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CHAPTER 1

INTRODUCTION

Chapter -1 INTRODUCTION
GlobUs healthcare is a global market research data collection company. We offer global field management services for projects with medical professionals and patients whether online, in-person or telephone. We execute research services for some of the worlds largest research and consulting firms, as well as for targeted niche market consultants. GlobUs healthcare offers a full range of research services and is equipped to conduct research and data collection services using traditional and nontraditional research methodologies. Our cornerstones are our survey solutions, online or offline. GlobUs healthcare has formed through two manageing director; Damir Fazlic and Sandeep Sankhla. It has partnership with world one and toluna. Its members are PMRG, ESOMAR,MRA and EphMRA, We have instituted a comprehensive global network, GlobUs Healthnet, comprised of specialized databases and panels, highly experienced recruiters, interviewers, and strategic partners. When partnering with Globus healthcare you will have access to:

the most extensive Canadian physician panels the US physician panel Global healthcare network

Its reach extends across Canada, USA, Europe, Asia, and South America. Our network comprises over 2,000,000 physicians, nurses, administrators, dentists, pharmacists, patients and sufferers. In addition to the developed, industrialized countries and markets, our unique reach and services give you also access to more challenging markets such are the markets of Southeast Europe/the Balkans, and the SAARC countries. Through our network of local and regional offices and strategic research partners, we provide research services virtually in every corner of the globe.

IMPACT OF THE RESEARCH The impact of research is a topical issue in Australia and internationally because of increasing pressures for research funding to be accountable in terms of benefits and transfer of research findings into practice and policy. The immediate driver for this project was the impending first cycle of the Australian Research Quality Framework (RQF). This project was, to a great extent, a response to the Recommended Model of the RQF launched in October 2006 [3], and its aims reflect the concerns raised at the time about how research impact could be measured. If publication measures (bibliometrics) were the sole measure of quality and impact, primary health care publication output would not be competitive. Public health and primary health care research is mostly published in journals which are not listed on the Thompson Scientific ISI Web of Science database and have not been assigned a Journal Impact Factor by ISI [4]. While research is essential to support the growing interest in primary health care, the challenge for the primary health care research sector is to compete for funding against biomedical sciences and other clinical research, when one of the key selection criteria for funding is the Chief Investigators track record, consisting primarily of publications. It thus became urgent to explore how primary health care research impact could be measured. The purpose of this two stage study was to develop a feasible way to assess the impact of primary health care research. This first stage studied four nationally funded research projects to: identify how much or what types of impact can be assessed through various means at different stages of research completion; develop efficient methods for primary health care researchers (or other relevant organisations) to track and assess the impact of their projects. This report gives the results of the first stage of the project, together with some insights relating to

the application of the Recommended Model of the Research Quality Framework (RQF) which will be implemented in Australian Universities commencing in 2007. In the second stage of the project, the team will refine and develop the methodology for assessing the impact of primary health care research and use this to assess the impact of a larger set of primary health care research projects. Several theoretical models developed to assess research impact were outlined in the 2005 PHC RIS publication Focus on measuring research impact [5]. One promising model of research impact the Buxton and Hanney Payback Framework [1], combines bibliometric measures with an assessment of impact on the users of the research. The Framework was applied to assess the research impact of the Arthritis research program in the UK through a combination of bibliometrics, Bibliometrics is the study of publication data. It uses a variety of statistical techniques to find patterns in publication output. One widely used bibliometric measure is the Journal Impact Factor (JIF), which assigns a rating to a journal based on the number of citations made to articles published in that journal during the assessment period. More highly cited journals rate higher. The ISI index is used to calculate JIFs. Primary health care is at a disadvantage because most of our journals are not listed in the ISI Web of Science database therefore citations to our articles are not recorded. Moreover, the number of citations is also related to the number of researchers in the field and the concentration of that research in specific journals. PHC researchers are relatively few in number and publish broadly in many journals. Primary Health Care Research & Information Service document analysis and qualitative case studies of research projects. We used the Payback Framework as a starting point to structure our enquiry.

