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The romance of the harem. By Miss Pardoe. v.1
Pardoe, Mss (|ua), 1806-1862.
London : H. Coburn, 1839.
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/uiuo.ark:/13960/t4dn4qr64
Public Domain
http://www.hathitrust.org/access_use#pd
Ths work s n the Pubc Doman, meanng
that t s not sub|ect to copyrght. Users are
free to copy, use, and redstrbute the work
n part or n whoe. lt s possbe that current
copyrght hoders, hers or the estate of the
authors of ndvdua portons of the work,
such as ustratons or photographs, assert
copyrghts over these portons. Dependng
on the nature of subsequent use that s made,
addtona rghts may need to be obtaned
ndependenty of anythng we can address.
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Ll
TH
U l .5lT
f lLLl l
c
ur / :/ t y e .
C r h
yf.t r
3r| ::| s
- s3 f |

k|m
- sas .
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, . f _ -8
The person chargng ths matera s re-
sponsbe for ts return to the brary from
whch t was wthdrawn on or before the
Latest Date stamped beow.
Theft, mutaton, and undernng of books
are reasons for dscpnary acton and may
resut n dsmssa from the Unversty.
U l lT lLLl l Ll T U -CH MP lG
L161 -1096

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- . // .
/ r y
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Dgt ed by the lnternet rchve
n 2009 wth fundng from
Unversty of lnos Urbana-Ch mpagn
http://www.archve.org/detas/romanceofharem01pat
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TH
M C TH H M.
Ml P D ,
UTH TH ClT TH ULT .
the rver and the dbsart, c.
Md many thngs most new to ear and eye,
The pgrm rested here hs weary feet,
nd ga ed around on Mosem u ury.
y .
l TH LUM ,
L. l.
L D :
H C L U , PU Ll H ,
G T M L UGH T T.
1839.
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L D :
. H l. |U ., 51, UP UT T T. H M T.
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4
P C .
The fatterng success of my ate work on
: Turkey has nduced me to offer to the Pubc
the present coecton of renta ctons
whch are genune taes reated by the profes-
sona Massad|hes, or tory-teers of the ast,
n the Harems of the weathy Turks durng
seasons of festvty, and partcuary n that
of the ama an. ln the seecton whch l
have made, l have, throughout the whoe work,
carefuy avoded the supernatura, save n one
sotary nstance, where the aegory was so
taented and temptng that l fet t woud
requre no apoogy wth any cass of readers
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l P C .
preferrng, n every other case, a fe-ke and
probabe chan of crcumstances, to a brant
and mpossbe pcture. Hence my fctons
nether borrow power from the Gen, terror
from the Ghous, nor grace and beauty from
the Pers they treat ony of ordnary men
and women but ndvduas paced n pos-
tons, and actuated by feengs, amost unknown
n urope.
ln order to ocase the dfferent taes, l have
endeavoured to adopt to a certan degree the
ford and fguratve stye of anguage n whch
the rentas so much deght, and so constanty
nduge whe l have been carefu nether to
carcature ther habts nor ther opnons but
to confne mysef as cosey as possbe to the
actons and feengs of every-day Turksh fe
and to fng off , f l may so e press t, a dea
of authorshp, to dentfy mysef for the tme wth
the ndvduas of whom l wrote.
How far l may have succeeded n my attempt
to foow up, through the medum of these fe-
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P C .
tons, my former task of deneatng Turksh
manners, t s not for me to determne but l
put them forth n the fu confdence that those
readers to whom the usages of the ast are fa-
mar, w admt the fdety of the pctures
and n the hope that those to whom they are
comparatvey unknown, w fnd suffcent at-
tracton n ther novety and pecuarty, to carry
them peasanty through the voumes.
radenhan Lodge,
|an. 1838.
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C T T
P
TH l T LUM .
P G
Part the rst 1
The Damond Merchant 24
Part the econd 110
The even Doors 132
Part the Thrd 269
The Tatar s Tae 287
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TH M C TH H M.
tnope, and so tte vsted by the wanderng
gaours, who of ate years have overrun the ast,
that there was no hope of obtanng the advce
of a rank Hakeem, or doctor, who woud, as a
matter of course, have cured the Hanoum on hs
frst vst and the wse men and the wse women
of the provnce had ong fary gven up the case
as desperate.
s tme wore on, thngs grew worse and worse :
and the Pasha wa ed more moody and mean-
choy. The Hanoum, weared ake of her da-
monds, her brds, her saves, and her husband,
sghed for some new and htherto untasted pea-
sure but how was ths to be procured Her
apartments had ong been fed wth the rarest
fowers, and her angud paate tempted by the
chocest fruts. very satete of the Pasha
(and they were many ) ost hmsef n efforts to
gratfy her fances and st there was no sats-
fyng them.
Carmf Hanoum was a Crcassan, ovey as a
hour, and qute conscous of her power over the
Pasha gorgeous n her beauty, as the tup
after whch she had been named and caprcous
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TH M C TH H M. 6
enough to have supphed a the harem of the
Grand egnour wth whms. ome of her
women even went so far as to say that ther
far mstress affected more ndsposton than she
fet, n order to satsfy her ove of power and
change and certan t s, that f the tte beauty
possessed the tact to do ths, t competey an-
swered her hopes, for the more e actng she
became, the more the Pasha appeared to hang
upon her smes.
fter ths e panaton of the state of affars n
the paace of the Pashak, t may be beeved
wth what deght the ntegence was receved
that a traveng save-merchant on hs way to
tambou had hated n the cty and that
among hs saves there was a Greek gr of n-
comparabe beauty and great taent, whom he
hoped to se to the utan.
The atrap, preceded by two kavasses,-f- and
foowed by four of hs chaoushes, threw a
purse to the ppe-bearer who brought hm the
news and, thrustng hs feet nto hs sppers,
Governor of a Provnce.
f Poce. l ffcers.
b2
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4 TH M C TH H M.
too an ous to entrust the msson to an offcer of
hs househod, he hastened to the caravansera,
whch was the temporary abode of the merchant
Tah . n dea had nstanty suggested tsef,
whch he determned to rea e. hat were a
few thousand pastres when put n competton
wth the happness of hs adored Carmf He
woud purchase ths wonderfu save, and her
taents shoud serve to begue the ennu of hs
beautfu young wfe.
The merchant prostrated hmsef to the earth
as the shadow of the Pasha fe across hs thresh-
od what ev mght not ths une pected vst
portend to hs fortunes ut he was soon re-
assured by the band hosh uduk we
found, whch met hs ear and, after havng tra-
versed the foor on hs knees to the feet of hs v-
ster, and pressed the hem of hs garment to hs
ps and brow, he meeky crossed hs hands upon
hs breast, and ventured to rase hs eyes.
ou have wth you saves of prce, s t not
so asked the Pasha, as he took possesson of
the ow sofa.
lt s so, my ord was the repy.
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TH M TH H M.
hence are they and are there any
among them who are worthy that l shoud ook
upon them
hat sha l say to my ord They are
from many ands, and some of them are worthy
even of hs gracous notce, whch w be to
them as a ght from Paradse.
l w see them, sad afua Pasha, as
hs chbouque-bearer knet and presented to hm
hs costy ppe of cherry wood pped wth
amber whe hs cafeghe approached wth the
tny cup of porcean, n ts fagree stand, redo,
ent of the perfumed mocha : l w see them
f l may fnd peasure n ookng on them, ah
hr ah ony knows. akaum we sha
see.
ashustun on my head be t reped the
merchant, as he performed the gracefu saam
aekum, and eft the apartment.
ne by one the veed beautes were ed to the
presence of the atrap. There were gorgeous
Georgans, wth ther arge, deep, fashng eyes,
and ther sparkng teeth, ther fney-mouded
astern sautaton.
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TH M C TH H M.
fgures, and |etty har angud Crcassans, wth
ther dreamy, dove-ke gances, ther snowy
skns, and ther e qustey rounded mbs and
beautes from the lsands, wth ther angushng
stess grace, and sweety-toned voces. ut the
far Greek gr dd not appear and as the ast
of the brght tran wthdrew, and the merchant
agan prostrated hmsef before the Pasha, he
asked camy re there no more
one, may t pease my ord. vaah f
there are a few urdsh women, but they are
bosh nothng.
upek dog T sad the atrap sterny :
Do you e to my beard here s the young
Greek whom you have hed back
The affrghted merchant bent hs head to the
earth : urey my ord |ests wth hs save the
gr s a gaour an nfde a harem adeh
an -born. othng, and ess than no-
thng.
uf ouf peace, peace sad the Pasha,
mpatenty, or your head sha answer for
your presumpton. ls t for you, and such as
you, to decde upon my peasure Tchapouk
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TH M C TH H M. /
quck brng hther the young Greek, or
the bowstrng sha gve your saves a new
master.
staferaah Heaven forbd fatered
out the merchant: w my ord hear hs ser-
vant The young gaour has aready been seen
by a u bash a captan of soders, who s now
on hs way to the capta, and who has promsed
to tak of her to the sar gha of the utan,
(whom may ah prosper ) How, then, can
the save of my ord, who s but as a dog n hs
sght, dspose of ths Greek woman unt he has
earnt the peasure of the Padshah P -f-
eb cur e camed the Pasha, enraged
at ths new dffcuty do you dare to eat drt
and to pour out your words, as though they
were the words of wsdom, w hen they are but
the promptngs of hetan, and the nstgatons
of the v ne l spt upon the grave of your
father, and backen the face of your mother
ho am l that l shoud sten to you, when
ray foot s on your head ak see the save
s mne, and the god s ready brng her hther
Chef of the unuchs. f overegn.
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TH M C TH H M.
wth speed or, by the beard of the Prophet,
your neck sha be ftted wth a bowstrng
ah buyuk der ah s great mur-
mured the merchant, as he prepared to obey
ho can wthstand hs fate
Durng the bref nterva that ensued, the
Pasha smoked on n sence hs curosty was
aroused, and hs anger e cted and yet he en-
|oyed the scene, for t had afforded hm a new
sensaton, and restrung hs nerves, whch had
attery been terrby shattered by hs an ety
for Carmf Hanoum. Thus he was n no un-
gracous mood, when, wth much parade, and
wth a most unwng e presson of countenance,
the merchant sowy returned, eadng n a fgure
ostentatousy muffed n cose and heavy dra-
pery.
y vah ths pear beyond prce s at east
we guarded sad the Pasha, endeavourng to
concea hs nterest beneath an affectaton of
scorn but we waste tme and l have occupa-
ton of more moment than sttng to wtness the
unveng of a woman.
en ektar der you are the master re-
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TH M -C TH H M. 9
ped the merchant, as he cast asde the mante
of the femae : be t as my ord ws.
or a moment the Pasha was sent for t
was truy a vson of surpassng beauty whch
had been so suddeny reveaed to hm. The
far Greek was scarcey s teen years of age,
sght as a wow wand, and gracefu as an
anteope. The bewdered a fua Pasha had
never behed such eyes, save n hs dreams and
then ony when he had dreamt of paradse. f
the deepest bue that had ever caught ther dye
from heaven, they were frnged wth ashes as
back as nght and the ong sky har, whch
fe n a score of rch brads about her vory
shouders, was of the same hue. Her sght
fgure was habted n a tght |acket of emerad-
cooured vevet, aced wth god and the cymar
that veed her throat was whte as the bosom
upon whch t rested. Her sma feet were
partay covered wth embrodered sppers of
crmson, sprnked wth sma pears and the
short fu pettcoat of whte nen reveaed an
anke of e quste symmetry.
The Pasha drew a ong breath. hat, ndeed,
b5
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10 TH M C TH H M.
was god, when weghed aganst a hour ke
ths ut he dd not, n that moment, thnk of
the beautfu Carmf hs do ed wfe nd
her prce s what was hs frst queston.
How sha l answer my ord sad the
merchant, wary. The save s hs.
Chok chay that s much smed the Pasha,
as he removed the chbouque from hs mouth,
and threw out a sender thread of smoke: but
the pastres are ready how far sha they be
counted
The save pays on the ebec, and sngs the
songs of her own and was the repy : nay,
shoud my ord care to sten, she can te taes
ke a massad|he.
ah kerm ah be prased e|acuated
the Pasha, as, for the frst tme snce the ve of
the save had been wthdrawn, hs thoughts were
forced back to hs absent beauty the Prophet
has heard my prayer. nce more l te you to
name your prce, and that the save s mne.
e brm what can l say. reped the
merchant meeky l have gven much for her
Professona story-teer.
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TH M C TH H M. 1 1
a|abder she s a wonder he speaks Turksh
ke a daughter of paradse and her voce s as
the voce of the bubu n the gardens of sh-
apor.
Mashaah there has been enough, and
too much of ths mpatenty broke n the
Pasha: for the ast tme, what ask you for the
gr
The merchant cast down hs eyes, and hestated
for a moment but he had been shrewd enough
to detect the effect whch the e treme beauty of
the maden had produced upon the Pasha and he
consequenty summoned courage to name a prce
whch he coud never hope to obtan, under
other crcumstances.
ah n the name of the Prophet, that
s much sad the started Pasha fty
thousand pastres hundred purses Lves
there a woman between tambou and Paradse,
who s worth a hundred purses
The merchant was sent.
Gve hm s ty thousand, and brng hther
the araba to convey the save to my harem
pursued the Pasha, turnng to hs prncpa
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12 TH M C TH H M.
chaoush and, as the offcer wthdrew, he shuffed
off the sofa, resumed hs sHppers, and, passng
the prostrate merchant wthout a gance, sowy
waked out of the caravansera.
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TH M C TH H M. 13
CH PT 11.
The most dffcut porton of the arrange-
