

last

28 years; and of which he has thrice been chosen Deacon.

May

2,

1842, he

was married

in Brooklyn, N. Y.,

by

Rev. William Beale Lewis, to Frances Maria Isaacs.


Mrs. D. died June
9,

1848,

and was buried at Greenwood.


by the
Rev.

Married 2d, in

Brooklyn,

Maurice

W^

Dwiglit, D.D., October 30, 1850, to Jane Joralemon

Dimon, daughter of John Dimon Esq., and granddaughter of the late

Judge Teunis Joralemon,

all

of that city.

In 1851 he prepared a History and Genealogy of


the Davenport Family

a
is

labor which after the lapse

of twenty-six years, he

permitted to supplement, to
to conclude, in a

complement, and,

2^^''^

tempore-,

work
it

which has far exceeded the proportions designed for

when

first

christened.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

295

His residence, for

six

months

of the year, is at

Dav-

enport Ridge, Stamford, Conn., which for nearly one

hundred and
cestors

fifty

years has been the

home

of his an-

and kindred

a i^ortion

of

which has never


it

been ahenated from the family since


possession of Rev.
5'^earsago.*

came

into the

John Davenport

of Stamford,

170

iccoiTnt of this site pp. 481-2.

In Huntington's History of Stamford, appears the following "This striicture occupies a most

is

jommanding view from the west slope of Davenport Ridge. It about live miles, north by east, from the Stamford Depot. The

panorama stretching around it is, at any season of the year, well worth a study, and in summer is very beautiful. This locality was voted to the Rev. John Davenport of Stamford, by the proprietors of the town, in January, 1705-6, in consideration of his hundred pounds interest in the 'Long Lots,'
'

upon at the time of his settlement here in 1693. By January 20, 1728, he gave it to his eldest son John, The M'ho built his house upon it, and died there in 1742. property passed next into the hands of the third John, who died in 1756, leaving it to the fourth John, a deacon in the North Stamford Church, who died in 1820. A portion of the land was bought of the heirs by Amzi B. Davenport, a grandson of this deacon John, and on it he built the residence represented in our cut. It occui^ies the site of an old residence removA few rods to the northeast stands 'ed aboiit eighty years ago. " the dwelling formerly occupied by his grandfather, who erected Davit with his own hands aboi;t one hundred years since. enport Ridge has an elevation of about 400 feet above tide water, with a view of Long Island Sound for a distance of forty From this point are seen the spires and turrets of fifmiles. teen churches, in the towns of Stamford, Greenwich, New Canaan, Weston, Greenfield Hill, with the shores of Long Island on ;on the south and the hills of Westchester County, N. Y.
as agreed

his will

the noi'th.

Of

this locality,

and

its

surroundings, the writer

may

well

296
(354:.)

SUPPLEMENT TO
YII.
Julius

Daveuport, born in

New

Ca-

naan,

Ct.,

Bates, of

May 2G, New Yoi-k,

1S21,

and married
J.

to

Mary Ann
4,

by Rev.

"W.

McLane, June
of a

1840.

For several years he had charge

private

school in Brooklyn, N. Y., and has since been engaged


in the general business of Real thirty years he has

Estate.

For nearly

been connected with the Clinton


in

Avenue Congregational Church,


the office of Deacon.
(355.)

which he has

filled

YIII.

Harriet Abigail Davenport, born in


]May 23, 1824,

New

Canaan,

and married

to Elisha

Comstock, of Norwalk, by the Rev. Theophilus Smith,


Octo])er
3,

1842.

Present residence

at

Buffalo, N. Y.
18-i.

Issue of 8.\eah Davenpoet,

(No.

(Who Married .Jonathau


(35().)
I.

Bates.)

John Davenport,

l)orn

January

19, 1806.

Married Sarah

Bell, April 17, 1831.

adopt the words nttered but yesterday, (Julj- 4, 1877,) at the dedication of Roseland Park, Woodstock, Conn., by our gifted
poet, Dr. Oliver AV*ndell

Holmes:
"At every step
I tread

The dust that wore the footprints of the dead. But for whose life my life had never known
This faded vesture which
it

calls its

own.

Here sleeps my father's sire, and they who gave That earlier life, here found their peaceful grave. In days gone by I sought the hallowed ground Climbed yon long slope, the sacred spot I found Where all unsullied, lies the Winter snow.
;

Where

all

ungathered. Spring's pale violets blow,

And

tracked from stone to stone the Saxon

name

That marks the blood I need not blush to claim, Blood si;ch as warmed the Pilgrim sons of toil. Who held from God the charter of the soil."

THE DAVENPORT
(357.)
II.

FAJIILY.

297
"24,

Charles Augustus, born September


Polly Tuttle,

1807.

Married
III.

August

1,

1830.
5.

(858.)

Theodore, born August

1809.

Ee185(1.

nioved to Canada, where he died December 21,


(859.)

IT.

Sally Ehzabeth, born

May

1,

1811.

Married ^Vm. Henry Bates, Noyember 7, 1880. Married l^orn June 11, 1811. .T.ulia, (8(i0.) Y.

Carmi

Betts,

October

0,

1S81.

Died October

6,

1884.

(8()1.)

VI.
1817.

Walter Henry, born

in Darien, Octo-

ber 26,

^Married Sarah L. Clock, May, 1848,

by whom he had one daughter, Deborah Ann, born March 4, 1849. :\Irs. B. died March 5, 1851. Married 2d,
to

Susan M. Weed, October


YII.

27, 1857.
27, 1819.

(8G2.)

Frances, born August

Died

July

27, 1820.

(808.)

YIII.

Fanny, born June

2,

1822.

Married

to Josiah Smith, of Stamford,

September

29, 1857,

by

whom
ber
7,

she has one daughter, Bessie Jane, born


1858.

Novem-

TWENTY-FOUETH GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of .Ta^ies Dayenpokt, (No.
18.5.

(8G4.)

I.

John Henry Davenport, born


9,

at

Davenport

Kidge, Stamford, April


(365.)
II.

1811.
at

George Davenport, born


married to

Davenport
Ful-

Eidge, jNIareh 24, 1813, and


ler,

Amanda

by her

father,

Eev.

Henry

Fuller, (pastor of the


25, 1841.

North Stamford Church,) November


D. died July, 1843.

Mrs.

Married 2d, to Charlotte Warner,

March

26, 1850.

298
(366.)
20,
III.

SUPPLEMENT TO

James Augustus Davenport, born July


of

1818,

and married to Martha Ann Meeker


1839.

Norwalk, November!,

He resided in Greenpoint,
in the occu-

(now Brooklyn,) N.
pation of a builder.

Y.,

and was engaged

December

28,

1855.

He A

died of rapid consumption,


short

time previous to his


his ecclesiastical

death, Mr. Davenport

had removed

connection to the Reformed Dutch Church of Greenpoint, then

under the pastoral charge

of

Rev. Goin

Talmadge.

With strong expectations on the part both


and brethren, arising from
his

of the pastor

deep

in-

terest in all that pertained to the Avelfare of this Chris-

tian fold, he

was ordained

to the office of

Deacon about

four months before his death.

His loss was deeply


of his fu-

mourned by those who thus cherished hopes


ture usefulness
(367.)

IV.

Isaac Lewis Davenport, born at Daven-

port Ridge. June 10, 1821, and married,


1846, to

December

3,

Emily

J.

Andreas.

Resides at Davenport,

Iowa.*
on the north bends to the west about 1500 miles from its moiith. It derives its name from Col. George Davenport, who was born in Lincolnshire, EngHe came to this country in 1803 entered the land, in 1783. U. fe. Army, with the appointment of Sergeant, and for many j'ears rendered important services to the Government, particuDuring the Black larly in our relations with the Indians. Hawk war, he was appointed Quarter Master General with the rank of Colonel. This town, in which Mr. Davenport with AnIt toine LeClaire had a large interest, was laid out in 1835.
*

This town

is beaiitifully

situated

on a

bluft'

bank

of the Mississippi,

where the

river

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(868.)

299

V.

Sylvester Davenport, born February 24,


22,

1824,

and married December

1847,

to

Ann H.

Strong.

Resides at Parkersburg, West Virginia.


(Issue of Julia

Ann Davenport,

(No. 186.)

(Who Married .Jotham Hoyt.)


(369.)
I.

John

Willis, b.

m North
17,

Stamford, Octo-

ber 30, 1820.


Smith.
(370.)

Married October

1842 to Maria E.

XL

Mary

Bell, b.

September

27, 1822, died

November
(371.) (372.)

13, 1843.
III.

Amelia, born October 22, 1823.


Charles Edward,

IV.

born

May

5,

1825.

Married Mary Keeler.

Died March

13, 1865.

present population, (1877, ) is abont 25,000. Mr. Davenport's residence was iipon Eock Island, opposite the city, where he was
killed

by one of a

partj'

who landed on

the Island for purposes

of plunder, Julj'
1858:

i,

1845.

In a lengthy sketch of him given in

the history of the town entitled " Davenport, Past and Present,"
i^p.

164-5, his character is thus

summed

up:

was a long and active one the position he occupied recpiired anything but a human drone to till it and his whole career, from beginning to close, was replete with ceaseless activity. Although of trans-atlantic extraction, he was the triie type of the American jjossessing indomitable resolution, a restless desire for jjrogress, with an invincible determination to overcome obstacles, and achieve siiccess. Added to these qualities, was an eminent ability to read human nature, to resolve its problems, and array the prejiidices, motives, hostilities, or what not, of all about him, in a manner that finally best aided his own undertakings. Especially was this last circiimstance prominent in all his dealings with the Ked Man. He read them as men, approached them as such, and by this humane and judicious procedure, received in almost all cases from them such treatment as men extend to each other. He was worthy

"His

life

300
(373.)

SUPPLEMENT TO
V.

Louisa Maria, born


2,

December,

1<S'2().

Married June
22, 1854.

18i0, to

Andrew Pearsall. Died Marcli


born April
17,

(374.)

YI.

Julia

Augusta,

1829.

Died July
(375.)

13, 1871.

VII.

Emily Cordelia, born


1835.

at

North Stam18,

ford, July 2G,

^Married
of

January

1858,

to

John W. Evans, now


she has living, David,

Brooklyn,

N. Y., by

whom

Edwin Davenport, Frank, Wil-

liam Davenport and Emily Edith.

TWENTY-FOUKTH GENEEATION. Continued.


Ihsuk of

Samuel Davenpoet,

(\o. 208.)

(376.)
Ct.,

I.

Charles Augustus Davenj^ort, of \Yilton,


2(),
1(3,

born August

1812,
1831.

and married

to

Sarah Maria
5,

(Taylord, October
(377.)
181(5;
II.

Died October

1853.
11,

Sarah Louisa Davenport, born April


8,

died
)

November
III.

1826.
in Wilton,

(378.
.

John Davenport, born

May

28, 1822,

and married to Sarah Elizabeth Whitney,


llesidesin Brooklyn, N. Y.

September, 1846.
of all

honor lor the love borne him by the savage it is an evidence that, like the philanthropic and immortal Penn, he rose above the vulgar and inhuman prejudices of the age, and found
in the Indian,
if

not a brother,

at

least a conscientious being,


|

who could

l:)e

driven to deeds of revenge and carnage by

ill-

treatment, or coxild be

made
"'

a tirm,

reliable,

honorable friend,

by treating him as a man.

Mr. Davenport's descendants still reside in th<_' town and are gentlemen of wealth and influence. His son George L. Daven-i port, born on Rock Island in 1817, was the hrst white child!
l)orn in that section of the country.

THE DAVENPOKT FAMILY.


Issue of Polly Davenport, (No. 211.)

301

(Who Married

Aruzi ScofieM.)

(379.)

I.

Amzi Lewis, boru

in Stamford,

March
1846.

6,

1821.

Married Mary Lockwood, December


II.

1,

(380.)
(381.)

Cyrus, born January 22, 1823.

III.

William Wallace, born in Stamford,

March

2,

1825.

Married Louisa

C.

Mead, December

17, 1855.

(382.)

IV.

Abio-ail
S.

Louisa,

born March
18, 1853.
10,
2,

2,

1827.

Married AVilliam
(383.)

Brown,

May

V.

Henry, born April


Scofield,

1829.

Married

Martha Ann

December

1869,

and died

August

10, 1876.

Issue of

Thaddeus Davenport,

(No. 213.)

(381.)

I.

William Henry Davenport, born in


1833.

New
29,

Canaan, November 27,


1862, to Fannie Ellen

Married January

Weed,

of Darien.

TWENTY-FOURTH GENERATION. -Continued.


Issue or Joseph Davenport, (No. 214.)

(385.)
23, 1825,

I.

Emily Susan Davenport, Ixmi October


16^ 1835.

and died May


II.

(386.)
30, 1830,

William Young- Davenport, born March


to

and married

Fanny Sophia Jerman, OctoDavenport,

ber

2,

1854
III.

(387.)

Caroline

born

May

15,

1837.

MarriedJulyl, 1851, to

Wm. Henry

Jerman, of

Stamford.
(388.)

IV.
39

George B. Davenport, born Ajml


18, 1844.

6,

1839,

and died April

302
(389.)

SUPPLEMENT TO
V.

Edward Sherman Davenport, born

Sej)-

tember

13, 1843.

Issue of Dakius Davenpobt, (No. 215.)

(390.)

I.

Caroline Davenport, born February


15, 1834.

1*0,

1833.

Died March
II.

(391.)

Horace Davenport, born September


19, 1837.

2-!,

1835.

Died May
III.

(392.)

Sarah Davenport, born November


14, 1865, to

20.
of.

1839.

Married June

Joseph H. Butler,

Brooklyn, N. Y.
(393.)

IV.

Burrall Davenport, born February 23,


15, 1850.
S.

1849.

Died June
V.

(394.)

Emily

Davenport, born in

New

Ca-

naan, January 14,

1852,

and married by Rev. John


13, 1871, to

Gaylord Davenport, December


Benjamin,
(Issi;e

Everard D.

of

New

Yprk.

of William
A\'illiam

Heney Davenpoet.

(No. 216.)
6,

(395.)

I.

Henry Davenport, born April

1840.
(396.)
II.

Sarah Ellen Davenport, born Septem-

ber

17, 1841.

Married to Cliarles L. Mitchell, October


I.

27, 1864.

Resides at Manhasset, L.
III.

(397.)

Ellen Maria Davenport, born Auo-ust 16,


21, 1864,

1845.
erts, of

Married June

to Capt. \yiHiam

Rob-

San Francisco,

California.

TWENTY-FOURTH GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of George A. Davenport, (No. 217.)

(398.)

I.

Mary Ann Davenport, born

in Wiltou,

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

303
22,

February

26,

1844.

Married

June

1869,
S.

to

Charles B. White, M. D., Surgeon in the U.

Army,

now

stationed at
II.

Columbus Barracks, Ohio.

(399.)

Julia Abbie Daveni^ort, born Aj^ril 16,

1847.
(400.)
III.

Benjamin Davenport, born


Is a graduate of the

in Wilton,

January 21, 1850.


of the University of

Law

School

Georgetown, D. C, class of 1874,

and
at

is

now

practicing as an Attorney

and Counselor

Law,
(401.)

in the city of

Washington.

IV.

Daniel Davenport, born in Wilton, Jan-

uary

13, 1852.

Graduated

at

Yale College in

1873.

Studied law in the


walk, and
is

office of Woodward & Perry, Nornow an Attorney and Counselor at Law

in the city

of Bridgeport,

Conn.

Married Mary E.

Jones, October 16, 1876.


(402.)

V.
8,

Timothy Davenport, born


1854
:

at

Wilton,

February

graduated at Yale College in 1875,


School, in 1877.
31, 1856.

and

at the

New Haven Law


VI.

(403.)

Sarah Davenport, born Oct.

Issue of James Smith Davenport, (No. 218. (404.)


I.

Charles Oscar Davenport, born in Wil-

ton, July 31, 1842.


(405.)
II.

Married

Emma Pullen.

George Alfred Davenport, born Feb-

ruary

14, 1849.

Issue of

Maky Ann Davenport,

(No. 219.

(Who Married Matthew Smith.)

(406.)

I.

Sereno Newton, born February

11, 1836.

304
(407.)
II.

SUPPLEMENT TO

Eugene, born

in Wilton, April 24, 1839.

Graduated

at Yale College in 18.59,


1

and

at the

Albany
22,

Law

School in

861.

He was

married February

1872, to Katharine

ard Bacon, D. D.,

W. Bacon, daughter of Eev. Leonof New Haven. Is now an Attorney


Law,
in

and Counselor

at

New York
18, 1873, 12, 1874.

City,

and has

Leonard Bacon, born March


Davenport, born September

and Winthrop

Issue of Elizabeth Davenpokt, (No. 220.)


(Who Married William Wheeler.)

(408.)

I.

Julia Emeline, born


13, 1846.

Februaiw

22, 1825,

and died November


(409.)
II.

Sarah Elizabeth, born

May

16, 1828,

and married Joseph S Conde, December

22, 1847.

Issue of Amzi Davenpokt, (No. 223.)

Ann Eliza Davenpoii, born February 5, 1835, and died May 20, 1856. II. Mary Elizabeth Davenpoi-t, born Feb(411.)
(410.)
I.

ruary

1,

1842,

and died February

9,

1842.
(No. 254.

Issue of William (412.)


I.,

Brown Davenport,

I.

Willie Augustus, born in Providence, E.

Febriiaiy 24, 1846.


(413.)
II.

Died August

27, 1865.

Frank Winthroj? Davenport, born


Resides at

in

Boston, Mass., January 27, 1852.


dence, R.
(414.)
I.

Pro\'i-

Ill,

Louise

Brown Davenport, born

in

Boston, Mass., January 10, 1855.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

305

TWENTY-FOURTH GENERATION. Contintted.


Issue of Chakles

W. Davenport,

(No. 258.)

(415.)
21, 1845.

I.

Mary Esther Davenport, born January


Priscilla Allen

(41G.)

II

Davenport, born Febru-

ary 17, 1847.


(417.)
III.

Charles Silas Davenport, born in


5,

Cam-

bridge,

111.,

March

1849.
in

(418.)

IV.
111.,

James Theodore Davenport, born


September
S.
5,

Cambridge,
(419.)

1854.

V.

Heniy

Davenport, born

May

5,

185G.
12,

(420.)

VI.

Grace Isabel Davenport, born July

1862.
(421.)

VII.
24, 1864.

Chester

Webb

Daven^jort, born Sep-

tember

(422.)
27, 1874.

VIII.

Rufus Eoy Davenport,

born April

(423.)
15, 1875.

IX.

Helen Mildred Davenport, born

May

Issue of

Thomas

F.

Davenport, (No.

259.

(424.)

I.

Willett

Thomas

Davenpoi-t, born in

Cam-

bridge,

111.,

April 22, 1849.

Died Sept.

21, 1849.

(425.)

II.

cember
(426.)

31, 1850,
III.

Thomas Arthur Davenport, born Deand died November 23, 1852.

Anna Mary Davenport, born May

21,

1853.
(427.)

IV.
111.,

Charles Elwood Davenport, born in

Cambridge,

August

10, 1855.

306
(428.)
14, 1858.

SUPPELMENT TO
V.

Fanny

Schofield Davenport, born April

Issue of Amelia L. Davenport, (No. 260.)


(Who Married Mahlon Lloyd.)

(429.)

I.

Charles,

born October

9,

1841.

Died

August 1, 1852.
(430.)
II.

Florence, born May, 1844.


Isabel,

(431.)

III.

born November

1,

1849.

Issue of

Mary

E. Da-venport, (No. 261.)


J.

(Who Married

Hannaman.)

(432.)

I.

Calista,

born January, 1846.

Died Sep-

tember, 1846.
(433.)
II.

Charles, born

September

23, 1848.
(No.
264:.)

Issue of

Edward Adolphus Davenport,*

(434.)
27, 1867.

I.

Edward Arthur Davenport, born June


Soule Frances Davenport, born July 16,

(435.)

II

1872.
(436.)
18,
*

III.

Paul Henry Davenport, born January

1875.

Edward Adolphus Davenport,


city,

(No.

264:,

was born in

York

April

11, 1834,

and removed

to Illinois in 1857.

New He

entered the army, at the breaking out of the Rebellion, as a vol-

unteer in the ranks, and was soon promoted to 1st Lieutenant,

West during the war. DuMajor General Edward Hatch, and was mustered out in 1865. February 15, 1866, he was married to Elenora A. Soule, daughand served
in the

army

of the South

ring the last year of service he was attached to the staff of

ter of Capt. Alfred Soule, of Freeport,

Maine.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


Issue of James Davenport, (No.
26.5.)

307

(437.
1

I.

Rui'iis

Davenport, born December

12,

844.

He

volunteered for the war in the 11th Minnesota


till it

Regiment, and served


civil

was disbanded.

He

is

engineer by profession.
II.

(438.)

Mary Davenport, born November


9,

30,

1847,

and died October


III.

1848.
29,

(439.)

James Davenport, born September


IG. 1851.
Jr., of St.

1849.

Died March
IV.

(440.)

JamesDavenport,
1,

Paul, Minhis

nesota,

born August

1852.

Is

now completing

course of Medical studies at the


(441.)

New York

Universit3\

V.

Alfred Davenport, born April 30, 1854.

Is

now

a book-keeper with Averell, Eussell

& Carpen-

ter, St.

Paul, Minnesota.

(442.)

VI.

Kate Davenport, born

in August, 185(5,

and died
(443.)

in January, 1857.

VII.

George

Little

Davenport,

l)orn in

April 1859, and died in September of the same year.

TWENTY-FOURTH GENEEATION. - Continued.


Issue of Hezekiah R. Davenport, (No. 266.
]\Iary

(444.)
3,

I.

Theodora Davenport, born August


13, 183G.

1835,
(445.)

and died August


II,

Frances Victoria Davenport, born


16, 1838.

May
in

29, 1837,

and died February


III.

(446.)

Ralsa Adolphus Davenport, born

New
Y.,

York, December 29, 1838.


16, 1865.

Died in Brooklyn, N.
in the

September

He was for many years

308

SUPPLEMENT TO
of Tiffany

employ

&

Co., jewelers, in

Broadway,

New

York, and such was the regard

of

the firm for one

whose integrity and gentlemanly bearing had won the


esteem and confidence of the Company, that their extensive establishment

was closed on the afternoon

of

his funeral, as a token of respect,

which had never be-

fore

been shown
IV.

to

am^ of their employes.

(447.)
9,

Phebe Cortleyou Davenport, born July


Jr.,

1841.

Married to Adriance V. Cortelyou,

May

19, 1869.

Mr.

C.

was a gentleman

of excellent pai-ts,

a lawyer, rising in the

esteem of the Brooklyn Bar,

when he
(448.)

died, Sej)tember 25, 1873,

aged 32 years.

V.

John Rapelyea Davenport, born Febru-

ary 20, 1844, and married in Brooklyn, N. Y., to Eliza-

beth L. Caldwell, February


(449.)
4,

16, 1871.

YI.

Mary Frances Davenport, born August


30, 1847.

1846,
(450.)

and died January


VII.

Caroline

Augusta

Diivenport,

born

January
5,

16, 1848,

and married

in Brooklyn,

November

1874, to
(451.)

Henry R. Cooper.
VIII.

William Lawrence Davenixn-t, born

in

Brooklyn, N. Y., August 28, 1850.


Issue of

Mary Ann Davenpokt,


(Who Married Kalph Hoyt.)

(No.

"ifiT.

(452.)

I.

Adolphus Davenport, born August

4,

1828,

and

for a while he practiced law in the city of

New
ber

York, and then went upon the stage as an actor,


of ' Dolly

under the name


23, 1873.

Davenport."

He died

Octo-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(453.)
II.

309
30,

Theodora, married

May
York.

1861, to

James

S. Sluyter,

formerly a law partner with David

Dudley Field,

in the city of
3,

New

He

died at

Jersey City, August


,

1864.

TWENTY-FOUKTH GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of Silas Davenport, (No.
269.)

(454.)

I.

Sarah

St.

John DavenjDort, born NovemJohn Davenport, born


1840.
J.,

ber 30, 1837, and died October 23, 1838.


(455.)
II.

William

St.

in

Brooklyn, N. Y., August 16,


laide

Married to AdeJanuary
8,

Howell Taylor,

of Trenton, N.

1868.

He served in the war for three years in Co. A, 2d Regt. of New Jersey Volunteers, mustered into service May
22, 1861,

and discharged June 21, 1864.


surveyor.

B}' profession

a civil engineer and

Has

for

many

years

resided at Elizabeth, N. J.
(456.
)

III.

Sarah Elizabeth Davenport, born in

Brooklyn, N. Y., June 24, 1843, and died in Elizabeth,


N.
J.,

August

24, 1874.

The mission
song.
cal

of Miss

Davenport was the ministry

of

Gifted by nature with more than ordinary musitalent

which

she

assiduously

cultivated

she

sought to employ this endowment for the welfare of


others.

Several years of her

life

were devoted to giv-

ing instruction in this divine

art.

Her
or, at

place was sel-

dom
the

vacant in the prayer meeting,


of

the Organ, in
w^ere joyously

House

Clod,
life

where her services

rendered.

Her

was one

of ceaseless activity,

mark-

310

SUPPLEMENT TO

ed by purity, industry, devotion, gentleness, and circumspection of speech.

The esteem

in

which she was held

was apparent from the large funeral gathering (which


filled

the 3d Presbyterian church of Elizabeth) of those

who assembled to pay their last tokens of respect to one who had endeared herself to the community where
she resided, by her labors and instructions, as well as

by her eminent worth and

self-sacriticing

devotion.

Both her former, and then present pastor, bore testimony


to the excellence of

her Christian character, and the


to the Church, of

loss her death

had occasioned

which

she was a member, and to a large circle of valued


friends.
its

Her body was reverently


toil,

laid to rest,

from

weary

in the beautiful

"Evergreen Cemetery"
song
is

of the city of Elizabeth, while her


gelic choir above.
(457.)

with the an-

IV.

Rev. Silas Augustus Daven^iort, M. D.,

born
at

in Brooklyn, N. Y., Jvuie 27, 1846.

Graduated
class.

Yale College in 1868, with the honors of his


J.,

Studied Theology at Princeton, N.

for

two years,

and, for one year, at the Union Theological Seminary,

New

York.

With a view

of preparing himself for infield,

creased usefulness, perhaps in a foreign

he purof
in

sued the study

of medicine,

and received the degree and Surgeons

M. D. from the College


the city of

of Physicians

New

York, in 1873.

In the latter part of

the same year, he embarked, under the auspices of the

Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions, as a medical

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


missionary to China
bhat country.
to

311

and was stationed at


latter part of 1874,

Ningpo, in

In the

he returned

the United States

and was

settled over a Presby-

terian Church, at Port Carbon, Pa., April 27, 1875. (458.)

V.

Anna Maria Vere Davenport, born

in

Brooklyn, N. Y., January 28, 1851.


Issue or Dea. William Davenport, (No. 270.) (459.
)

I.

Mary Ann Davenport, born


1834,

in

Stamford,

December
(4Gp.)
31,

1),

and died April

5,

1850.

II.

Charles William Davenport, born March


9,

183G,

and died May


III.

1838.
at

(461.)

William Webster Davenport, born


16,

Davenport Ridge, Stamford, January


was married June
Maine,
7,

1839,

and
Co.,

1876, at Monroe,

Waldo

by Rev.

J.

E.

Adams,

to

Eudora Moulton,

laughter of Eluathan Movilton, of Jackson, Maine.


(462.)
20, 1841.

IV.

Emily Clarissa Davenport,

l)orn ^larch

(463.)
in

V.

Rev. Henry Adolphus Davenport, born

Stamford, March 26, 1845.


studies
at

He pursued

his prepar-

atory

Williston

Seminary, Easthampton,

Mass. and entered Amherst College in class of 1865,

where he remained for three years.


at

Studied Divinity

the

Union Theological

Seminar^',

New

York, 1869-

1872, since
the

which time he has been Church Missionary of


street.