DEFINATION
The word impact is used in a number of different ways in the academic context. It is often used to refer to the Journal Impact Factor, which is a statistic calculated on the number of citations to articles in a particular journal. Journals containing higher numbers of cited articles are given a higher Impact Factor by the Thompson Scientific, who run the ISI Web of Knowledge database. Only journals indexed in ISI can have an Impact Factor.
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Research Impact is also used generically to refer to publication impact, or to publication plus other types of impact. Buxton and Hanney use the term in this broader sense in their model. However, the RQF uses the term Research Quality to refer to publication measures and Research Impact to refer to the social, economic, environmental and/or cultural outcomes of research. In the RQF terminology the Payback Framework thus assesses both research quality and impact. Buxton and Hanneys terminology is used in this report except where specified in discussion of the ROF. Delivering research insights to global pharmaceutical companies: GM INSIGHTS Research provides custom market and media research services to global pharmaceutical companies. We deliver insights to clients to help them optimize sales, brand and communications. We assist clients with strategic decisions throughout product life cycle by providing actionable insights into trends in different disease/drug categories, market and opportunity assessment, positioning and segmentation, and, pre-and post-launch tracking. We also help PR and communication teams in pharmaceutical companies in media monitoring and measurement, providing global coverage, across regions and languages. GM INSIGHTS Research enables pharmaceuticals and healthcare clients to: Gain deep understanding of health, wellness and emerging technology trends Analyze segmentation and targeting Measure Return of Marketing Effort (ROME) Track special event coverage Monitor and measure buzz in both traditional and social media Understand message congruence Identify and track key influencers If you would like to know more about our expertise and experience in the Pharmaceuticals and Healthcare industry.

Gm insights Research can support you with research-based findings to understand:


Consumers perception of the existing products versus need for new product introductions Market segmentation Product and brand positioning Competitive assessment on brand and product awareness Consumers shopping behaviors, price sensitivities and packaging preferences. Distributor Distributor, who sells to retailers, Retailer (also called dealer or reseller), who sells to end customers; Distribution is also a very important component of Logistics & Supply chain management. Distribution in supply chain management means the distribution of good from one business to other it can be factory to supplier, supplier to retailer or retailer to the end customer. It is defined as a chain of intermediaries; each passing the product down the chain to the next organization, before it finally reaches the consumer or enduser. This process is known as the 'distribution chain' or the 'channel.' Each of the elements in these chains will have their own specific needs, which the producer must take into account, along with those of the all-important end-user. Channels of Distribution A number of alternate 'channels' of distribution may be available: Distributor, who sells to retailers, Retailer (also called dealer or reseller), who sells to end customers Distribution channels may not be restricted to physical products alike from producer to consumer in certain sectors, since both direct and indirect channels may be used. Hotels, for example, may sell their services (typically rooms) directly or through travel agents, tour operators, airlines, tourist boards, centralized reservation
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systems, etc. process of transfer the products or services from Producer to Customer or end user. There have also been some innovations in the distribution of services. For example, there has been an increase in franchising and in rental services - the latter offering anything from televisions through tools. There has also been some evidence of service integration, with services linking together, particularly in the travel and tourism sectors. For example, links now exist between airlines, hotels and car rental services. In addition, there has been a significant increase in retail outlets for the service sector. Outlets such as estate agencies and building society offices are crowding out traditional grocers from major shopping areas. Put simply, as the owner of a wholesale distributorship, you will be buying goods to sell at a profit, much like a retailer would. The only difference is that you'll be working in a business-to-business realm by selling to retail companies and other wholesale firms like your own, and not to the buying public. This is, however, somewhat of a traditional definition. For example, companies like Sam's Club and BJ's Warehouse have been using warehouse membership clubs, where consumers are able to buy at what appear to be wholesale prices, for some time now, thus blurring the lines. However, the traditional wholesale distributor is still the one who buys "from the source" and sells to a reseller. Role of distributor Only the manufacturers and the retailers know the real importance of the role which the wholesale distributor plays in the whole process of creating the good, and then selling it to the customer. Therefore, it is understood that neither the manufacturer, nor the reseller, or retailer can survive without them. Now what exactly is it that the wholesale distributor does, which makes them so important in the whole lifecycle of product creation and selling Simple: They act as the middle party. They buy from the manufacturer, at the lowest price possible, and they resell to the retailer or reseller at a profit, who then sell products at a higher profit. For example, lets take a can of motor oil. It is manufactured,

and then packaged. Then it sold to the resellers who sell it at a profit. Te key player between the manufacturer and the reseller is the wholesaler. They move the product from the manufacturer to the customer. The merchant wholesale distributor will buy the product from the manufacturer, and then store it in warehouses. When needed, (from time to time) the wholesaler will sell the product to the reseller or use it for himself. According to U.S. Industry and Trade Outlook, published by The McGraw-Hill Companies and the U.S. Department of Commerce/International Trade Administration, wholesale trade includes establishments that sell products to retailers, merchants, contractors and/or industrial, institutional and commercial users. Wholesale distribution firms, which sell both durable goods (furniture, office equipment, industrial supplies and other goods that can be Used repeatedly) and nondurable goods (printing and writing paper, groceries, chemicals and periodicals), dont sell to ultimate household consumers. Products exist in all shapes, sizes, forms, and types. Anything everything around us is some sort of product. This indicates that there is a lot of room for growth in this area. As a wholesale distributor, you will perhaps run a separately possessed and operated organization that purchases and puts up for sale products of which you have taken ownership. Normally, such operations are run from one or more warehouses where stocked goods are received and afterwards transported to clientele. Therefore, as a wholesale distributor, you will be buying goods, but will be selling them as a profit. Put this way, it seems like that is pretty much the same thing which a retailed would do. However, the difference is that a wholesaler does not contact the customer; rather he/she contacts other businesses. Therefore, the wholesale distributor works in a business to business realm, by selling to resellers and possibly other wholesale dealers too. However, this is the traditional definition of a wholesaler. There are many distributors who open for certain hours to serve the general public, so that they too get a chance to buy products at a lower price, i.e. wholesale price, and not retail price. However, in such cases, the