ment was yet to be accompshed for the Pasha
coud not concea from hmsef that t was |ust
possbe that the beautfu Carraf mght not
atogether approve of the means whch he had
now adopted for her gratfcaton and he therefore
resoved to take her by surprse, and to regae her
wth the vaunted mnstresy of the far save,
before she was ntroduced nto her presence.
The mornng mea had accordngy scarcey
termnated on the morrow, ere the Pasha
found t necessary to summon the young
Greek, who had been kept carefuy con-
ceaed, n order that he mght e pan to her
the sufferng state of her new mstress, and
hs own an ety for her amusement. he en-
tered sowy, and wth her whte arms foded
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14 TH M C TH H M.
meeky upon her bosom : her eyes were heavy,
and the Pasha saw that she had been weepng.
The anguor of gref added a new charm to her
beauty and as she bent her forehead to the
earth on the threshod of the chamber, the
atrap wecomed her wth a gente hosh
gedn you are wecome.
Her prostraton performed, the save stood
wth bent head, one pace wthn the room, and
awated the orders of the Pasha.
orkma fear not was hs ne t address
your home beneath my roof sha be a happy
one. How are you caed
atnka, murmured out a ow soft voce.
ay, nay, sad the atrap gay your s s
but an nfde name for such a hour. How say
you. sha we ca you eya . Ts a more
fttng appeaton for such a y
en ektar der, agam you are the master,
my ord, was the repy.
eya be t then, pursued the Pasha :
and now, hear me. our taents have been
e toed, and l doubt not that they are worthy
hte.
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TH M C TH H M. 15
of a the prase whch has been avshed on
them. l have a far wfe, beautfu enough to
have been the daughter of a per, and born of
a sunbeam, but she angushes beneath a crue
maady, and we cannot restore to her eyes the
ght that has fed from them. e ths task
yours t w requre a gente hand, and a
brght sprt.
My heart w be n the task sad the far
Greek softy, even now l am ready.
Tab,|anum we sad, my sou e camed
the Pasha you sha be the hakeem, to whom
she w owe her recovered boom, and to whom
l sha be ndebted for a renewa of the hap-
pness to vhch l have ong been a stranger.
hosh gedn you are wecome, far eya , to
the harem of afua Pasha.
nd how ws my ord that l shoud enter
upon my offce demanded atnka, somewhat
hasty : sha l take my ebec, and sng to the
Hanoum f end one of our mountan meodes
That were we done, sad the atrap
but l woud not that she shoud see the mn-
stre whe she stens to her voce : that were too
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p
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16 TH M C TH H M.
much and the Pasha ooked patron ngy,
and amost tendery, towards the young Greek.
ut the gance feU ke a sunbeam upon marbe
the maden dd not rase her eyes and, after a
short sence, she asked humby
hat ws my ord that l shoud sng.
ha the stran be sad, ke the heart of the beau-
tfu stener or |oyous as the mood n whch he
oves to see her .
e t even as you w sad the Pasha and
cappng hs hands, he gave orders to an attendant
that atnka shoud be conducted to an apart-
ment contguous to that nhabted by the uyuk
Hanoum, where she coud be heard unseen.
Ths command uttered, the save awated
no further bddng to wthdraw but, once more
prostratng hersef, she performed her saam
aekum, and foowed the attendant from the
apartment.
Carmf Hanoum sat moody on her sofa,
heedess of the efforts of her madens to arouse
her from her revere. he had cast asde her
costy tusbee of gems, and fung her feather-
osary.
G
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#
p
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TH M C TH H M. 17
framed ana from her n dsgust. Costy per-
fumes were burnng n a vase of sver on a sma
tabe near her, and at ntervas she passed her
hand through the scented vapour as f uncon-
scousy. |ewes of prce were scattered over
her cushons, and a few fowers were strown
among them but they were ake unheeded.
et t seemed not hke the anguor of dsease
whch weghed her down but rather bore the
character of deep and setted meanchoy, fed by
regretfu thought.
uddeny she rased her head, as a ow stran
of musc broke upon her ear : t was a wd
gushng meody, haf hope, haf sadness and,
by whatever spe t wrought, t fastened at once
upon the sprt of the far Carmf Hanoum, who
sat entranced among her cushons, and stened
breathessy even to ts cose.
G TH G L .
|oy s a brd
Catch t as t sprngs
lt w return no more
hen once t spreads ts wngs.
Hand -mrror.
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_
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#
p
d
18 TH M C TH H M.
lts song s gay, but bref,
The voce of sunny weather
ut ah the brd and eaf
ansh both together
|oy s a fower
Puck t n ts boom
Tw cose ts petas up
lf darker skes shoud goom.
lt s a ovey thng,
nd formed for sunny weather
ut ah the fower and sprng
ansh both together
|oy s a chd
e e t n ts mrth
or soon ts p w know
The wtherng tant of earth.
lts eye s brght as truth,
type of sunny weather
ut ah the sme and youth
ansh both together
The song ceased, but for a ong nterva the
beautfu Crcassan remaned motoness. The
stran had evdenty awakened memores whch
she sought not to dspe and, when at ength a
deep sgh reeved her overcharged heart, she
mpatenty commanded that the nvsbe mus-
can shoud be brought before her.
G
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o
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2
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_
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#
p
d
TH M C TH H M. 19
t her desre the curtan of tapestry was
rased, and the Greek gr stood on the threshod
wth her ebec n her hand.
|ab wonderfu broke from the ps of
both, as they ga ed earnesty on each other and
atnka had bounded haf way across the foor,
and the wfe of the Pasha had sprung from her
sofa, ere the save remembered that she who had
once been her frend had now become her ms-
tress and she stopped suddeny wth the ndg-
nant bood mantng her brow, and woud have
turned asde, but the deghted young Hanoum
caught her to her heart.
ster of my sou she murmured, as the
frst rush of |oyfu surprse was succeeded by a
camer and more assured deght : hence
come you ecome are you, as the frst roses
that gem the gardens of the pers dear have you
ever been, as the memory of the oved and ost
l come from your own far and from the
mountans where we were wont to wander toge-
ther was the repy : but when you were gone
the fowers of the vaey hung ther heads and
the wnd on the h-tops murmured ony sadness.
G
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#
p
d
20 TH M C TH H M.
ut l have found you once more, and the sor-
rows that have faen upon me snce we parted
are forgotten.
ne of them at east s overpast hasty n-
terposed the Crcassan : from ths hour, be-
oved of my sprt, you are free. nd as she
spoke she ed the maden to the sofa, and seated
her by her sde.
The news soon reached the Pasha that, n the
person of the Greek save, hs wfe had found a
ong-ost frend and he earnt the fact wth a
bewderment of feeng whch he dd not seek to
anayse but when he agan vsted the beautfu
Hanoum, and saw that the ght danced n her
eye, and that her p was wreathed wth smes,
he amost persuaded hmsef that he was satsfed
wth the event.
Had the worthy atrap been more conversant
wth the mysteres of a woman s heart, he mght
perchance have suspected that even the meetng
wth one whom she had oved n her own and
wth the ove of a sster, woud be nsuffcent to
produce so sudden and so great a change n the
temper of hs wfe but afua Pasha was nq
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#
p
d
TH M C TH H M. 21
w ard n the ore of ove the effect deghted
hm and, sensbe as he hmsef was to the
beauty of the far Greek, he ooked no deeper
for the cause, but smoked the chbouque of con-
tent, and occuped the dvan of |ustce, as we
satsfed wth hmsef and a that appertaned to
hm, as though nether mystery nor |eaousy e -
sted n the word.
lt was on a far evenng n summer that the
two frends sat together, conversng n ow whs-
pers of past years and vanshed happness. The
draperes of the porta were drawn back and
beyond the threshod of the apartment stretched
away the garden and groves of the paace, far as
the eye coud reach. ountans of decate whte
marbe threw ther sparkng waters nto the ar
and, as the voume descended, touched by the
coours of the settng sun, t fe back upon the
otus bossoms n the basn ke a tde of gems.
rds of gorgeous pumage were suspended n
goden cages from the branches of the ta trees,
or wandered among the ranbow-tnted fowers
whe the sweet breath of the me-buds and the
Persan |asmne came soothngy upon the wnd.
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#
p
d
22 TH M C TH H M.
lt was a ovey hour but there was a saddenng
nfuence n ts u urous cam whch the far
Crcassan fet n every puse tears stood n her
deep eyes and the unbdden sgh rose at nter-
vas, as f to rebuke the effort whch she made to
sme.
The gente Greek ga ed fondy on her for a
moment and then, fngng her whte arms about
her neck, she sad payfuy
, gu um my eyes when afua Pasha
pad s t purses for a certan save whom
he purchased not many months back, t was
n the hope that she mght be abe to w e
hs wayward wfe from her sadness. How say
you sha we try her sk My frst tae
l have tod you, as the rose avows her ove to the
bubu, n secret the rest may be more openy
devered the Prophet grant that, ke the bu-
bu s answer to hs bossom-ove, they may be
sweet, even athough perchance somewhat sad.
peak, ff endmou my mstress, sha t be so
|anum my sou answered her com-
panon l ve but to sten. nd, havng
paced hersef more commodousy among her
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#
p
d
TH M C TH H M. 23
cushons, and possessed hersef of the far hand
whch was wanderng ovngy among her tresses,
the Pasha s wfe, surrounded by her saves, pre-
pared to hearken to the tae of her new-found
frend.
The Greek remaned sent for a moment,
wth her open pam pressed upon her brow
n deep thought and then, suddeny smhng
upon the young beauty at her sde, she struck a
few notes upon her ebec, and commenced her
narratve.
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#
p
d
24 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT lll.
TH Dl M D M CH T.
t the regn of utan Mourad the econd,
there dwet n tambou a young man whose
name was Hassan. Hs father, who had been a
merchant of some reputaton, ded whe hs
son was yet a chd and hs mother had ved
through the subsequent years of her wdowhood
wthout an nterest or an affecton whch dd not
centre n her boy. e had the youth repad
the ovng care of hs ast parent and often dd
the aged usnu-gu bess the Prophet who had
spared such a treasure to her grey hars.
Hassan ffend was ardent, magnatve, and
hgh-hearted, and was as remarkabe for hs
mora quates as for hs persona attractons.
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#
p
d
TH Dl M D M CH T. 25
s he s the hero of my story, l must be e cused
f l attempt hs descrpton and l w gve t
n as few words as Dossbe. To a stature so
ofty that, had t not been tempered by e treme
grace, t mght have been consdered amost as
a defect, he unted the advantages of a nobe e -
presson of countenance, and features of the
most cassca beauty. Hs dark eyes had a
depth whence, n moments of e ctement, the
vng fre fashed forth wth meteorc brUancy
and hs p had that curve of mnged scorn and
softness whch betrays the workngs of the sprt
wthout the ad of words. The turban never
bound a nober brow than that of Hassan f-
fend nor was the grde of cachemre ever
foded above a more generous heart.
Consttuted as l have here descrbed hm, t
w not be matter of surprse to any that Has-
san created for hmsef a surpassng nterest n
the breast of the Defter-dar, or Treasurer to the
Crown, who soon fet for the young man the
affecton of a father. Hs ove was gratefuy re-
turned and t was the more vauabe to Hassan
because he had never known a father s fondness.
L. l. c
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#
p
d
26 TH M C TH H M.
To the affecton of a son he added the reverence
of a protege, and thus deepened the feehng whch
shed a gow of happness over hs e stence
whe hs brghtest moments, despte hs youth
and hs enthusasm, were spent n the socety of
hs powerfu and parta frend.
Thus were thngs stuated, when one of those
dpomatc avaanches, whch descend no where so
suddeny nor so fatay as n the ast, over-
whemed the Defter-dar, and he found hmsef
dspossessed of a hs honours at a perod when
they had become habtua to hm. or was hs
nterest at court the ony oss whch accompaned
hs dsmsson from offce true, hs fortune,
whch was ampe, remaned ntact and unn-
vaded by the hand of power he was st sur-
rounded by u ury and ndugence but hs
antechamber was no onger thronged wth those
troops of frends who had been wont to crowd t,
and whose attendance had ever been consdered
overpad by hs smes : he awoke on the mor-
row after hs dsmssa, weared by a nght of
ftfu and uneasy dreams, ony to fnd hmsef
aone.
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#
p
d
TH Dl M D M CH T. 27
There s somethng strange and startng to
one who has been accustomed to a bevy of
aduators to a herd of suppants to a throng
of obsequous sycophants n fndng hs atar
suddeny abandoned by the ncense-breathng
worshppers who were wont to encrce t and
thus fet the Defter-dar. He wandered st-
essy and sady through hs spacous apart-
ments he ad hs ppe asde, and eft hs coffee
untasted and, after a whe, he passed nto the
harem but even the smes of ef - abah,
hs wfe, faed to awaken hm to |oy. nd yet
she was the wfe of ony a few short months,
and beautfu as a hour. Gente as the Morn-
ng ephyr, whose name she bore, dark-eyed as
the ga ee, and gracefu as a fawn, ef -
abah found the spe of her oveness for the
frst tme poweress.
s she fung hersef upon a pe of cushons
besde the sofa of the Defter-dar, and ooked
up tendery n hs face, a codness fe upon
her heart, and she remaned for a whe sent
yet even that avaed her nothng, for her s-
ence passed unheeded no fond ga e n,
c2
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n