Alexander Chapel, King


patronage
of of

New

York, under
Presbyterian

the

the

Fifth

Avenue
is

hurch

which Dr. John Hall

pastor.

He was

or-

312

SUPPLEMENT TO
at
^I.

dained to the ministry by a Congregational Council


Stamford,
Ct.,

in 1873.

"Was married to Lizzie

Enright, by Kev. John Hall, D. D., Sept. 29, 1874.


(4G4.)

VI.

Merriam Bacheler Davenport, born


9,

in
ofj

Stamford, February
classical

1851,

and completed

a course

study at Williston Seminary, Easthampton,

Mass., in 1873.
| I

Issue of Emily Davenpoet,


(^\Tio

(No. 272.)

Married Harvey Sanclerson.)

(465.)

I.

Adolphus Davenport, born January


killed in the battle of

18,

1837.

Was

Chicamauga,

Sej)-

tember
(466.) (467.)

16, 1863.
II.

Emily Texiana, died young.


Isabella,

III.

born in Texas and married a

Mr. Webster.

Resides at Galveston.

TWENTY-FOUETH GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of William Davenport, (No. 285.)

(468.)

I.

Mary Davenport, born

at Erie, Pa.,

Oc-

tober

5,

1824.
II.

(469.)

Fanny Davenport, born December

11,

1826, and married


braith, of Erie, Pa.

May

25, 1846, to

William A. Gal-

Mr. Galbraith
father.

is

a gentleman of wealth, and like his


office in

Judge Galbraith, has held public


resides.

the

town where he
(470.)
III.

Sarah Davenport, born March

5,

1829.

(471.)

IV.

William Roswell Davenport, of Erie,

Pa.,

bom

July 31, 1831, and

mamed, June

4,

1856,

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


Elizabeth
Pa.

313
Shirk, of Erie,

W.

Shirk, daughter of

Da%dd

]lv

Mr. Davenport has been for many years exteusiveengaged in several important branches of business
his native town.

jin

He
a

is

President of the Erie Car

Works,

which

is

very successful

and extensive

enterprise, liaving capacity to build ten or even twelve He is also financial manager of the firm cars per day.
of

Davenport,

Fairbairn

.^

Co., the largest car States.

wheel

manufactory in the United

He

has also con-

nection with other commercial or manufacturing undertakings, and, with so many and weighty cares of
business,
is

not forgetful of the higher claims of hu-

manity and religion being President of the Young

Men's Christian Association of Erie. Samuel A. Davenport, of Erie, V. (472.)


Jan. 15, 1834,

Pa.,

born

and married Dec.

30, 1862,

Kate Walker,

daughter of John H. Walker.


in Erie.
(473.)
3,

Is a

prominent lawyer

VI.

Helen Sophia Davenport, born January


Maralla P. Davenport, born June 12,
14,

1839.
(474.)

VII.

1842.
ISfiG.

Married Henry B. Plummer, November

TWENTY-FOURTH GENERATION. Continued.


IssxjE OF

Henp.ietta

Edwards Davenport.
Wallser.)

(No. 290.)

(Who Married Lucius

(475.)

I.

Aldace Atwood,
23, 1861.

born June

30,

1838.

Died October

314
(476.)
II.

SUPPLEMKNT TO
AlioeHenriett.a,boi'n February 10, 1841,
12, 1845.

and died April


(477.)
III.

Edna Minerva, born October


of Savbrook, Ct.,

23, 1843.

Married Fisher Dibble

and had one

son George, born June 2G, 1867, and

Edna May, born


29, 1848,
]

June

17, 186*).

(478.)

IV.

Lucius Pierpont, born March


13, 1872.

and died July

(Drowned

in the Ohio.)
(291.)
i

Issue of

Nancy Veke Davenport, No.


(Who Married Jacob
T. Bond.)

(479.)

I.

James Davenport,
23, 1840.

born Februav}-

8,

1838, died
(480.)

March
II.

Leonard
8,

Currier,

of

Bi'ooklyn, N. Y.,
28, 1864, to

born August

1840.

Married April

Sa-

rah R. Sneden.

Mrs. B. died March 27, 1875.

Mar-

ried 2d, to Sadie Shaw, April 30, 1877.


for ten years ter

Mr. Bond has

been

in the

employ

of the

Brooklyn

Wa-

Department, in which he now holds the position of


Registrar.

Deputy
ren,

By

his first wife he

had two
5,

child-

Florence

Davenport, born June

1865,

and

Leonard Garrison, born November

11, 1868.
'292.

Issue of Augusta Davenpoet, (No. (Who Married Leonard


(481.)
I.

Currier.)

Frances Augusta, born January


1,

25, 1836.

Married November

1858,

to Capt.

Alexander B.

MacGowan, 12th
had two children
1860,

Infantry of U. S. Army, by
;

whom
6,

she

Charles Davenport, born July 16,


1863.

and George Pierpont, born November

Mrs.

MacGowan,

died December 22, 1875.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(482.)
II.

815
29,

Mary

Jane,

born January

1888.

Died February
(483.)
III.

13, 1862.

Henrietta

Edwards,

born

June

15,

1840.

Died March
IV.

25, 1845.

(484.)

Julietta

Davenport,
2(),

born

Jvme

15,

1840,

and married December

1859, to Dea. Greorg'e


Ct.

W.

Hazel, a merchant of

New

Haven.
5,

Their child;

ren were, Ella Augusta, born Nov.

1800
6,

Westlake,
;

born November

7,

18()2,

died August
13,

1863

Leon2,

ard Currier, born

November

1864, died Augixst


14, 18(56, died

1865

Sarah Currier, born March


4,

Sep-

tember

1866

Edward Davenport, born November

30, 18()7,

died July, 1868; George, born April 80, 1870,


;

died Jvily 29, 1870

Frances Augusta, born April


26, 1873.

1,

1872

Kuth, born March


V.

Died July 1873.


6,

(485.)

Sarah Maria, born February


15, 1865.

1842.

Died December

Issue of Frances

Ann Davenport,
B.

(No.

29.3.

(Who Harriea Edward

Hayes.)

(486.)

I.

Frances

Augusta,
11, 1863.

born December

1,

1840,

and died October


II.

(487.)

Edward Walker, born August


19, 1868.

4,

1842,

and died December


(488.)
III.

Caroline Pierpont, born June 24, 1845


20, 1846.
2,

and died August


(489.)
(490.)

IV.
V.

Alfred Davenport, born July

1847.

Hubbell Lay, born August

12,

1851,

316

SrPPLEMEXT TO
'24,

and married October


to

187G,

h\ Rev. G. "Webb, D.D.,


Stelle, of

Kate Parker

Stelle,
J.

daughter of David D.

New

Brunswick, N.
VI.

(491.)

Martha Jane, born October

19, 1853.

Married William Munsell.


Issue of

Samuel

B. Davenport, (No. 294.)

(492.)

I.

James Percival Davenport of Watertown,


At the commencement

Jefferson Co., N. Y., born in Alexandria, Ya., Februa-

ry 11, 1842.

of

the Rebellion,
S.,

he entered the regular army of the U.


till

and served

the close of the Avar,

charged.
ta
lie

when he was honorably disHe was married November 20, 1871, to Lotof

Hawver,

"Watertown, Jefferson Co., N. Y., where'

has has since resided.


(493.)
II.

Augustus

Pierj^oint

Davenport, born^

February

23, 1844, in Alexandria, Ya.,


till,

and served

in

the 13th N. Y. Cavalry,

like his brother,

he was

honorably discharged when the war closed.


(494.
)

III.

Adelaide Virginia Davenport, born in


10, 1846,

Brooklyn, N. Y., July

and married

May

8,

1867, to Marcellus S. Deal, of


"

Nevada

city, California.!

Mr. Deal was one of the leading

men

of

Nevada

County.

As

editor of the

'Nevada

Transcript' he was
in
at

honest and
all

fearless,

and the acknowledged leader

public entei'prises of the day.

As an Attorney
and esteem

Law
that

he was

fast rising

to the

head

of his profession of
all

and he enjoyed the

fullest coniidence

knew him."

He

died September 21, 1873.

) )

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(495.)
S\ Y.,

317

IV.

Etnina Davenport, born in Brooklyn,

June

13, 1848,

and died February

23, 1849.

(496.)

V.

Street L. Davenport, born in Brooklyn,

N. Y., April 27, 1850,

and died March


Frances

25, 1851.

(497.)

VI.

Ada

Davenport,.,

born

in

Brooklyn, N. Y., February

13, 1852,

and married

to

Hon. T. B. Reardon, Judge of the 14th Judicial District


)f

California.
(498.)

VII.

Alice

Ophelia Davenport,
20, 1854.

born in

Brooklyn, N. Y.,

May

Issue of John

Gould Davenpoet,

(No. 295.)

(499.)
21,

I.

Franklin Edwards Davenport, born

May

1845.
II.

(500.)
7,

Elmira M. Davenport, born September

1847.
(501.)
III.
4,

John Pierpont Davenport, born De-

;ember

1850.
S.

Issue of Sullivan

Da^t:npoet, (No.

307.

(502.)
(503.)
17, 1866.

I.

Ella Davenport, born April 24, 1863.

II.

John

Elliott

Davenport, born January

^504.)

III.

Clark
6,

Davenport,

born

October

6,

1872, died
(505.)
17, 1875.

March
IV.

1873.

Cora Ann Davenport, born February

Issue of

Maey Hetty Davenpoet,


(Who Married

(No. 319.

Beujaiiiin L. White.)

(506.)

I.

Infant son, died November, 1871.

' ;

318
(507.)
11.

SUPPLEMENT TO

Warreu
8,

Lyttle,

born Februaiy

-27,

1872,

and died March


(508.)
III.

1873.
2,

George Bennett, born March

1874.

T WENTY-FOUETH GENEKATION. Continued.


Issue of .John
8.

Davenpokt. (No.

311.

(509.)
21, 1839.

I.

Juha Matilda Davenport, born January


Martha Davenport, born January

(510.)

II.

21,

1840.
(511.)
III.

James Davenport, born Deceniber


Ehzabeth Leverett
and married
to

17,

1841.
(512.)

IV.

Davenport,

born

December
ler.

27, 1843,

David Parks Fack-

November
V.
Y.,

17, 1875.

(513.)

John Sidney Davenport,


June
25, 1846.

Jr.,

born

at

Os-

wego, N.
studies in

Pursued

his preparatory
in 18(52,

New York.
of

Entered Yale College

and

received his degree of Bachelor of Arts from the same,


in 1866,

and

LL.

B.,

from Harvard University


at

in

1869.

Is

now an Attorney and Counselor


city.

Law

iu|

New York
Mary

January

6,

1875,

he was married to
j

Elizabeth Rintoul.
Issue of Theodosia Davenport, (No. 312.
(Who Married
llussell C. Wheeler.)
i

(514.

I.

John Davenport,
1834, and studied

of

New

Haven, boru

August

28,

at the Sheffield Scientific

School in

New

Haven, and received the degree of Bach-

elor of Philosophy from Yale College in 185.S.

He

en-

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


tered the

319

army as Captain

in the 15th Reg't of Ct., in the

summer

of 1862.

In the spring of 18G4, he was taken


staft",

prisoner at Plymouth, Va., while on the General's

and separated from

his

Regiment.

He was

taken to

Libby Prison, where he remained awhile, and from


thence was removed to Macon,
(Georgia.
till

Afterwards

he was confined
of that year,

at

Columbia, Greorgia,
after

December

when

enduring great sufferings and

hardships, as a prisoner of war, he was exchanged, and

returned

home

with impaired health.

Mr. Wheeler has for

many

years been engaged in


in

the extensive manufacturing business established

New Haven by
port,

his

grandfather, John Alfred Davento his country

whose devotion

and

his country's

cause was so ardent that his memorialist remarks of

him

that " he cheerfully gave

up two grandsons

to the

war; the one to an early and glorious death, the other


to a long

and martyr-like imprisonment, and declared

his readiness,

had he been

thirty years younger, to

go

himself to the front."

Mr. 'Wheeler was married October

12, 18()(i, to

Miss

Kate Fellows, daughter


Haven.
(515.)
II.

of R.

S.

Fellows,

of

New
York,

William, born in the City of

New

August

14,

1886.

Graduated
notice of

at
is

Yale 1855.

The following

him

drawn from the Obit-

uary Record of the Deceased Graduates of Yale College


for
18()4:.

"

William AVheeler, younger son of Russell

'

320
C. (Y. C. 1816,)
fell

SUPPLEMENT TO

and Theodosia (Davenport) Wheeler,


June
22,

in battle near Marietta, Ga.,


in

1804.

He
his

was born
college

New

York, August 14, 1836.

During

life

the family removed to

After graduation he remained in*

New Haven. New Haven,


May,
18.57,

en-

gaged

in legal

and other

studies,

till

when
in
I

he sailed for Europe.


travel,

After passing the

summer

he continued the study of law during the winter


the University of Berlin and he

i|

of 1857-8, at

subse-

quently visited Italy

and Greece.

He

returned to

New Haven

in

July, 1858,

and

in the next Spring, he entered the

Law

School at Cam-

bridge, Mass., where he received the degree of


in 1860.

LL. B.
City,
;

He

soon opened an

office in

New York

and entered on the practice

of his profession

but

when

the rebellion began, he could not resist the call

of his country,

and

first

went to the defense

of the

Capitol, with the Seventh Reg. N. Y. S. N. G. in the

spring of 1861.

After this temporary service, he enlis-

ted a company of men,

many

of

whom

were Germans,

and received a commission,

first

as Lieutenant,

and

subsequently as Captain of the 13th Independent Battery of

New

York.

In this

artillery service

he was
death.

ar-

duously engaged until he was cut

down by
at

In the Shenandoah Valley and

Gettysbm-g, with

the Ar;ny of the Potomac, and subsequently in the battle of

Lookout Mountain, and during the recent ad-

vance into Georgia, he bore a most honorable part.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

321

As

his battery

was connected with no brigade, pro-

motion above the rank of Captain was not possible for

him without a change

of service.

He

was,

however,

appointed Chief of Artillery on the Staff of Gen.


Geary, (2d Div. 20th

Army

CorjDS,) in

which capacity

he served with distinction.

During an engagement with the enemy,


sary
for his battery
to hold

it

was neces-

an unoccupied position
his corps.

between the First and Second Divisions of

Gen. Geary told him that he could give him no support

from the infantry.


then,'

'

Yevj

well, I will

support myself

was Capt Wheeler's

reply.

few moments

af-

terwards a bullet from a sharp shooter pierced his heart,

and he

fell

instantly killed.
relish for

His keen
ceiDtion

knowledge,

liis

quickness of

jier-

and

his nobility of soul


;

were strengthened by
dis-

the army service


tinction

and bright

hopes of scholarly

were buried

in this patriot's grave.

His body rests in Greenwood Cemetery.


course commemorative of his
life

A
in

Dis-

was preached

New
10,

Haven, July
(51G.)

17,

by Prof. Timothy Dwiglit."


Julia

III.

Davenport, born November

1844.
(517.)

IV.

Theodosia Mary, born September

21,

1847.
(Issue of Eev. James Radcliffe Davenport, (No. 313.

(518.)

I.

Anna Whiting Davenport, born Februa-

ry

2,

1838.

322
(519.)
7,

SUPPLEMENT TO
II.

John Alfred Davenport, born February


at

1810.

Graduated

Yale College in

18(51.

Keceiv-

ed the degree of A. M. from the same in

18B4:,

and the
in

degree of Bachelor of Ijaws, from Harvard College,


1866.
of

He was New York,


his

admitted to
in

the

Bar
has
at

in

the

city

1869, where he

since

prac-

ticed

profession as a Counselor

Law.

Was

married to Mary Fairfax Morris, daughter of Goveiieur Morris of Morrisania, N. Y., August 15, 1874, at

Rose

Castle, Carlisle,

England, by the Rt. Rev. Lord

Bishop of
port.

Carlisle, assisted

by the Rev.

Jas. R.

Daven-

(520)

III.

Maiy Boorman Davenport, born FebYork, January 28, 1869.


Russell Wheeler Davenport, born No-

ruary 19, 1845, and married to Henry Eugene Alexander, of


(521.
)

New
IV.

vember
titic

26, 1849.

School of

He studied New Haven and


at

at the Sheffield Scien-

received the degree of

Bachelor of Philosophy

Yale College in 1871.


(No. 314.

Issue of Mary Booeman Davenport, (Who Married Josiah W. Wheeler.) (522.)


I.

Mary Boorman, born June

1837,

and mar-

ried October 15, 1863, to Doctor Giovanni Ceccarini,


of

Rome,
(523.)

Italy.
II.

Elizabeth

Davenport,

born

January

1839.
(524.
)

III.

James Boorman, born November 1842

died December 1842.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(525.)

323
8,

IV.

William Rupell, born July

1847, and

iied January 10, 1852.


(526.)

V.

Emily M. Davenport.

TWENT Y-FOUKTH GENEKATION. -^Continued.


IssuK OF Dea. Theodore Davenport, Jr., (No. 316.)

(527.)

I.

Harriet Cbesebrougli

D avenport,

born

March

1(5,

1864.
II.

(528.)

Theodore Davenport, born in Stamford,

Ci,

May

7,

1865.

(529.)

III.
;

Georgia Elizabeth Davenport, Decemdied September


7,

ber 19, 1869


(530.)
Ct.,

1875.
in

IV.
2,

John Davenport, born


September
j

Stamford,

June

1871, and died

7,

1875.

Issue OF

Mary Caroline

davenport, (No. 260.)


A. Carter.)

(Who Marriea Galeu

(531.)

I.

Galen

A.,

born

November

13,

1854

died August 11, 1855.


(532.)
II.

Edward
Galen

B.

Little, l^oru

December

13,

1855.
(533.)
(534. )

JII.
IV.
V.

A.,

born November

23, 1857.
2,

Theodora Davenport, born July


Wells
Davenport,
13, 1873.
.321.

1869.
22,

(535.)

born January

1872, and died

May

Issue of James Boorm.\.n Davenport, (No.

(536.)

I.

Mary Freeborn Davenport, born OctoTheodora Davenport, born March

ber

16, 1872.
11.
7,

(537.)

1874.

324
(538.)
III.

SUPPLEMENT TO

Jolm Davenport, born October

18,

1876.

TWENTY-FIFTH GENERATION.
Issue of Isaac

Gould Davenport,

(No.

3-48.)

(539.)

I.

Isabella Augusta Davenport,


1,

born in
12,

New
1832.

York, August

1832, and

died

November

(540.)
25, 1833,

II.

Isabella Augusta Davenport, born July


17. 1844.

and died December


III.
1,

(541.)

John William Davenport, born


1835,

in

New

York, July
(542.)
31, 1838.

and died February

26, 1838.

IV.

Mar}^ Jane Davenport, born January

Died young.
V.

(543.)

John William Davenport, born

in

New

York, January 12, 1839, and was married to

Hannah

Holmes, March

27, 1860.

He

died April

3,

1863.

TWENTY-FIFTH GENERATION. - Continued.


Issue of Amzi Benedict Davenport, (No. 353.)

(544.)

I.

John Isaacs Davenport, born

in the city

of Brooklyn, N. Y.,

May 16, 1843. He was at the Brooklyn


Institute,

Collegiate
years,

and Polytechnic
at the

for one or twoi

and

seminary of Rev. R. E. Rice, in Stam-

ford, Ct., for

about the same time.


ofifice

In 1862, he began

the study of law in the

of

Hon. Lucian Bu'dseye,


in the State of

Ex-Judge

of Jihe

Supreme Court
till

New

York, where he remained

the Fall of 1863.

During-j

the greater portion of this period he was employed, at

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

325

night',

on the

reportoi-ial staff of the Neiv Yorl- Trihiine,


Latter part of the

and during' the

time became a corresac-

pondent of that journal.

The same Autumn he

companied Major General Butler to Fortress Monroe, as


bis j^rivate secretary

the General having been assignDepartment


of Virginia

3d to the

command

of the

and

North Carolina, and the

Army

of the James.

In the winter of 1863-4, Mr. Davenport was appointed a


alry,

Lieutenant in the 1st United States Colored Cav-

and assigned
Secretary.

to the

General as his Aid de

Camp

md

Early in 1804, he was

made

Assistant

Provost Marshal, and subsequently organized and had


sole charge of the the

Bureau

of Military Information, in

Department and Army.

Lieutenant Davenport was an active particii^ant in


ill

the important engagements of the

Army

of the

lames, notably in those of Drury's Bluff,

New

Market,

Bermuda Hundred, the


5eige of Petersburg, &c.

assaults on Petersburg, the

He was on

several occasions

placed in

command

of

detachments of both infantry


for the

md

cavalry,

and sent into the enemy's country

purpose of breaking up rendezvous of bounty-jumpers,


ieserters, &c.

In

all

these

expeditions he was emi-

nently successful, and received the thanks of the

com-

manding General.
'aptain "for faithful

In March, 1865, he was brevetted

and conscientious performance

of

luty."

After the close of the war, while residing for a few

326

SUPPLEMENT TO
in the family of

months

General Butler, he resumed

the study of the law, after which he returned to thei


city of

New

York, and was admitted to the bar at


in the

the;

General Term of the Supreme Court

Fall

of

1865, and soon after accomj^anied Hon. E. D. Morgan,

then U.

fe.

Senator from

New

York, to the National!

Capital, as his private secretary.

few months

after!

he was appointed to the charge of the Washington'

bureau

of the

New

Yoj'b

Tribune, as the successor of

Gen. Carl Schurz, and in the latter part of March, 1866,

became associated with Gen. Schurz


Detroit

in starting the

Pod,

at Detroit,

Michigan.

November 14th
lentown,
St.

of

that year, he

was married

at Al-

Louis Co., Missouri, to Louise Eugenie

Post, daughter of the late Dr. Louis Post, of St. Louis,

previously, for

many years,

a physician of

New

York.

Shortly after his marriage, Mr. Davenport retired

from the Detroit

Post, and,

returning to

occupied an editorial

j^osition

on the

New York, New York Tt'ihis connection

bune

till

May, 1867, when he severed

with the press, and began the practice of law.

In the Fall of

18(58,

following the Presidential elec-

tion of that year, he

was retained by the Union League


its

Club, of

New

York, as

Attorney to present to

Committee

of the

House

of Representatives of the Uni-

ted States, the facts and witnesses as to the frauds

committed

in the city of

New York

at that election.

This employment continued during portions of the

THE DAVENPORT

FA^iIILY.

327

^ears 18G9-1871, when, both at Wasliington


ay,

and Albaand prosuff-

Mr. Davenport was engaged

in drafting

uring the passage oi laws to protect the right of


jrage.

In 1870, he was appointed United States Commissioner,

by Hon. Lewis B. Woodruff, Judge

of the U. S.

ircuit Court,

and

in 1871, received the office of Chief

Supervisor of Elections under the Enforcement Act of

ongress of 1871,
Elective Franchise.

for

Promoting the Purity

of

the

Of the nature and extent

of the ser-

nce here rendered some idea


Aie following extracts

may be formed from


1872,
entitled,

epitomized from an editorial in

the

New York

Times, of October 31,

'Commissioner Davenport's Work."*


*" The work of registration now closed, has been going on for nonths with a quiet system and energy which reflects the greatest credit vipon its author, Mr. Davenport, the Chief SuThe work was commenced some months pervisor of Elections. iince, by drawing oif from the United States Census of 1870 These names the names of all males over eleven years of age. Were arranged under the numbers of the houses in which they resided, and all the residents on each single block were brought into a book by themselves, thiis requiring about 2,500 books. But besides this, the names of all males over eleven j'ears of age, were also arranged in forty-two huge volumes, alphabetically, ^o that if the name of any man is given, the place of his resilience at the time of the Census of 1870 was taken can be at Dnce ascertained. If he removes, his migrations can be traced and noted in the same books. In both these records the details of age, nativity, and naturalization ajapear as from the census. From the Board of Health records, names of deaths are checked off, and also convictions of crime and pardons, as found in The books made ujd from the office of the Secretary of State. the census show about 3.50,000 names of which about 20,000 are

328
111

SUPPLEMENT TO
1876,

upon the recommendation


citizens of

of several of the

most prominent

New York

and Washington,

Mr. Davenport received the additional appointment,

under Judge Alexander Johnson,

of Clerk of the Uni-

disposed of by the deaths and convictions.


stop here the magnitude of the
paling.

Even if we were to work wotikl be something apthoiisand names, with


first,

Three hundred and

fifty

all

under houses in which they reside, and then broiight into separate books bj^ blocks, and, secondly, the same names have been arranged, alphabetically in the same manner that the Directory gives them; but while the Directory contains only 211,244 names,
their personal details, have been arranged,

Mr. Davenport's record contains 350,000 names. Besides this Mr. Davenport has procured maps showing the nature of the buildings upon every lot in the City, and these maps are reguThere can, therefore, be no larly corrected every thirty days. more registering from vacant lots, churches or unoccupied buildings as has been frequent hitherto. The names registered in 1871 are then compared with the register of 1872, and all changes noted. 'Davenport's census," as the reporters are fond of calling it,
contains the

name

of every male in the city, of mature age.


1872,

The
first

registration in

was 21,000

less

than in 1868.

We

say again

we

shall have an honest election this year, for the

eqiialled ability, energy,

time in years, and our citizens will owe that to the unand industry of John I. Davenport.
this fact, they will know how to appreciabuse which has been showered upon him

With a knowledge of
ate the interested for a few

weeks past."
'

few days later, the same paper, in summing up the results of the election, adds, "Among the men who have done well in bringing about the magnificent triiimijh of Grant and Dix in this state, we should not omit to mention Commissioner Dav-

enport,
'

who has been rewarded


'

for his services

by the most

knowing had not been for his untiring exertions, no honest vote would have been approximately possible in this city."
liberal
it

abuse.

But he can have the

satisfaction of

that

it


THE DAVKNPORT FAMILY.
tetl

329

States Circuit Court, lor the Southern District of

New York, in the


all

place of

Kenneth (t. White, resigned


is

of

which

jDositions

he

jDresumed

still

to hold dur-

ing good behavior and the pleasure of the Court.

Commissioner Davenport
jjreparing for publication a

is

at present

engaged

in

work

of

some three hun-

dred pages,
vention

entitled,

'

Election Frauds and their Pre-

or, a

History of

New York

Elections Past and

Present."
(54:(>.)

II.

Albert

Barnes
8,

Davenport,

born

in

Brooklyn, N.
to
of

Y
Ct.

April

1845.

Married Nov.

24, 1868,

Delia Minerva Crofut, daughter of Henry Crofut,

Danbury,
(547.)

Is

now

merchant

in

New

York.

III.

Frances Maria Davenport,

born

in

Brooklyn, N. Y., February 27, 1848, and died at

New
in

Canaan,
(548.)

Ct.,

August

18,

1848.

Buried

at

Greenwood.
born

IV.

Jane Joralemon Davenport,

Brooklyn, N. Y.,
L.
I.,

May

2(),

1852. Died at East Hampton,


at

August
V.

11, 1855.

Buried

Greenwood.
born
G,

(549.)

Henry Benedict Davenport,


1,

in

Brooklyn, N. Y., June


at

1854.

Married June
H.
Jeffers,

1877,

Cleveland, Ohio, by Rev.

Wm.

D. D., to

Flora D. Lufkin, daughter of Prof. A. D.


that city.
(550.)

Luikin, of

Resides in Brooklyn, N.
VI.

Y^.

James Pierpont Davenport, born

in

Brooklyn, N. Y., July 27, 1850.

He pursued
of

his pre-

paratory studies at Williston Seminary, Easthampton,

Mass.
^ale

and received the degree of Bachelor

Arts at

College,

New

Haven, June

28,

1877.

330

SUPPLEIMENT TO
i^lanting of the Ivy,
l)v

At the

on the previous Tuesday,

the following, eoni^josed

young Davenport, was sung

by his classmates.