public may have to buy products in bulk, and not in selective quantities, like they may do so at resellers. However, the traditional wholesale distributor is still the one who buys from the source and sells to a reseller. Put simply, as the owner of a wholesale distributorship, you will be buying goods to sell at a profit, much like a retailer would. The only difference is that you'll be working in a business-to-business realm by selling to retail companies and other wholesale firms like your own, and not to the buying public. This is, however, somewhat of a traditional definition. For example, companies like Sam's Club and BJ's Warehouse have been using warehouse membership clubs, where consumers are able to buy at what appear to be wholesale prices, for some time now, thus blurring the lines. However, the traditional wholesale distributor is still the one who buys "from the source" and sells to a reseller. Starting up a distributor Setting up shop: When it comes to setting up shop, your needs will vary according to what type of product you choose to specialize in. Someone could conceivably run a successful wholesale distribution business from their basement, but storage needs would eventually hamper the company's success. "If you're running a distribution company from home, then you're much more of a broker than a distributor," says Fein, noting that while a distributor takes title and legal ownership of the products, a broker simply facilitates the transfer of products. "However, through the use of the internet, there are some very interesting alternatives to becoming a distributor [who takes] physical possession of the product." According to Fein, wholesale distribution companies are frequently started in areas where land is not too expensive and where buying or renting warehouse space is affordable. "Generally, wholesale distributors are not located in downtown shopping areas, but off the beaten path," says Fein. "If, for example, you're serving building or electrical contractors, you'll need to choose a location in close proximity to them in order to be accessible as they go about their jobs."

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State of the Industry Upon opening the doors of your wholesale distribution business, you will certainly find yourself in good company. To date, there are approximately 300,000 distributors in the United States, representing $3.2 trillion in annual revenues. Wholesale distribution contributes 7 percent to the value of the nation's private industry GDP, and most distribution channels are still highly fragmented and comprise many small, privately held companies. "My research shows that there are only 2,000 distributors in the United States with revenues greater than $100 million," comments Fein. And that's not all: Every year, U.S. retail cash registers and online merchants ring up about $3.6 trillion in sales, and of that, about a quarter comes from general merchandise, apparel and furniture sales (GAF). This is a positive for wholesale distributors, who rely heavily on retailers as customers. To measure the scope of GAF, try to imagine every consumer item sold, and then remove the cars, building materials and food. The rest, including computers, clothing, sports equipment and other items, fall into the GAF total. Such goods come directly from manufacturers or through wholesalers and brokers. Then they are sold in department, high-volume and specialty stores-all of which will make up your client base once you open the doors of your wholesale distribution firm. All this is good news for the startup entrepreneur looking to launch a wholesale distribution company. However, there are a few dangers that you should be aware of. For starters, consolidation is rampant in this industry. Some sectors are contracting more quickly than others. For example, pharmaceutical wholesaling has consolidated more than just about any other sector, according to Fein. Since 1975, mergers and acquisitions have reduced the number of U.S. Companies in that sector from 200 to about 50. And the largest four companies control more than 80 percent of the distribution market.

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Charter -2 Company profile

Healthcare research GlobUs is a global market research company that provides healthcare research worldwide. At the core of our value proposition is our intimate knowledge of the pharma/healthcare research. We specialize in working with physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, other health care workers, and patients. Our panels expand across many countries and include thousands of medical professionals, specialists, pharmacists, and dentists. Our strength, advantage, and success come from our strong, personal relationships with healthcare professionals. We have earned their respect, and we are welcomed in to their offices, hospitals, labs, and other places of work. Our name is recognized, and welcomed by the healthcare professionals. The healthcare professionals respond by accepting our invitations and by sharing their knowledge, insights, and opinions. We have capability and are equipped to conduct a large number of interviews and recruit a large number of physicians in a short period of time.