/


h
t
t
p
:
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/
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w
w
.
h
a
t
h

t
r
u
s
t
.
o
r
g
/
a
c
c
e
s
s
_
u
s
e
#
p
d
28 TH M C TH H M.
gered upon her beauty and a tnge of btter and
regretfu surprse mnged wth the sgh that
heaved her bosom, as she stretched her |eweed
hand towards her ebec, and swept the cords
wth fngers as ght as the breath of evenng
among roses.
The sprt of the Defter-dar was softened by
the stran, and he sghed n hs turn but,
aas the sgh was not for ef - abah for, as
hs troubed thoughts resoved themseves nto
cam, he remembered Hassan and, whe the
beautfu Crcassan was breathng out a ay of
ove, he was mentay e patatng on the deghts
of frendshp.
f what ava, he asked hmsef, have
been the tos and the ntrgues of years f
what vaue have been the fase vows of the tme-
servng herd who have foowed n my path
The tos have wthered me the ntrgues have
bghted me the fatterers have proved fase
the gaud and the gtter of court favour were the
sunhght n whch they basked, and they have
no tme to shver n the shade of dsappontment.
ow s the moment to revenge mysef on fate.
G
e
n
e
r
a
t
e
d

o
n

2
0
1
3
-
0
1
-
1
9

1
4
:
5
3

G
M
T


/


h
t
t
p
:
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/
h
d

.
h
a
n
d

e
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n
e
t
/
2
0
2
7
/
u

u
o
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a
r
k
:
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6
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/
t
4
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n
4
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6
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c

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h
a
t
h

t
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o
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g
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a
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c
e
s
s
_
u
s
e
#
p
d
TH Dl M D M CH T. 29
and to make the ure of ambton yed to the
cam mpuse of frendshp. l am no onger the
favourte of Mcurad, but l am st the frend of
Hassan and what s the possesson of power
compared to that of one honest heart hen
the storm rages, the surf s scattered upon the
shore but the |ewe whch s hdden n the depths
of ocean s unmoved by the tumut of the b-
ows.
th ths consoatory refecton the Defter-
dar concuded hs revere and, as the sme of
recovered compacency rose to hs p, ef -
abah ceased her song, and smed n her turn
at the success of her fond e perment.
or was the stoca composure of the e -
courter sub|ect of surprse to those around hm.
very Turk s aware that the same hand whch
beckons hm to a Pashak can aso twne the
bowstrng about hs neck and he accepts the
one wth as much outward composure as he sub-
mts to the other. ven beggary, suddeny as
t may come upon hm, fas to wrng a murmur
from hs ps. He ooks upon wordy ad-
vancement and wordy possessons as mere
G
e
n
e
r
a
t
e
d

o
n

2
0
1
3
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9

1
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:
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M
T