IVY ODE.
By James
Air
'

P.

Davenpokt.
"

Abschekl.
I.

The

Ivy, bright Ivj', with rich robe of green,

llich robe of green,

And

a glory without decay,


its

Conceals 'neath

verdure the roughness unseen.

Hidden, unseen, Of the ruin deserted and grey. E'en so shall this hoiir, of union the last. Hide deep from our sight every vain trouble past, And each fancy of discord and envy shall screen,
Tenderlj' screen,

From
The

the joys of this parting day.


II.

Ivy, firm Ivy, that graces the wall,

Graces the wall

Of the ancient, decaying tower, Supports and makes strong with

its close

tendrils small.

Firm, although small, And upholds it with gentle power. E'en so every tie of our past college life,

That comes throiigh a union in


Recives a new strength that

jjleasure

and

strife,

is gi'eater

than all, Greater than all.

From

the

mem'ry

of this blest hour.


III.

May

the Ivy, blest Ivy, that here

we bestow.

Sadly bestow. In the thought of the years gone before, With each swift passing season spring up\^xrd and grow,
Steadily grow

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


With new beauty and grace ever more.

331

And

with

it

may

grow, as the years pass away,


love that our hearts feel to-daj^
ns,
;

The friendship and

That these may unite

we may Where'er we go,


where'er

go,

With a
(551.)

tie

that shall part never more.

VII.

Margaret Dinion Davenport, was born


October
at
27, 1858,

in Brooklyn, N. Y.,

and died Novem-

ber

3,

18G2.

Buried

Greenwood.

(552.)
at

VIII.

William

Edwards Davenport, born


August
31, 18()2.

Davenport
(553.)

IJidge, Stamford, Ct.,

IX.
at

Theodore

Dwiglit

Davenport,

(twin
31,

son,)

born

Davenport Ridge, Stamford, August


at the

1862.
at

Died

same

place. July 23, 1803.

Buried

Greenwood.
(554.)

X.

Mary
2,

Ver(^

Davenport, born in Brook-

lyn, N. Y.,

May
XI.

18G1.

(555.)

Charles Benedict Davenport, born at


1, 180().

Davenport Ridge, Stamford, June


(55G.)

XII.

Frances Gardiner Davenport, born


30, 1870.
3-54.)

at

Davenport Ridge, Stamford, April

Issue of Julius Davenport, (No.

(557.

I.

AVilliam Bates Davenport, born in


10, 1847.

York

city,

March

tory studies in Brooklyn,

New He pursued his preparaN. Y. Was a member of


and, entering on the study

Yale College, Class of


of law,

18(57,

was admitted

to the

bar in 1870.

Is now an At-

torney and Counselor at Law, in Brooklyn, N. Y.

He was

married, June

4,

1868, to

Miss Carrie

C.

332

SUPPLEMENT TO
of Westerly, R.
I.,

Peckham,
ried

who

died in 1871.
St.

Mar-

2d

to Miss Lottie

Sheperd, at

John's (ProtesJ.,

tant Episcopal) Church, Elizabeth, N.


1874.
(558.)
II.

September

9,

Julius Bates Davenport, born in

New

York, June 24, 1849.


(559.)
III.

Alexander Milne Davenport, born in

Brooklyn, N. Y., September 15, 1851.


1874, by Rev. Theodore L. Curler, D.
Child.
(560.)
Y.,

Married May,
D., to Matilda

IV.

Mary Theodora, born


Graduated
at

in

Brooklyn, N.

June

25, 1856.

the Packer Collegi-

ate Institute, Brooklyn, 1876.


(561.)

V.

Charles Davenport, born and died Octo-

ber

6,

1859.
Issue of Harriet A. Davenport,
(No. 272.)

(Who Married Elisha Comstock.)


(562.)
I.

George William, born


and married

in

New

Canaan,

November
kin,

22, 1845,

to Clara

Louisa Luf-

daughter of Prof. A. D. Lufkin, of Cleveland, Ohio, he has had Walter Vivian, born at Omaha,

by

whom

Nebraska, January 23, 1870, and

who

died June 25,

1870
ber

and Arthur Bennett, born in

New York, DecemIs

24, 1872,

and who died February 1877.

now

merchant
(563.)

in Buffalo, N. Y.

Frances Maria, born October


9,

26,

1848

died

January

1849.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(564.)
III.

333

Sarah Elizabeth, born November 24,


4,

L849

died August
IV.

1855.

(565.)
(566.)

May

Catliarine,

born July

3,
;

1854.

Mary
12, 1855.

Jane, born July 12, 1855

died Sei3-

iember
(567.)

VI.

Jesse

Date, born Februaiy 27, 1857

lied

August

14, 1857.

TWENTY-FIFTH GENEKATION.
Issue of

Geokge Davenport,

(No. 365.)

(568.)
)ort

I.

Helen Maria Davenport, born


19,

at

Daven-

Ridge, Stamford, April

1851.

Married to

lenry Lockwood, of North Stamford, by Rev. Josiah


:eabody, April 24, 1872.
(569.)
)ort
II.

Cieorgiana Davenport, born at Daven-

Ridge, Stamford, April 23, 1858.

TWENTY-FIFTH GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of James Augustus Davenpoet, (No. 366.

(570.)
, 1841.

I.

Charles Francis Davenport, born

May
York,

Married to Grace Quinan, of

New

Fanuary 13, 1863.

She died ^ay

13, 1872.

Married, 2d, to
876.
)ut of

Mary Ann

Marshall, February 21,

Mr. D. went to Washington on the breaking


the rebellion with the 7th Regt, of

New

York.

ie was obliged to return

home from

sickness.

On

his

ecovery he rejoined his regiment at "Washington, and


3ren.

Scott expressed his thanks, that under God, the

'th

Regiment had saved Washington.

He was
J.

for

oany years a

member

of the

New York
N.

Stock Board.

lis present residence is at Elizabeth,

334
(571.)
19, 1843.
II.

SUPPLEMENT TO

George Ralsey Davenport, born Feb,


6,

Married March
III.

1 1863, to Matilda Furman,

(572.)

Emma
;

Louisa Davenport, born

De-

cember

17,

1846
IV.

died October 16, 1854.

(573.)
13, 1848.

Jane

Amanda Davenport, born

Sept.

Married Clement C. Moore, June


V.

28, 1871.

(574.)
4,

Martha Adelaide Davenport, born March

1852.

Married to Charles Frederick Mullins, Aiig-

gust 28, 1873.


Issue of Isaac Lewis Davenpokt, (No.
(575.)"
I.

367.

Sarah Andreas Davenport, born October

16, 1847.

TWENTY-FIFTH GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of Charles A. Datenpoet,
(576.)
I.

(No. 376.)
"Wil-

Sarah Louisa Davenport, born in


5,

ton,

August

1832,

and married October


of

15,

1856,

Gerardus P. Adams,
(577.)
II.

South Norwalk.
18, 1834,

Emily Davenport, born June


of

and married Augustus Whitlock,


18, 1853.

Wilton,

Octoberi

(578.)

III.

Rev. John Gaylord Davenpoi-t, was

born

in Wilton, Ct.,

November

24, 1840.

He

graduastudied

ted at Williams College,


Divinity
at

Mass., in 1863, and

the Union Theological

Seminary,

New
D.,

York,

1864-5, and with Rev.

Mark Hopkins, D.
1865-7.

while Tutor at W^illiams College,


ried
Ct.

Was mar-

November

29, 1866, to Alice W^estcott, of Wilton,

Was

ordained to the work of the ministry, by a

THE DAYENPOKT FAMILY.

335

ongregational Council, and installed over the Park


Street Congregational Cliiircb, in the City of Bridgeport,

Ct, July

1,

18G8.

This Church was organized January 15, 1868.

Mr.
min-

Davenport has been

its onl}'

pastor,

and both

his

istrations in the pulpit,


his

and his pastoral labors among


His has

people, have been abundantly blessed.


active,

been an
i-ation

working Church; and, with the co-ope-

of pastor

and people,

this

Body

of Christ has

oeen greatly enlarged

and extended.

Mr. Davenport

ngages in the ministry as a work of joy and delight,


bearing the messages of that Gosj^el, which proclaims
Glory
to

God

in the Highest,

and on earth peace

to

good-

li'illing

men.
is

In his

visits to

the householders of his

dock, he

wont
"

to carry this original benediction


this

Peace be within
tilling

house

God's benediction

every heart

With sweet contentment and with brightening hope. As the swift years depart

May

the dear earthly

home
be,

A living
'Till

symbol of the heavenl}'


shall gather all

God

we

love to share,

His blest

eternity.

Affectionately your pastor,

336

SUPPLEMENT TO
Issue of John Davenpoet, (No. 378.)

(579.)

I.

Samuel Davenport, born

in Wilton, Ct

October
of U. S.

15, 1847.

Was

sergeant in the 7th Regiment

Cavahy, and died near Fort Wallace, Kansas

July

30, 18G7.
II.

(580.)
(581.)
19,

Thomas Davenport, born

Sept.i3, 1819.

III.

Daniel B. DavenjDort, born February

1851 and died August 23, 1852.


VI.

(582.)

Helen L. Davenport, born April


to

9,

1855,

and married
(583.)

James

A. Kehlbeck, October 28, 1875

V.

Charles A. Davenport, born

May 31, 1857.


31,

(584.) (585.)

VI. Katie H. Davenport, born July 19; 1859

VII.

Frank

B. Davenport,

born October

1861.
(586.)

VIII.

John Davenport,

Jr.,

born June

1,

1864.
(587.)
5,

IX.

Sarah M. Davenport,
1,

bom December
2,

1866,
(588.)

and died October


X.

1870.

Susan E.

Davenjjoi-t,
1,

bora December

1868, and died October


(589.)
17, 1872.

1870.

XL

Elizabeth H. Davenpoi-t, born January

TWENTY-FIFTH GENEE ATION. Continued.


Issue of William

Henry Davenport,

(No. 384.

(590.)

I.

Lottie

M.

Davenport, born

May

27,

1866.
(591.)
II.

Minnie M. Davenport, born August

15,

1867.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


(592.)
23, 1869.

337

III.

Deodate

S.

Davenport, born February

(593.)
30, 1871.

lY.

Jay Beverly Davenport, born October

Issue of William

Young Davenpokt.

(No. 386.

(594.)

I.

William Albert Davenport, born Octo-

ber

1,

1855.
II.

(595.)
7,

John Leeds Davenport, born November

1857.
(596.)
III.

Fanny Maria Davenport, born July

2,

1870.
Issue of Caf-oline Davenpokt, (No. 387.)

(Who Married William H. Jermau.)

(597.)
(598.
)

I.

Georgiana, born October 14, 1855.


Caroline Isabella, born June
1,'

II.

1857.

(599.)
(600.)

III.

Emily E. born Augaist


William
Grant,

10, 1861.

IV.

born

in

Stamford,

March
June

31, 1865.

(601.)

V.

Edward Davenport, born


Galen
A.,

in Stamford,

24, 1870.

(602.)

VI.

born October

3,

1873.

Issue of Saeah Davenpoet, (No. 392.)


(Who Married Joseph H.
Bntler.)

(603.)

I.

Winfred Davenport, born


6,

in Brooklyn,

K. Y., April
(604.)

1866.

II.

Eena, born December 20, 1868. 'Died

June

2,

1871.

338
(605.)
street,

SUPPLEMENT TO
III.

Lemuel Campbell,
9,

born

in

Ponu!

New

Canaan, October
Sarali Emily,
S.

1872.
6,

(606.)

IV.

born March

1877.

Issue of Emily

Davenpoet, (No. 394.)

(Who Married Everard D. Beujamin.)

(607.)

I.

William Everard, born in Minneapolis


8,

Minnesota, October

1872.

TWENTY-FIFTH GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of

Maky Ann Davenpoet,

(No. 398.
S. A.)

(Who Married Dr. Charles


(608.)
I.

B. White, U.
7,

Frances, born June

1870.
28, 1871.

(609.

II.

Mary

Sturges,

born August

Died September
(610.) III.
(611.) (612.)

10, 1871.

Katharine, born

November

14, 1872.

IVV.

Edith,bornMareh27, 1875.
Winifred, born, January 18, 1877.

Issue of Chakles Oscak Davenpoet, (No. 404.

(613.) ton,

Frank Eugene Davenport, born in WilDecember 18, 1871, and died April 18, 1877.
I.

TWENTY-FIFTH GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of John R. Davenpoet, (No. 448.)

(614.)

I.

Henry Caldwell Davenport, born No


Grace DavenjDort, born July
17, 1873.

vember
(615.)

24, 1871.
II.

Issue of Caeoline A. Davenpoet, (No. 450.) (Who Married Henry K. Cooper.)

(616.)

I.

Mary

Thornhill, born January

18, 1876.

) ) ) )

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.


Issue of William St. John Davenport. (No. 455.
(617.)
I.

339

William Taylor Davenport, born Feb-

uary

8,

1869.
II.

(618.)
;-ust

Bessie

St.

John Davenport, born

Aug--

18, 1870,
III.

(619.)

and died October 18, 1870. Frederick St. John Davenport, born
Bailey Davenport, born Octo-

Vlarch 31, 1872.


(620.)

IV.

Greorge

ber 4, 1873. (621.)

V.

Clarence

Rapelyea

Davenport,

born

September

15, 1875.

Issue of William

Webster Davenport,

(No. 4G1.

(622.

I.

Milton Webster Davenport, born in

New

Canaan, March 11, 1877.


Issue of Rev.

Henry

A. D.wenport, (No. 403.

(623.)

I.

Henry Davenport, born

in

New

York.

May

17, 1876.

TWENTY-FIFTH GENEEATIOK Continued.


Issue of Fanny Davenport, (No. 469.
(Who Married William
A. Galbraith.)

(624.

I.

Fannie D. born April

11, 1852. 12, 1860.

(625.)
(626.)

II.

John William, born June


Davenport, born April
William
8,

III.

1862.

(Issue of

E. Davenport, (No. 471.

(627.)

I.

Mary

Elizabeth

Davenport, born, No-

vember
(628.)

28, ]857.
II.

Cliat-les

William Davenport, born

in

Erie, Pa.,

June

26, 1860.

340
(629.)
III.

SUPPLEMENT TO

Frank Roswell

Davenport, born

in

Erie, Pa., April 27, 18G5.


(630.)

IV.

Helen Louise Davenport, born, Janu-

ary 17, 1867.


Issue of Samuel A. Davenport, (No. 472.

(631.)

I.

Catharine Dudley Davenport, born in


23,

Erie Pa.,

November

1863.

Issue of Marilla P. Davenport, (No. 474.) (Who Married Henry


B. Pliimmer.

(632.)
(633.) (634.) (635.)
Co.. Pa.,

I.

Henry, born December

11, 1867.

II.

Fanny

Galbraitli,

born March

23, 1869.
8,

III.

Elvira Gilmore, born January

1870.

IV.

Margaret, born in Franklin, Venango


24, 1875.

December

TWENTY-FIFTH GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of James P. Davenport, (No. 492.) (636.)
I.

Ada May Davenport, born


October
20, 1875.

in

Nevada

City, CaKfornia,

Issue of Adelaide Virginia Davenport, (No. 494.)

(Who Married MarcelUis (637.)


I.

S. Deal.)

drove Davenport, born


10, 18(58.

in

Nevada

City,

CaUfornia,,
(638.)
(639.)
31, 1871.

March
II.

Vii'ginia Vere,
"

born January

12, 1870.

III.

Baby

"

born

May

28,

and died May

(640.)

IV. V.

Maril Lenore, born July


Marcelle
Somertield,

19, 1872.

(641.)

born

April

16,

1874.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

341

TWENTY-FIFTH GENE-KATION. Continued.


Issue of .John
(G42.)
I.

S.

Davenport,

Je., (No. .513.)

Elizabeth Leverett Davenj)ort, born Oc-

tober 29, 1875.


(643.)
II.

John Sidney Davenport, born

in

New

York,

May

30, 1877.

Issue of John

Alfeed Davenport, (No.

519.

(644.)

I.

Beatrice Gary DavenjDort, born

at the
Y.,

old

Goveneur Morris mansion, Morrisania, N.

Au-

gust 21, 1875.


Issue OF

Mary Boorman Davenport,

(No. 520.)

(Who married Henry Eugene Alexander.)

(645.)

I.

Mar^^-aret Davenport,

born November

10,

1869.
(646.)
II.

MabelWhiting, born February

5,

1872.

(647.)

III.

Eugene Davenport, born May

10, 1875.

TWENTY-SIXTH GENERATION.
Issue of John
I.

$>avenpoet, (No. 544.)

(648.)

I.

Louise Post Davenport, born in


4,

New
in

York

city,

September
II.

1867.

(649.)

Benjamin Butler Davenport, born


16, 1871.

New

York,
)

May
III.

(650.

John Havens Davenj^ort,

l)orn in

New
1874.

York, January 21, 1873.


(651.)

IV.

Mary Davenport, born August

3,

Issue of Albert Barnes Davenport, (No. 546.)

(652.

I.

Albert Shelton Davenport, born in


26, 1872.

New

York

citv,

March

"a

342
(653.)
II.

SUPPLEMENT TO

Laura Nichols Davenport, born April

3,

1875.
IssxiE OF

William Bates Datenpoet, (No.

557.)

(654.)
lyn, N. Y.,

I.

Edith Hoxie Davenport, born in Brook8,

June

1870; died Jvxne

5,

1872.

rWENTY-SIXTH GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of Charles F. Davenpoet, (No. 570.)

(655.)

I.

Daisy Quinan Davenport, born July

1,

1864.
(656.)
II.

Etfie

Davenport, born September 20,

1865.
(657.)
III.

Charlie Davenport, born in Elizabeth,

N.

J.,

May

12, 1872.

Issue of

Geoege Ralsey Davenport,

(No. 571.)

(658.)

I.

Emma

Louisa Davenport, born Decem-

ber

5,

1864.
II.

(659.)

Henry Augustus Davenport, born No

vember
(660.)

12, 1869.

Charles Fi-ancis Davenport, born

January

31, 1871.

Issue of Jane

Amanda

Da^tinpoet, (No. 573.)


C. Moore.)

(Who Married Clement

(661.)

William Bryant, born November 8, 1872.

(662.) II. Frederick Davenport,


Issue of

born Sept.

25, 1876.

Maktha Adelaide Dve\port,


(Who Married Charles
F. Miilllns.)

(No. 574.

(663.)

I.

Francis Kussell, born July

6,

1876.

THE DAVENPORT FAMILY.

343

TWENTY-SIXTH GENERATION. Continued.


Issue of Emily Davenpokt, (No. 577.)

(Who Married Augustus Wbitlock.)


(6(i4.)
I.

Minnie Louise, born

May

22, 1855,

and

died February 17, 1858.


(6G5.) (G66.)
II.

Emma Louise, born December 13,

1858.
Ct.,

III.

Charles Wilbur, born in "Wiiton,

January
(667.)

16, 1862.

IV.

Carrie Augusta Davenport,

born Au-

gust 16, 1869.


Issue of Rev. John G. Davenport, (No. 578.)

(668.)
21, 18()8.
(()69.)

I.

Clarence Gaylord Davenport, born April

II.

Lilian Louisa Davenport,

born June

28,

1874.

(This child of the niufh

generation in descent

from Rev. John Davenport, was baptized, September


12,

1875,

by Rev. Leonard Bacon, D.D., the

iiiiif]i

in

succession, from the said


toral office of

John Davenport,
in

in the pas-

the First Church

New

Haven.)
in

(670.)

III.

Mary Lindley Davenport, born


March
12, 1877.

Bridgeport, Ci,

APPENDIX.

AN EPISTLE
To THE Reader, By John Davenport, Prefixed to The Christian's Daily Walk, in H0I3' Security and Peace &c., &ic., by Henry Scudder, teacher of the Word, Rector and Pastor of the Church of Colhngbomdusiat, " Thine ears shall hear a in W^ilkshire, England. voice behind thee saying tliis is the way, walk ye in 21. The Eighth Edition corrected IsA. XXX it." the Author. London 1G42. enlarged by and

THE EPISTLE TO THE READEE.


The searching out
the wits

of man's time happiness hath exercised

and

j^ens of

many

philosophers and divines with a

dif-

ferent success.
1.

Some by

a mistake of the end have erred about the means.

A.11

their enterprises have

ended in vanity and vexation, whilst

they have caught at the shadow of fruit in a hedge of thorns, and have neglected the tree itself, whence the fruit might

have been gathered with more certainty and less trouble. I marvel not at Varro's report of (288) several opinions about this subject, when I consider man's natural corruption, whose understanding is so darkened (Eph. iv:18, ) that (as those Sodomites were weary in seeking the door of Lot's house, ) (Gen. xix 11,) so in vain have the wisest heathen sought the happiness, which (though like blind men, they groped after it) they could never find and his spiritual appetite and taste are so distempered that he can judge of the chief good, no better than the sick man can do of the best meats. Others, having the eyes of their understanding enlighten2.
: ;

ed,

(Eph. i: 18,) and their senses exercised to discern both good and evil, have concluded that man's true happiness con-

350
sists in the
soiil'hi

enjoyment of God, by

a holy

conformity and

sweet

communion with him.


else is true
'?

happiness than the enjoyment of the is the chief good appears in this, that all the properties, which raise up goodness to the highest top of perfections, are in God only. For he is the most pure,' perfect, universal, primary, unchangeable, communicative, dethe efficient pattern, and iitmost sirable and delightful good end of all good without whom there is neither natural, moral, nor spiritual good in any creature. Our conformity to him the Apostle Peter expresseth, when he saith, that the saints are made partakers of the Divine natiire that is, they are renewed in the spirit of their mind, and have put on the new man,
chief good

For what

And

that

God

which after God is created in righteousness, and true holiness. So that they have. First, a new light in their understanding faculty, that they know God, not only as Creator, but as Kedeemei also of the world, and whilst they behold, as in a mirror, the glory of the Lord, with open face, they are changed into the same image from glory to glory, as by the Spirit of the Lord. This knowledge is begun in this life, in the knowledge of faith, and shall be perfected in the life to come, in the knowledge oi
sense
;

this is in a glass

that shall be face to face.

Secondly,
is,

they have a

new

life

in their will

and

affections, that

thej

have disposition and inclinations in their hearts, suitable, and conformable to the directions of the Word this the Apostld Paul intended, when he said of the Romans that they had obeyed from the heart, the form of doctrine, whereunto they were delivered. He saith not, which was delivered unto you,i but whereunto you were delivered, that is, the Word is as a mould, whereinto being cast, you are fashioned according tc it. Hence it is, that the saints are said to be sealed with the Holy Spii'it, because as the seal leaves its print upon the wax,> so the Spirit makes holj' impressions in the soul this is called the writing of the law in oiir hearts in allusion whereunto
;

the Apostle comjiares the hearts of believers to tables, the min-i


isters to pens, the

Spirit to ink

(withoiit

which the pen can and understood


;

write nothing, ) and the affections or conversation of these believers to

an

epistle,

and

this is said to be I'ead

of all men,
3.

when they walk as examples of the rule


it is

2 Cor.

iii, 2:3.'

Hence

that godliness hath a self-sufficiency joined

351
Because a man is now in communion with ) when, a man beholds in righteousness, he ihall be satisfied with his image; (Ps. xvii: 15.) Hence comes hat peace of conscience, joy unspeakable and glorious, and hat holj^ triumph and exultation of spirit, which you may obvith
it,

(1

Tim.

vi:6.

iod,

whose

face

lerve in the

Apostle

Patil.

Having
vith
fest,

showed what this conformity and commimion God is, I will add one or two words more to make it manthat only those are truly happy who are in this estate. I
briefly

na^'

spare quotations of writers,

who concur
it;

in this opinion,

fone of sound judgment have denied


lave
for

the best schoolmen

determined and concluded it; and there is good reason For, first, man's utmost end is, that it may be perfectly veil with him, which he can never attain unto without commulion with God, who is the chief of spirits and the best of goods.
it.

)ther things are desired, as subordinate to this.

The body

is

or the soul, as the matter for its form, or the instrument for

moral virtues are desired not is exjaected by them, as Fame or glorj^ is desired, not so ^lory, pleasure, and riches. nuch for itself, as for the opinion of others; whence it is called Worldly and bodily pleasures are excessively desired, 5oxi'ias drink in a fever or dropsy; better it is to be without the malidy than to enjoy that remedy. Riches are desired not for hemselves, but for the substance of life. Life is not so much :lesired for itself, as for the enjoyment of happiness, which, svhen a man hath sought in the labyrinth of earthly vanities, ifter much vexation, and disquietment of spirit, he must conlude, that it is only in that truest and chiefest good, which is
ts

agent.

Human wisdom and

br themselves, but for the fruit that

the fountain

whence true delight

first

lloweth and the object

wherein

at last it resteth.

Secondly, That is man's happiness, in the possession and enjoyment whereof his heart resteth best satisfied. So far a man is from true happiness as he is from full contentment in that which he enjoys. The bee would not sit iipon so many flowers if she could gather honey enough from any one, neither would Solomon have tried so many conclusions, if the enjoyment of anj' creature could have made him hajjpy. Would you know the cause why so many (like Ixion) make love to shadows and leave the sxibstance, or (that I may speak in a better phrase)

352

APPENDIX.

forsake the fountain of living water, and dig to themselves

broken cisterns that will hold no water V Briefly, it is because man, who in his pride wonld have seen as much as God, is now become so blind, that he seeth not himself. For, if men knew either the disposition of their souls by creation, or the distemper of their souls by corruption, they would easily escape this
delusion.
1.

The

soul

is

a spiritual substance,
its rest

God, and therefore


into the sea,

and

as

whose original is from must be in God as the rivers rum every body rests in its center. The noblest,
;

faculties are abased, not improved, abused, not employed, vexed'

not

satisfied,

Or when, as they that were brought up in scarlet embraced the dung. Or as when servants rode on horse-back, and masters walked like servants on the ground. Or as when seventy kings, like dogs, did eat bread under Adoni-bezek's table, Or as when Sampson made the Philistines mer(Judges i: 7.
rior objects, as
;

when they are j^oked and subjected to these when Nebuchadnezzar fed amongst beasts

infe-'

ry with his eyes jjut out.

Consider the soul as it is now in this state of corruption, 2. nothing can now content it but that which can cure it. The soul is full of sin, which is the most painful sickness; hence the prophet compares wicked men to the raging waves of the sea, that is never at rest, whose waters cast up mire and dirt. What will you do to comfort him that is heart-sick? Bring him the choicest delicacies he cannot relish them. Compass him about with merry company and music it is tedious and troublesome to him. Bring him to a better chamber, lay him in an easier bed all will not satisfy him. Bring the physician let the physician cure him of to him, then he conceives hope his distemper, and then he will eat coarser meat with a better stomach and sleep on a harder bed, in a worse chamber, with a more quiet and contented heart. Just so it is with a guilty conscience, though he is not always sensible of it. What comfort can his friends give him, when God is his enemy? What delight can he take in his stately buildings, or freqiient visits, who may expect, even this night, to have his soul fetched away from him and to be cast into hell amongst devils ? What is a golden chain aboiit a leprous person, or the richest apjJarel upon a dead carcass ? Or,
;
;

EPISTLE TO THE READER.


fhat comfort will a costly banquet yield to a
actor

353

condemned malenow going to execution ? Surely no more than ^dam found, when he had sinned in the garden, or than Hainan had when Ahasuerus frowned on him, in the banquet. On

who

is

be in peace with God, and in a sweet heavenly graces and comForts in his soul, he can rejoice in tribulation, sing in jnis)n, solace himself in death, and comfort his soul against ^jrincipalities, and poAvers, tribulation, and anguish, height, and This true happiiepth, things present, and things to come. ness which all men desire (but most miss it by mistaking the ready way conducing to it) is the subject matter of this book.

he other

side, let a

man

communion enjoy the

infliience of

Here you shall learn the right way of peace. How a man may duty conscionably, and bear every day's cross :lo every day's omfortably receive it thankfully and read it carefully. Objection I. But this course is too strict. In bodily distempers we account that physician the Ans. wisest and best, who regards more the health than the will of the patient." The cari)enter squares his work by the rule, not Oh, miserable man, what an antipathy the rule by his work.
;

gainst truth

is

in this cursed corrupted nature,


false i^rinciples

which had

rather perish

by

than be saved by receiving

and obeying the truth. But, secondly, as it is strict, so it is necessary, and in that case, strictness doth not blunt but sharpen the edge of industry to duty. Therefore, saith our Saviour,
strive to enter in at the strait gate, that
is,

therefore,

strive to

enter because the gate

is strait.