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We go above and beyond traditional research and approach in working with healthcare professionals. Solutions and services Online research Panel Provision Canadian physician panel USA physician panel Access to over 2,000,000 healthcare professionals worldwide Global Reach/Multi-country Recruiting Programming and Hosting Data Processing Translation Quantitative healthcare research Sample Provision CATI/phone Interviewing 100 stations International Reach CAPI/in-person Interviewing Recruiting Programming Data Quantitative healthcare research F2F IDIs or Tele-depth Moderating and Interviewing Qual Recruiting Online Groups Facility Canada, USA, Europe, Asia, LATAM Global Reach Processing

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ORGANIZATION CHART

Sandeep Sankhla
Danny Singh

Mages hC

Karthika P

Bharath

Nitish Appac hu

Manis h

Gauth am

Sunil

Prema latha

Prash anthi

Vasu matha
.

Arbin

Ganpa th

Rakes h

Sandeep Sankhla Business Director at Serial Entrepreneur sandeepsankhla@gmail.com 2010 - Present (2 years)

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We are a third generation Market Research outsourcing company which binds the best practices in this industry to its global clients. We offer a compelling combination of research and evaluation expertise. It aims at providing solutions to better understand the global market in a cost efficient and time critical manner. We offer standardized and customized research services with an operational consulting background which allows organizations to take informed decisions. By partnering with us, you can cut through the complexity of data to information, you need to make and control critical business decisions. We offer a compelling combination of research and evaluation expertise. From in-depth interviews to Web surveys and from gathering syndicated research reports to human analysis, we offer tailored, best-in-class research services. We understand the underlying market dynamics which allow us to provide operational consulting support service for overall decision making. International Business Development Manager at GM Insights Research Knowledge Services 2008 - 2010 (2 years) International Business Development Region: Europe / UK Services: Outsourced Market Research, Media Services, Information Support Services and Social Media Analysis Verticals: PR, Pharma, CE, Automobile, Hotels & CPG Role: New Business Development, Account Management and Marketing Senior Executive at Feedback Global 2007 - 2008 (1 year) Business Development (Europe & US) Business Director at Serial Entrepreneur 2010 - Present (2 years) We are a third generation Market Research outsourcing company which binds the best practices in this industry to its global clients.

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We offer a compelling combination of research and evaluation expertise. It aims at providing solutions to better understand the global market in a cost efficient and time critical manner. We offer standardized and customized research services with an operational consulting background which allows organizations to take informed decisions. By partnering with us, you can cut through the complexity of data to information, you need to make and control critical business decisions. We offer a compelling combination of research and evaluation expertise. From in-depth interviews to Web surveys and from gathering syndicated research reports to human analysis, we offer tailored, best-in-class research services. We understand the underlying market dynamics which allow us to provide operational consulting support service for overall decision making. International Business Development Manager at GM Insights Research Knowledge Services 2008 - 2010 (2 years) International Business Development Region: Europe / UK Services: Outsourced Market Research, Media Services, Information Support Services and Social Media Analysis Verticals: PR, Pharma, CE, Automobile, Hotels & CPG Role: New Business Development, Account Management and Marketing Senior Executive at Feedback Global Business Development (Europe & US) GlobUs healthcare Panel Recruitment Methodology GlobUs healthcare Quality Parameters GlobUs healthcare Panel Recruitment Methodology A quality panel comes from a quality source. At GlobUs, we are fanatical about recruiting and maintaining a first-class panel. The panel is drawn from multiple sources and recruited using a broad array of techniques to select unique and responsive members. We use both online and offline methodologies. We recruit our panel by email/phone/fax to capture their interest in being part of our panel. Then we send them invitations and links with a password to their email address and they are profiled and registered to our online panel. It is very important for users to opt-in to become a part of the panel. Email invitations are delivered to
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recruits who have consciously chosen to be part of the online panel. Once the basic demographic information is collected we send across a detailed profiling survey which also helps to ascertain the data consistency and all those respondents failing to meet expectations are removed from the system. Only on successfully completing all the required fields would the physician be considered as active to participate in our studies. The industry standard and accepted way of verification of opt-in status and email address is using the double opt-in paradigm. Our validation process starts with capturing and working with a genuine database. The name and contact info is also captured from either online genuine mentions in licensed association, directories, colleges of physicians, etc which helps us verify that the physician is genuine. Each member goes through a strict verification process to ensure there are no questions when it comes to credentials. We want you to spend your time focused on results, rather than being concerned with panel integrity. Additional steps taken for validation is phone calling the physician hospital/clinic/office and validating and verifying respondents. For USA we use American Medical Association to check the sources. www.globushc.com