/


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a
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a
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t
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o
r
g
/
a
c
c
e
s
s
_
u
s
e
#
p
d
30 TH M C TH H M.
transtory benefts, and the grave as the great
and certan end of a and, unke the theo-
retca uropean, who, admttng the same be-
ef, nevertheess acts as though the were the
supreme good the pha and mega of a
created bengs the Mussemaun, nstead of ter-
mnatng hs reverses wth a psto or a ra or, or
supportng them at best wth a dogged and
suen despar whch paces hm beyond the pae
of future e erton, and atrophses the energes
of a who are dependent on hm, camy resgns
hmsef to a fate whch he had not power to
contro, and makes the best of that whch st
remans. The Defter-dar was weathy he yet
possessed the means of tranqu, and even costy
en|oyment the substance was untouched, t
was the shadow ony whch had passed away
and, under such crcumstances, no Turk woud
arrogate to hmsef the rght of compant or
deem that he coud be an ob|ect of commsera-
ton.
lt was a tme of festva, the ama an was
wanng to a cose the morrow was the feast of
the aram and the Defter-dar ere ong qutted
G
e
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o
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2
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t
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t
.
o
r
g
/
a
c
c
e
s
s
_
u
s
e
#
p
d
TH Dl M D M CH T. 31
the women s apartments, n order to prepare the
presents whch, at ths perod, t s customary
to dstrbute among the members of the house-
hod.
s the e -courter turned a hasty gance on
the many gfts that ay around hm, each en-
veoped n the boksha or handkerchef n whch
the offerng s made, he coud not repress the
rsng scorn whch grew out of the memory of
past years, and the convcton that the nk that
now unted hm to those who were about
to share hs bounty, was one of nterest, not
ove. ut the feeng passed away, as hs eye
ngered on the costy gfts prepared for Hassan
and, wd unwonted earnestness, he once more
unfoded the boksha to assure hmsef that the
present was worthy of hs ove.
shaw from the ooms of Cachemre, whose
prce woud have ransomed a provnce, con-
ceaed amd ts fods a Damascus dagger, and a
par of damond studded pstos and, as the
Defter-dar repaced the weapons, and refoded
the handkerchef, he put nto the hand of a
trusty save the precous offerng of frendshp,
G
e
n
e
r
a
t
e
d

o
n

2
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M
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t
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o
r
g
/
a
c
c
e
s
s
_
u
s
e
#
p
d
32 TH M C TH H M.
and turned away wth a cam brow and a cheer-
fu sprt.
ut the cup of dsappontment was not yet
draned to the dregs, and the Defter-dar was
fated to mbbe the draught even to the ast
drop.
ager to e pedte the work of bounty, the
save oaded hmsef wth as many packages as
he coud convenenty carry, and hastened on
hs errand. umerous were the greetngs
whch awated hm as he passed on and each
chance- passenger whom he encountered on hs
way grasped hs hand n feowshp and con-
gratuaton, as s customary at ths soemn feast
cannon boomed aong the osphorus the ds-
tant sound of musc came upon the wnd and
the good Mussemaun, e cted and preoccuped,
hasty paced n the possesson of one of the m-
patent e pectants the sumptuous gft destned
for Hassan and then unconscousy pursued hs
way to the dweng of the young ffend.
Hassan, meanwhe, suffered far more at the
msfortunes of hs frend than the Defter-dar
hmsef. The e -courter was no onger n the
G
e
n
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r
a
t
e
d

o
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2
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h
a
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h

t
r
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t
.
o
r
g
/
a
c
c
e
s
s
_
u
s
e
#
p
d
TH Dl M D M CH T. 33
frst rush of youth he had attaned the age
when, despte a crcumstances, a certan degree
of phosophy s forced upon every man. He
had suffcent e perence to perceve and to ap-
precate the hoowness and uncertanty of
wordy honours, and a mnd energetc enough
to turn to nober means of consoaton. ut
Hassan was yet n the fresh years when the dew
of hope fas pentfuy on the waysde of e -
stence, and cas up a thousand brght tnts
from the wdng fowers whch bossom there.
He had not yet earnt the usefu and care-
taught esson of sef-e amnaton and sef-go
vernment. He coud not comprehend the pos-
sbty of castng asde wordy dstnctons,
and repacng ther gtter by the -more soca
possessons of feowshp and regard. He had
ever ooked upon the Defter-dar as upon one
born to authorty and trust and he coud not,
n the frst rush of feeng, dsentange those
attrbutes whch had so ong been bent n hs
magnaton. To say that he pted the nd-
vdua were an error he ony mourned the
ev for he regarded hs frend wth the sam.e
c 5
G
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t
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o
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/
a
c
c
e
s
s
_
u
s
e
#
p
d
34 TH M C TH H M.
honourng eyes as when he moved n prde and
power. The sun, sad Hassan, n repy to
some observaton of usnu-gu, hs mother s
st the sun, though couds may have passed
before t. ho sha dare to ft an rreverent
ook to the gorous orb, or to derde ts want of
ght, because the vapours of the mornng have
overshadowed t
The Defter-dar, retorted the aged woman,
as she resumed her ppe, and deposted besde
her cushons the bag of embrodered cachemre
contanng the scented tobacco wth whch she
had |ust repenshed t the Defter-dar has st
the heart and the hand of a prnce and fear
not
hat shoud l fear e camed Hassan,
hs dark eyes fashng scorn at the nference of
hs more wordy-mnded mother Mashaah
have l oved hm ony for the rches wth whch
he has oaded me Have l been bought at a
prce Do not even ou know me better l
te you, mother, that the word hods not the
beng who sha ever rend away my heart from
the Defter-dar he has been a father to me n
G
e
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2
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t
r
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t
.
o
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/
a
c
c
e
s
s
_
u
s
e
#
p
d
TH Dl M D 3l CH T. 35
affecton, a frend n trust, a protector n munf-
cence. He ony can undo the work of hs own
kndness and whe he st oves me, nothng
sha part us, though a the s of fe shoud
accumuate around hm.
The words had scarcey passed the ps of the
e cted young man, when a save of usnu-
gu s harem stood spperess at the door of the
apartment, hodng n her hand an embrodered
boksha, whch she ad at the feet of Hassan as
the gft of the Defter-dar and then, retreatng
a few paces, she crossed her hands before her,
and awated n sence the orders of her ord.
th an eager hand and a throbbng heart,
Hassan prepared to unfod the handkerchef
and usnu-gu rased hersef from her recum-
bent poston to feast her eyes on the costy
present whch her son was about to revea.
lt was not the e pectaton of acqurng a new
and vauabe possesson whch agtated Hassan
as he threw back the fods of the boksha : t was
the conscousness that the gft offered on the oc-
cason of the aram s aways n proporton
to the desree of reo-ard n whch the nd-
G
e
n
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r
a
t
e
d

o
n

2
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:
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M
T


/


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a
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h

t
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t
.
o
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g
/
a
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s
s
_
u
s
e
#
p
d
36 TH M C TH H M.
vdua to whom t s offered s hed by the
donor and hs dsmay may consequenty be
conceved when the handkerchef devered up
ts contents. The bood mounted to hs brow,
and the fre fashed from hs deep eyes, as he ds-
covered ther nature a shrt of the stuff worn
by the boatmen on the osphorus pantaoons
of the common matera used by the peasantry
a shaw whose coarse fods were meet ony to
bnd the forehead of a ghe -metkan, or domestc
save. uch was the present whch had been
tendered to the htherto favourte frend of the
Defter-dar
or a few moments the young man remaned
speechess and that bref space suffced for a
thousand comments from usnu-gu. he-
kur ah Prase be to God she e camed
we are not yet so sunk as to need such
courtesy as ths ls the Defter-dar become a
dvane, an dot, or does he take you for the son
of a baghd|ee, that he sends you garments
fttng ony for a save en chok adam, you
are much of a man, f you bear ths wthout com-
pant
abourer.
G
e
n
e
r
a
t
e
d

o
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2
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t
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o
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/
a
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c
e
s
s
_
u
s
e
#
p
d
TH Dl M D M CH T. 37
ut Hassan answered not. He sat wth hs
head bowed down upon hs breast, ost n
thought unt, as the ndgnaton of hs mother
became graduay more oud and ess measured,
he roused hmsef, and reped n a broken tone :
nough of ths. l have read the meanng of
the Defter-dar he s ord of hs own w, and l
have no rght to condemn hm for ts e ercse.
the word has changed to hm and he s free
n hs turn to change to me. lt s hs own fat
whch separates us. ay he fnd another heart
that w cng to hm as fondy and as fathfuy
as that of Hassan woud have done had he not
spurned t from hm
gush of tears foowed the words and
hasty fngng from hm the wadded coverng
of the tandour beneath whch he had been
sttng, the young man foded hs pesse about
hm, and rushed nto the street. He had need
of the keen cod ar that was bowng from the
osphorus to reeve hs aboured and panfu
breathng, for hs agony suffocated hm.
wooden frame, contanng a bra er of heated charcoa,
and overad wth sken coverets.
G
e
n
e
r
a
t
e
d

o
n

2
0
1
3
-
0
1
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1
9

1
4
:
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3

G
M
T


/


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a
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/


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.
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a
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h

t
r
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t
.
o
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g
/
a
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c
e
s
s
_
u
s
e
#
p
d
38 TH M C TH H M.
, save ths, l coud have borne he mur-
mured to hmsef but to be ranked among
hs mena servants to be put upon a footng
wth hs saves to be tacty taught that he
hods me as ghty as any other varet whom he
has bought wth hs god ths ony l cannot
bear. l-fated Hassan to have but one frend,
and to ose hm thus
or hours dd the young man wander about
the cty : he heard not the busy hum of the
streets he heeded not the brght eyes whch
fashed upon hm as he passed, from beneath the
|eaous yashmac he returned not the greetngs
that were addressed to hm by hs acquantance,
nor the de |ests of whch he was the sub|ect.
Hs mnd was absorbed by one engrossng dea
and at ntervas he mentay repeated, l-fated
Hassan to have but one frend, and to ose
hm thus
ln ths dark mood of mnd the young ffend
turned asde from the streets, |ust as twght
was begnnng to thcken around hm and en-
tered one of the cemeteres of the cty. The
e worn by Turksh femaes n the street.
G
e
n
e
r
a
t
e
d

o
n

2
0
1
3
-
0
1
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1
9

1
4
:
5
3

G
M
T


/


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a
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/