Bradford well compared the way of religion to a narrow bridge, over a large and deej) river, from which the least turning away We see into what a gulf of misery Adam plungis dangerous. ed himself and his posterity, by stepping aside from God's Walk way. Therefore forget not these rules of the Apostles
:

circumspectly and make straight steps to your feet, lest that which is halting be turned oiit of the way. Objection II. But many of God's children attain not to this
strictness, yet are saved.

Ans. It is true, though all God's children travel to one country, yet not with equal agility and speed they all shoot at one mark, yet not with the same dexterity and strength.
;

Some

ditference there

is

in the

outward action, none in their

354
inward intention
in the affection
;

APPENDIX.

in

some inequality there is degrees there is some


First,

in the event,
disi3arity,

none none in

truth and uprightness.

All that are regenerate are alike strict

in these five things, at least.

they have bnt one path,


all follow.

one way wherein they


rule to guide
ly, all

all

walk.

Secondly, they have but one

them

in that way,

which they

Third-

upon this rule, so as they are not willingly ignorant of any truth. Nor do they suppress, or detain any known truth in righteousness, but they stand in the ways, and ask for the old way, which is the good way. Fourthly, they all desire, and endeavor to obey every truth not only to walk in all the commandments of God, without reproof before men, but also, in all things to live honestly and uprightly before
their eyes are
;

God.

Fifthly, if they

fail,

by occasion,

(as a

member may by

be disjointed) yet they are in pain till they be set right again if they stumble through infirmity, (as sheep maj' slip into a puddle) yet they will not lie down and wallow in the mire, which is the property of swine if they are sometimes
accident,
; ;

by violent temptations, or step aside by mistake, yet they will not walk on in the counsel of the wicked, nor shall any way of wickedness (that is a constant or daily course They are so far from perin any one sin,) be found in them. verting the straight ways of God, (that is, speaking evil of that
aside,
is good) that they will justify God in condemning themselves, and subscribe to the righteoiasness of his word, praying that their ways might be directed to keep his statutes. To conclude, laying aside all cavils, beg of God a teachable disposition, and make thy best profit of the labors of this faithful servant of Jesus Christ, a jDainful and profitable minister of For the matter of the book, use it as thy daily the gospel. For the manner and occasion of penning it, use it counselor. I mean stir up the gifts of and learn to write by this copy God that are in thee, to become more profitable to others, both in presence, by discoiarse, and in absence, by writing. How are we bound to bless God for those Epistles, which the Apostles wrote, not only to whole Churches, but also to private persons V Nor was this course extraordinary, and proper only to those persons and times; in succeeding ages, to this day, the In the believers have been much edified by this course. Greek Church Chrysostum wrote divers Epistles, amongst the
;

drawn

35,^

rest,

in the last of them, he takes occasion to


to

commend Olym-

he wrote that Epistle, for her delighting to employ him in answering questions, and resolving donbts. Athanasius besides divers epistles to others, wrote a little book to Antiochus, containing answers to 162 questions. Basil wrote about 180 Epistles amongst which, in his 81st Epistle exhorting Eustathius to more frequency in writing, he gives this reason, because, they say, (saith he, ) that wells are bettered by being drained out. Amongst the Latin fathers, (Hierom) Jerome wrote diThere is one, which Erasmus fathers upon Pauvers Epistles. linus Nolanus, written to Celantia. wherein are many pithj' and remarkable directions about walking with <jod in a holy course, (which is the argument of this book:) it is a large epistle and worthy to be often read. In St. Ambrose's works are ten books of Epistles, amongst which, in his 41st and -iSth Epistles to Sabinvis, he commends this course of instructing one another by writing. In St. Augustine's works are to be found 242 Epistles, in the first of which he exhorts Volusianias, to whom he wrote, to read the Scriptures, and bids him, if he doubt, to he adds also two write, promising that he will answer him reasons of his counsel, the second whereof is because a writing is ever ready when a man is tit to read, nor is that any burden
pia,
;

whom

(saith he)
ure.

which

man may

take

up or

lay

down

at his pleas-

He that reads his Epistles at leisure, advisedlj', shall find many errors confuted, many doubts answered, many truths cleared, many useful directions for a holy life, recorded and laid up in those Epistles (as so many jewels in a rich cabinet)
for the
later
tles,

good of posterity

forever.

If

thence we come to those

times and see what large and elaborate, and learned EpisCalvin, Beza, Drusius,

countries, or look into those holy letters of Bradford,

blessed martyrs, in
shall conclude that

and others have written in other and other our own language, besides many since, we this course hath been of no small use, for

the direction and comfort of God's people, in all ages. I will add one thing more concerning our own nation and times. It is a pity, and to be lamented, that so many worthy letters as are written upon special occasions, for resolution of spiritual

doubts, from day to day, by one or another, are imj^risoned in


secret closets

and cabinets, which,

(if

they were brought to light

356

APPENDIX.

and published, ) I am persuaded, would not only exceed all that ever hath been done in this course, since the Apostles'

many hiindred (which disquiet Christians,) that ever hath been, or, except some such course be taken, ever will be in the world. I will briefly touch one or two objections more,
time, but also be the best help of resolution of cases

and

doubts

which some may interpose against


Objection
III.

this

work and

so conclude.

Many have

and therefore this is Ans. True it is, many have written upon this subject largely, and worthily, as Master Rogers, in seven treatises, abridged by Master Stephen Egerton and Master John Downam, in a large and useful work, and, that I may not forget him, whom, in some respects I should first have mentioned, the Reverend Dean of Worcester, Doctor Hall, that true Christian English Seneca. Also, Mr. Bolton, whose general directions for comfortable walking with

already written on these subjects, superfluous.

most judicious.
taught,
that
is

God, are deservedly approved of the Yet I answer, first, that is never too often never sufficiently learned. Secondly, in the
the triith
is

mouth
edified

of two or three witnesses,


as

confii*med.

Thirdly,

God

is

much
:

glorified, so the Chiirch is

much

and Cephas are j'oiirs, and you, Christ's. Fourthly, the Christian and intelligent reader shall find in this, some things new, other things expressed in a new manner, all digested in siich a method, with such brevity and ijerspiciiity, as was necessary to make the book a vade mecum, easily j^^ortable, and profitable to the poor and illiterate. Objection IV. But it exceeds the limits and proportion of a
gifts

by variety of

Paul, Apollos

letter.
first copy was more brief: upon occasion of a secwherein some other cases were propounded, the judicious author not only handled these arguments largely in his' public ministry, but also added more particulars for his friend's full satisfaction, in a second copy, hence it came to this quantity. But lest .whilst I plead for him, I should seem to be guilty of the same fault myself, I will here stop, wishing thee, (gentle and honest-hearted reader, to consider that account must be given of what thou readest, as well as of what thou hearest, and therefore to join prayer with thy reading, that spiritual

Ans.

The

ond

letter,

EPISTLE TO THE READER.


^-isdoni

857

jf

and strength may be increased in thee for the jsractice what thou learnest. So I commend tlie book to thy reading, md thee, and it, to God's lilessing.
Tliine in the

Lord Jesns,

John Davenport.
From my study
London," this
in

Coleman

street,

I'Sth

of April, 1627.

LETTERS OF REV. JOHX DAVENPORT.


SKETCH OF LADY MARY VEEE.
This excellent lady, born in the year 1581, was the youngest Her mother died three days after she was She born, and her father, when she was only eight years old. was the daughter of Sir. John Tracy, Kt., of Tuddington, County of Gloucester, England. Her husband was Horatio, Lord Vere, Baron of Tilbury, the son of John de Vere, the fifteenth Earl of Oxford. During the reign of Charles I, he went into Holland as commander of a regiment sent to join with the united princes of Germany. He died, the 2d of May,1635, (while Mr. Davenport was in Holland,) and was interred near his brother. Sir Francis Vere, in Westminister Abbey. Several letters from John Davenport to Lady Vere, obligingly copied by the late Rev. W. Davenport Bromley, from the Britof fifteen children.
ish
i|

Museum

{Catalogue Ayscough,
'

"Letters of Divines, Mu:

seum Beittanicum Bibl., Biechan

1275,

Plut.

CVIL

D,")

were printed in the edition of The Davenport Family, 1851. We here give four additional ones, three of which were never One, drawn from the New England Historibefore published.

and Genealogical Register, for April 1855, the others kindfrom the British Museum by Professor F. B. Dexter, and Rev. E. E. Atwater, of New Haven. Of Lady Vere and her husband, between whom and Mr. Davenport there existed a warm and lasting friendship, the leai'ned Archbishop Usher, in a letter sent to her, in 1628, uses the
ical

ly furnished

following language " The thing that

have most admired in your noble Lord,

is,

that such lowliness of mind, and such a high pitch of a brave spir-

it.should be yoked togetherand lodged in one breast.

other side,

when

I reflect

upon you, methinks,


I did.
is the

And on the understand thati


man
is the

saying of the Apostle better than


age and glory of God, so the icoman

That as

(he

imto

glory of the man.

And

/
a.^CDl' U-^Sil" WCgSiCg,
BORN ]o81
DiED 1671

LADY MARY TERE.


your comfort
let

359
have any insight in
I ike

me add

this,

That

if I

things ot this nature, or any judgment to discern spirits,

have clearly beheld engraved on your soul,


perscription of

bnaqe and su-

my

God.

"

is

See Thane's British Autography, Vol. 1, p. 39, from which drawn the likeness of Lady Vere, accompanying this sketch.

Lord Vere, by
co-heirs, viz
:

his wife.

Elizabeth,

married

Lady Mary, had five daiighters, his to John Holies, second Earl

married to Sir Roger Townsend, Baronet, of whose decease, she married Mildmay Fane, second Earl of Westmoreland Catharine, married 1st, Oliver, son and heir of Sir John St. John, and '2d, John, Lord Paulet; Anne, married to the celebrated jjarliamentary general, Sir Thomas Fairfax, Lord Fairfax Dorothy, married to John Wolstenholm, eldest son of Sir John Wolstenholm, Bart, of Nostol Co. York.* To Lady Vere, in the time of the Commonwealth, was committed the care of the Dukes of York, and Gloucester, and the
of Clare
;

Mary,

Eaynham,

after

Princess Elizabeth.
* Burke's Extinct Peerage.

LETTERS TO LADY YE HE.


EEV. JOHN

DAVENPOKT TO LADY YEEE.


(Birch
275, folio 164.
ilie

To

ihe

Rhjht Ilonorahle and truly Noble Lady,


be directed at the

Lady

Vere, these

Hague.

[London,] December 26, 1629. | Madam, The importunity of this bearer to carry, at the least, an acknowledgement of the receipt of the token which it i^leased your Honor to send to my wife, together with my own desire

and many other favors from you, emboldeneth me to this end and brief expression of myself, in so few lines, being by present iirgency of biisiness and some strait of time, this Saturday night, denied liberty of enlarging myself That ancient candor, and nobleness of disposition which you have always exercised towards me, in making a good construction of my errors, as it hath formerly imprinted in me an high esteem of your worth and good oi^inion of me, so at this time it gives me assurance that this endeavor will be pardoned, and my desire of presenting most humble and hearty thanks to your Honor will be accepted. I hoped ei'e this time to have obtained my long desire of seeing my Lord and your Ladyship with j^ours in England. Tho Lord preserve you in the way and make your retiii-n prosperous This day I received a letter from your noble son, my Lord Houghton, which should have been here, I think, a month sooner; to whom I desire to be excused, that I wi-ite not an answer for want of time. I hope shortly to give an answer to himself, not in writing but in speech, at your return to England, which I hope may be hastened with all convenient speed. In the mean space I present my humble seiwe to his Lordship and his worthv son. Bv Mr. Sedgwick I received a letter from Mr.
of expressing onr thankfulness for that
i-eceived
!

LETTERS TO LADY
Balinfora, wliom
I

TERE-.

3G1

love unfeif^nedly for the graces that shine in

him. If he resolve to settle at the Hague, I beseech the Father of Spirits to encourage his spirit to that great work, and to furnish him with wisdom, and utterance, and zeal,in abundance, and

go forth with him in his ministerial labors, in much power and I cannot write to him now, but I acknowledge myself his debtor. Now the good Lord show mercy to my noble Lord, your Honorable Ladyship, and to your whole family, in ordering your consultation and resolutions to his own glory in your welfare; and in filling your hearts with all needful graces and comforts, and in protecting your person, and preserving you in
efficacy.

health and safety there, and in your voyage, .and in fulfilling I rest in much haste, craving pardon for all your necessities
!

this slurred scribbling.

Your Honorable Ladyship's much obliged

in the Lord.

John Davenporte.
I will

not

fail to solicit

in voiir Vuisiness

Sir Maurice Abbot concerning Hales.

EEV. JOHN
Dated July sterdam.
Madaini,
21, 1035,

DAYENPOET TO LADY YEKE.


to

and directed

Hackney, written

in

Am-

How much it has been against my mind that this letter hath been so long delayed, I need not report to your Honor, who have, in your own heart, experience of those lively stirrings of affections towards absent friends, in their afflictions, and how unfeigned love in such cases causeth a vehement and restless desire in friends to be useful and helpful to them, as in an oven, where the fire is kept in, the heat is doubled, or as in a stream when the course of it is stopped the swellings of it are increasShortly after the sad tidings of the great breach which ed. God had made in your family was brought on this side the sea, by a flying report, and confirmed by divers letters, I fell into a relapse, and was the second time let blood for a fever and catarrh,

and

so remained

weak

for a season.

Upon my

recovery

362
waited for a convenient messenger, accounting it vinsafe to by the post, lest my letters should be opened by others, as some formerly have been. And now having a conveyance that answereth my desire, oh that I were able to satisfy my desire also in writing fully and effectually to the settling and
I

write

'

comforting of your heart. But that work is above man's power. It is a glory incommunicablj' proper to God to be the Giver of consolation, and to his Spirit to be the author of comfort yet seeing there are breasts of consolation through which spiritual refreshments are supplied to the hearts of believers, which are called the comforts of the Scriptiires, and that this diity lieth
;

words to comfort one another, body joined together than others, so to be more speedy and industrious in this work, I am bold to attempt, at least so far as may serve, to express mj^ sympathy with your Ladyship in this affliction, which is not a private cause of sorrow to your Honor alone, and to your noble family, but a public cause wherein many are interested myself especially, and above many, to whom his heart was enlarged and his mouth opened. With what assurance of good acceptance was I wont to speak, write, resort to him? How strongly did that plainness of heart tempered with much wisdom, that softness and pliableness of his sjiirit in respect of God and his Word, accompanied with a magnanimous undauntedness in tight with an adversary, that serious dislike of ajjparent evils in others, testified by a studious avoiding them in himself, knit my heart unto him ? Yea, the workings of his affections were not weak but strong. First, toward God, whose favor he preferred above all things, as appeared in the many questions and cases he hath put for clearing to his own heart the assurance of his acceptance with God, and in the complacency and content wherewith he received discourses tending Second, toward the Word of God, which was sweet that way to him Joeing dispensed publicly in the ministry, privately in Christian conference; Third, toward the people of God, ministers and others, whom the more they excelled in the fruits of holiness and righteousness, the more he delighted in, countenanced, and encouraged; Fourth, toward the ways of God, wherexmto he applied himself carefully (so far as he was enlightened and convinced) both in his public command and
all

upon

Christians, with these

and

as anj'

members are nearer

in the

LETTERS TO LADY VEEE.

3G3

;overnment. in the field, and in his private comportment in his amily, resolving with Joshua, that he and his household would Hence sprang his care to sanctify the Lord's erve the Lord.

lay with his family, at home, as well as in the assembly: hence he daily sacrifice of invocation in the name of God, continued

morning and evening without interruption or omission in his amily ;hence,his procuring that the souls committed to his trust, lervants as well as children, might be taught to know and fear jod, by some able and faithful man, weekly, who was maintainyea, hence arose that ardency ed for that service in his family
;

l)f

spiritual affections, for the salvation of his children, desiring lothing more than they might serve God aright and be instru-

rnents of his glory in their several places.

For

all

which, and in

5ther particulars,

him, yea, a

God made your Ladyship an helper meet for quickener and encourager of him in that way wherein

you walked together as heirs of the grace of life. So that you ?annot but have comfort in his death, when you call to mind his life and the testimony of your conscience concerning your carriage toward him and conversation with him, (which was uch as became a daughter of Sarah, ) whilst he lived with you. may now be your rejoicing when he is taken from you upon both which considerations you may sav to your own heart, as David, I shall return to him though he shall not return to me, and with that assurance quiet and relieve yoiir spirit as he did.
; ;

(Madam) from the dead to the living. The rewhich once you had to this earthly husband is ended and ceaseth in his death, but the relation you have to your iheavenly husband remaineth inviolable with whom you communicate in all his honors with all saints (with whom you are set together in heavenly places in Christ) and in his acceptance with the Father, to whom he prayed that the love wherewith he loved him may be in us, and we in him. From him you
Yea, look higher
lation
;

may

expect

protection and
Christ's,

supply of

all

good,

for all

is

yours,

So that it is but a conduit pipe that is broken, the fountain being still open to you. Nor is he taken away before you had warning of it, in a sensible decay, which a little while hence might have come to such a pass as might have been burdensome to himself and uncomfortable to your Ladyship. Ah but he died out of his own house, of a vomit, which he could never bear ? And doth

and you

and Christ God's.

364

God order time, place, and means, by His providence to his own praise ? A hair of our head perisheth not without His providence, much less are our lives taken away without it. I will say of him, as it is said of David, when he had served his
not

But

time by the appointment of God, that he slept with his fathers. there was some other circumstance that made it grevious it may be, that you think not lit to utter. Be it what it maj' be, even that is ordered by God's hand, for some special end. It may be it would not have been so heavy in your sense, \\nless that grain had been added, and then the trial would not have been so full. God so ordereth the trials of his servants that patience may have its perfect work which if it be
;

effected in

your Ladyship by
Therefore,
If this

this trial,

you

may be

entire
to

lacking nothing.
crease your

when

sense pleadeth,

in-

circumstance had not been, his death had not been so grevious to be borne, let Faith answer. If this circumstance had not made it so grevious, my patience had not been so tried, nor my submission to God's good pleasure so fully manifested. I know there is
sorrow,
difference between the proposal of a diity and the pracand that after the judgment is gained to acknowledge the truth and equity of it, the will and affections are not instantly inclined to own it as the best way for one in this case and after the will is thus wrought to the approving of it, a Christian is not presently able to do it, biat he goeth about it somewhat unskillfully, and is weak and defective in practice of it. Wherefore it will be meet to add one word or two for yoiir help therein, that you may endure chastening, which is made a note to difference between punishments wherewith bastards are afflicted and chastisements wherewith children are exercised. If you endure chastisements, saith the Apostle (Heb. xii 5, 6. God offereth himself to you as a father to his children. As if he should say, the same outward judgment may befall a son and a bastard, a son in way of chastisement, and a bastard in way of jjunishment. And you shall know in which of these conditions you are, by your enduring it. A son endureth chastisement, a bastard cannot. But, you will say, what is reqiiired to a right enduring of it? I answer to a right enduring of affliction it is required. First that the iinderstanding do rightly apprehend and 1. That it is conceive of the affliction in all the causes of it.
tice,
; ;

much

LETTERS TO LADY VERE.

365

doeth it. This made Christ say, ux Heavenly Father that oni that my father will have me drmk cup the ShHll not I drink of correcteth his " 2 That in love he doeth it as a father of' son that he every Lord the doth so loveth, child which he corrects He good. your for That he doeth it 3. receiveth be partakers may we that Apostle, the saith good, us for our submit Second, It is required that the will of his holiness. and repining; so murmuring without only not hand, to God's " dumb, and opened not my mouth be;

David
cause

I was as quieting yourwas thy doing," but also with content. A "It is the Lord, said, Eli old as pleasure, self is God's good seemeth him good in his own eyes;' let him do what him, in giving to him the glory of his praising blessing and goodness, as Job conwisdom, and faithfulness, and fatherly the name of the Lord. be "Blessed all, of loss the in cluded condition, you may do, you must resolve that such a

said,

it

Which
at

that

circumstances, is ordersuch a time, and in such and such best to you, and your the for counsels ed by his wisdom and have been exercised Ladyship shall find it so in the end, after you be rightly orafflictions the that required is It thereby. Third, him, and love to as chastisement, dered to a right enduring of him, and rejoice displeased having for grieve and fear him, love, now shed abroad tribulation, under the assurance of his to come, which these your heart, and under the hope of glory cause unto bemoment, for a but are which

light afflictions,
lievers, or
fit

upon and prepare them for, whilst they look not are not seen; which things upon but seen, things' which are temporal, but the things that for the things which are seen are shall be the more fit to do, you this All eternal. are are not seen you look up to God as pilgrimage, the changes of this
if

in all afflictions as sweetreconciled to you in Christ, and upon your Christ, by whom of suffering the in ened and sanctified to you of God being satyou have received the atonement, the justice
isfied

The Lord

whom

for your sake. and his wrath pacified and appeased by him, Ladyship, (to seal the assurance hereof to your am persuaded it certainly appertaineth, ) by his holy
I

Spirit of promise

which is the earnest of our inheritance for the by Christ, and by the same Spirit, the purchased redemption you may comLord open the eyes of your understanding that breadth and prehend with all saints the height, and depth and
Vi

"^"^

APPENDIX.

length of his love to you in Christ, ^^'hich passeth knowledge I pray God to strengthen you by his Spirit in the inwlrd man that you may do his will in all things with childlike obedience, and in all things suiTerhis will with childlike patience ^"len. So praying, I rest,

and

Your Honorable Ladyship's much obliged


[postscript.]

in the

Lord Jesus.

John Davenporte.
the blots and bad writing which were wherein I was constrained to write at this time, myself also being in some distractions by the unquiet spirit of the old man, who to all his former injuries addeth this that he hath now published a tedious book in English full of reproaches and slanders against me, herein als^o he doeth injury to Mr. Parker, Dr. Ames, and Mr. Forbes who are at rest, and Mr. Hooker who is far absent, and to the

Good Madam, pardon

caused by

much

haste,

members

best

of his

own

church,

whom

write to her, and


to

strained to answer for the truth's sake, notwithstanding all my former weaknesses. But our God is strong, in whom I trust, that he will strengthen me to write with such a spirit as I ought. Help me with your prayers, and, if any speak of Mr Paget's book, let them know that I am about to answer it. and shall discover many untruths in it, and a misreporting of the question between him and me. It may be of good use to prevent prejudice in the queen, if your Honor when yon are pleased to

which will give the prelate too much advantage, and open the mouths of enemies against the truth. This I am now con-

he brandeth several ways

my Lady

pray them not to be prejudiced by any suggestions against me, from that book or otherwise, till they may peruse my answer. This I desire, not for any use I have of the Queen's lavor, but that she may not be hindered from receiving good by my ministry, which yet she well esteemeth.

me and

Leicester, take notice of their tavor

REV. .JOHN
IVLiDAM,

DAVENPOET TO LADY VEEE.


EoTTEKDAii, Dec.
25, 163.5.

Having so good an opportunity

as

this,

by the

t\xvor

this

LETTERS TO LADY VERE.


bearer,

367

yonr ancient servant, hath done me, to acquaint me with cannot neglect to prehis purpose of returning for England, I of my thankfulsent your Honor with a few lines in expression your Ladyship upon wait to entertainment wife's my for ness shortly after her in your house, where she was much refreshed, your noble favor arrival in England, and for the continuance of
I receivand affection expressed in those welcome lines, which matter of much ed by Mr. Balinf ord, whose coming to me was a and for the good joy, "both for his return as it was from prison, gave ne4s of your Ladyship's health, and the hope which he me of your recovering that inward comfort, which outward I confess, I often wished myself affliction hath much abated. to strengthnear your Ladyship, not that I thought myself able words than comforting and healing more with en your spirit the sufwere ministered by divers but that I might show for the serviceable, measiire any in be to desires my ficiency of do in preshelp of your faith and joy, which seeing I cannot perform as I may, as I desired and hoped, my desire is to
;

ence,

in this paper intercourse.

, *

know. Madam, upon much experience of your way, that you have right in Christ to those treasures of spiritual good mercy. things, which are laid up in Him for the vessels of wells of conthe of out satisfied be and them, of fill your Take Are those treasures hidden? They are in Christ for solation. your Christ himself is yours, and whatsoever is his, for
I

you.

His Father is your Father by adoption his God is the your God by the covenant of grace, by virtue whereof all world the than hopes better for evidences, IDromises are your which can give your present afflictions are amongst privileges sanctified by his and love, Father's your by sweetened are sweet Spirit to the drawing of you from insuaving vanities to a communion with himself. He hath many ways of doing you all good, which you know not of, and delighteth to do above our thoughts, that his ways may appear to be not as our ways, but as far above them as heaven is above earth. "^Vhilst your
good.
; ;

spirit is troubled

about the sad thoughts of your losses, wants, supplies, sorrows, give me leave to remind it of your gains, Have you obtained more acquaintance with God, comforts. more to be weaned from the creature, more fervency in prayer,

368

APPENDIX.

more fitness of spirit to resign up your will and ways to tha appointment and dispose of your Heavenly Father ? The gain doth abundantly recompense and weigh down your loss. Is a spirit of faith supplied, enabling you to depend upon God reconciled to you in Christ, a spirit of love to compose j-our spirit to quiet itself in the good pleasure of a wise and loving Father, a spirit of wisdom to guide your mind by a right discerning between things that differ, to choose that which is most excellent both in respect of the end and of the means ? Whatsoever your spiritual or outward wants are, in your apprehension, such a supply is made by the good hand of a gracious God as may turn your complaints into thanksgiving. Can you rejoice in tribulation under the hope of glory, in casting off the burden of your cares upon Him that careth for you, in that liberty which Christ hath purchased for your access to

can, your joys are greater; your tribulations abound, your consolations abound much more. Lay those things together, and compare your losses with your gains, your wants with your supplies, your sorrows with your comforts, and you will say that you are not abased but exalted, filled not emptied, not cast off, though cast down, but accepted, beloved, blessed.
?

who God

the throne of grace, in that interest you have in His mediation is your Husband, surely a clear call to the right hand of

Be your sorrows what they

and

as

The haste of the bearer calleth me off. The good Lord persuade your heart effectiially of his love, whereof you have much cause to be fully assured in Christ. Ah, that I could be of any use for the service of your faith Many engagements bind
!

me to it. None shall be more ready to do it than myself, who am more obliged than many. But what can a poor pilgrim, a banished man do? That which I may perform in this condiyourself, as the

tion shall not be wanting in prayers to God, or in letters to knowledge of your condition or necessity shall

minister occasion.
I must cease writing for the present, but ever remain feigned thankfulness and faithfulness.

m un-

Your Honorable Ladyship's much obliged

in the

Lord Jesus.

John Davenporte.

LETTEHS TO LADY VERE.

B69

EEV. JOHN
To
the BUjht

DAVENPORT TO LADY VERE.


Mary
Vere, present these in

Honorable Lady, Lady

Hackney.
QuiNNiPiAC, July
28,

1639.