SERVICE DELIVERY INNOVATION How can a services firm best respond to overwhelming market forces? It must find new ways to deliver its services, and it must surpass client expectations. Through successful innovation a firm can protect its largest revenue generators, making possible its investment in the next big thing in terms of high-margin service offerings. In doing so, a firm must address the converging challenges of client sophistication, globalization, competition, technology innovation, and modularization while still taking advantage of the market opportunities as they arise. To succeed at this balancing act, professional services firms must bring together resources in new ways, creatively package high-value products and services, and cocreate solutions with their clients. Professional services firms that lead the pack are those that consistently deliver on client service innovation in three primary areas: resourcing and partnering, packaging, and cocreating value with clients. In the independent survey cited above, 71% of professional services 17 firms indicated it is important to partner with other services providers. When a firm seamlessly blends internal and external partner resources, it gains a distinct advantage because it can meet a variety of client needs in a rapid,
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efficient manner. For example, when internal consulting resources are stretched too thin, innovative professional services firms rely on technology to quickly identify and then deploy appropriate partners, subcontractors, and offshore resources to meet clients needs. To facilitate collaboration with suppliers, firms can implement technology that seamlessly integrates subcontractors into their service delivery processes across diverse markets. Armed with tools designed to improve supplier management, a professional services firm can create a single, real-time view of all external resources and effectively meet client needs regardless of location. Characteristics of Successful Service Delivery Innovation Professional services firms that excel at service delivery innovation demonstrate the six key characteristics: A networked organization Flexible workflows Global sourcing Client and supplier collaboration Continuous innovation Enabling technology A Networked Organization Professional services organizations are ultimately collections of people: deeply specialized professionals who bring together their expertise to create value for clients. As such, the relationships and networks that link individual professionals are at the heart of the organization. Siloed professional organizations are ineffective. Successful organizational networks rely on human capital policies and technologies that quickly and effectively locate expertise, support project teams, and encourage collaboration throughout the organization. Flexible Workflows Streamlined and effective workflows are a vital component of service delivery innovation within a professional services firm. However, this workflow is markedly different from the workflow required by a routine operation, such as processing an invoice for payment. Workflows within innovative professional services firms need to be readily reconfigured to adapt to different projects, situations, and emerging market needs. Workflows need to support the firms efforts to identify talent, create marketplaces, establish pricing mechanisms, enhance client relationships, and integrate quality assurance processes into workflows. The systems and processes in place should support the introduction of new services and products across the organization.

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Global Sourcing Both internal and external sourcing strategies are critical to the success of a global professional services firm, and work and resources need to flow across boundaries. To succeed at global sourcing, professional services firms must undertake several initiatives. First, they must consistently implement highly effective processes for identifying and applying internal talent. Secondly, firms must establish an approach for drawing on external talent as soon as required. Professional services firms must master this complex activity in order to compete in a global market influenced by low-cost labor and emerging pools of expertise. Firms need integrated workflow technologies, available collaboration spaces, appropriate organizational design, and a professional culture that supports work across borders. Firms must also adapt and mesh the work and social attitudes of its home country with the very different cultures of colleagues and clients on other continents. Client and Supplier Collaboration If a firm provides black box services characteristic of no collaboration with clients it will rapidly become a commoditized service provider. Professional services firms need to effectively and continuously collaborate with their clients to build greater value and lock in clients for the long term. Firms must also achieve outstanding collaboration with their talent suppliers. In a modularized economy, receiving the greatest value from external talent requires bringing them into the firms processes rather than contracting for work piecemeal. To enable external collaboration, professional services firms can use technology that allows remote professionals to view and participate in key business processes.

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Chapter -3 Methodology of the study


DATA COLLECTION: Generating or bringing together information that has been systematically observed, recorded, organized, categorized, or defined in such a way that logical processing and inferences may occur. SOURCES OF DATA: The sources of data may be classified into primary sources and secondary source. a) Primary Data:

Primary data has been collected through Questionaries, obersativation and discussion and also through interview from the available employee at GM INSIGHTS.

b)

Secondary Source:

Secondary data consist of profile of the company and it attribute, which are collected from internet and browses taken from the company. TITLE OF THE STUDY A study on Organizational structure of GLOBUS HEALTHCARE (RESEACRCHING COMPANY IN pharmaceutical AREA)

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM This project mainly focuses on the various convenience pharmaceutical company being provided by GLOCAL MIND and to know how efficient is the MEDICINE in performing those services and provide recommendations if required.

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OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY


To know about the various diseases and there medicines provided by pharmaceutical company.