h
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a
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o
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/
a
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c
e
s
s
_
u
s
e
#
p
d
TH Dl M D M CH T. 39
nght-wnd was aready sghng among the ta
cypresses that overshadowed the graves, and the
turbaned head-stones geamed cod and ghasty
through the goom. ln the dstance the u-
mnated mnarets ooked ke fary paaces hung
n md-ar the word wthout was brghtened by
festvty, and oud wth reve Hassan fet as
though t were a btter mockery and whe he
ngered among the damp graves, he congra-
tuated hmsef n the darkness of hs sprt that
he was aone and, n the fervour of the feeng
he e camed aoud, es they too must run
the same career of cheatng affecton but as
yet they are happy for them the ve s st
unrent, and they deem that a men are truth
but / am undeceved. lnshaah l trust n
God l have draned my draught of btterness,
and the cup s empty. l-fated Hassan to
have but one frend, and to ose hm thus
nd what avas frendshp at your brght
age, ffendm murmured out a ow voce
cose besde hm, as a sma hand was ad
ghty on hs arm : osh der t s nothng.
rendshp s for the grey-beard and the
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p
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40 TH M C TH H M.
dotard but your beard s yet back as the md-
nght coud, and your wt keen as the dagger n
your grde frendshp s but the dregs whch
hfe offers to the aged when youth has draned
the draught frendshp s the cod restng-pace
of satety, when passon has e tngushed the
fames of ts fery car, and swept onward on
dusky wngs nto rrecoverabe darkness. ou
are not formed for frendshp the sprng sun
does but ght up the fowers: the fruts of
autumn requre a fercer beam. ou are ke
one who hungers at a feast, because he acks
energy to stretch forth hs hand.
ho are you and what woud you wth
me .f asked Hassan, goomy.
l am caed eech-so, was the repy
and l ask of you ony to be |ust to yoursef
the bubu amd ts sorrows has ts rose t mur-
murs not to the wnds of heaven wthout one
fond ear to sten there s a charm even n gref
where t awakens sympathy. ut the brghtest
eye w grow dm wth tears, and the smoothest
brow become furrowed by btter thought and
thus the young and the quck-hearted do we to
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 41
trampe care beneath ther feet, ere t becomes
too strong to be overmastered.
our s s |oyous phosophy affet oUah
much good may t do you sad Hassan wth a
scornfu sme, as he bent down to take a coser
vew of hs companon, nterested n spte of
hmsef n the snguarty of the adventure :
but a man must be a fop or a stoc who pro-
fesses t.
nd wherefore asked the ow, soft, but
somewhat mockng voce : the stoc of three-
and-twenty bds far to change hs creed at ffty
for one ess stern. Hassan f end, f you coud
ony ook on me, you woud beheve me.
ou know me, then sad the young
man, wth astonshment.
now you was the aughng re|onder :
who n tambou knows you not Those who
may not gather the rose are, nevertheess, not
forbdden to ook upon t.
Hassan stened more compacenty. l have
tracked you for the ast hour : l woud fan save
you from yoursef. ou are cursng your feech,
Consteaton.
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p
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42 TH M C TH H M.
when you are, n truth, your own worst enemy.
Move a few paces onward, nto yonder spot,
where the refecton of a custer of ba ng
mnarets amost cheats the eye nto a beef of
dayght. l w detan you but a moment, and
you sha then be free to act as you deem
best.
Hassan nvountary obeyed and, as he fo-
owed cosey on the footsteps of hs strange
gude, he was struck wth the ghtness of her
movements, and the gracefu unduatons of her
sght fgure but when they had at ength
reached the spot whch she ndcated, and that
she wthdrew her yashmac, and reveaed to hm
the oveest face on whch he had ever ooked,
hs breath came qucker, and he demanded hur-
nedy : How sad you that you were
caed
eech-so murmured the ow voce.
nd you are rghty named e camed
the e cted young man for your consteaton
must, ndeed, be ever n the ascendant. peak
hat woud you .
ffendm, l have tod you a my errand.
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 43
l woud fan ca back the sme to your p, and
the ght to your eye. ur mouahs may prate
to you of prayer our Pashas of power our
merchants of god l promse you a these, f
you care to mend your fortune. nd now,
foow me on the nstant, f you w or bd me
farewe at once, for, f we part to-nght, we part
for ever. l am a Turksh woman the sun has
set, and l am yet abroad : none, save yoursef,
must ook upon, or dog me. How say you
you confde n me Can my sme ghten
your gref. sen brsen you know best t s
for you to decde w you trust to me
lnstanty eternay.
lt s we sad eech-so, as she read|usted
her yashmac, and drew her heavy coak more
cosey about her : l sha ead you by bye-
paths and unfrequented streets : foow me at a
dstance and when you see me enter the dwe-
ng whther l am about to conduct you, the
door w be eft a|ar, and you may safey pass
the threshod.
tay yet a moment murmured Hassan.
nd, wherefore, ffendm hen once we
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44 TH M C TH H M.
have eft the pubc streets, and that the same
roof covers us, sha l not be free to f your
ppe, to hand your sppers, and to serve your
coffee not the musc of my ebec be
softer than the dstant murmurs of the cty and
the gances of your save be more da ng than
the gare of many torches
Hassan nssted no farther and n the ne t
nstant he was foowng the short and rapd
steps of hs new acquantance through byeways
htherto unknown to hm. t tmes he caught
gmpses of the osphorus, baskng n the refec-
ton of the myrad amps of the h-seated cty :
at tmes he eft t far behnd hm, to foow the
ascent of some steep and narrow street but he
hestated no onger: and, after the hurred wak
of an hour, durng the whoe of whch tme he
never once ost sght of hs mysterous gude, he
saw her pause an nstant at the porta of a statey
budng whose vast shadow ay ong upon the
earth, and then dsappear across the threshod.
ln the ne t moment he stood on the same spot :
the door, as he had been forewarned, remaned
a|ar he pushed t genty back, strode through
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 45
the porta, and found hmsef n a spacous
and covered court, ghted ony by one dm
and fckerng amp.
Hassan stood for a whe n some perpe ty, and
not wthout a passng suspcon that treachery
was ntended towards hm when suddeny a
back save, habted n a rch costume, who
had evdenty been awatng hs arrva, se ed
hm by the hand, and drew hm forward.
Hassan was nether of an age nor a temperament
to yed savshy to fear, yet, as he was hurred
onward through dark passages, and dragged up
one fght of steps and down another, where the
deep sence was broken ony by hs own footfas
and those of hs conductor, a vague apprehenson
of ev grew upon hm but t was by ths tme
too ate to recede, for, even coud he have escaped
from hs companon, and had no resstance
been offered to hs retreat, he was conscous that
he shoud be totay unabe to retrace hs path :
and under these crcumstances he resoved
quety to foow up the adventure, termnate as
t mght.
Havng come to ths decson, he bestowed
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p
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46 TH M C TH H M.
undvded attenton on the movements of the
save who conducted hm and soon became
convnced that, athough the budng nto whch
he had been ntroduced was e tremey spacous,
he had, nevertheess, trodden the same ground
more than once : a crcumstance whch proved
that, whatever mght be the motve of ts owner,
the ntenton was evdenty to mystfy hm as to
ts formaton and e tent. ot a gmpse of ght
had he encountered snce he qutted the court
and, as a door mmedatey n front of hm sud-
deny fe back, Hassan nvountary pressed hs
open pam upon hs eyes to shed them from a
gare whch amost bnded hm. Peas of rng-
ng aughter, and the gad sounds of many
ebecs, mnged wth the |oyous voces of women,
burst upon hs ear and, as he hasty wthdrew
hs hand, the ght form of eech-so detached
tsef from a group of young beautes, as far
and brght as hours, and approached hm wth
a boundng step.
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 47
CH PT l .
TH Dl M D M CH T Contnued.
Hour after hour sat usnu-gu n her apart-
ment, hstenng to the footfas of every passng
save, and deemng that each n turn heraded
the return of Hassan but Hassan came not
Dayght had passed away and the umnated
mnarets shot hgh nto the ar, ke fery shafts,
ther gracefu coumns of ght, whe the bosom
of the Channe gowed ke moten meta beneath
the ba e. Musc was soft n the dstance, and,
at ntervas, a ght augh or a merry song rang
upon the wnd and st Hassan came not
s yet, however, usnu-gu rather marveed
than mourned at hs deay: a the youth of
tambouL were abroad n the gad cty, and
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p
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48 TH M C TH H M.
Hassan, gente as he was, ever oved to be the
frst n every festva. The aged woman, there-
fore, quety repenshed her ppe, and spped
her coffee, and ost hersef n con|ectures as to
the motve of the e traordnary conduct of the
Defter-dar, and menta repnngs at the un-
merted mortfcaton of her hgh-hearted son.
nother hour was ftered through the ap of
tme, and the oud cannon boomed aong the
osphorus n rapd successon, whe the fttng
fres of the festva ran skmmerng aong the
dark face of nght, ke mmc ghtnng gancng
over the tops of the ta cedars, and spreadng n
sheets of transent fame a mante of goden
gory about the cty. t ength the cod grey
ght of mornng broke pae and chy n the
east the dusky rocks of the satc coast oomed
out, stern and stere the whte budngs of
Pera geamed bank and beak n the fant sky
and the dstant mnarets of cutar ooked ke
gant-sprts, as the frst beams of day reveaed
ther shadowy outne. lt was the morrow of
the aram and st Hassan returned not
usnu-gu, who oved her son wth a devoton
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 49
as untrng as t was profound, had watched
throughout the nght wthout a sensaton of
wearness. Hassan was young and hgh-sprted,
and had, doubtessy, been detaned by hs
assocates and the heart of the mother was
soothed by the beef that, amd the dsspaton
of the festva, he woud forget hs recent mort-
fcaton. ut wth the chy, cheeress dawn
came other and more an ous thoughts. ke
to the pan-worn patent and to the weary
watcher to the sck and to the sorrowng
there are no moments so sad and so depressng as
those n whch day and nght stand together on
the threshod of tme, as though each were
reuctant to yed up ts empre.
hen the ght broke around her, usnu-gu
began to fear she knew not what Hassan
was mpetuous, haughty, and uncomproms-
ng of what rashness mght he not have
been guty, n the frst rush of hs resent-
ment True, he had oved the Defter-dar
as a father but usnu-gu was woman
enough to be aware that outraged aff ecton s
the very foundaton on whch may be erected
the frmest superstructure of hatr. Hs atach-
L. l. D
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p