'Madam,

hand of our God upon us, my dear child is with sundry desirable' friends, as Mr. Fenwick and his lady, Mr. Whitfield['s daughter,] to our great comfort. Their passage was so ordered, as it appeared, that prayers were little accepted, for they had no sickness in the ship except a shore one sea sickness not one dead, but they brought to

By

the good

safely arrived,

for a

coming forth, and both are alive and well. They attained to the haven where they would be, in seven weeks. Their provisions at sea held good to the last. About the time when we guessed they might approach near us, we fasting set a day apart for public extraordinary humiliation by and prayer, in which we commended them unto the hands of our God whom winds and seas obey, and shortly after sent out the first ship a pinnance to pilot them to our harbor for it tvas But our pilot, having watched that ever cast anchor in this place. and the for them a fortnight, grew weary and returned home very next night after, the ship came in guided by God's own

more then was known

to

be in the vessel

at their

woman was

safely delivered of a child

hand

The sight of the harbor did so please the to our town. Captain of the ship and all the passengers that he called it the Since that, another ship hath brought sundry Fair Haven. passengers, and a third is expected daily and which is more, the Lord our God hath bestowed upon us the greatest outward privileges under the sun, to have and enjoy all His ordinances purely dispensed in a church gathered and constituted accord;

ing to His

and hath promised that in name. He will come unto his people and bless them. And now. Madam, my desire is that your Ladyship may be assured that whatever interest I have in Jesus Christ, and by him in fellowship with His people at the throne of grace, it is wholly for your advantage, if in anything your honour I may express the reality of my thankfulness to helpfulness to for my favors formerly received, and for your
every place where

own mind He

in all things,
shall set his

370

APPENDIX.

one in carrying him in your coach to Sir Theoddic for advice abont his neck, and for your cost upon liini in a coat, of which bounty and labor of your love my servant Ann hath made a full rejjort to us. The Lord recompense the same to your Ladyship and to your noble familj' an hvindred fold. I hope before this time He hath rebuked the fevers, and small pox in your family, and will make the loss of Mr. St. John a mercy to your daughter, whom I love and honor in the Lord. The Lord, the Holy One of Israel, our Kedeemer, hath undertaken to teach His people to iJrofit as well by His providence as by His ordinances, even by all His dispensations accordingly, I believe He will, and pray that He maj' be pleased graciously to make this loss be her gain, and these trials evidences of His fatherly love both to your Ladyship and her, that
little

my

Maherne

the mortalitj' of earthly comforts and the dissolubleness of the

marriage bond with the creature may quicken us to secure our interest in the everlasting God, and oar marriage with the Lord Jesus Christ, by an everlasting covenant of his grace which nothing can dissolve. My wife preseiiteth her hiimble service with much thanfulness to your Ladyship. We both desire in like manner to salute my Lady Wake and all your noble daughters. Had I time, I would write to Mrs. Watson, your scribe. At present, I have no more libertj' than to salute her, and to let her know that, if her affections stand hitherward, I shall gladly be useful to her in what I may, and do think that it would be comfortable to her many ways. But it is God who sets the bounds of our habitation, to whose everlasting arms I commend your Ladyship, with all yoiirs, in Jesus Christ, in whom I rest

Your Honorable Ladyship's much obliged

in the Lord,

John Davenporte.

MISCELLANEOUS LETTERS.
JOHN DAVENPORT TO MRS. SAEAH COTTON.*
(From Mass. His. Society Collections, Fourth
Series, Vol. VIII, p.
51(5,

giv-

en in original orthography, jivinctuation, &c.)

The departure of our freinds being (Deaee Mes. Cotton, ) more suddaine then I expected, I wanted opportunitie of saluting you, by letter, according to my desire, yet now, hearing of another way of transmitting these lines, I am encouraged to put pen to paper, to express my sincere love to you, in the

praying you to be assured, that I doe as heartily wish all good to you and yours, as to my selfe and myne, which I would most gladly make visible, by reall and suitable effects, if I knew how, and had power in my hand answerable to my desire. But this is your comfort, that whatLord, and to your familie,
ever deficiency
is

in the creature,

there

is

Allsufliciency for

you & yours in God, who is your God & Father in Christ Jesus, by an everlasting Covenant, whereby he hath made ouer (as it
were, bv a deed of gift) his Allsufliciency, in respect of the Yet seing it fruite & benefit of it, unto you, through Christ. hath pleased the onely wise God to make men his instruments,
that His goodnes
that order,

may be diffused and communicated unto us in and by those outward meanes, in the communion of it will be saints, which he vouchsafeth and suiteth to that end well pleasing in his sight that you improve that channell, & those conduit pipes for your communion with that blessed founOf this kind, I know you haue plentifull taine of all good. helpes, daily, at hand, which you doe well, in that you make vse of them, according to the opportunities which God gra;

*Mrs. Sarah Cotton, the second wife of Rev John Cotton, of Boston, was the daughter of Richard Hankredge, of Boston, England, and the widow of William Story. Her marriage to the Vicar of Boston took place, April 25, 1632. After his death she married Rev. Richard Mather, Aug. 26, 1656, and
died

May

27,1676. Collections ilass. His. Society,

Fourth

Series, vol. viii, p. 226

372
ciovjsly aifoarcleth

unto you.

And,

if I

may be

of any use to

yourselfe or to any of yours, be assured that your interest in

me
any

is

such, that the intimation of your desire will haue the

force of a strong
ofl&ce,

compas.

in[ga]gementuppon me for the performance of and service of love, that is or shall be within my In the mean time and ever, (with my wife's most af-

fectionate salutations) I heartily

commend
I rest

yoii

& yours

to the

grace of our Lord Jesus, in

whom

Your assured thanckful

friend,

John Davenport.
Newhaven, the
25th d. of the Qth
ni.

1653.

JOHN DAVENPORT TO JOHN COTTON. *


(From Mass. His. Society Collections Fourth
Series, Vol. VIII, p. 547.)

To

Mf

[John

Coiton.'l

the 9th day of the

dated the 17th of the 11th m. I x-eceived m., and having so good an opportunity, by so safe an hand Mr Sam:Streete, I returne such Answer as I can to your Letter, wherein I observe with thanckfullnes jowv

Deaee

Sb,

Yours

12.

* Rev. John Cotton [H. C. 1657] was a sou ot the distinguished Rev. John Cotton of Boston. He was born March 15, 1640. He first preached at Wethersfield, Conn. In 1664, May 3, he was excommunicateci from the but First Church in Boston formerly his father's for several offences the ne.\t uiontli, upon his penitential acknowledgment, was again received into fellowship. From 1664 to 1667, he preached at Martha's Vineyard to a congregation of Indians and white people, and acquired a good knowledge of the Indian language. He was settled at Plymouth June 30, 1669, and reained his pastoral of&ce there till Oct. 5, 1697. The ne.xt year he went to and having gathered a church, preached there till his Charleston, S. death, of the yellow fever, Sept. 18, 1699. His Church erected a handsome monument over his grave. Notwithstanding the early blot ui^on his reputation, he appears to have been ever afterwards a faithful and extensively useful minister. Wiiile at Plymouth, he frequentlj' preached to several congregations of Indians in the neighborhood. The whole care of revising and correcting Eliot's Indian Bible, 2d Edition, printed at Cambridge in

1685,

was intrusted

to

him. ro//pf/(Vjij., J).

'226.

LETTER TO JOHN COTTON.

373

kinde acceptance of my loving freenes, in expressing my deepe I could not liave approued !ence of yonr sinfull miscarriages. lay faithfulnes to God, to you, & to my owne conscience, if I had leglected such a season of so speaking to you, as I did, that being ;he first opportunity which was given me of treating with you, we tcnus, about such matters as were not fit to be committed to
raghting, which might ng of your name, which
rt'hile I

fall

into other hands, to the blemish-

desired to preserve unspotted by me,

sincerely endeavoured the healing of your soul.. How have I fervently desired that as you beare boath your father's names, so you might hold forth the virtues of Christ, n the spirit & conversacion, which eminently shined in him Thus you would be knowne to be his son morally, by imjften
!

as natiirally by generacion, which would you a double interest, in the hearts of God's people, who knew, loved, &: highly honoured your blessd Father, who being dead would thus have lived in j'ou, as vorthy Mi" Hooker doth in his good son, at Farmington. Nor im I out of hope that yet it may be so, if the Lord convince ^'ou powerfiilly of your former sins, tt humble you effectually for them to juslifie wisdomes counsels by your holding forth publickly your unfeined reiDentance, as I told you Origen did, with many teares, that scandal might be remoued, which while it remaines, will be to Karexov, to hinder the acceptance of your exercise of guifts in preaching, with men, & the blessing of it from God. You promised you would send me a copie of your publick acknowledgmt, which is rejDorted to be slight & unsatisfying, & that you would propound some things in reference to your case, for further aduise. But you have done neither, whereby I am dissaduantaged from giving you that helpe which otherwise I might have done, with God's assistance. It is a temptacion from Satan to hinder you from propounding your case, iipon a secret expectacion to see more of God in it, hoping that God, who helped me b efore to speake as if I had knowne the inward frame of your heart, will againe direct me to speake some thing to the troubles of your heart though I be not fully acquainted with them. For though if you had acquainted me with your troubles, & the groiinds of them, & the eiiects, my bowells would have bene tro ubled with

itacion

as

well

have

given

48

374
yoii

APPENDIX.

i^ from a true sj'inpathy I should have endeavasswage your griefe, or to direct your apprehencions, or otherwise to speake siiitably to your case yet it is not God's manner, nor may you expect it, to reveale to his serves, by immediate inspiracion, the cases of others, which, by his ordinances, they aught to expresse, themselues, & seek helpe in from others that the communion of saints may be preserved & exercised among them mutually. Thus you see how Satan tempteth you to tempt God. As for me, be you assured that, in any way of God, you shall finde me really ready, iii^on all Fareoccasions, to be helpfull to you as the case may reqviire. wel & account me, as I am,

&

for yon,

oured

to

Your

true freind in the Lord,

JOEX Davenporte,
N. H. the 23: of the
Sk,
1st

m. 166|

your Father, which you your promise. Some I reed by Edm Toolie, & some by Jacob Molines, with your letter. If any yet remaine with you, you will further oblige me if you send them to me. Iterum vale.
sent

I thanck you for my letters to


according to

me

my

desire

&:

[In Collections of Mass. Historical Society, Vol. VIII. Fourth Series, uuder heading " Mather Papers" are many letters relating to the Regicides, portions of which were written in characters, which are deciphered and giveai by the editors, (page V26,) wth translations, from which, a few, written by John Davenport, will be extracted here.]

FROM
A

MR. DAVENPORT, JUNE


God

2,

[1662,] In cipher, p. 172.


:

brief relation of

some news from England


are imprisoned
;

That many

of the people of

very sad times feared to

be approaching. 2: Corn is very dear. No sect so much favored as the Quakei'S, none so much trodden vinder foot as the Presbyterians. 3. Great grumbling in E:[ngland] I:[reland] S:[cotland] but P. B. says they will still all. The 30th of present month, December, feared to be a bloody day, if the Lord prevent not. Sir H. Vane, Col. Lambert and some others comm.itted to

Gernsey Castle sent

for to

come

to trial.

The

first

REGICIDE LETTERS.

375

day the Parliament


affirm.

sat

they gave the King 20,000 as some

letter

Mr. Wharton broiight this news from the Bay inclosed in a which came by the way of Barbadoes. One thing I have had by the way of Virginia, viz Anbni popuU in Scotia Contra
:

Episcopos amarescimtur et nomiuUi interjicimiiur : tied vix quicquam quodfertur credendmn est. Concerning the two Colonels,*

who were formerly

here there's no speech

lately.

A LETTEK FEOM MR. DAVENPORT JUNE


[Partly in cipher.]
I

2,

[1662

?]

told

spake with one that came from England in July last. He came into England with brother to me that said he the Queen Mother, and there speaking with his brother was a traitor, and that he could not be saved being no Catholic. One present answered that the King was no Catholic. Ergo, he replied two or three years would show what he was.
,

The occasion

of this discourse, was one (a disaffected person) was a moderate man. C. Seely said that E. P. G. C. that said the King is favorably inclined is gone towards Germany, that Henry Cromwell liveth about the Court and en&c.
to

him,

joys
sea.

all

his estate.

Col.

Hewson

is

said to be dead

beyond the
its

By

the

way

of Virginia I hear,

(but they say

treason

Queen Mary's days. to say so) that things are as bad as in This'came by a ship which (Mr. Hudson saith) came from
England twelve weeks
printed Acts.
ago.
I

have lievewith sent you some

MemorandiTm.
July, 1661.

The Acts last mentioned were passed 30th The substance of most of them were sent by Mr.
1.

W. W.
*

as in No.

Whalley and

Gofle.

376

APPENDIX.

JOHN DAVENPOET* TO WILLIAM GOFFE.


[Partly in cipher.
Keceived the 3th of 5 m: 1662.
]

(p. 198.)

[Memorandum by

Gofle.]

There was a General Governor and a Major General chosen for this Country to seize upon the Militia for the King, and a Bishop and aSuflfragan, for Ecclesiastical Government but Mr. Nortonf writes, that they are not yet out of hopes, to prevent it.
:

is Sir Robert Carr,| (a rank Papist.) There are great thoughts of heart, (among the Godly) about us, what impositions Avill be laid upon New England.
"

The governor's name

The Episcopal Government is by Act


ed through England.

of Parliament proclaim-

Exceeding great taxes laid upon the People. There is great talk of many ministers with their congregations, coming over the next year, if room can be found for them. There is one Mr. Allen come over this year, of about 30
^

years of age, a very able man and two great merchants|| of London, with their families, of 30,000 estate, godly men. I saw in a letter this day, that Corn in England is at 14. 15. 16. 17s. a bushel, the poor in great extremity, and little care for their relief.
;

The King
The[re]
there
is is

is

engaged to the utmost, to promote Episcopacy. great likelihood of war, with France, the French

Ambassador

is gone home in a rage. It is to be feared that a sad scourge at hand, for England.

There were nine ministers that went up


receive their orders,

to the

Bishop

to

country to their several places, to put in execution those orders, seven of the nine
* This letter, although without signature,
is

and returning

to the

in the handwriting of Da-

venport.

Kev. John Norton, Teacher of the First Church in Boston, was sent with 8imon Bradstreet, as agent of the Colony, to England, in February, 1662.
t

They returned, September 3, of the same year. + Sir Robert Carr came as one of four commissiouei-s to reduce the (Colonies to obedience, kc, &c., in 1661. Rev. James Allen came over from England in 1662. He was ordained Teacher of the First Church in Boston, Dec. 0, 166,S, as colleague with Mr. Davenport. He died Sept. 22, 1710, aged 78 years.
II

Probably

Humphrey Davie and Nehemiah Bourne.

REGICIDE LETTERS.

377

were immediately struck dead, the eighth struck blind, the ninth mad, a very remarkable hand of God. The Broad Seal is bought and sold, so that there is no hold of anything granted to any man. There are abundance more particulars. (I suppose that is

meant in the Bay. ) Thus much as the sum of intelligence which Mr. Glover brought in a letter from the Bay, the 5th day, last week, to Springfield, and is since come hither. Unto these I shall add three passages of news which I heard from Mr. Jones, and were reported to him by Mr. Hudson from Auger* as followeth. 1. The Charters of all the Cities and Corporations, in England, are called in and nullefied, except London and Bristol, or
York.

That Mass is tolerated throughout England. That by the House of Commons in Parliament it was voted that the King should have the power of ordering, and disposing men's personal estates, but when it came to the House of Lords, it was opjiosed, for one of the Lords stood up. and said that it was known he had been faithful to the King's interest, but could not consent to that, for he miist be faithful to his own interest, his wife's and children's, who would thereby be undone (or to that purpose. I hear that the Synod in the Bay, is broken up without doing anything, and have adjourned the meeting till October or
2. 3.

November

next.

New Haveu. The names written by Davenport are erased and the cipher inserted by Goffe.
* Probably Nicholas Anger, of

378

APPENDIX.

JOHN DAVENPOET TO JOHN WINTHKOP,

JK.

[Several letters of Rev. John Davenport to Gov. John Winthrop, Jr., were printed In the Historical Discourses of Rev. Dr. Bacon in 1839, and others in Collections of Mass. Historical Society, Vol. X, Third Series, some of which were given in the Edition of the Davenport Family, in 1851. We now select a few from the twenty preserved among the Winthrop Papers, as printed in Collections of Mass. His. Society, Vol. VII, Fourth Series, beginning
at

page

489.

John Winthrop was born in Groton, England, in 1605. He was the son of Gov. John Winthrop, of Massachusetts, and first came to America with his father in 1631, but soon returned to England. In 1635, he came back with Lion Gardiner* (who built a fort at the mouth of the Connecticut River) and in 1644, 5, removed his family to Pequot harbor, where in the spring of that year he founded what is now the city of New London. He was elected Governor of the Connecticut Colony in 1657
the date of the letter
first given.]

To

the

Right

WorsMpfull John Winthrope, Esqr. Governour of Connedacul Golonie, these present in Hartford.

HoNOTTKED SiE, Though


indisposed for wrighting

my

sj^irit

is

much

streightenecl

&

by that late dreadfull stroake upon us, from the hand of the Most High, in the loss of our incomparable Governourf & my faithfuU freind, under which we still bleed, and, I feare, unto the death of our politique body unles God be pleased to shew himselfe in the mount, above all
letters,

that

we can ask

or thinck

yet I willingly take this sad occasion

to salute yourselfe,

and Mrs. Winthrope, respectfully


our names,

&

affec-

tionately, in the Lord, in boath

who long

to see

your
t

face, in j'our best season.


7,

Theophilus Eaton, who died January

1657.

was bom in England, and educated to the profession of arms. Studied civil and military engineering, and became an officer in the British Army. He engaged in the wars of Holland, and became "Master of Works of Fortifications in the ledges of the Prince of Orange." While in Holland he was intimate with John Davenport, Hugh Peters and others, with whom he entered into an agreement to employ his services for
* Lion Gardiner

the Company of Patentees of the Territory at the mouth of the Connecticut River "in the drawing, ordering, and making of a city, towns, forts and fortifications." By the terms of his agreement made with Peters, Davenport,

and others, he was to act in this employment four years and have under his control three hundred able-bodied men. Ho arrived at the mouth of

LETTERS TO JOHN WINTHEOP,

JR.

379

inclosed, wliereiinto this serveth for a cover, will, shew you what the case & desire of brother and sister Herrymans is. With them I also joyne my hiTmb[l]e request that you will be

The

pleased to consider and advise speedily, that, if it may be, his eyesight may be preserved and his eye healed. Being assured I of your readynes hereunto, as unto every worke of mercy, hand, cease to diverte you from the weighty affaires under your

and to detaine you from this present necessary worke of mercy, which craves your serious consideration and speedy helpe. The Lord guide you in boath & prosper all your endeavours for My sonne also prethe good of many, & of this our brother buisesents you with an account of his negotiation about the Jesus. Lord our in Farewell care. his to commended nes you
!

In

whom

I rest

Sir,

Your obliged freind & servant

in the Lord,

John Davexporte.
Newhaven,
this 21 of the 11th

m.

57.,

in the evening.
:

ludorseclby JolniWinthrop..inn.,

-Mr Davenport, about G

Herrimaus

JOHN DAVENPOKT TO JOHN WINTHKOP,


To
the

JR.

(p. 495.)

Right Worshipful! his

much Honoured

freind.

John

Win-

thrope, Esqr.
IJariford.

Deputy Governour of Connectacut,

these present in

Honoured Sie,-I received

2 letters from you,

&

return

many

son David, born April 29, 1636, the Connecticut River. Nov. 28, 163.5. His Lion Gardiner died in 1663. was the first white child born in Connecticut. Gardiner's Island He left large landed possessions on Long Island, and also was entailed on his -situated near the East Hampton shore-which Dongau,) who erected it into a lord^son David (by patent from Governor of "Lordship and Manor of Garship and manor, to be laiown by tlie name
diner's Island."

Gardiuer.this Island has descended from It is reiarkable, that, since Lion eight proprietors, in reguDavid to John, and from John to David, through failed, and until the present genelar succession, male issue never having been unbroken. -See Mass. ration the descent from father to son having
.His. Collections Vol,

X. Third

Series, p. 173-185.

380

APPENDIX.

thancks to you for them boath, & for the intelligence contained in them. The death of those 3 men, & the mortality in the countreyes in England, are sorrowful tydings. That which concernes the Lord Fairfaxe answers my former
oj^inion.

hope we

shall speedily receive our letters

from London, and


cfcc.
'

thereby the true state of the publick affaires there,

Wright hath twise written to me, to encourage my returne London. However God shall be pleased to order my

Dr.
to

sorrow for I heard that Mr. Goodyeare was wholly left out in the cho'yse of magistrates whereas I had bene secure, thincking they purposed to choose him Governour.f But, the day following, upon enquiry into the cause of it, I received such answer as cleared unto me that it came to pass, not by any plot of men, but by the overruling providence of God. For the proxies generally voted for Mr. Goodyeare to be Governour, & Mr. Leete, Deputy, and none of them gaue theyre votes for Mr. Goodyeare to be Deputy Governour, if the former fayled, nor to be magistrate, but put in blancks to boath, taking it for granted that he would be chosen Governour. But, before they proceeded to election, some of the Deputies of the Court propounded and urged
;
;

ward God, & his people. Concerning our Court matters here the last Election-day was the saddest to me that ever I saw in Newhaven, by our want of him, whose presence, etc, was wont to make it a day of no less contentment then solemnity. Being weary, after my sermon, I was absent from the Court. The 1st newes that I heard from thence added to my

way, I am truely sorry for the loss of such a man,* whose hearte was to;

the

necessity, or great expediency, in respect of our condition, at present, of having the Governour present

among

us.

Hereunto
fell

Deputy Governour, for this yeare. To this latter the proxies, for the most part, concurred, & most of the present freemen. The votes of the present freemen & some few proxies carryed the election
who had died the preceding winter. At the Court of Elections, held at New Haven, 26th May, 1658, Francis Newman was chosen Governor, in place of Theophilus Eaton, deceased Goodyear died in October following.-.Vei ^are Colonial
* Gov. Eaton,
t

the freemen generally consented, & hereby the election on Mr. Newman to be Governour, & Mr. Leete

up-

Records

ii

231

268.

LETTERS TO JOHN WESITHROP,


or Governour
to

JR.

381
which he

Mr.

Newman by
;

plurality of votes,

strongly refused, hut importunity of

many

in the Court, at last

and some of Mr. Goodyeares overcame him to accept it freinds & relatives spake earnestly, when these 2 were chosen, such to hinder his being chosen to magistracy, alleadging
reasons as they had.

What the minde of God is herein, time will shew. The Court sate since the election, til this day, & have passed thorough many weighty buisenesses, by the helpe of Gods presence with them, to good satisfaction, both to themselves & Give me leave to add a touch upon your buisenes others. about your lead mine, which I make bold to suggest, onely unI am informed that one found in a letter written to your selfe. to another from London, that lead is of good value, probably above what you know. My wife telleth me that she spake with one, who told her that he found, in that letter, that they will
will give 8/
ijer

tunn

for

lead in the bigger peeces,

&

51

per

tun for the smaller peeces and 20 s per tun for the dust of it, which, it may be, you cast away, as of qo use. This intimation may be of use to you, we boath thought, to prevent some loss you might sustaine by those that will, probably,be trading with

you

concealing

knowing of what esteeme it is in London, & My selfe, for theyre owne advantage. sincere love maketh me thus bold to acquaint you with any thing which may he e re vestra, to know. I hope Mrs. Winfor the lead,
it

from your

& your wholl familie is in health, because I know nothing to the contrary. The good Lord continue it, with his favour A' loving kindnes in Jesus Christ to your selfe & them all. We boath, with our sonne, present our humble service to you The Lord Jeboath, & our affectionate salutacions to them.
thrope
sus dwell with you in peace
Sir,
!

In

whom

I rest.

Yoiars

much

obliged,

John Davenport.
Newhaven,
the 3d d. of the 4th m. 58.

Indorsed by John Winthrop, jun., "Mr. Davenport."

382

APPENDIX.
JK.

JOHN DAVENPOKT TO JOHN WINTHEOP,


To
the

(p.

501.)

Honoured John Winthrop,

E>iqr.,

Governour of Vonneda-

cule, these present.

HoNOUEED SiE, Mr. Entherford being now arrived here from


ter to

the Baye, telleth us that Mr. Yale is come, which also his letme from the Baye confirmeth. He saith sister Hannah
is

Eaton*
ren,

offred

&

2001 per

an husband a godly man, who hath 2 childannum. He purposeth to come with brother
;

who is expected here speedily. I have a letter from my brother Hooke, but no intelligence, since the change of govAlsop,
letter I

ernment, from him, though from other hands I have. One send you to read, with desire that you will returne it to

me

againe, at your leasure, that I may answer it. I have also sundry weekly Intelligences, but in them there is not much news since the change of government. I have sent j'ou 3 or 4 other bookes, which I have not yet time to peruse, nor scarse

my

letters as I

would, being

filled

with impediments

at this

time.

Were you

here, I could take

up your spare time with


in

pleasing diversions,
the world.

b^ reading varietyes of occurrences

All the use that I

make

of such things

is to

see

how
to

sies that

things worke towards the accomplishment of the propheconcerne these times, & to know how to pray suitably

changes of j^rovidences.

Present myne, my wifes & sons humble services, together with your selfe, to Mrs. Winthrope, & our loves to yours. I
with Mrs. Pierson having heard nothing from If she be alive, the Lord send forth his word & heale her, & many sick & weake persons among us Farewel, in our Lord Jesus, in whom I rest, Sir,
feare
it is

how

thence

all this

day.

Yours obliged,

John Davenport.
Newhaven, the 29th
d.

of the 5th m. 1659.

The messenger sent last year is returned to the Baye, A: hath brought 30 tun of stones for the iron worke. Excuse mv hast.
Indorsed by John Winthrop, jun., "Mr. Davenport, Rec
*
:

Julj-

28 :"

Hannah, youngest daughter ofTheophilus Eaton, married July 4, lim, at Loudon, William Jones, who came next year to New England in the ship with Goffe and Whalley the regicides and settled in New Hi\en.~Savagc'
;

Geneal. Diet.

LETTERS TO JOHN WINTHROP,

JR.

383
JR.
(p. 502.)

rOHN DAVENPORT TO JOHN WINTHROP,


To
(he

konourcdJolui Winthrope, Esqr. Governour of Connedacide,


these present in Hartford.

I suppose Mr. J. C. hath reported unto you Sir, word of mouth, because I wanted time (by received he what & liber [ty] to wright what I woukl) from me, for that end, concerning the state of affaires in England upon this unexpected the change, whereby the Lord Protectour* is reduced unto

HoNOUKED

state or a private

gentlemen, by his voluntary act, at the perGeneral Fleetwood, Lord Disborough, Ac, Lord suasion of the yet the Colonels & cheife leaders of the army in Scotland (among whom I find your wife's brother. Col. Read his name)

have petitioned the revived long lasting Parliament, now reassembled upon the desire of the army, to allow the last Lord Protector 20,000/ per annum during his life, whereof 10,000/ per

annum

is

to

his fathers

faithful

be inheritance to that house, in recompence of & honourable services for the good of the

Commonwealth. It is also, by others, desired that the Lady Dowager may have 10,000/ per annum conferred upon her, during her life, as a marke of honour and thanckfulness in reference to her deceased husband. The people seeme to be very
well pleased with this change, & to promise to themselves great good thereby. But quicquid id est, timeo Danaos vel donaferentes; to I suspect that Jesuites have an hand in turning the wheele,

introduce the K. of Scots; wherein I am the more strengthned by an offer of 40,000/. made by a Quaker, as it is said, for White Hall, which, together with Hampton Court & Greenewitch & other of the Kings houses, is set to saile. Probably, the Jesu-

purse shall pay that summe, in the name ct by the hand For of a Quaker, to settle there, in time, a Jesuites Colledge. the marriage betweene France and Spaine, & the foiles of the
ites

K. of Sweden,
Scots,

&

may

fill

the interest which they may gaine in the K. of them with hopes of reducing England sensim,
for the slaying of the witnesses,

sine sensu, to

become, as informer times, the Popes asse againe,

which may make way

which

is

the 1st thing to be done, before theyre rising, & the burning of Rome, & the calling of the Jewes. But I forget that you are
" Richard

Cromwell

liis

father, Oliver,

had died 3d September,

16.58.