SCOPE OF THE STUDY This chapter focuses on the mechanisms and internal arrangements used by competition agencies to achieve an effective project delivery. It explains the role of project management as a tool that is used by some agencies to promote effective project delivery, as well as, the interaction between projectCompetition authorities from around the globe face complex and diverse cases, procedures and special tasks. However, these agencies have one objective in common - which is to effectively fulfil its legal mandate. In every project carried out by the agencies, there are several factors and constrains derived from the very nature of each project. Therefore, competition agencies need to consider all these elements so that in overall they effectively contribute to the outcome of a project. This chapter seeks to provide insight on the agencies challenges, experiences and practiceswhen managing projects related to law enforcement procedures or advocacy efforts. The Agency Effectiveness Working Group was set up by the ICN, among other things, as a way to explore and share the practices developed by its members in issues related to the effective delivery of projects - within a context of individual constrains.

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Limitations Problems in the department Time Zone Response to clients email Work Load Manual handling of incentive files

Service delivery is concerned specifically with the services offered. In particular, it deals with the required service levels, availability, continuity, financial viability, security, and the necessary IT infrastructure capacity. The interactive diagram below briefly summarises the main aspects of the service delivery methodology defined by the ITIL standard With service delivery innovation, firms can create and implement new methods of delivering professional services that result in increased client value, lower costs, and higher profitability. Services Delivery Methodology The Business Strategy and IT Alignment Service is a first step in determining any anomalies within the IT operations. The goals of this service are to determine IT operations performance strengths and weaknesses as demanded by the overall business strategic objectives. It also includes benchmarking and comparison with the industry standards to highlight areas of improvements. The key Business and IT performance indicators are measured and analyzed for any variations from requirements. This allows for evaluating possible strategies and corrective actions required to meet the business objectives. G-ESI Methodology Our team of experienced management consultants and business analysts work with the client C-Level management and stakeholders to review the business strategy, goals, objectives and the operations performance. Preliminary assessment is done via a web based tool using Q&A and interviews. The current IT environment is assessed via audits and using non-intrusive software tools to gather benchmarking data. Data analyses are performed to determine system operations and performance hot spots. A snapshot of the
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performance status is compared with industry metrics and like companies to determine strengths and weaknesses. A SWOT analysis report is created and discussed with the client management team. The performance data is used to design possible corrective solutions based on company priorities and constraints. Finally, recommendations are made to implement projects to align the IT environment with the client business strategy. Additional IT services for end-to-end solution creation, development, delivery and ongoing support to ensure a single vendor solution are available. Additional portfolio of services include the following: Center Of Excellence Solution Design and Development: G-ESI has a unique solution design, development and deployment model based on center of excellence. This is to ensure the highest quality end-to-end delivery of IT projects at the best possible value. All solution designs, development and testing is done in our controlled environment prior to delivery. Only the accredited and certified staff is deployed on client projects, thus minimizing unnecessary surprises and lowering costs of development through deployment. Program/Project Management: Our experienced and certified staff is part of the solution delivery services to our clients. Our project governance and oversight includes project management service (PM-SaaS) to allow customer monitoring and reviews. Portfolio Management and Project Management Office (PMO): Proven Project Management technologies to manage and control projects and implementing standard processes are a key to successful project delivery. G-ESI specializes in PMO setup and implementing network based project management technologies. Offthe-shelf partner products (Microsoft Project Server, HP Mercury Quality Center and Project Portfolio Management) as well as SaaS solutions are offered based on customer needs. Technology and skills training: All our IT staff are trained in our COE with hands-on training and accredited with industry credentials. Post-Sales support: All solution delivery and implementation are offered with Gold (8 hour), Silver (12 hours) and Bronze (24 hours) service levels for Post-Sale Support. Our 24X7 call center and skilled staff are available to service toll free L1-L5 service calls as well on-line chats.
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Soft Launch

Done by Nebu 10% response

Full Sample

Survey is launched completly IR rate is high no recruitment is done Recruitment for 60% of projects and guidlines 40% by direct sampling For EU co. still using only English

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Vendor

Redirect link pass back ID Send links in mass, unable to read all emails Manually stick links and incentives

Queries about incetives

Respond to the doctors queries Mgmt of incentive file

Incentive file

Get final ID from client Compare with the server Cross checking Finally file created

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Chapter - 4 Data analysis and interpretation Screener survey 1. What is your primary medical specialty? a. b. c. d. e. f. Primary Care / Family Practice DISQUALIFY Dermatology - DISQUALIFY Oncology Dermatologic Oncology Surgery DISQUALIFY Other (please specify): __________ - DISQUALIFY

Primary Care / Family Practice DISQUALIFY Dermatology - DISQUALIFY Oncology Dermatologic Oncology Surgery DISQUALIFY Other (please specify): __________ - DISQUALIFY

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2. Are you board certified or eligible in this specialty? a. Yes b. NO

Yes

No

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3. Which of the following best describes the setting where you spend the majority of your practice time?

a. Community-based office practice b. Community-based hospital practice c. Comprehensive cancer center d. University/teaching hospital e. Nursing home DISQUALIFY f. Other (specify): ______________ - DISQUALIFY