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50 TH M C TH H M.
ment to the -Treasurer had been dvested of
every tant of wordness and sef-nterest a
spontaneous outpourng of reverence and regard
but t s ever the most generous sprt whch s
the quckest stung and the mother found no
consoaton for her soUtude n the suggestons of
her awakened fances.
The saves of usnu-gu removed her mornng
mea untouched. Hassan was yet absent and
the tearess eyes of the grey and faded woman
burnt wth the fever of her throbbng bran.
lt was thus that she was found by ef -
abah, the favourte wfe of the Defter-dar, who,
on the day succeedng that of the aram, entered
the harem of usnu-gu, foowed by a coupe
of her saves and, castng asde her yashmac,
turned towards the mother of Hassan a brow as
moody as her own.
Ha, ha so, so, you are tardy wth your
wecome, ffendm commenced the beautfu
Crcassan, for the aged woman had uttered no
greetng to her vstor nor do l ask from you
more speedy courtesy. Mashaah the wrongs
that l have suffered from the son are fty
foowed by the codness of the mother.
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 51
lf you are coDe to te of Hassan, speak
sad usnu-gu, earnesty.
lf l am come to te of Hassan was the
retort thnk you that l can tamey suffer the
rvary of a strpng n the affectons of the
Defter-dar re my eyes dm, or my cheeks
faded,, that l shoud be overooked because he
has a smooth tongue and a ready wt ls he not
a sak-s a no-beard
ls Hassan ndeed wth the Defter-dar
asked usnu-gu, whe a geam of |oy t up
her faded brow.
hat avas t that he s not demanded
ef - abah peevshy when even the ngra-
ttude and dscourtesy of hs absence durng the
festva of yesterday have not yet opened the
eyes of the Defter-dar. e var what s ths
m l to sten to no dscourse more fatterng to
my sef-ove than repnngs at the non-appearance
of an n grate
Tak not of ngrattude, ffendm sad
the mother ndgnanty after the bokshak
wth whch the Defter-dar honoured my son,
Gft.
D 2
UMM
1 rT HU l
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#
p
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52 TH M C TH H M.
he coud scarcey have e pected thanks at
hs hands lnshaah Hassan ffend s no
save
ere he a Pasha he coud not desre one
more costy e camed the Crcassan but
perchance the spoed favourte forgot the frend,
when he no onger ooked upon the Defter-dar.
shrt suted to a caque|he l sad the
mother, scornfuy.
Pstos for hs woman-hand, of whch the
damond-hts can aone be vauabe to the
trouber of the peace of harems- foowed
up the Crcassan.
chavar,-|- fttng ony for a peasant
pursued usnu-gu.
Damascus dagger whose feow woud be
sought n van, even throughout the goden cty
of tambou perssted ef - abah.
shaw commenced the aged woman.
orthy to have covered the ons of the
came whch carred the Prophet broke n
hev companon.
usnu-gu capped her hands wth a gesture
oatman. f Trowsers.
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#
p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 53
of contemptuous ndfference, and hasty com-
manded that the boksha of the Defter-dar shoud
be unfoded before the vstor when the surprse
of the Crcassan was e treme, on seeng the
coarse and unseemy garments whch had been
tendered to Hassan as the gft of hs protector.
apdy and energetcay dd ef - abah
enumerate and descrbe the contents of the hand-
kerchef whch had been prepared by the hands
of the Defter-dar for hs favourte and, forget-
fu of her own fanced sub|ect of compant
aganst Hassan, she was soon engaged as an ousy
as usnu-oru hersef n a thousand contradc-
tory and mprobabe con|ectures as to the cause
of hs unwonted absence. ut, aas n van
dd they surmse, and consut, and e pan
Hassan returned not
Months wore panfuy away. The heart of
usnu-gu was a wdowed heart and, as she
ooked upon the sparkng waters of the os
phorus durng the sunny days of summer, she
saw not ther beauty, she fet not ther charm :
to her those waters ever seemed to be the grave
of Hassan.
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p
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54 TH M C TH H M.
es, woud she murmur to hersef n her
bereavement there beneath that smng and
treacherous wave, es my many boy my ony
one the ght of my eyes, the moon of my
evenng sky, the bubu whose voce s hushed
the |oy of my od age, Hassan the hgh-
hearted
or dd the Defter-dar mourn ess deepy the
dsappearance of hs favourte. f hs death,
hs voent or sef-nfcted death, t was mpossbe
to doubt, as every endeavour to dscover hs fate
had proved abortve and the frst angush of
despar had sowy yeded to the camer but no
ess heart-fet gref of resgnaton, when a etter
was one mornng paced n the hands of the
Defter-dar, who started wth a surprse whch
amost amounted to ncreduty, on recogn ng
the we-known character of Hassan.
smah ln the name of the most
mercfu ah such were the contents of the
paper l am ost to you, and to the word
l am ost even to mysef and, havng tod you
ths, l dare not add any thng n eucdaton of
a mystery whch must have bewdered, and.
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#
p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. D
l do even hope, have greved you. l thnk of
you often fondy your memory dwes wth me
as the remembrance of ost ght ngers wth the
tenant of a dungeon or as the vson of departed
berty comes back upon the sprt of the de-
sparng captve. l ove to remember that
l was dear to you l have forgotten a that
wounded ake my prde and my affecton. l
retan |eaousy and fondy the genter remns-
cences whch are wound about my heart too
cosey ever to be rent asunder l parted from
you proudy a the kndness that you had a-
vshed upon me every token of affecton, every
proof of regard, had been the spontaneous offerng
of your own generous nature. as l now appea
to your memory as a suppant. lf you ever oved
f you st ove me f you woud save me
from msery, from sufferng, from death a speedy
and panfu death chersh no doubt, admt no
suspcon seek not to penetrate a mystery too
dense ever to be fathomed. Do not despse nor
refuse me but rememberng ony the ovng trust
of our earer and happer communon, bestow
out of the weath whch ah has poured nto
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p
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56 TH M C TH H M.
your ap suffcent to save me from destructon
Depost, at the wanng of the moon, a purse,
contanng twenty thousand pastres, on the ta
turbaned head-stone to the rffht of the great
avenue of the Cemetery of cutar one w be
there to secure t but, as you ove me, nger
not to assure yoursef of ths fact, nor to pater
wth the messenger. ln dong ether you w
destroy me. l dare add no more pty and
pray for the ost Hassan.
The Defter-dar read and re-read the etter
there coud be no doubt but that the hand-
wrtng was that of hm whom he had oved so
we of the son of usnu-gu and, athough
wth a sck heart, and a throbbng puse, he
hestated not to obey the bddng.
The dawn was spreadng fanty n the sky,
and the moon was wanng nto a pae and scky
whte, when the Defter-dar, eavng hs caque at
the per of cutar, sowy wound hs way
through the hushed and sumberng cty, and
thence passed aone nto ts statey necropos.
Long sweeps of wnd were heavng the heavy
cypress boughs, ke sprt-sghs but the Defter-
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 57
dar quaed not n hs purpose. He punged
nto the deep goom of the grave-forest, and
soon stood before the ta stone whch had been
ndcated. t ts base was one of those sma
reservors, hoowed n the marbe for the use of
the brds and the wanderng dogs, so common
n Turksh bura-paces the htte basn was
dred up : and n ths spot the generous frend
deposted the sum whch had been requred of
hm, turned a ong, searchng ook nto the
goom around hm, and then sowy moved
away.
ut t was dffcut to depart wthout one re-
trospectve gance and the Defter-dar had not
progressed more than a few yards, ere he paused,
and ooked back. dusky fgure ftted across
the path, and ngered an nstant beneath the
ta tomb a deep voce murmured, lt s
we and then the e -courter was once more
aone n the mdst of the deep stness.
d5
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p
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58 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT .
TH Dl M D M CH T contnued.
year went by a ong and dreary year
and the memory of Hassan became to the Defter-
dar ke the ndstnct vson of a panfu dream
but the mystery was yet to deepen, and the fact
of hs e stence was once more to arouse a the
pan-fraught sympathes of those who had oved
hm. second etter, wrtten Hke the frst n
agony of sprt, was paced n the hands of the
Defter-dar at the e praton of that perod by
one of hs saves and the bearer, unmoved by
the per of hs msson, had cast off hs sppers
on the threshod of the -Treasurer, and there
awated a repy.
nce, thus ran the mssve once l was
dear to you you were to me as a father, and
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 59
1 oved you as a son. That l st hod you n
my heart, be ths my wtness l may be for-
gotten may have been so ong yet l pray you
n mercy to reca my memory. l am n danger
mmnent, nstant danger and you aone can
save me. ou are weathy, you are generous
a trusty save w dever ths etter. houd
you deny my prayer, or detan my messenger,
l sha soon be beyond hep. lf, however, you
woud once more save me from destructon, et
hm be the bearer of twenty thousand pastres.
l dare not doubt that you w preserve me
lnshaah you are the ast hope of the mserabe
Hassan
The Defter-dar summoned the strange save
nto hs presence he brbed hm wth god and
soft words he threatened hm wth the bast-
nado and the bowstrng but he coud e tort
no ntegence of the present poston or the
threatened per of Hassan.
Destroy, or even detan me, and he s ost
was the ony answer to every threat. Dog
me and, whe l am eudng your pursut, hs
fate w be accompshed.
To the more gente argument of brbe and
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p
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60 TH M C TH H M.
entreaty he was equay nvunerabe. lf yo
grant the request of whch l am the bearer, he
sad, Hassan s saved and for mysef, n that
case, my reward s sure. ffendm, l ask of you
nothng save dspatch.
thout the hestaton of a moment, the
Defter-dar paced the requred sum n the hands
of the messenger and accompaned t wth a
etter, repete wth frendshp and an ety, to
Hassan, and e pressons of the most affectonate
and sorrowng nterest. He besought hm to
unve hs meanchoy mystery to hs best frend,
for meanchoy t must assuredy be, when t coud
thus sever hm from the mother of hs youth and
the companon of hs manhood he promsed,
shoud he have paced hs fe n |eopardy by
some act of voence or foy, to e ert for hm a
the nterest whch he yet possessed at court and
concuded by drawng a mserabe pcture of the
wretched usnu-gu, wtherng away nto a
sotary and unregretted grave.
ut when the etter was concuded, and the
money devered nto the keepng of the save, t
was not so easy to suffer hm to depart un watched
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 61
and a trusty servant was put upon hs track,
who foowed for hours the ntrcate course of the
stranger but he foowed n van the nat-
tenton of a moment suffced to render abortve