384
upon your journey

APPENDIX.
to the Baye,

where you

will receive full in-

telligence of all things.

My

brother Hookes letter was written


a letter, &,
I beleive,

though it is not yet brought to my hand, because he doth not mention your name in my letter, & because, in his former letters, he promised to wright unto you. The Lord make your journey safe, comfortable, ct prosperous We want your presence here exceedingly. Many among us are
selfe,

before this change. written one, to your

He purposed

hath

sorely visited & distressed, & some distracted, in the paroxisme of theyre disease, for a time, which taketh them in theyre heades with extreme paine, as sister Beamont, brother Myles & his son his daughter also hath bene neare unto
;

brother excepting himself, cum multis alijs. Mrs. Pierson is in a hopeful way. Mr. Pierson hath bene touched, so that he could not keepe the fast, last 4th d., but wisely tooke the physick in the beginning, & will, I hope, doe well.
Doelitles house,

death, but I hope that, through the mercyes of God. they are somewhat better. All John Thomas his house have bene downe, his wife is stil very weake, cfehimselfe not strong, & all

questions my wife hath about the various exercises of people under this afflicting hand of God some she purposeth to send inclosed in this to which, if you have time to returne an answer, be pleased, together with it, to returne to me my
; ;

Many

copie in your

&

hand of Mr. Hopkins his will. Myne, my wifes sons humble respects .being presented to yourselfe & Mrs.

Winthrope,

&

our love to yours, I rest

Yoixrs obliged,

John Davenport.
Newhaven, the 5th day
of the 6th m. 1659.
:

Indorsed by John Winthrop, Jun., "Mr. Davenport: rec

[illegihh.]"

JOHN DAYENPOET TO JOHN ^nNTHROP,


To
the

JR.

(p.

504.)

honoured John Winthrope, Esqr., Gocernour of Connectacute, Colonie, ihene present in Hartford
SiE,

HoNouBED
to

I received,

by brother Wakeman,

3 letters
i

my

selfe,

(besides those that

my

wife

&

son received, togeth-

LETTERS TO JOHN WINTHROP,


er

JR.

885

neighboxirs

with your bountiftil siipplies of medicines for our sick & freinds, which are many, ) for which your great

labour & liberality of love, I retnrne many hearty thancks, being exceedingly obliged to yon for the same. 1 received also my copie of Mr. Hopkins his will, & Mr. Lyngs letter & the printed papers, which last you might have retained with you.
I shall onely, at present, add that since my wrighting to you, I have received letters & bookes, & written papers from my ancient and honoured freinds Mr. Hartlib,* & Mr. Durief wherein I finde sundry rarities of inventions, & projects for common good, of sundry kindes, which I long for an oi^portunitie to communicate to your selfe, might your first leasure give us an

occasion of personal discourse together.


to be transmitted unto

They

are too

many

you by passengers, & yet such as, I beleive, will affoard singular contentment to your piiblick spirit. & probably you will finde some particularities among them, which may be advantagious to your private profifit, in the improvement of yoiir Fishers Island, &c. I cannot concee.le anythinge from your selfe, such is my unfeigned love, that I can conjecture may be e re vesira to know. Your report of Mrs. Winthropes illnes & danger would have deeply afflicted me, had it not bene allaied with the hopes of her recovery, yet, as it is, we cannot but sympathize with her & your selfe, in this afflicting providence; yet so as acknowledging Gods mercy, to his

who ordered the circumstances of it so favourably, that should befall her, while your selfe was present with her, that she might have there by both comfort and helpe for her The good Lord goe on in healing to cure, by his blessing. heale, & in restoring to restore her unto perfect health & strength, with a sanctifyed & blessed fruiteof this his Fatherly chastisement that you may rejoyce together in his goodnes all youre daies, & be satisfyed with his mercies in Jesus Christ I am sorry for the sicknes & weaknes of your 2 daughters, beseeching the God of our life & health to send forth his word
praise,
it
;

* Samuel Hartlib. the ingenious autlior of


I^'atui'al'liistory,

was the son

of a Polish

come to England about 1040.


tion."
t

agriculture and supposed to have Milton addresses to him his Tract "Of Educa-

many works on
Is

merchant, and

Rev. John Dury. a Scottish divine, and a

member

of the "Westminister

A.ssembly.

386

"

APPENDIX.

of blessing witli the nieanes to heale them, & to sanctifie theni with the rest of yoiir branches, to himselfe, in Jesus Christ In whom I rest,
Sir,

Your much oblige! freind &

servant,

John Davenporte.
Newhaven, the 19th day
POSTSCRIPT.

of the 6th nioneth, 1659.

Sir,

Because

cannot, by a jjencile,

must, under a

vaile,

represent unto you


tions
son,

my

wifes deepe sense of your tender affec-

& greate love towards her, expressed in your letter to my and wherein you was pleased to shew how the report of her least illnes affected yoii. For I want words to declare her
;

transcendant thanckfulnes for the same. Concerning Mr. Yale she hath treated with hii;|i as effectually as she could, & moi'e fully than she would, if it had been for her selfe, for you having the linnen, & pewter, & cushions

urging the full consent of his mother, under her hand. But to that he replyed that his mother was now dead, & so her act was void, & that he is bound to attend his order, which is to send them to England. My wife told him that she did not doubt that, if Mrs. Hannah knew it, she would consent. Biit he stil insisted in his want of power to doe it. The chayres & stools, of which yoii spake, Mr. Yale is willing to sel. If Mrs. Winthrope please to have them, my wife would doe her indeavour to answer her desire therein, upon notice from you. My wife thincks you had better buy new linnen in England, & you will there have better pennj'worths for Mr. Newman, our Govei-nour, hath now a siiite for a table cloath, a dozen of diaper napkins & a towel, of Dammask fashion, for 26 shillings. We long to heare of Mi's. Winthropes perfect recovery, <fc of perfect health restored to your familie quod facit Deus 1
; ;

Etiuui uUjue eibtm vale.

Tuissimus,
Indorsed by John Wiuthrop, jim.,
'

J.

D.

Mr. Davenport

reo

Aug

20."

LETTER TO JOHN WINTHROP,

JR.

887
JR.
(p. 511.)

JOHN DAVENPORT TO JOHN WINTHROP,


To
ihe

Wujht

WorshipfuU

d'

worthih/

Ilonnnred John

Winilirope,

Esqr. Governonr of Connedacttie


ford.

Coloriie, these

present at

Hart-

Honoured
by the same

Sir,

received,
I

by Mr. Goodwin, the

Intelli

gences from England, which


liand.

now retnrne, with manj' thancks,


by

Here

is

a report brought from Vii'ginia,

a ship lately arrived there from England, in 5 weekes, that the

doe no more credit then Mnnkes being in London, & sole General, hy Lamberts and Fleetewoodes laying downe theyre commissions, or the establishment of the presbyterian way. All which, I hope, with many other rnmors,
of Scots
is

King

in

London, which

that report of the Quakers, concerning General

will be

found not

tnie, in siindry particulars,

when we
shi^j

shall re-

at Cape Anne, Lieutenant Cooke speakes of another also, at Cape Codd, which, I thinck, is that of which sister Atwater wi'ote. Major Hawthorne & your brother, Mr. Richards, went out of this harbour, in the evening after the fith day, towards Road Island, purposing to travaile, by land from thence to Boston. The Dutch Governour comjjlemented with them, in liberal intertainment but, for the principal buisenes about which they came, he denied to give them libertj' of passing up the river, alleadging that it would cost him his head, if he should permit that; & some of the Dutch traders threatened that themselves would cut off his head, if he should grant that unto the English yet he offered them, to refer the whoU matter to England ct Holland, with acquiescence in theyre determination which ourfreindes refused, iirging theyre line; against which the Dutch Governour demanded, why thej^ had not claimed it all this while? They answered, that they finde more neede of it now than formerly. He pleaded long possession. They replyed that the English had right to Hudsons River before them, & proved it more largeThe issue is, ihey parted placidely that I can now declare. ly, and our freinds are to make theyre report to the General Court, at Boston. In conclusion, they told them that they should returne again, towards the end of summer. I perceive, if that buisines jjroceedes, as Major Hawtherne thincks it will.

ceive our letters from England.

Besides that

388
all

the Colonies are likely to be ingaged in a warr with the

Dutch.

Concerning what you are pleased

to

propound,

I shall

take the 1st opportunitie to speake with the Townesmen, that


a good part of that

which they are

to paie,

in reference to the

I could wish that you had expressed quantum. I understand, by Mr. Goodwin, that his house is hyred for you to dwell in. The courses that the General Court take about Mi-. Hoi3kins his legacie seeme to me very strange, viz that they would know what portion of it they shall have, & yet hinder his Trustees from receiving what belongs to that estate, hy sequestracions,one after another, whereby the estate will suffer no small loss, some being ready to deliver up what they had purchased, because they will not have a litigious title, & one hath waved his bargaine, upon that account others, who were readj' to have paid what they owe to the estate, now refuse to paye, pretending the Courts order, whereby, when the sequestracion shall be taken oft", there is danger that, through loss of the season, when they were prepared to paye, there will be a loss of the payment itselfe, the debtours pleading theyre dissabilitie now. And the pretence whereupon the sequestracion is the 2d time laid on, is, that the Inventor}' is not given in, whereas some of the Court, it seemes, knew that it was left with our Atturneies in Hartford, by Capt. CuUick, with a trust to be by them presented to the Court, which thej' also acknowledge, & take the blame wholly upon themselves. But I doe not love contenWe have agreed in the answer, which I send inclosed. tions. Mj'ne, my wifes, & sons humble services being presented to yourselfe & Mrs. Winthrope, with our affectionate salutacions to your daughters, with my hearty desires & prayers continued for an abundant blessing from heaven upon you boath, & all
:
:

house, be paide, according to your order, to Mr. Yale.

yours, in N. E.

&

Old.

I rest
etc,

Yours ever obliged,

John Davenporte.
Newhaven, the 20th
Sir,
d. of

the 2d m. 1660.

You may

please to communicate the inclosed to the


" Mr. Davenport about Mr. Hopkins

General Court, or theyre Committee, as our joynt answer.


Indorsed by John WinthroiJ, jun.,
legacy."

LETTERS TO JOHN WINTHROP,

JR.

389
JR.
(p. 515.)

JOHN DAVENPORT TO JOHN WINTHROP,


Honoured
Sir,

Having

so sure a conveyance,

returne

the inclosed, with acknowledgment of my very greate obligement imto you, for your labor of love, in piatting such a taske
selfe, at such a time, as the transcribing of the weekely intelligence from the 3d to 10th of the 3d m., and in gratifying mee, so unworthy, with the perusal of it, whereby I iinderstand the state of the laublick, in our deare native countrie, and doe wish that sundrie of our relations & freinds were well settled in these ends of the earth. I heare nothing yet concerning Capt Pierse his arrival, which I much wonder at, for I perceive that he hath bene about a quarter of an yeare in I wish that he be safe. I am in expectacion of his voyadge. our Teacher's returne, with bro: Rutherford, every houre. In the letter which Mr. Richards conveyed to me from him (for which I retiirne hearty thancks to him, & for his kinde accejitance of such intertainmentas we could make, on the suddaine, with mj' resalutations to them boath) brother Streete reporteth a strange passage which he heard at Boston, which, it may be, will minister some matter of laughter iinto you, as it doth of indignation unto me. It is this. A comjoany being mett some where in England (he thincks thSy were 5th monarchy men) and Sir Henry Vane with them, it was propounded that, seing Christ was not yet come, they should thinck of some one that hould be cheife among them, til he shall come, and that be mg consented to, it was considered whom they should choose, and it was concluded, with common consent. Sir Hen: Vaine thereupon onerose up with a viol of oile, which he poured on Sir Hen Vaines head, and called him King of Jerusalem. Men, it seemes, are serious about setSit fides penes Auihorem. ting lip Kings our comfort is, that the Lord raigneth, and his counsels shall stand. In rightly obeying this King we shall become faithful to whatsoever powers he settes over us. We have much sicknes among us, both in the farmes & towne, by the afflicting hand of the Most High renued upon us, Some whoU families & sundry particular jjerrighteously.
: : ;

upon your

sons.

Be pleased
.'50

to present

myne,

my

jvifes

and sons humble

ser-

vices, together with

your

selfe, to

Mrs. Winthrope, and our re-

390
spectful, affectionate

APPENDIX.
salutations,

and tbancks

to

Mr.
!

&

Mrs.

Kicbards.
I rest,

The Lord Jesus dwell with you in peace


Sir,

In

whom

Yours exceedingly obliged,

JoHX Davenporte.
Newhaven, the
Istd. of the 6tb m. 1660.

JOHN DAVENPOET TO JOHN WINTHROP,


To
(he

JE.

(p.

519.)

Bl(jht

Worshipfull John

Whdhrope,

Esqr.,

Governour of

(Jonnedacule, these present in Hartford.

Honoured
largely to
will permit.

Sir, It was in my purpose to have written more you then the hast of this unexpected sad occasion

Therefore, respiting that to a

fitter

season, I shall

limit this to the present case,


it

was told

my

which you will find reported, as son, by the sickmans wife, Avho is Joseph & Tim-

othy Nasbes owne sister, a member of our church, & now in danger to be left a yong widow, with sundry small children, if

God

take away her husband, a member also of our church, called Talmage. * Be pleased to take his case into your serious consideration. And the Lord guide you to prasscribe what he will bless, for the helpe & recovery of him, upon whom a whoU
familie dependes for daily bread, as the onely instrument in

Gods hand for theyre outward subsistence; & who is approved in the church, as a man fearing God and faithfulin all his dealings with men My wi/e &. son joyne with me in presenting our humble services to your selfe & Mrs. Winthrope, with our affectionate salutations to yours with our desire that you would desist from your purposed voiage forEngland, at least, for this f
! ;

* Robert Talmage of New Haven, Nash. ^Savage's Geneal. Did.

who

niarried Sarah, daughter of

Thomas

t This letter was written on the 16th of .Tune, nine days after the General Court, at Hartford, had voted .'500 to defray the Governor's expenses " in reference to his intended voyage to England, if his purpose and resolution

continue to go, in regard this court hath made choice of his worship an agent to further our welfare, in presenting our Address and Petition to the King's Majesty, and to improve his abilities and procm-e us a
still

do

to be

LETTER TO ELIZABETH WINTHROP,


^eare

391

for simdrie reasons,

rant time, at present, to offer

which to me seeme weighty, but I them to your consideracion.

The Lord guide j'ou in such resolucion


,s

&

acting in this matter


!

may be

safest for

your

selfe,

&

best for your familie, &c

In

vhom I

rest.

Sir,

Yours obliged,

John Davenport.
^EWHAVEN, the 16th of the 4th m. 1661.
Indorsed by John Winthrop, jun., " Mr. Davenport, about
iiaKS

Goodman

Tal-

sickness."

rOHN DAVENPORT TO ELIZABETH WINTHEOP.


Fn his
leave this

(p. 520.)

Honoured freind Mrs. Winthrop, these present in Boston ; or letter, icith the packet, at Mr. Amos Richardsons, merchant in Boston, to he delivered to her hands with safety &

speed.

Honoured Mrs. Wintheope, This


ffith

is

onely to salute you,

due respect

&

sincere affection, as one to

whom

confess

ny selfe to be exceedingly obliged, and to cover the inclosed, rom your precious husband, that it may come safe to your lands, by this our approved freind, CaiJt. Clarke, who, I
inow, will speedily deliver
it

to yourself.

From one passage


he longed, in might take the

n your worthy husbands


printer,

letter,

I jjerceive that

for the returne of the spring,

that he

opportunitie of returning vmto you, which confirmes my what Capt. Seely reportes, that we may expect his reAirne, by the will & blessing of God, some time the next
irst
Deliefe of

iioneth.
jvith

The goodLord,whom windes& sea obey, fill his sailes & carrie him & his companie, as upon agles wings, farr above the reach of all hurtfull dangers, & make
favourable windes,

ais
ily,

returne full of comforts

&

to

many

others, for

& blessings to you & and your famwhose good he hath allwaies bene &
time
!

ready to improve his precious talents

If Capt. Clarke

Patent," kc.Pub. Rec. of Conn., i. 369. Winthrop sailed not long after on this mission. He had left Connecticut as early as July, as appears by a letter

of William Leete, dated Aug.

(i,

1661.

392
returne,

by the way
letter,

of Hartford, to Boston,

lie

will bring

you
will

another

of later date, inclosed to Mr.

Willis.

You

also receive

when you have

from me, by this bearer, bookes of newes, which, perused, he desires they might be sent to Mr.

Stone or Mr. "Willis, for freinds there to see. Be pleased to present my respectful salutacions to Honoured Mr. Symons & his wife, to your son and daughter Newman, & to your daughter,

Mrs. Lucie,

you

& to all yours. The Lord Jesus & them in mercy & peace & loving kindnesses
Yours exceedingly obliged,

dwell with
!

In

whom

I rest

John Davexpoet.

My wife & son jiresent theyre humble service to yourselfe, with salutacions to all yours, affectionately.

H. the 14th day of the 2d moneth, called April, 1662.

Indorsed by John Winthrop, juu., "Mr. Davenijort, 1662."

JOHN DAVENPORT TO JOHN WINTHKOP,


To
the

JE.

(p. 529.)

Honorable John Wlnihrop, Esqr. Governour of Connedeeute, these present with speed, at his house in Hartford, with the packet.

HoNOE.^BLE SiE,
turne

Tliesc
for

few

lines,

in the midst of sundrj'

tend onely to reyour kinde letter, & to usher the packet of intelligences which I received from London, by Capt. Martin, which, I thinck, you will willingly peruse, if you have not seen them alreadie. I thought to have proposed a motion for your wrighting to the Governour of Mattachusets, that a day might be agreed upon, wherein all N. E. might, with one accord, bewaile the burning k devastacion of that greate citie ;* but even now, an order is come to us from the Court for a fast to be kept publickly in these churches, on the 1st Wednesday in April, which will be the next 4th day. The warning is too short for so sollemne & extraordinary a duetie
at present,

distracting buisenesses

upon me,

many thancks

The writer alludes

to the great fire of

London, wliich occurred in Sep-

tember of the preceding year.

LETTER TO JOHN WaNTHROP,


yet

JR.

393
to

we purpose

to obeie

it,

as

it

may

please

God

inable.

also thought to have

added some thing concerning the Synod;

whereunto I suspect that we are not regularly & orderly called, weight by the Courts order, for many reasons which are of things, all in attended order due see a to desire with me, who for nedum in so weighty affaires. But I shall suppress that,
the present,

& also our just greivance for the ill usage of the messengers sent from these churches to enquire of the causes Hartford, to the of that scandalous division in the church at end that we might consider fit expedients for the quenching among them, as fire, & for the settling of trueth & peace
of that

we

of churches. are bound to endeavour by the communion sending This some of the Magistrates laboured to hinder, by them reproving &by them, before them convent to the Marshal The cheife actors herein were [the 2 before many witnesses.

Allins

&

might add 'also a wrong done to this by an unrighteous order (as the Asdeclared it to be in sistants & Deputies from these Townships them to Mr. Eospaid by be to rate for a the Court at Hartford,) But I am loath to trouble you with complaints of things setor. High done in your absence, & without your consent. To the Most Sir, we commend our cause & case. For yourselfe, Honorable

& Mr.

Talkot.]

the neighbour Townes,

am desirous to assure you that I am as heartily yours as ever, engagements for alwaies mindful of your love, & of my strong me & myne, the same, together with the effects thereof toward your selfe & to service our present who do joyntly & severally salntacions Mrs. Winthrop, with our affectionate & respectful
to all yours
;

praying that all blessings may be accumulated up-

on you & them, through Jesus Christ, in whom I rest Yours exceedingly obliged, Sir,

John Davenport, Senior.


N. H. the 27th
d.

of the 1st

m.

1067.
:

rec Indorsed by Jolm Wiuthrop, juu., "Mr. Davenport,

Mar

29

166T."

just seventy years of age, This last letter was written when its author was Cliurch in Boston. We here and about the time of his removal to the First work, ^i^l^ ''."' '^'^*];.^ts and tran^^^^^^^ riose the epistolary portion of this Vol. i. pp. 32b- s) ot the Latin tions (as given by Mather, in his Magnalia, signed by the other mimsleMer composed by Mr. Davenport and jointly Rev. John Dury, 'or the famous the to 1660 (about ters of the colonj. Churches of the reformaUon. restoring of cn,n,/,-o, among the divided
)

394

APPENDIX.

JOHN DAVENPOKT TO EEV. JOHN DURY.


[extract. ]

" Flagrante Schismntis Tncendio, Ecdes'ms, quas oporiehat Arctissimo Pads ei Uniiatis Vinculo Deo Lacerabat Erinnys usque
;

ColUgari, mlseras in sectas Invisa

munes Hostes opem

conferrent,
;

iticas invicem aguni

adeo ut qui muhiom contra comproh dolor ! conceriationes MidianSicut enim Juvenes, quos ad Dimicandum quo-

Abnerus Provocabat,

rundam
Ijene

Viiio,

se muiuis Vulneribus Confecerunl; sic, qui partes potius aguni male Disputantium,
Lites,

quam
Schis-

Evangelizantium, Jurgia,

Ammorum

Divortia,

mataet Scandala, inEcclesiis Evangelicis Suhoriuntur,non sine gravi Lifirmorum Offendiculo, nee sine summo bonorum omnium Mcerore,
ae Inimicorum Evangeliccn Veritntis Oblectamento." " While the fire o{ schism has been raging, the hateful fury has miserably torn to pieces the churches that should have been held together in the strictest bonds of love and unity inso;

mutual help against the fallen upon one another, as in the day of Midian. As the young men, upon the provocation of Abner, wounded one another to death thus, by the fault of some, who do the part rather of bad loranglers than of good preachers, there do arise in the reformed churches those broils, and strifes, and animosities, and schisms, and scandals, which offend the weak and afflict the good, and are no little satisfaction to the enemies of gospel-truth."
for
;

much

that they

who should have united common enemy, alas, have even

-"

Nunc
tot

Vero,

Postquam Gustos

Israelis,

Deus

Pacis, dedit in
istis

Medicinam faciendam esse, Xecessarium Judicarint, En! Bonorum omnium Animi, in Spem eredi, Malorum istorum Saluiarem flausulam Expectant, et Votis intimis, Palrern Misericordiarum Vobiscum invocani, ut Spiritus sui

Corda

Ecclesiarum ei Magistmtuum, id Vulneribus

Gratia,

aciiones

Servorum Suorum

dirigere,

Secundum Verbum Suum, Consilia et ad Sancti No^ninis Sui Gloriam

dignetur."

" But now that the 'Keeper of Israel,' the 'God of peace,' hath put it into the hearts of many churches and rulers, to ap-

prehend it necessary that a cure should be sought for these wounds, behold the minds of all good men do with a raised hope expect an happy close of these mischiefs and with most
!

"

LETTER TO KEV. JOHN DURY.

395

hearty prayer do beseech the Father of Mercies, that he wouhl,

by the grace
his

of his SiJirit, according to his word, please to di-

rect the counsels

and actions of his servants,

for the glory of

own holy name."


nofi

" Rede qKidemJevisii, Reverende Fraler Dtira?e, quod

etiam

hi

eodem Vobiscum Corpore, Sub eodem Vapite Jesu Vhrlsto, Constihdos, ad I^^egotmm hoc, in Scmriormn Communione Promovendmv, fraterne invitasti."

reverend hroiher [Durj-,] in that manner, imto the promoting of this affair, in the communion of sainis invited us, who belong to the same mystical body with your selves, under one head, our Lord
ri>,'ht

"You have done

well,

you have,

after a brotherly

Jesus Christ."
" Dlca Verv non
nil est

Orthodoxis

f/npin^efidw, quasi Opiatissimc'

Paci, quce inter Sclssas Evangelicas Ecclesias qumritur, OJfenel

diculum posuerint

remoram,

qui. Xecessltate Poslulante, en utun-

iur Libertale Eefutandi Errores,

quam Pax non dehci

bnpedire

ade-

oque sno Exemplo futuram pacem pTCBmunlunt, a


posUis."

Vltiis

InExcessu.

" Quippe quod sincere de Errorlbus Judicare, et Errores Tolerare, Ulrinnque Judlcamus esse ApostoUcce Bocirinw Gonsonum. Toleratio Vero Frcdrum Infirmorum, non debet esse adsque Eedargutione, Bed tantum absque Eeiamen
In

Fratrlhus Infirmis

jectione."

"Nevertheless,
desired so

'tis

not to be
if

against the oiihodox, as

made an article of complaint they would hinder or delay the peace


it,

much among

the reformed churches, because thej^ do,


iise

as necessity shall call for

that liberty of refitting errors,


;

which peace ought to be no bar unto and by their example, would rescue the future peace from the extremes wherewith it would be rendred faulty." "For we reckon that as well to judge what things are errors, as to bear with such errors in weaker brethren, are both of them agreeable to what we have been taught by the apostles. The toleration of our erroneous brethren shoiild not be without rebuking, but
rejecting of
it

should be without

those brethren.

396

APPENDIX.

LIST OF WRITINGS OF REV. JOHN DAVENPORT.


F. B. Dexter, (recently elected to'the Larnard Professorship of American History in Yale College) in his PajDer, now piiblished in the II Vol. of Collections, of the New Haven Colony His. Society, (1877,) pp. 234-238,
list

has given a very carefully prepared

John Dayenport, with the dates of composition, (or of publication where the former date could not be ascertained, ) and adding also the whereabouts of the copies of his printed works so far as known by him in which great
of the writings of

completeness has been attained. We here copy (with slight changes or additions, ) the list as thus given bj' Prof. Dexter, with the initials used, which refer to the following libraries A. A. S., American Antiqiiarian Society Bodl., Bodleian B. Publ., Boston Public Library B. Ath., Boston AthencBum G. B., the late George Brinley Br. Mus., British Museum H. M. D., the Rev. Henry M. Dexter, D. F. B. D., my own D. H. U., Harvard University M. H. S., Mass. Historical SociU. S., Library of Congress Y. C, ety Pr. Prince Librai'y Yale College. 1615-16. MS. volume of sermons preached at Hilton Cascle presented to Y. C. in 1794 by his great-great-grandson, Hon. James Davenport, of Stamford. Five MS. letters to the Rt. Hon. Sir Ed1624, Oct. -Nov.
: ; ;

ward Conway, Secretary


25, pp. 354-7, 371.

of State

in the Record office,

London.

Abstracts are given in Calendar of Domestic State Papers, 1623-

[Printed

(ip. jiart)

in present edition of the

Davenport Familj', pp. 56, 66.] Response in his examination for degree of B. 1625, May 18. in a MS. volume belonging to A. B. Davenport, D., at Oxford of Brooklyn, N. Y., and Stamford, Ct. [See pp. 69, 70 this vol.]
;

[1625-28?] In the last named volume, reply to Dr. Alexander Leighton, about Kneeling at the Sacrament also, other memoranda on conformity. [See pp. 73, 78, this volume. ] A circi lar letter, signed by him in conjunc1627, Mch. 2.
;

tion with

Thomas

Tayloi, Richard Sibbes, and William Gouge,


;

asking help for Palatinate Christians


Papers, 1627-28, p.
p. Iviii.
77,

in Calendar

Dom.

State
i,

and in Sibbes' Works,

ed. Grosart, v.

1627, Apr. 25.