A B C D E F

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4. What percent of your professional practice time is spent performing each of the following activities? Your total must sum to 100%.

a. __28_% Direct patient care (including surgery) IF <70%, DISQUALIFY b. __23___% Teaching c. __25_% Conducting research d. __24__% Other

SHOW TOTAL / TOTAL MUST SUM TO 100%

A B C D

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5. In a typical month, how many patients do you personally see or treat for any condition?

a. _____# of patients seen per month [Range = 0-999; IF <50, DISQUALIFY]

Range

Less More

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6. Are you currently managing cutaneous malignant melanoma patients? By managing, we mean you are responsible for making decisions regarding initiation of and changes to therapy regimen.

a. Yes b. No DISQUALIFY

Sales

yes no

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7. In a typical month, how many melanoma patients do you personally treat or manage for their condition?

a. _____ of melanoma patients [Range = 0-999; CANNOT EXCEED Q6 RESPONSE; IF <20, DISQUALIFY]

Column1

A B

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8. Of the [INSERT Q8 RESPONSE] melanoma patients you personally treat or manage in a typical month, how many are nonresectable stage IIIc-IV cutaneous metastatic melanoma patients?

a. _____# of patients are non-resectable stage IIIc-IV cutaneous metastatic melanoma patients CANNOT EXCEED Q8 RESPONSE; IF <5, DISQUALIFY

11 22 22 43 PERCENTAGE 28 55 39 76 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 non-resectable stage

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9. Do you or does any person in your immediate family work for or regularly consult with any of the following? a. Government agency (e.g., FDA) DISQUALIFY b. Pharmaceutical or biotech manufacturer DISQUALIFY c. Pharmaceutical advertising agency DISQUALIFY d. Pharmaceutical market research company DISQUALIFY e. None of the above IF CHECKED, DO NOT ALLOW ANY OTHER RESPONSE

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 A B C D 18 19 32 33 25 45 38 Sales PERCENGTAGE 67

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10.When was the last time you participated in market research regarding melanoma?

a. Never b. Within the last month DISQUALIFY c. 1 to 3 months ago d. 3 to 6 months ago e. More than 6 months ago

Other (please specify): __________ DISQUALIFY 22% Primary Care / Family Practice DISQUALIFY 26% Surgery DISQUALIFY 16% Oncology 20% Dermatologic Oncology 10%

%
Primary Care / Family Practice DISQUALIFY Dermatology - DISQUALIFY Oncology Dermatologic Oncology Surgery DISQUALIFY Dermatology - DISQUALIFY 6% Other (please specify): __________ - DISQUALIFY

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Survey finding summery


To know about Melanoma and Much More! From doctors The most dangerous form of skin cancer, a malignancy of the melanocyte, the cell that produces pigment in the skin. Melanoma is most common in people with fair skin, but can occur in people with all skin colors. Most melanomas present as a dark, mole-like spot that spreads and, unlike a mole, has an irregular border. The tendency toward melanoma may be inherited, and the risk increases with overexposure to the sun and sunburn. Melanoma is classified into four clinical types which are called:

acral-lentiginous melanoma, lentigo maligna melanoma, nodular melanoma, and superficial spreading melanoma.

Fair-skinned people and people with a family history of melanoma should always use a high-SPF sunscreen when outdoors. Everyone who has concern about an unusual mole-like spot should see their doctor. Detected early, melanoma is almost always treatable. Undetected, melanoma can spread rapidly and be fatal. A dark-pigmented, usually malignant tumor arising from a melanocyte and occurring most commonly in the skin. If md does not qualify terminate add customary termination statement If md qualifies: Add customary qualification statement and instructions for proceeding Doctor, during the course of this survey you will be exposed to profiles of products that are not yet FDA approved. For the purposes of this research please assume all information provided here to be true. However, for descriptions of existing products and their approved uses, please refer to actual product prescribing information for those products.

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Chapter -5 Summary of findings, suggestion and conclusion. Findings


Delivering research insights to global pharmaceutical companies: GM INSIGHTS Research provides custom market and media research services to global pharmaceutical companies. Emower delivers insights to clients to help them optimize sales, brand and communications. We assist clients with strategic decisions throughout product life cycle by providing actionable insights into trends in different disease/drug categories, market and opportunity assessment, positioning and segmentation, and, pre-and post-launch tracking. We also help PR and communication teams in pharmaceutical companies in media monitoring and measurement, providing global coverage, across regions and languages. GM INSIGHTS Research enable pharmaceuticals and healthcare clients to: Gain deep understanding of health, wellness and emerging technology trends Analyze segmentation and targeting Measure Return of Marketing Effort (ROME) Track special event coverage Monitor and measure buzz in both traditional and social media Understand message congruence Identify and track key influencers If you would like to know more about our expertise and experience in the Pharmaceuticals and Healthcare industry. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A variety of forces shape the professional services industry from fierce competition and globalization to the modularization of business processes and technology. Clients want professional services firms to deliver costeffective services in smaller, fixedprice contracts, but at the same time want to retain highly seasoned professionals equipped to address their most challenging Industry-specific process needs. To succeed in this environment, professional services firms must Continually improve their service delivery methods to increase