the e ertons of a day and he returned to the
paace of the Defter-dar, defeated and baffed.
nce more months passed away and, even
as t had been foretod to Hassan, the dsconsoate
usnu-gu ded. he had mourned her son,
when she beeved hm to be ost to her for ever,
wth the cam, deep gref of resgnaton but
her feebe frame and e cted mnd coud not
contend wth the rrtaton of ths new mystery,
ths unfathomabe secret and she bent beneath
the shock as the forest tree bends to the tempest
breath and as the overstraned branches, bowed
beyond ther powers of resstance, rend the
trunk from whch they sprang, so dd the feengs
of usnu-gu, nduged and encouraged n the
sotude of the harem, break the heart that coud
sustan the pressure no onger.
There were moments, when n thnkng of
Hassan, and n weavng strange fances on hs
fate, the Defter-dar amost hoped that he shoud
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62 TH M C P TH H M.
hear of hm no more. That hs etter had re-
maned unanswered rather greved than sur-
prsed hm for e fet that, had Hassan been
free to act, he woud ong ere ths have returned
to hs home, and to those whom he had oved
from hs boyhood and he, consequenty, vsted
hs sence upon the same system of coercon
whch had forbdden hs re-appearance among hs
frends. Coud he have dsentanged the raveed
sken of secresy n whose meshes the poor youth
was bound, the Defter-dar woud have e erted
every energy, and straned every nerve to restore
hm to the word but to hear of hm ony to
earn the mserabe prvege of knowng hm to
be beyond human hep, was a torment rather
than a bessng to s an ous affecton. Hs
mother was no more hs former assocates had
dmost forgotten hm. He, aone, remembered
hm wth regret and yet he woud have thanked
the messenger who brought the tdngs of hs
death. ut ths was not to be: a thrd tme
came a scro from Hassan a voce from
hs vng grave a record of hs |eopardy
an appea to the frend who had chershed
hm
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 63
or the ast tme, he wrote, Hassan the
son of ad, pours forth hs gref before the
Defter-dar of the utan Mourad. l have a
vague dream that a shadow had passed over your
brghtness, ere from me ght was atogether
shut out. lt may have been so l know not f
t were l heed t not, though you procam t to
be truth. The sky s fu of stars: the sage
aone marks the quenchng of those whch fade
from the gaa y : to the common ga e a s un-
changed l sha troube you no more ths s
my ast appea. ave me, or l am ost god
aone can serve me : you have god, and your
heart s arge : to none ese can l appy. l
wrte to you ke a madman, but t s ony the
madness of desperaton. l care not what may
be the consequence, l w wrte to you no more.
rend father protector save me agan on
ths occason pace the same sum as before at the
dsposa of my messenger and then pty and
forget the ost Hassan.
The Defter-dar reped to the mssve by
senty puttng a purse of god nto the hands of
the e pectant save, and cody teng hm that
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p
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64 TH M C TH H M.
he was free to depart when he sted The man
ooked steady n the face of the courter, made
a respectfu obesance, and wthdrew. s he
eft the house, he ganced steathy back to note
f he were pursued, but the street was empty
and the manner of the Defter-dar had been suf-
fcenty ndfferent to convnce hm that the e -
stence and we-beng of Hassan were rapdy
becomng unmportant to hs former frend.
Thus assured, the messenger made few dgres-
sons from hs drect path and, after haf an
hour of rapd wakng, beat upon the door of a
statey manson, and was nstanty admtted.
ut the Defter-dar had earnt a esson of sef-
reance from the faure of the attendant whom
he had on a prevous occason ntrusted wth the
dscovery of a secret whch he was morbdy
an ous to unrave and, sufferng the messenger
of Hassan to eave the house by the man porta,
unpursued and unmpeded, he hasty changed
hs turban and pesse, and passed out by a sde
door openng nto hs own garden, and thence
nto a cross path termnatng n the man street,
aong whch he shrewdy con|ectured that the
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 65
save, whose person he was confdent of recog-
n ng on the nstant, must utmatey pass. or
was he deceved n hs con|ecture for, havng
by ths ess crcutous route arrved n the great
thoroughfare before the person whom he was
an ous to observe, and havng, moreover, by
hs own change of costume, prevented a sus-
pcon save that whch mght be created by hs
subsequent want of cauton, he had ere ong the
satsfacton of seeng the save turn the corner of
the ane, and make hs way towards the great
square of the tmedan.
The Defter-dar was carefu, as they crossed
the arge open space, and passed besde ts statey
coumns, to shroud hmsef among the crowd
and, when they entered the street beyond t, to
eave such a dstance between the stranger and
hmsef as to set suspcon at defance. He re-
marked that the save ooked back at ntervas,
ke one who cared not to trust atogether to hs
seemng mpunty but whenever ths happened,
the Defter-dar crafty paused, as though he were
enterng some house besde hs path or fary
swung hmsef round, and made a few backward
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p
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66 TH M C TH H M.
steps, as though hs route crossed that of hs
feow passenger: thus preventng the perfect
vew of hs person whch woud have betrayed
hs contnued dentty.
nd thus t was that the Defter-dar tracked
the messenger of Hassan to the dweng whch
he entered and he even ventured to nger for
a whe n ts mmedate neghbourhood to mark
whether he woud re-appear : but he came not
forth agan and the Defter-dar fnay bent hs
steps homeward, wth the feeng of one who s |ust
awakenng from a perpe ed and panfu dream.
n the morrow he caused strct but guarded
nqures to be made, and soon earnt the hstory
of the house and ts nhabtants. lt was the
abode, sad the neghbours, of a stern and pous
matron, Hemdoune Hanoum by name, whose
harem was nvsbe as that of the Grand egnour
hmsef: who gave ams argey to the poor and
who wecomed wth courtesy every wanderng
dervsh or fakeer who camed her hosptaty,
and deemed her cares ampy repad by ther
prayers and bessngs.
ln van dd the Defter-dar endeavour by subte
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 67
questonngs to ect nformaton of a more mys-
terous and e ctng nature the whoe day was
spent n useess efforts to shake, or at east to
throw a doubt upon, ths we-connected story
and, when evenng fe, he became more than ever
perpe ed as to the measures whch he shoud
adopt to penetrate so cosey- woven a mystery.
The hour of rest came, and the Defter-dar
retred to hs bed, but not to seep. He ay re-
vovng a thousand schemes, each ess feasbe
than the ast, unt suddeny a new dea burst
upon hm when, wth a prayer to ah and the
Prophet, he composed hmsef quety upon hs
cushons wth a sme upon hs p, and sept.
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p
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TH M C TH H M.
CH PT l.
TH Dl M D M CH T C ntnved
ary n the mornng, the purse-bearer of the
Defter-dar bent hs way to the great Tcharch of
the cty, and was absent neary an hour and
durng ths tme, hs master more than once re-
moved the chbouque from hs hps, and eant
forward n the atttude of stenng. hen at
ength he returned, he passed at once to the
p esence of the ffend and, havng made hs
obesance, and carefuy et fa behnd hm the
heavy screen of tapestry whch veed the door
of the apartment, he drew from beneath hs
ampe robe a handkerchef, from whch he took
the fowng garments of a ektachy, or Mountan
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. by
Dervsh. There was the wadded cap of coth
wth ts bndng of crmson woo the buffao-
horn wth ts eathern sng the broad bet of
untanned eather casped wth a casp of meta
the scaret sppers, the heavy rosary, the ron
amp suspended from the grde, and the ampe
robe and mante of serge.
The metamorphoss was speedy competed
and ony a few moments had passed snce the
return of the purse-bearer, ere the e -courter
tood before hm n the fu garb of a mountan
devotee. ut the Defter-dar, however e ceent
he admtted the dsguse to be, woud not venture
to trust t to the pryng eye of day and the
garments were accordngy ad asde unt the
twght came to ad, wth ts ong shadows, the
enterprse of the adventurous frend.
t ength the favourabe hour arrved and
when the Defter-dar passed out nto the street
n the mdst of hs own saves, not a prostraton
was made, though many an eye turned on hm
n wonder, as none had seen hm enter. ats-
fed wth ths unceremonous proof of hs suc-
cessfu transformaton, the heart of the f end
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p
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70 TH M C TH H M.
beat hgh wth hope as he pressed forward to
the dweng of the mysterous Hemdoune
Hanoum nor dd he aow hs hand to fater
as he beat upon the we-remembered door.
weary nterva eapsed ere hs summons
was answered but utmatey a sturdy save
appeared, who seemed desrous to ve the nte-
ror of the dweng from the ga e of the n-
truder, as he scarcey opened the porta suffc-
enty to enabe the suppant dervsh to per-
ceve that the ha beyond was of vast e tent
and magnfcent proportons, athough scanty
ghted from the gaery whch ran round ts
ofty was.
The Defter-dar was not, however, to be d-
verted from hs purpose by the surness of a
porter and he tod hs tae of trave and wear-
ness n a tone whch at once nsured to t the
ampe credence of hs stener.
The Hanoum ffend cares not to open her
doors after sunset sad the save cody she
s a wdow, and deems t not seemy. ut you
are a hoy man, and you are trave-spent l
w te her of your arrva, and sha be speedy
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#
p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 71
wth my answer. ashustun, upon my head be
t she sha know that you are at her thresh-
od. nd, wthout awatng the repy of the
Defter-dar, he hasty cosed the door, and the
sound of hs rapdy retreatng footsteps soon
ded away n the dstance.
fter a bref nterva he returned, and wth
cv words wecomed the stranger to the roof of
hs mstress, as he stood asde to gve hm en-
trance and the Defter-dar found hmsef n a
statey ha, paved wth marbe, around whch
ran a wde gaery, whence opened a range of
apartments. ut he had tte tme to acquant
hmsef wth the ocaty, for he was hasty
hurred forward a consderabe dstance down
one or two dark passages and, fnay, nto a
second saoon of ncomparabe beauty, sur-
rounded, ke the outer ha, by a gaery, whose
heavy baustrades were rchy wrought and
gded, and to whch access was afforded by a
nobe fght of marbe steps that swept downward
on ether sde of the statey apartment he cast
a hasty gance around as he was about to fo-
ow hs conductor to a chamber on the ground
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p
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72 TH M C TH H M.
foor, when a shuffng of sppers was heard,
and the save paused, and bowed reverenty
before a ta muffed fgure whch hasty ap-
proached hm.
ls ths the hoy man asked a voce
whch woud have been harsh, had not tme