An

Epistle to the Reader,

prefixed to

Henry

"O'EITINGS

OF JOHN DAVENPORT.

397

SciidcTer's

" Christian's Daily Walk."

[Printed in the Appenletters


;

dix of this work. ]


1628, Jan. 18.

to

The first of a series of nine manuscript Lady Mary Vere in the Br. Mus., Birch MSS., 4275
;

prin-

ted in the Davenport Genealogy, of 1851,


1628,

p. .312.
;

same ibid., 314. committee (of which he is the first named) of the "Company of the Massachusetts Bay," to John Endecott in Transactions A. A. S., iii, 30rt, 79,
30.

June

The second

letter to the

1629, Apr.-Jnne.

Two
;

letters

from

96.

1629.

"A

Royall Edict for Militarj' Exercises

published in

a Sermon preached to the Captabies and Gentlemen that exercise Armes in the Artillery Garden" June 23, 1629. Lond. 4. jjp.
viii, 27.

B. Ath.,

and

also

an imperfect copy in A. A.

8.

1629, Dec. 26.

The

third letter to

Lady

Vere.

[Found

at

page 360 of this volume. ] 1629. Preface, signed jointly by him and the Eev. Richard Sibbes, D.D., to the following works of the Kev. John Preston, D. D., late Master of Emmanuel College, Cambridge The New Covenant The Breast Plate of Faith and Love The Saints' Qualification. These prefaces are reprinted in Grosart's edition of Sibbes' Works, v. i, pp. xcv-c. His MS answer "to certaine obiections devis1631, Jan. 15. ed against him bj' Timothy Hood, sometyme his Curate ;" in Record Office, London. An abstract is given in the Calendar
: ; ;

Dom.

State Papers,

1629-31, p. 483.

[Found

in

Supplemen-

tary Edition of Davenport Family, (1876,) pp. 85-88.]


1633, Febr. 11.

An
3,

entry
Pt.

made
ch. 4.

in his "Great Bible," ac;

knowledging God's
in the Magnalia, Bk.

heliJ in
1,

the matter of the Feoffees


[See pp.
88,

quoted

89 of this vol-

ume. ]
[1633,

Nov.

?]

MS. on

"Christ's Church,

and

his

government

of

it ;"

in A. A. S.
;

The fourth letter to Lady Vere printed in [1633, Nov. ?] Davenport Genealogy of 1851, and pp. 96 to 110 of present volume. MS. letter to Sir Wm. Boswell, agent of the 1634, Mch. 18. King of England at the Hagiie in Br. Mus., Additional MSS.,
;

No. 6394.

p. 196. 51

398
1634,

APPENDIX.

[Dec]

"

IvstComplnt. against an Vnivst Doer.

"
. .

containing: a translation of a Latin letter written [in Febr.,1634]


to the Classis of

to the Elders of the English

"Certaine Instructions delivered Church," dated Apr. 28, 163-1 " The Greivances, and Complaints of the English Church in Amsterdam, Anno 1634. The 18. of October ;" and further remarks. This pamphlet, (4, pp. iii, 24) was published by W. Best, without the author's knowledge. In Br. Mus. andBodl.
;
: .

Amsterdam

1635, Jan.

"A

Protestation

Made and Published upon

oc-

casion of a i^amphlett, Intitled vnivst doer

..."

Eotterdam.
letter to

Complaint against an 4. pp. 7. In Kev. D. "WilIvst

liams's Libr.,

London.

Fifth 1635, July 21. volume, pp. 361, 366.]


1635, Dec. 15.

Lady

Yere.

[Found

in present

Sixth letter to the same.

Ibid, pp. 366, 368,


;

1636 [Jan. ?] Seventh letter to the same [edition of 1851.] " Apologeticall Reply to an answer [by J. Paget] to 1636.

the unjust complaint of


pp. XX, 334.

W. B[est]. ..." Eotterdam. 4"^. In Br. Mus., BodL, Pr., and G. B. 1638, Mch. 12. Letter (in his hand, but signed also by Theophilus Eaton) to the Governor, Deputy, and Assistants of Massachusetts. Printed in Collections of Mass. Hist. Soc, 3d Series, vol. 3, p. 165, in Savage's 2d ed. of Winthrop's Joiirnal, i, 484,
and in Davenport Geneal., [edition
[1638-9?]
1851,] p. 323.

"Discoiirse about Civil

Government

in a

New

Plantation whose Design is Eeligion." Cambridge, New Eng4. pp. 24. land. "In the Title page whereof, the 1663, Name of Mr. Cotton, is, by Mistake, put for that of Mr. Daven-

portr

(Magnalia, Bk.

3,

Ath., H. U.,

and G.

B.

In Pr., M. H. S., B. Pt. 1, Ch. 4.) [A copy of this small tract, of 24 pages,
sale

brought
Library.

$45,

at the recent

(in N.

Y.

of

the Menzies'

1639. "An Answer of the Elders of the severall Churches in New England unto Nine Positions, sent over to them (by di." This was printed as pages vers Ministers in England) 49-78 of a volume entitled " Chiirch-Government and Church." London: 1643. 4. Pr. A. A. S., Covenant discussed
. . . .

U.

S.,

and

F. B. D.

[1639,

Aug. 22 V]

"A

[See pp. 133-135 of present edition.] Profession of Faith, made at his ad-

WRITINGS OF JOHN DAVENPORT.

399

mission into one of the Churches of God in New England. " I have a copy printed as pages 34-40 of John Cotton's " Covenant 4. The same, i^rinted of Gods free Grace." London, 16-41. 4^. pp. 8,) is in Br. Mus., (London, 1642. separately. Bodl., U. S., H. M. D., the library of the late Eev. Horace Bushnell, D. D., and G. B. Br. Mus. and B. Publ. have it, appended to Cotton, as above, 1645. Eeprinted with Preface, by the Rev. Dr. Bacon, New Haven. 1853. 12. Eighth letter to Lady Vere printed in N. 1639, Sept. 28.
;

and Geneal. Register, ix, 149. Also in present edition of Davenjjort History and Genealogy, pp. 369, 370. Remarks at the trial of Mrs. Eaton in the 1644, Aug. 14. records of the New Haven Church, and printed in Bacon's
E. Hist,
;

Hist. Discourses, 297.

Ninth Letter to Lady Vere. " The Knowledge of Christ Indispensably required of all men that would be saved ..." A volume of sermons, from Acts ii, 36, with the running-title, "The True Messias or Crucified Jesus the Christ." London. 1653. 4.
1647, Nov. 13.
[1648, or earlier.]

pp.
S.,

vi, 87.

In Br. Miis., Bodl., Univ. of Aberdeen, A. A.


B.

S.,

U.

and G.
:

[1649?]
ate

MS.

letter to the Rev.

Charles Chauncy, of Scitu-

no. 21 of pt. 2 of the Cotton Pai^ers in Pr.


;

Letter to the Rev. John Cotton, of Boston 1650, May 6. printed in Davenport Genealogy, [1851,] 343. "The Power of Congregational Churches Asserted [1652?] " and Vindicated In answer to a treatise of Mr. J. Paget.
;
.

London.
163.]

1672.

16. pp.
S.,

x,

179 [or,

by
S.,

correct numeration,

In Pr., M. H.

H. U., A. A.
F. B. D.

Amer. Congregational

Association, H.
1653, Aug. 20. In Bacon, 366. 1653, Aug. 25.

M.

D.,

and

Letter to John Winthrop, of

New London.
:

MS.

letter to Mrs.
i,

in Mather Papers, vol.


Coll., xxxviii, 546,
p. 371.]

no. 14,

in Pr.

Sarah Cotton, of Boston Printed in M. H. S.

[and in present edition of Daveni^ort Family


Letter to
6.

1655.

Mch.

10.

J.

Winthrop.

In Bacon, 367, and

M. H.

S. Coll.,

XXX,

1655, Apr.

14-19.

Letter to the same.


8.

In Bacon, 369, and

M. H.

S. Coll.,

XXX,

400
1655,

July

6.

Letter to the same. Letter to the sauae.


S. Coll.,

In Bacon, 370, and M. H.


In Davenport Genealo-

S. Coll., XXX, 11.

1655, Nov. 22.


gy, 346,

and M. H.
xxx, 14.

xxx, 12.

1655, Nov. 30.

Letter to the same.

In Bacon, 371, and M.

H.

S. Coll.,

Catechisme containing the Chief By Davenport, and his assis16-. tant in the ministry, William Hooke. London, 1659. pp.62. In Br. Mus. and Y. C. Eeprinted (with Davenport's "Profession of Faith,") New Haven, 1853. 12. 1656, July 131658, Aug. 8. MS. outlines of sermons in
[1656,

or earlier.]

"A

Heads

of Christian Religion."

volume of 312 pages, 12, in Y. C. 1658. Letter to the Church in Wethersfield.


Soc. Coil,
1658.
ii,

In Conn. Hist.

88.
is

by Wood (Athena? Oxonienses, ed. Bliss, iii, hand in writing the life of Mr. John Cotton published by John Norton." Letter to J. Winthrop. 1658, July 20. In Bacon, 372, and M. H. S. Coll., xxx, 19. 1658, Aug. 4. Letter to the same. In Bacon, 373, and M. H,

He

said

891,) to have "had' a considerable


. .

8.

ColL, xxx, 21.


1658, Oct. 22. 1G59, Febr. 28.

Letter to the same.

In Bacon, 375,

Remarks
Letter to

at a

town meeting, qiioted from


In Bacon, 375, and

the Record bj' Bacon, 119.


1659.

Mch.

18.

J.

Winthrop.

M. H.

S. Coll.,

xxx, 23.

1659, Apr. 15.

Letter to the same.

1659, Sept. 28.

Letter to the same.


Letter to the same.

In Bacon, 377. In Bacon, 378, and M. In Bacon, 379, and M. In Davenport Geneal.,
381,

H. H.

S. Coll.,

xxx, 25.

1660, Febr. 22.


S. Coll.,

xxx, 29.

1060, Miirch 29.


379,

Letter to the same.


xxx, 30.

and M. H.
5.

S. Coll.,

1660, Apr.
S. Coll.,

Letter to the same.

In Bacon,

and M. H,

xxx, 31.

1660, Apr. 13.

Letter to the same.


Letter of

In Bacon, 382, and M.

H.

S. Coll.,

xxx, 33.
4,

1660,

June

resignation of trusteeshii) of the

WRITINGS OF JOHN DAVENPORT.

401

3opkins Fi;nil, addressed to the General Court of New Haven. ;n Trumlmll's Hist, of Conn., 2d ed., i, 532. In M. H. S. Coll.. Letter to J. Wintlirop. 1660, July 20.
txx. 34.

16G0, Aug.
!18ol,) 350,

11.

Letter to the same.


S. Coll..

In Davenport Geneal.,

and M. H.

xxx. 37.

1660, Oct. 17.


;1851,) 353,

Letter to J. Winthrop. In Davenport Geneal.,

andM.

H.

S. Coll.,

xxx, 42.

1660, Nov. 27.

Letter to the same.

In Bacon, 385. and M.

H. S. Coll., xxx, 44.

[1660

?]

tVIagnalia,
also, S.

Latin letter to the Rev. John Dury. Extracts in the See, iii, pt. i, ch. 4, [and present vol. p. 394.] Mather's Apology for the Liberties of the Churches, p.
Bk.
19.

166.

1661,

Aug.

Letter to Sir

Thomas Temple.
S.
. . .

In Daven-

port Geneal., [1851,] 356, and M. H.


1661.

Coll., xxviii, 327.

"The

Saint's

Anchor Hold

Sundry Sermons."

12. pp. viii, 231. In Br. Mus., Pr., G. B., Library A of the Rev. Dr. Bacon, Library of Lane Theol. Seminary. portion of this is given in Davenport Geneal., 1851, pp. 293-310.

Loudon.

1662,

July.

Letters to

xxxviii, 198, 192, 181

Wm. Goffe. In M. H. S. [and Davenport Genealogy, 1876.]


of

Coll.,

1662, Nov,

5.
;

Answer of the Freemen


believed to
ed.,
i,

New Haven Colony


Davenport.
In

to Connecticut

be written by
515.

Trumbull's Conn., 2d
1663,

March

23.
S.

Letter to the Rev. John Cotton, of Ply-

mouth. In M. H.
1663,

Colh. xxxviii, 547, [and present vol. p. 372.]

May

6.
i,

A
517.

second

letter

to Connecticut.

In Trum.,

bull's Conn.,

1663.

"Another Essay
I.

for Investigation

of the Truth,

concerning,

The

Siibject of Baptism.

II.

tion of Churches." Cambridge, N. E. 4. pp. face (pp. xvi) is by Increase Mather pp. 65-71 are tilled
;

The Consociaxvi. 71. The Preby


Br.

'Considerations

and G.
1664.

B.

by the Rev. Nicholas Street." In Imperfect copies in H. U. and H. M. D.


.

Mus.
In

A MS. A

" Vindication " of the last

named Essay.

the library of the late Rev. W. B. Sprague, D.D.,

of Flushing,

copy is in A. A. S. March. "New Haven's Case Stated." Records printed in Bacon, 359.
N. Y.
1664.
;

In N. H. MS.

402
1664,

APPENDIX.
Dec.
i,

14.

A
The

third from N.
final letter to

H. Colony to Conn.
ibid,

In

Trumbull,
1665,

526.
5.

16G5, Jan.

Conn.

i,

528.

June

24.

Letter to Maj. Gen.

John Leverett,

of Boston.

In Hutchinson's Collections, 392. 1665, Nov. 2. MS. letter to AVilliam Goodwin, of Hadley
no.
o5':(

in vol.

of ]\Iather Papers, in Pr.

printed (in part) in

M. H.

S. Coll., xxxviii, 126. 10.

1666, Apr.

Letter to

J.

Wiuthrop.
ibid.,

In M.

H.

S.

Coll..

XXX, 58.
1666,

June

14.

Letter to the same

xxx, 58.
xi.

1667, Sept. 18.

"Epistle to the Eeader," pp.

prefixed to

Increase Mathers
1669.

"Mystery of

Israel's Salvation."

London,

In B. Publ., G. B., P. B. D. 1668, Apr. 18. Transfer of the Hopkins Fund to the General Court of Conn. in MS. Records of N. H. Hopkins Grammar
16.
;

School, p.

4.

1669, May. Mass. Election Sermon, from .II. Sam., Published, but no copy now known to be extant.
J

xxiii, 3.

669.

" God's Call to His People to

Turn unto Him."

Cam. .

bridge, England, 4. pp. 27. In Bodl., B. Publ., and G. B. In 1687 appeared a folio sheet of "Proposals for Printing

an Exposition of the whole Book of Canticles by the late John Davenport." A copy is in Br. Mus. Wood says that the MS. was 100 sheets, but that the intending publisher died be.
.

fore the design

was carried

out.
S.,

In the MS. Winthrop Papers of M. H. unprinted letters of Davenport.

are

more than

fifty

404

APPENDIX.

THE DAVENPORT TANKAKD.

This Taukard, of solid beateu Silver, and well preserved, belonged to Kev.

John Davenport, and, without dotibt, was brought over by him in " the good ship Hector," Capt. Femes, iu 1637. It descended to his grandson, the Rev. John Davenport, of Stamford, when it passed to his daughter Sarah, (No.
7.5,)

who married

Rev. Dr. Wheelock,


it

After being with her des-

was bought of the family of her grandson, Kev. William Patton, D.D., of Newport, R. I., by Hon. John Davenport. (No. 120,) of Stamford, and given by him to his grandson, John S. Davenport, (No. 311.) the xJresent owner.

cendants, for two generations,

The family Coat of Ai-ms, probably engraved on it in London, apjiears ou the tomb-stone of both the Stamford minister, and also of Sarah Wheelock, as confirmed to Henry Davenport, (No. 58,) the father of John, by Leuuard and Vincent, at the Herald's Visitation, in 1(11',).
The Crest resembles that
of a wolf's head, and, probably like the felon
Crest, has reference to the family rights for the clearance of wolves

and robVivian

bers from the forests of Leek and Macclesfield, granted,

bj- charter, to

de Davoni5ort,

(ot

the 5th generation,) six hundred and

fifty

years ago.

ADDENDA.
The
foiand
14tli

of May, (in the midst of the printing of this volume,

me

in receipt of a letter from Mr.

Wm.

Geo. Fretton, an

historian and antiquary of Coventry, containing


al

some addition-

information gathered from the records of that ancient city too valuable to be omitted in this work.* In it he sends a fac-

John,) as affixed

Henry Davenport, (the father of Rev. an act of Leet, Oct. 12, 1622 also one of Christopher Davenport, from a deed dated March 20, 1576 ^just 300 years from the date of our present undertaking. It may here be remarked that the name is frequently found in ancient documents, as also in the Calendar of State pa^iers, as Dami^ort, but always indexed as spelled in the usual form. Kev. John Davenport was accustomed to write his name with a final e. "We are thus enabled to account, somewhat, for the difference in the autograph, here given, of Christopher Davenport, which is undoubtedly that of the Mayor of 1602, and the one shown on the outline engraving facing page 41, which was some 46 years later. The reader can judge how much that period had improved both his orthography and chirogphy. We here quote from the letter of Mr. Fretton " This portrait of Davenport is in the Council Chamber with that of other benefactors of the city. His will is dated 1627, and it was proved in 1629.t The copy I sent you was taken from a
simile of the aiitograph of
to
;

* Mr. Fretton succeeded his father as Master of one of the Free Schools,

founded by Mrs. Katherine Bayley, who died in 1730, and was buried in the Archdeacon's Chapel of Trinity Church, near where is noted the burial of Philemon Holland.
of Coventry,

tThis date corrects the conclusion, on page 39, that Christopher Davenport in the contest lor the removal of the high altar piece, in the Church of the Holy Trinity; and, as herein shown, the name

may have been engaged


of

Henry appears
52

a few years after on the records of St. Michael's Chvirch.

406

ADDENDA.

drawing by Nickson, in the Cogmbe Collection. The name of Henry Davenjjort appears as a Chiirchwarden at St. Miehrel's Church in 1642 the only instance I have met with the name among the wardens of that Church. " Among the monuments in the Treasury of St. Mary's Hall,
;

is

a deed of acquittance from Christopher Davenport.of Covento the

try,

Mayor and Corporation


bj^

in

payment

of a legacy of

William Hopkins, of the same citie, drapei-, deceased. Dated 20th March 1576, with wafer seal monogram, signed 'p'nie.

200, given to Agnes his wife

Q^^yj/

"In one

of the Maniiscript

Annals of the

city is the

follow-

ing interesting entry in reference to Christojiher Davenport, (I.) In this year was a '(1598.) Roger Clark, Draper, Mayor.

between the Commonalty and the masters about Clark being Mayor, rose from the Jayle, came to St. Mary's Hall and ' would have gone into the Council House, but the Commonal'ty would have thrust him down St. Mary's Hall stairs, then he went home to his own house, but the People took the Sword frqm him, and said he should not have it he and the masters 'would have had Mr. Damport, but the Commonalty would 'have Mr. Richard Smith, and so they Rad, and kept out Mr. 'Damport 3 choise days longer,* but Mr. Smith did little good for their good will that strove for him. Mr. Dampoit was a good man to the Commonalty.' "In reference to the School, said to have been founded by DaveniDort, (the account of which I gave you down to the Commissioners report,) I have gleaned further information. [See p, The Commissioners having recommended that the fund 41.] should be applied to the education of poor children, as originally intended, a master was aj^pointed in 1834. who was, at
'great strife

'the chusing of the Mayor, Insomiich that Mr.


'

'

'

'

'

'

* This

means

3 election days,

or three years' dehiy,

which would have

niade his election in IGOl.

407
that time one of the under masters of the Free School, and the Corporation paid him 15 a year in consideration thereof. In
1839, he resigned, and the then master of Bablake School was appointed, additional boys being placed on the foundation, for whose teaching the master received the stipend formerly paid

to the

Free School, but their clothing and maintenance were provided for by the Bablake Trustees. On the resignation of this master, a few years ago, the payment made to him was transferred to the Trustees of the Bablake School, and incorporated with the income of that foundation and it was probably this that gave your informant [in 1850,] the impression that Bablake School was founded by Davenport, which was in:

correct.

" On referring to the City Leet Book to-day, I met with the signatures of both Christopher and Henry Davenport [broththe former ers,] attached to an act of Leet passed Oct. 15, 1622
;

is

exactly like the one I sent

you

[see

page

47,]

and the

latter

is as

follows

'^mm?^
'I find,

Henry's signature,

many

times, in the books of the

Drapers' Company, of which he was a member, and his signature is as above. I also find that the second Christopher's name [brother of John,] is among the members of the Braidweavers'

and

Clothiers'

Company, and in

1642,

find the

name

of

Christopher and Henry Davenport, who paid for their freedoms (they were youwj men, and probably sons of one or

both of the elder Daveni^orts."*)


* I take these, persons last named, to be Henry son of Henry Davenijort. (Xo. 58,) given in one of the pedigrees as his only child by his second wife, Elizabeth the Henry by his first wife, (No. 63,) having died young and Christopher, to be the son of Edward, (No. 61,) and the cousin of Christo:

pher,

known

as Francis de St. Clai-e.

(See p. 42.)

408
work was in press, we have also received through W. Bromley Davenport, Esq., M. P. of Baginton Hall, Coventry, photographic views of Capesthorne and Wootton Halls, two of the ancient Cheshire estates of which Mr. Davenport is proprietor. The same gentleman has also kindly sent me copies of the report of the Commission appointed to examine his collection of Historical manuscripts, contained in Baginton and Capesthorne Halls, from which report we here give a few selections, taken somewhat at random.
While
this

the courtesj' of

The Manuscripts

of W. Beomley-Davenpoet, Esq., M. Baginton Hall, in WAE^VICKSHIEE.

P.,

at

There is a large wooden case containing many hundreds of ancient deeds relating to Warwickshire property, and with them
are a few Court Rolls of the Manor of Haseley. In one of the bundles of deeds was a paper indorsed, "John Weale's note of the grant to me of " Shakspeare's house, by goodwife Sharpe." The document is dated 4th of March 97, and is signed with "the mark of John Weale." It states that John Weale of Hatters, had " given, granted, and assigned to Job Throck" moi'ton of Haselej', in the county of Warwick, esquire, and to "his heirs forever, all his right, &c., in a certain cottage or "tenement, with the appurtences in Haseley aforesaid, wherein

" Will"i Shakespeare

now

dwelleth."

A hand

of the last centu;

ry has indorsed this

document

as of the year 1697

but the

writing and the

name

of the grantee

(Job Throckmorton)

prove that the document is of the year 1597. The name of Shakspeare was not uncommon in the county but, having regard to the Christian name and the date, an examination of the Court
;

Rolls for Haseley

may be suggested. In the libraiy are a good many veiy interesting Manuscripts, [We extract here and there.] Contemporary copy of Walter Travers's letter to the Lords of the Council, pi-aying that the Archbishop's pi-ohibition of his preaching at the Temple might be recalled. (The controversj' The letter has is mentioned in Izaak Walton's Life of Hooker.
been printed. Johannis Rainoldi ultima Berfins, "Moyses ex Aegypto
prtelectio

habita 5 Julii 1593.

filios Israelis ;" ends,

"

et

imperi-

409
tim in

omnem

reternitatem,

Amen."'

(Folio, 8 leaves,

closelj'

written.

A comparison of the translations of the Bible the vmlgar Latin and that which is out of the original Latin and Greek. Copy of letter from Charles 1 to John, Bishop of Worcester, V. C. of the University of Oxford (18 July 1G42,) giving thanks
;

for the loan of a very large si;m of

money in

a time of

imminent

necessity.

Francis Atterbury to "Wni. Bromley, Esq. (dated at Chelsea,)


gives the result of his researches for the discontinuance of bur-

gesses
1620.

thanks him for an extract from the Lord's Journals for


of Instructions for levying Ship money,
(S^o pages,

Copy

Whitehall, 12

Aug. 1635.
place

Chief Justice Heath, of what took on Strafford's impeachment, between the King, the Judges, and Bishops. Original holograph letter by Ben Jonson, addressed, " To my right worthy friend, Mr. Geo. Garrard," sending an Epitaph (of 14 lines, also holograph) on 'Sell Boulstred. The lady's ei^itaph is rather poor, although Jonson, by his letter, thought I do not tind it among his printed works, and therewell of it.
fore subjoin
it

Memorandum by Lord

Stay, view this stone, and if thou beest not such. Read here a little that thou may'st know much It covei-s first a Virgin, and then one That diirst be that in Court a virtu 'alone
;

To

an Epitaph. But she had more. She might have claym'd t' have made the Graces foi;r. Taught Pallas language, Cynthia modesty. As tit to have increas'd the harmony Of spheares, as light of Starres she was earth's Eye, The sole religious House and Votary, With rites not bound, but conscience. Would'st thou She was 'Sell Boulstred. In which name I call
till
:

all?

Up

so

much

truth as

could

liei'e*

ptirsue
true.

Might make the

fable of

Good Women
it

From Ben

Jonson's letter

would seem that he composed

and wrote the verses while Mr. (xarrard's man waited. Privy Seal Warrant by Anne, Queen of James 1, for John
* In the margiu Jonson proposes the word
it

in substitution for here.

410
Woolf
to

fumes, &c.

be apothecarie to provide sweet powders, waters, per26 Nov. 1604.

Copy
over) to

of Latin letter from George Louis

and Sophia

(of

Han-

Queen Anne.

1713.

Original letter from the Electress Sophia to Mr. Bromley, complimenting him on his son. (Indorsed Received 25 May,

1714.)
Folio,

one
2.

vol.

Copy

of the Parliament Rolls,

Edw.

3 to

Richai'd

Remembrances for order and decency be kept in the Upper House of Parliament by the Lords when his Majesty is not there. (15 leaves.) Folio. A collection of certain cases and proceedings at law from the death of King Charles 2 to the end of the reign of King William 3. Begins, "Mem. The "King died on the 6tli "King James was proclaimed of February, about | after 11.
Folio, 18th century.
to

The volume contains 92 leaves, and is, I think, written at 3." by James Wright, whose autograph is on the cover. Reports of proceedings in the Star Chamber, temp. Charles
1.

folio of 120 pages.

Copies of credentials to ambassadors to difl'erent States, temp. Queen Anne. Folio, 108 pages. Copies of letters by William Bromley while Secretary of State,
1713-14.
Folio,

several volumes.

letter

in one of

them

gives an account of

Queen Anne's

death.

and

about 30 quarto leaves, entitled Second Advice to the Freeholders of England. Pedigrees of Warwickshire and Leicestershire families. A folio volume of 58 leaves (from Sir George Naylor s library.
political tract of
last

Copy of Visitation of Staftbrshire, 1583. A folio volume, from Sir George Naylor's library. There are several MS. volumes by James Wright, a barrister of the Temple in the 16th and 18th centuries.
Miscellanea and Collectanea (biographical, genealogical,
erary and historical.)
lit-

volume. There is also a 12 volume of sermons by Abraham Wright whose appointment to preach at PauFs has been previously
folio

noticed.)

AlFKED

J.

HOKWOOD.

ADDENDA.

"ill

Thk Manuscripts

of W. Bkomley-Datenpoet, Esq., Capesthoknp:, in Cheshire.

1M. P.,

at

those at BagThe manxiscripts here are not so numerous as [Here deselect.] inton but are nevertheless interesting. contains a A folio volume, paper, partly of the 15th century,

miscellaneous collection,

Pownall, Co. Chester. Esq.,

by Humphry Newton ot born (according to entries of births, beginning of the volume) on deaths, and marriages at the to Elena, daughter Thursday, 3d October 1466, and married on the 7th April Pennial. of Esq., Fitson. and heir of Thomas
chiefly
1490.

The contents areof legal forms; Genealogical and historical notes and copies memoranda of the an English tract on fee-farms (2 1. pages ;)
title of

the heirs of Neuton (1 leaf. leaves. vision in a traunce of John Neuton (3 Humphry Kental of the vill of Newton, made by

Neuton
letter

and
of

A narrow

his counsel, 14 Henry for every slip of paper containing proverbs hall. the of larder the in set to the alphabet,
7.