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Client value and profitability and lower costs. This involves implementing more efficient resourcing and partnering processes, creatively packaging services, and co creating value with clients. However, for any of these endeavors to work, a firm must have a foundation that supports global processes and workflows that enhance client and supplier collaboration. For the firms that succeed, the rewards are great. They can differentiate themselves in a crowded marketplace, lock in loyal clients, use internal and external resources more profitably, and improve time to market. This paper reviews the forces that affect the professional services market today, defines and explains the main pillars of service delivery innovation, and reviews the benefits firms derive from service delivery innovation. It concludes by listing key operating and financial metrics that can measure the value created for firms when they commit their strategies to ongoing service delivery innovation. Gm insights Research can support you with research-based findings to understand:

Consumers perception of the existing products versus need for new product introductions Market segmentation Product and brand positioning Competitive assessment on brand and product awareness Consumers shopping behaviors, price sensitivities and packaging preferences.

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SUGGESTION
Company can create an expressive outlet for your employees. This will empower them to make suggestions that will probably help the company function better, creating engagement and loyalty. They need to show your employees that their opinions matter. Company dont need a computer program to keep track of all the suggestions. All you need is a box where employees can anonymously drop in suggestions as well as encouragement from the company explaining the importance of giving this a fair try.

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CONCLUSION
Currently avg. projects/month 6-7 Expected to build up a delivery team which can handle 10 projects/month 3 members in each team excluding the leader Providing a cell phone to delivery manager to access the mails of the clients.

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Limitations Problems in the department


Time Zone Response to clients email Work Load Manual handling of incentive files

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

WEBSITE: WWW.GOOGLE.COM WWW.ANSWERS.COM WWW.REDIFF.COM WWW.MONEYCONTROL.COM

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1. What is your primary medical specialty? a Primary Care / Family Practice DISQUALIFY b. Dermatology - DISQUALIFY c. Oncology d. Dermatologic Oncology e .Surgery DISQUALIFY Other (please specify): __________ - DISQUALIFY 2. Are you board certified or eligible in this specialty? a. Yes b. NO 3. Which of the following best describes the setting where you spend the majority of your practice time? 1 .Community-based office practice 2 .Community-based hospital practice 3 .Comprehensive cancer center 4 .University/teaching hospital 5. Nursing home DISQUALIFY 6. Other (specify): ______________ - DISQUALIFY 4. What percent of your professional practice time is spent performing each of the following activities? Your total must sum to 100%. a_____% Direct patient care (including surgery) IF <70%, DISQUALIFY b_____% Teaching c_____% Conducting research d_____% Other SHOW TOTAL / TOTAL MUST SUM TO 100%

5. In a typical month, how many patients do you personally see or treat for any condition? a._____# of patients seen per month [Range = 0-999; IF <50, DISQUALIFY]

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6. Are you currently managing cutaneous malignant melanoma patients? By managing, we mean you are responsible for making decisions regarding initiation of and changes to therapy regimen. a. Yes b. No DISQUALIFY

7. In a typical month, how many melanoma patients do you personally treat or manage for their condition? a_____# of melanoma patients [Range = 0-999; CANNOT EXCEED Q6 RESPONSE; IF <20, DISQUALIFY 8. Of the [INSERT Q8 RESPONSE] melanoma patients you personally treat or manage in a typical month, how many are non-resectable stage IIIc-IV cutaneous metastatic melanoma patients? a. _____# of patients are non-resectable stage IIIc-IV cutaneous metastatic melanoma patients CANNOT EXCEED Q8 RESPONSE; IF <5, DISQUALIFY 9. Do you or does any person in your immediate family work for or regularly consult with any of the following? a. Government agency (e.g., FDA) DISQUALIFY b. Pharmaceutical or biotech manufacturer DISQUALIFY c. Pharmaceutical advertising agency DISQUALIFY d. Pharmaceutical market research company DISQUALIFY e. None of the above IF CHECKED, DO NOT ALLOW ANY OTHER RESPONSE 10. When was the last time you participated in market research regarding melanoma? a. b. c. d. e. Never Within the last month DISQUALIFY 1 to 3 months ago 3 to 6 months ago More than 6 months ago

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