The contents

of the Patent to Dr.


1, 1621t.

for fines, &c., 5 Charles

(Dr.

Chambers and i\Ir. Browne, Brown was Sewer in or-

dinary to the King.

noticed a Copy ot There are loose papers, among which I Chas. Ednephew, his of death the on Verses by Henry Marten There are 36 lines monds, Esq., wiio died 7 July 1661, at 30. very poor. Marten was dated Tower. 21 July 1661. They are 1680. the regicide he died at Chepstow in
;

Another, of Offices, 15th century, Grolier binding. most exquisite paintings. of French origin 15th century, with 13th and 14th cenThere are a great number of deeds of the now or formerly the property of the

A Book

turies,

Davenports

concerning lands &c. at Capesthorne, Merton, Somerford,


;

and con-

Macclesfield and a roll 3 cerning the serjeanty of the forest of giving an account of robinches wide and nearly 2 feet long, who held the office the roll bers beheaded by the Davenports of Edward 2. is, I think, of the time : the deeds I noted especially the following
;

Among An Inquisition

(temp. Hen.

3,)

with seals of the jurors, rewill

turning that Vivian de

Davenport had against his

ex-

412
changed with Ranulph, formerly Earl of Chester, his park, and the pu-

&c. of Macclesfield for the serjeanty of Macclesfield

This feudal office, forture to the said serjeanty belonging. merly involving the power of life and death, without appeal, has ever since remained in the family, and is now vested in Mr. Bromley-Davenport. Order, by Edward son of Henry 6, as Earl of Chester, to take It is addressed the outlawed persons named in the schediale. The schedule to John Davenport, and is dated 37 Hen. 6. contains many names. A roll of the 8 James I, containing the taxation money, for Macclesfield, Wm. Davenport being principal collector. Letters patent (8 Hen. 6) appointing John de Davenport to collect the proportion of the Northwich hundred of the subsidy of 1,000 marks for the support of the King in his wars.

*******
Alfred
J.

At both his houses Mr. Davenport so welcomed and entertained me and lightened ray labours that I cannot in my remembrances place Baginton after Capesthorne, or Capesthorne before Baginton.

Horwood.

the sale a few

Medieval Relics. Reference is made in note, on page 34, of months ago of the ancient Bramhall estate. Since
:

then the papers on both side the Atlantic contain the following At a recent sale of me liiBval relicts in Bramhall Hall, Cheshire England, what was thought the finest piece of heraldic tapestry in England, was knocked down for 25. It was worked between the years 1550 and 1579, and was sixteen feet long by seven wide. It contained thirty-three coats of arms, detailing the alliances of the Davenport family for generations. At the same sale a four post bedstead with hangings of curious needlework, dei^icting Adam and Eve in Paradise, brought 150. A long inscription announced that they were worked between 1610 and 1636, by Dame Dorothy Davenport. The old oak furniture
generally sold well, and a cabinet of the sixteenth
laid
centiii'y, in-

with marbles,

and beautifully painted,

brought

210

guineas.

EERATA.
We approach the subject indicated bj' this heading, with a consciousness of the imperfections of both the aiithor and
we must confess the sins of others,) of even the here correct the most observable errors, while the expert and critic will doubtless find others. In some cases, the
editor, and,
(^if

printer.

We

family record has not been furnished in a


in its jaroper place.
Page
19,

manner perfectly

ac-

curate, or legible, and, in a few instances, came too late to

appear

in last line, misprint of

word

chiefs.

P. 40, in first line of note, read 1871, for 1864. P. 51, in eighth line, for show, read shows. P. 50, in sixth line, for arraigned, read arrayed. P. 57, in last line but one, for Loyal, read Royal. P. 60, thirteenth line P. 117, in fifth line P. 119, P. 247,

from top, for my, read any. from bottom, for 1638, read 1838. in eighth line from bottom, insert the, after to. after sixteenth line supply date, Aug. 19, 1867.

P. 252, fifth line, leave out the


P. 276, ninth line

word and.

P. 259, in first line, for Francis, read Frances. P. 313, seventh line P. 317,

from bottom, for Philopjedian, read Philopfedean. from bottom, for Maralla, read Marilla. in eighteenth line from top, for No. 307, read 308.

P. 333, in twelfth line, read April 13th, for April 23d.

P. 341, in eighth line, for Beatrice, read Beatrix. P. 341, in last line, for

New York

city, read

Danbury,

Ct.
f5ofa.

P. 351, in twenty-second line P. 383, eighth line

from top, misprint of word


or,

from top, for

read

of.

P. 405, nineteenth line, correct the orthographj' of chirography.

The extracts found on pp. 100-105, should have been credited as drawn from the j^aper of Prof. Dexter, (N. H. Colony, His. Society Papers, ) Vol. II, ])p. 224-5, with quotation marks given at the close of 9th line, (p. 105.) The notes found at the bottom of pp. 102-3 were supplied from manuscripts furnished by Mr. Dexter, from the State Pliper Office, London, or from Calendar of State Papers.
The following
foot of

notice should have appeared after the note at

page 168:
53

414
Dr. B. F. Davenport, (a yoiiiig physician, of No. 751
street,

Tremont

Boston,) has collected

many hundred names


;

of the des-

cendants of this Thomas Davenport, his ancestor, who settled and also of Capt. Kichard, who at Dorchester, Mass., in 1640 sailed from Weymouth, England, June 20th, 1628, in the ship besides many hundreds of others who bear the name Abigail of Davenport in this country all of which results, it is believed, he designs, in due time, giving to the jjress.
;

Dr. Davenport has been indefatigable in his efforts to connect

the family of

Thomas and Richard with

the English branches,

in which, as yet, he has been unsuccessful: but in his efforts,

thus
a

far, he has wrought a good work, although he complains of want of adequate interest and co-operation on the part of

those

whom

he addresses for aid in his collections.

liev. George H. Davenport, of Foxlej', Hereford, Engwhose ancestors removed, at an early period, from Cheshire to North Staffordshire, (but a few miles from Davenport in the former county,) has for some years been interested in exami ling the records of Chester, Litchfield, and also in the British Museum, and in making collections in regard to the family in England. He has been very anxious to obtain information of the whereabouts of certain MS. Pedigrees of the familj- of the Davenports of Cheshire and Staffordshire, compiled by Wirrall and others, which were bought bj' some American collector about 1872. Any information concerning them is earnestly solicited by Eev. Mr. Davenport, and may be communicated to him, by addressing the writer. No. 11 Garden Place, (Brooklyn Heights, ) Brooklyn N. Y.

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INDEX
OF SURNAMES OTHER THAN THAT OF DAVENPORT.
Oheever, 142. 3heldleton, 21. Bingham, 241. Chesebrough, 254. Birdseyc, 324. Bishop, 189,201, 207, 240 Child, 332. hristmas, 251. 254. Clarendon, 159, 341. Blundeville. 21. Cleaveland, 248, 276. 34. 'Blunt, 230, Clock, 297. JBoleyn. 55. Coggshall, 235, 258. Bolton, 356. Cogswell, 234, 235. Bond, 278, 314. Colton, 223. Bonney. 268.
jBeveridge, 222.
I

Abbot, (il, 66. 9i. 361. Adams, 233, 311, 334.


Aldersey, 68. Alexander. 24.5,
Allen, 168, 197,
376.
3-2'2,

20.5,

Ailing, 141. Aul.stine, 244.

Alvord, 201. Aniblar, 226.

IBoorman,
1

253, 254,

260,

Ambler, 188. Ames, 106, 366.


Andreas, 298. Andross, 1.59.

280.

Comstock, 272, Conde, 304.

296. 332.
5Ji,_CtiT

Boswell. 54.

3onway
1
,

6,

40

.56,

Bourne,

376.
27.

64, 66, 67.

Bradford, 26.

Apthorp, 244. Arderne, 32. Atwater, 13,111,


224. 358, 387. Augur, 142. 377. Averell, 307.

Bradshaw,
115,14'.
,

Bradstreet, 377.

Cooke, 190, 224, 387. Cooper, 308, 338. Cortelyon, 308.

iotton, 5, 90, 109, 112. 114, 135, 137, 166, 173, 174. 199, 223, 371, 372. Sowles, 241. Bridgeman, 4. Irissey, 226. Bristol. 196. Crofut, 329. Bromliall, 31. B. Cromwell, 135, 144, 145. Bromley. 12,23, 29, 37, 375. 358. Bacon, 3, 80, 117, 118, 217. Cross, 120, 121, 131, 143, 158, Brough, 103. Crosswell, 218. 160. 168, 172, 173, 174, Brown, 244, 301. Bruen, 256, 257, 258, 291. CuUick, 388. 193, 216, 304, 343, 378. Currier, 278, 314. 80. 61, 65, Buckingham, Badger, 292. Cuyler, 3.32. Budington, 293. Balinford, 361, 367. D. 238. Buel, 220, Banks, 37. iBurchard. 271. Barber, 121. 172. Dana, 269. iBurdett, Barker, 238. iDavis. 155, 377. Burkley, 25. Baruabit, 36, 49. Deal, 316, 340. Burnett, 243. Bascom, 293. Defoe, 72. Bates, 248, 265, 296, 297. Burr, 208, 271. 'Delancey, 281. 273. Burrall, Baxter. 145. Delves. 30. Burt, 224. BeaoUer, 115. Demon, 254. 288. ;B\ishnell, Beaumont, 384. Beecher, 115, 116, 219, Butler, 302, 325, 326, 337 Dexter, 3, 5, 38, 50, 52, 54, 85, 95, 358. Buxton, 246. 235, 294. Dibble 314. Beers, 194. Dickens, 21.5, 246. Bell, 188, 201, 239, 296. Digby, 2. Bellamy, 238. Dimon, 294. Benedict, 241, 242, 263, Cable, 244. Disborough, 383. Caldwell, 308. 264. Dix, 358. Calveley, 31 Benjamin, 302, 338. Dixwell, 155. Carpenter, 307. Bennett, 275.

Bray, 103. Brereton, 25, Brewster. 3S

26, 30.

Berkeley, 40.
Best, 105, 107. Betts, 203, 204, 268, 269,
297.

iCarr,376. Carter, 285, 323. Ceccarini, 322.

Dodd, 197 Done, 30. Dougau, 379.

Chauncey,
55

91, 196, 271.

Doolittle, 384.

'

430
Dudley, 107, Dugdale. 38.
277,

INDEX.
145, 151, 1.55, 376, 3s2. Goodrich. 157. Cioodsell, 202, 203. Goodwin, 387, .388. Goodyear, 380, 381

IHubbard,
248.

129, 174, 176,

Duey, 385. Dwight, 193,


E.

209, 215 236, 248, 286, 294, 32l!

IHudson, 375,377.
iHuested, 240, 268. Hull, 167.
I

Goring,

49, 66, 79, 80 110, 112, 114, 115, 116 117, 121, 126, 127 128 lii9. 130, 131, 138, 151 155, 165, 171, 176, 187 197, 21G, 380, .382. Edwards, 186. 194 195 107, 293, 297, 261. Egerton, 356. Eld. 40. Eliot, 322. Ely, 225.

Eaton, 31

Gouge, Gould,

103. 84. 189.

Hulme, 22, 24. Humphrey, 102.


Huntington,
207

Grant, 328. Greenleaf, 293.

jHunt, 223! 279.


208
224, 233, 234, 295.

H.
Halt, 201. Hales, 50. Hall, 224, 225 312,356. Halsted, 229.

jHurlbutt, 229.

Hutchinson, Hyde, 31.


270
Irving, 282, Isaacs, 294.

112.

Handford,

243.
30(i.

Endicott, 146. 152


168.

Haneman,

157

Hankredge,

Enright, 312 Evans, 300.


Evarts, 248, 283.
F.

Hannaman,
Harlbrd,
35,

371. 275.

James,

187.

Hartlib, 385.

Jeayes, 41.
iJefifers, 329.

Harris 96, 99.

Harrow, 316. Hatch, 306.


Havelock, 13. Havens, 228.
387. Haye.s, 279, 315.

Jefiferson, 233.

Jennings, 130.

Jerman,
Johnson,

301, 337.
140, 200, 353

Tackier, 318.

Jssup, 271.
293, 328.

Fane

359.

Eairbairn, 313. Fairfax. 359, 380.

Hawthorn,

Fellows, 319.

Fenwick,

Haynes, 197. Hay ward, 71.


[Hazel, 315.

Jones, 116,
226, 377.

1.51, 1.53,

155

Ferner, Fessenden, 286


Field. 309.

184, 369. ill.

Joralemon, 294.
K.

Head, 289. Heber, 45.

Hide, 32. Higginson, 6, 47. Foot, 241. Hill, 68. Forbes. 103, 106, 366 Hilton, 51. Freeborn, 286. Hodshon, 142. Fretton, ll 37, 40, 41 47 Holland. 50. i "gill, 126. Holies, 359. Fuller, 80, 240, 276,

334. Fi.Bher, 234. Fitch, 207, 235, 245 Flavel, 222.

Firman,

Heminway,
Hewson, 375

947.

Herbert, 261. Herrinian, 379.

Keeler, 243, 299,

Kellond, 152. Kelsey, 238.

Ketcham, 227
Kiffen. 79.

Fleetwood, 383, 387

Kingsley,
137, 176.

3, 117, 118,

122

Kirk, 152.

Knapp,

243, 271.

'

297.

Holmes,

9 68, 296, 324

Holt, 231.

G.
Galbraith, 312, 339. Gardiner, 378. Gautier, 285.

Gaylord, 81, 205 ''06 207,231,232,239,300.' Geary, 321.


Gilbert, 126.

125, 135 136, 197, 366, 373. Hopkins, 40, 112, 129, 138 139, 141, 142, 187, 192

Hood, 85. 86, 87. Hook, 171, 384. Hooker, 102, 106,

Lafayette, 234.

Lambert,
'Lane, 43.

374, 387.

Laud,

14, 45, 60, 70 82, 84, 88, 90, 91, 96 100, 101, 102, 110, 113

114.

239,241,3.34,385. 386.'

Horton,

Lawton.
Legh,

24.

29.

Glover, 42, 142, 377. Goderic, 20, 21."

Hotchkis.s, 116, 229.

Houghton,

360.

LeClaire, 298. Leete, 152, 161, 380.


31.

Godwin,

96.

Goffe, 101, 102, 103, 144

|Howlette, 41. iHoyt, 201, 246. 267, 271


I

Leicester, 366.

272, 276., 299, 308.

Leigh, 112. Leighton, 10,

72, 73, 74.

431
INDEX.
N.
Leverett, 280,
'iSS.
|

246, 293, 294. Quinan, 333, Liecester, 106, 107. Neal, 73 91. Limlsell, 4.5. Newell. 284. R. 126. 122, 277. 94, Newman, Liudsley, 38b. 130, 143, 380, 381. 306. iKadcliffe, 247. 2.4, 32. Newport, Lloyd,235, Kandall, 277. Newton, 24. Locke, 194. Rapelyea, 276 Lockwood, 235, 255, 285, Nicholas, 152. 226, 241, 244, jRaymond, Nickson, 35, 40. Loomis, 282. 272. Lounsbury, 267. Noble, 172. 317. 230 Reardon, Libnitz, 194. iNoyes, 171, 197, 220, iRedfield, 270. Lutliiu, 329, 332. Norton, 166, 376. Read, 383. Lyhes, 232. Reed, 243, 271. Lvngs, 385. Reynolds, 117,203,225. O. Lyou, 269, 278. lRice,157, 324.

Lewis.

-240,

iRich, 55.

M.

loimstead, 270,272. lOrmerod, 20.

Richards, 25b, 387.


Riley, 231.

tOwen, 218.
lOxenbridge, 173.
Macclesfield,
2.5.

Rintoul, 318. lRipley,230.

MacGowan,

Maherne, Maiuwariug, 30, Paget, 96, Maltby, 192,203,204,224, 105, lOtj,


226, 244, 272.
I

314, diu184.

P.
100, 101, 102 107, 366.

Roberts, 302. iRockwell, 277.

Rode, 25. Rogers, 289, 356. Rogerson, 40.


Rossiter, 117. Russell, 142, 307.

Mannington,
Marshall, 333.

64.

Palmer, 270,45, 275

366 iParker, 106, 278, 893, Mason, 251, 257. Parsons, 218. Massey, 26, 32. 229 Patten, 205, 228, Mastou, 68. 359. 127, Paulet, ^litber, 4, 5, 6, 111, Peabodv, 333. 179, 177, 128, 143, 174, 300. Pearsall, 183,186,200, 371.
i

Park 221

Rutherford, 382.

Sackett, 227.

jSalemon, 23.
|Saltonstall, 141. .Sampson, 288. Sanderson, 277, 312.

Maude. HiMaxwell, McClure,


118.
270. 80, 81, 112, 113

,Peck, 39.

Peckham,332. Penn. 120, 300.


Peover, 25. Pepperell, 200.
Perrit 248.

[Saunders, 9. jSavage, 33, 156.


Savile, 43.
|Say, 91.

McElroy,

251.

McLane, 296. Mead, 301.


Meeker, 298. Meeks, 142.
Milton, 385. Milnor, 275. Mitchell, 302. Mix, 142, 230. Molines, 374. Monks, 387.

Perry, 303. Peters, 378.


[Phelps, 227.

Schurz, 326.
Schofield, 274. Scofield. 240,269,274, 301. Scott, 333. Scribner, 241. Scudder, 81,239,349. Searle, 167.

Pierpont, 141, "1. 193,


'

194, 195, 196, 231, 247.

Pierrepont, 283.
'pierson, 185,
384.
257, 382,

Plummer,
Pomeroy,

Montaigne, Moore, 274.

56, 60.

313, 340. 218.

Sedgwick, 360.
Seely, 126,375. Selleck, 188, 189.
131.

Morgan,

326.

Morris, 192, 322, 341

Post, 326. iPotter, 247,273, 2i9. Pratt, 66,67.

Shakespeare, Sharpe, 40.

5,

Morton, 272. Moule, 36. Moulton, 311.


Mullins, 334, 342.

Preston, 80. Prestwick, 33.

Prime, 238.
Prince, 109.

Shaw, 314. Shepherd. 239, Sherman, 242.


.

332.

Munday,

72. Miinsell, 316. Myles, 284.

Prynne,

45, 91, 257

'pullen, 303.

[pyncheon, 224.

Shirk, 313. Shults, 247.250. Sibbs, 81, 84. Isiddington, 27.

432
Sidnam,
63.

INDEX.
Timbs, 67. Todd, 231, 249. Tomlinson, 248.
Toolie, 374.

Silliman, 230, 283. Skinner, 259,260, 262,291. Slason, 201. Sluyter, 309.

Westcott, 334. Whalley, 144, 145, 151,


155, 382.

Wharton,
Wheeler,

Tornick, 24.

75, 233, 242. Townsend, 243, 246, 270, 272, 280, Tracey, 278. Tracy, 217. 218, 358. 292, 296, 297, 299. Snedon, 314. Trowbridge, 142. 167. Soule, 306. iTrumbull, 139, 163. 204. 208. 215. Spear, 252. Spring, 254. iTiirner, 70, 126. Spurston, 68. jTuttle, 246, 297. Stafford, 231. Twisden, 40. 'Twiss, 280. Stanton. 121. Stebbins, 223, 224. Steele, 316. U. Stephens, 289. Sterling, 271. iUsher, 358. Stiles, 9, 139, 154, St. John, 268, 269, 276, V. 359 iVane. 112, 374. Stoddard, 186, 200. jVarro, 349. Stone, 102, 125. Venables, 19, 20, 32. Stonell, 277. Vere,4. 13, 55, 63, 82, 96, Storrs, 224, 225, 238. 100, 103, 106, 107, 109, Story, 371. 184, 358, 359,360,3361, Stow. 72, 239. 366, 369. Street, 142, 160, 161, 171, Vernon, 25, 26. Vossius, 101. 103. 223. 231, 372. Strong, 299. Stuart, 172. W. Sturges, 270. Sturtevant, 292. Waddington, 2. Swettenham, 25. Wade, 197. Swift, 137. Wadsworth, 159. Suhm, 230. Waite, 283. Symonds, 68. Wake, 370. Wakeman, 384. T. Waldo, 278. Walker, 172, 277, 290, 313 Talmadge, 298. Ward, 270. Taylor, 45, 81, 84, 141. Warham, 186, 200, 206. 172, 206, 232,271, 309. Warner, 271, 297. Teachout, 274. Warren, 243, 265, 266, Temple, 155. 271. Teunet, 217, 218. iWashington, 208,233. 236 Thacher, 293. Waterbury, 239. Thackeray, 215. Watson, 370 Thane, 359. Webb, 227, 241, 272, 316, Thomas, 274, 384. Webster, 312. Thompson, 277. Weed, 197, 297, 301. Tiffany, 308. Wells, 68, 207, 227. 233, Tillotsou, 55, 234, 239, 240, 255.

Smith,

72,

375. 250, 270, 282, 284, 304, 318, 319, 320. 321, 322. Wheelock, 203, 204. 205, 222. 227, 228, 229, 230. Whelpley, 265, 256, 289, 290. White, 46, 92, 207, 280, .303, 317, 329, 338. Whitfield, 195, 216, 217, 218, 369. Whiting, 284, 300. Whitloek, 241, 334, 343. Whitney, 224. Whittier, 211. Whittlesey, 171. Wilcox, 279. Wilford, 224. Willcox, 255. Williams, 186, 198, 199. 200, 223, 224, 224, 225, 277, 278, 285. Willard, 206. Wilson, 66. 165, 166, 291. Winslow, 200, 239. Winston, 142. Winthrop, 146, 158, 159, 160, 163, 378, 379, 381, 382, 383, 384, 386, 387. Wolcott, '..02, 203, 239.*

WoUey,

5.

Wolsteuholm, 359. Wood, 4, 5, 6. 8, 42, Woodbridge. 251.


Woodruff. 282, 327.

68.

Woodward,
Woolsey,

205, 230, 247, 279, 303. 140, 193. Workman, 91. Wren, .55, 66. Wright. 2.54, 380. Wulfric. 20. Wyon, 66. Wythingtou. 24.

Y.
Yale, 129. 130,
139.

141,

Young,

382. 386, 388. 216, 269.

NOTICES OF THE PKESS, OF THE EDITION OF


(From the New York Inaepeiuhnt, Jan.
8th,

1851.

1852 by Kev. E.

S. Storrs,

D. D.)

A HiSTOKY AND GENEALOGY OF THE DaVENPOET FAMILY IN ENGLAND AND America. FROM A. D. 108(5 to IrtSO. By A. Benedict Davenvoet, (of the twenty-lourth geueration.) New York b. W. Beuedict.
:

are not connected with the Daveuiiort lamily either by cousauguiuity or by alliance, we have read this book (which, by the way, is not, as some might suppose, a mere pamphlet, but a well-filled duodecimo vollord Littleton's and-so-tourthsume,) and we find in it, as in one of ' much weighty matter." The reader of this column shall have the benefit of some among the many thoughts which our perusal of the book has .'iuggested to us. Americans are not unconscious of the ijride of ancestry. Y'oung as we 1. are among the nations democratic and radical as we are in our spirit and tendencies destitiite as, in some men's estimation, we are ol all veneration for antiquity and of all connection and sympathy with i;he past, we have not been brought into the world without ancestors and we are beginning to be studious of local and family antiquities. Many along pedigree has been traced out, enrolling the descendants of some Pilgrim whom the Mayflower brought to Plymouth, or of some grim Puritan, who came over with Winthroij and with Eaton. Many a dry catalogue of names has been printed, in which thousands of the scattered sons of the tmiversal Yankee nation read their descent from " earth's best blood." The book now before us is by far the most elaborate work of the kind which has yet been published. It is a proof that such studies are advancing among us. It is a new demonstration that Americans have some historic sentiment, and are not incajjable of the pride of ancestry 2. This book shows us, by an example, what kind of men the chief planters of Mew England were, in respect to social position in their native country. The Davenport family deriving its nanxe from its territorial possession, in the county ot Cheshire, is traced through all its Euylish generations from Orme de DavenxJort in the days of William the Concjueror down to John Davenjjort in the days of the Puritan exodus, and iudeid down to the l)resent time. It is a family of the proud Norman blood and its principal seat at this day has been occupied by successive generations of Davenports for seven hundred years. A branch of this family was transplanted to the ancient city of Coventry about the year 1510 and there, Irom one generation to another the Davenports sustained, almost as if by some hereditary right, the highest municipal offices and honors. John Davenport, the first liastor of the New Haven Chui-ch, and jointly with Theophilus Eaton, the founder of the New Haven Colony, was ot the Davenports of Coventry. All the leading men ot the original emigration to New England were of the same rank and class, and held essentially the same social position in their native country. The fathers of the New England towns and states were not of the peasant class but ol the gentry. They were of that intelligent, free, entei-prising, high-minded middle class, which is distinguished from the great nobility on the one hand, and from the boorish i)easautry on the other and in which the vigor, the political freedom, and the progres.sive energy ot the English nation has always resided. The x^eople of New England, as a body, are not Anglo Saxmi as they are often called, but Anglo-Norman. The names enrolled in such a book as Farmer's Genealogical Register are evidence on this point. To a great extent they are the names of Norman families, names of the English nobility and gentry.

Though we

my

3. We have in this genealogy an instance of the rapidity with which a family multiplies its descendants and connections in such a country as ours. John Davenport, the first of the name in this country, had only one child, John Davenport, Esq of New Haven, and afterwards of Boston. From this second John Davenport, whose only son, Rev. John D., was pastor of the church in Stamford, has descended, in less than two hundred years, a posterity the number of which we will not venture to estimate. The posterity of any one of the sons of Jacob two hundred years after the return of the patriarch with his wives and children from Mesopotamia, could hardly have been much more numerous. The persons now living who rejoice in their descent from the founder of New Haven and the mayors of Coventry, are numerous enough, if they could all be brought together, to found a very respectable commonwealth by themselves. i. It is instructive to observe in this genealogy, as may be observed in so many of the New England genealogies, the hereditary descent of covenant blessings. The entire race of the descendants of John Davenport, taken as a whole, from generation to generation, is a striking instance of the manner in which the line of descent from the lathers to the children is the line of transmission not only for God's choicest blessing, but also for those inferior blessings which ordinarily attend upon a life of godliness. The true nobility of birth and blood is the humble nobility that is born of godly parents, and descended from a godly ancestry. Doubtless such a nobility, like any other, may be disowned and dishonored, or its privileges may be forfeited by the unworthiness of those to whom it belongs but it is nevertheless true that to be thus descended is, by God's arrangement, and according to this covenant, alike a privilege and an honor.
, ;

(From the New York

Evangelist, Sept. 11th, 1851.)

interesting work, indisxiensable to the numerous offshoots of the fruitful Davenport stock. Those early times were famous for large families and numerous intermarriages and in tracing the direct line of the family down through its twenty-five generations, we find it allied to a great variety of names conspicuous in our history, all of whom may find here some light upon their jjedigree. The name of Davenport is classic in New Haven, Stamford and other Connecticut towns and as the family has followed the universal law of migrating in all directions, they have carried with them a good share of the ancestral worth and repute. The editor of this volume has not only given a direct and unbroken genealogy of the various branches of the family, but thrown in a great variety of sketches and facts which have great interest. An appendix is also given, full of curious matei'ial, illustrative of our early times. These sectional histories are of great historical value and the editor of this work, in jjreserving the annals of one of the best as well as most famous stocks among us, has not only gratified a reasonable family pride, but done a great public service.

A very

(From the New Englander, Nov.

18.51.)

observe, a.s one of the signs of the times, the piiblication of many genealogical histories of the families of the earlier pilgrims, and among the best of these, botli in matter and type, we place this memorial of the Davenport family.

We

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