softened n some degree ts asperty e
brm what can l say ls ths the dervsh
who cams sheter for the nght beneath my
roof. nd, as the queston was uttered, a
ean and wthered arm emerged from the mass
of drapery, and a bony hand hed a amp cose
to the face of the pretended devotee.
The Defter-dar bent ow before the speaker,
and answered humby n the affrmatve.
shr, mockng augh, that rung pan-
fuy n hs ears, was the resut of the assurance
and, ere he had recovered from ts effects, the
mante n whch the femae was enveoped was cast
off the amp that she hed transferred to the save
who st stood senty besde her and, as she
capped her hands, the doors aong the gaery
were fung back, dscosng a gare of gt by
whch the Defter-dar was momentary bnded,
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#
p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 73
whe, ke a fght of summer brds, forth
focked a troop of madens as far as the morn-
ng, whose rngng and yet musca aughter
created n an nstant an atmosphere of |oy about
them, as they rapdy descended the marbe
stars nto the ha.
|ab wonderfu here s one, haf
croaked, haf shreked the wthered crone who
appeared to be the mstress of the reves, one
who comes to us wth a chapet of beads and the
robe of a dervsh, and thnks to cheat us nto a
beef of hs sanctty Look to t, a of you,
for there must be treachery here. nd, as she
ceased speakng, the save put the amp nto the
hand of the foremost of the young beautes,
who, wth a gesture haf mockng, haf curous,
rased t to the face of the merchant as the od
woman had prevousy done, and then passed t,
wth a sent shake of the head, to her negh-
bour.
hen each had payed her part n ths sn-
guar pantomme, and that a had dscamed
any knowedge of the stranger s dentty, he
stood n the centre of the group, uttery unabe
L. T.
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p
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74 TH M C TH H M.
to con|ecture the meanng of a scene such as
assuredy he had never before wtnessed and so
bewdered were hs senses bv the oveness
around hm, that no fear for hs persona safety
mnged wth hs surprse. That the character
for pety borne by Hemdoune Hanoura n the
neghbourhood, was not atogether merted, he
at once perceved and, as he ganced towards
the ean and wthered bedame who stood
garng at hm wth keen and eager eyes, as
though she woud read hs secret on hs brow,
strange thoughts and fances crowded upon hm,
and he amost began to regret that he had un-
dertaken the adventure. ut repentance came
too ate : he was now uttery n her power, and
he fet that frmness aone coud save hm from
ts effects.
ur hoy guest fants wth trave, once
more burst forth the acrd voce of the od
woman he has toed a day beneath a
hot sun, and there s nether so nor dust upon
hs garments he has eft hs sppers on the
threshod, and the crmson s yet unfaded. Let
hm, however, bow us one bast upon hs buf-
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. |b
fao-horn, and we w crave the beneft of hs
prayers. How now, f endm, s your breath
spent, that you refuse me ths courtesy
lt was, however, no part of the Defter-dar s
purpose to refuse, though he hestated for a
moment ere he comped, beng perfecty gno-
rant of hs own capabtes n ths new scence
and when at ast he rased the prmtve nstru-
ment to hs ps, he bew so dscordant and un-
measured a bast as threw the auonhng madens
nto a convuson of merrment, and perfecty
satsfed Hemdoune Hanoum that her ordnary
sagacty had not forsaken her.
Ge, ge come, come she e camed, we
w troube cur pous guest for no more moun-
tan musc. He has, however, done hs best to
amuse us, and we are bound to repay hs good-
w n knd. eech-so, my daughter, to
your care l confde hm shew hm the wonders
of our fary-paace, and tend hm carefuy
unt he has overmastered hs fatgue l w be
wth you anon and, wth another fendsh
augh, she shuffed from the ha.
eech-so ga ed upon the stranger for an
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p
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76 TH M C TH H M.
nstant, as though some fant and far-off memory
were shapng tsef nto tangbty n her mnd
but she dd not ong nduge so dangerous a
mood, and, n the ne t moment, she was busy
engaged n assstng her companons to repace
the coarse head-gear of the Defter-dar wth a
turban of consummate cost and beauty, and to
throw over hs robe of serge a pesse rchy ned
and overad wth sabes. hen ths was done,
they ed hm to a sofa, and estabshed hm
among the yedng cushons, whose goden
embrodery shewed gorgeousy on ts ground of
pae bue satn and, whe one fed hs ch-
bouque of |asmn wood, and another handed to
hm on her knees the mnute cup of mocha, n
ts precous settng of fagreed god, pped
wth |ewes, eech-so estabshed hersef on a
Persan carpet at hs feet, and, wth her gracefu
ebec and powerfu voce, reguated the move-
ments of a group who had ranged themseves n
the centre of the foor, to dance the dance of the
harem.
The Defter-dar was da ed, but he was not
bnded. He fet at once that a ths was part
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 77
of a system ntended to bewder and throw hm
off hs guard but he was no onger young
enough to yed up hs reason captve to the
fascnatons of the moment. Dark eyes were
fashng round hm, whte arms were wreathng
gracefuy n ar, and ong |etty tresses were
fang n rch masses on shouders as whte and
smooth as vory. The Defter-dar saw a, and
fet ts beauty : but, as he ga ed about hm, he
remembered a tae, whch had once been tod
to hm by a gaour, of one of the dversons
of the far est, where crowds fock together,
and seat themseves under pavons of crm-
son, to sten to soft musc, and to see far
women and gracefu men mmc the adventures
of every-day fe, and ve through a ong and
eventfu e stence n the course of one bref
nght. ven thus ooked the Defter-dar on the
scene around hm. He fet that t was a hoow
and decetfu pageant, whch must ere ong fade
before sterner and coder reates and when
the brght shapes whch had ftted past hm n
the dance utmatey grouped themseves about
hm, as f to awat hs peasure, he thanked them
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p
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78 TH M C TH H M.
for ther courtesy n a voce as steady as ts
wont.
The dance had not ong ceased when Hem-
doune Hanoum entered the apartment, and, as
she crossed the threshod, every far head bent
ow before her. lt s we, she sad, as she
ganced towards her vster my ord has cast
off hs dsguse, and has now ony to te us
hs name and rank, ere we devse new modes
of amusement to dvert hs esure hours.
e brm what can l say ou do
your save too much grace, ffendm, sad the
Defter-dar quety that l am not that whch
l woud fan have seemed, s true, and l w
not wrong your sagacty by attemptng onger
to concea the fact. ut nether am l that
whch your courtesy woud suggest. our
recepton has been so much beyond my poor
deserts, that l am bound n grattude to te
you a
s the Defter-dar paused for a moment, he
accdentay caught the brght eye of eech-so
f ed eagery, and, as t seemed, deprecatngy,
upon hm but t mght have been ony fancy
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TH Dl M D M CH T. /9
that there was warnng n her earnest ga e, and
he had no opportunty to convnce hmsef of
the fact, as her head was hasty averted when
ther eyes had met.
l am a merchant, f endm, tradng from
a port n the ack ea to the far cty of
tambou, and l have |ust freghted an outward-
bound brg wth the whoe produce of ten years
of ndustry, eavng mysef so scanty provded
as to be uttery unabe to meet the day outay
necessary to my e stence, unt the arrva of
a brother merchant, for whom l am an ousy
watchng from hour to hour and who has pro-
msed me a share n a venture of so proftabe a
character, that, shoud he hod to hs word, my
fortune s made. ln ths straght, beng un-
wng to odge mysef n a khan wthout the
present means of payng fary for the accommo-
daton, l e changed my usua dress wth a
deaer n the Tcharch for the costume of a moun-
tan dervsh, we knowng that n that guse l
shoud be certan to proft by the ams of the
pous. The fame of the hoy and chartabe
Hemdoune Hanoum reached me as l stood n
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p
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80 TH M C TH H M.
one of the great thoroughfares of the cty,
uncertan towards whch quarter l shoud frst
bend my steps, and decded me at once. l have
now confessed mysef to be an mpostor, f-
fendm, and shoud you put me forth, l sha
submt to the |ustce of your fat wthout a
murmur.
s he ceased speakng the Defter-dar ganced
towards eech-so, and ths tme there coud be
no mstake. n e presson of unutterabe re-
ef had passed over her features, but she sat
wth her face turned sghty asde, and her
hands foded upon her bosom, as though she
fet no nterest n the narraton of the stranger.
nd you are then reay too poor to odge
yoursef n a pubc caravansera sad Hem-
doune Hanoum nterrogatvey.
ou have sad t, was the concse repy.
Do you not rather mock us wth a new
fabe . asked the od woman angry, when
you amuse us wth the tae of your poverty,
whe you wear upon your fnger a damond
whch woud we ngh ransom a provnce
y vah we are not to be cheated twce.
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 81
or a moment the Defter-dar dd not repy
for a second hs ready wt deserted hm and
the bood rushed n a voume to hs brow, as he
stood sef-convcted of a careessness whch, for
aught he knew, mght perhaps cost hm hs
fe.
That the aged fend who sat wth her keen
eyes f ed upon hm, evdenty goatng over hs
dscomposure, woud suffer hm to depart after
havng ad bare before hm, for some hdden
purpose of her own, the secrets of her house-
hod, he was not weak enough to beeve even
for an nstant and that she woud not scrupe to
rd hersef, by the most effectua means, of so
proftess a guest, he was equay assured and,
n ths demma, he resoved to make one more
attempt, ere he resgned hmsef tamey to a fate
at whch t was not dffcut to guess.
hat bossom sha be hdden from the
sun and what sand-rft sha resst the bow
e camed he, as f n admraton of the shrewd-
ness of hs hostess. ls t not n van that l
woud concea even a porton of my secret from
Hemdoune Hanoum, to whom t s gven to
e5
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p
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82 TH l U C TH H M.
know a thngs. Ths rng, fendm and,
as n obedence to a gesture of the od woman,
he wthdrew t from hs fnger, and paced t n
her hand, he remembered wth a pang that the
precous |ewe had been the gft of the utan n
hs days of court favour, and that t was now, n
a probabty, ost to hm for ever ths rng
s a porton of the mystery. Look on t we,
and then te me f t be not a damond of sur-
passng beauty.
The aged woman ready obeyed : she passed
the gorous |ewe on her own bony fnger, and,
havng e amned t near the ght, and ascer-
taned that t was wthout spot or bemsh and
that, as she sowy moved her hand to and fro, t
gave out a thousand ranbow tnts, she wth-
drew wth t nto a far corner of the saoon, and
there, shadng t from the gare of the tapers,
she admred the sparks whch, wth every move-
ment that she made, t fung out nto the dark-
ness.
lt s a rare stone she sad, more bandy
than she had yet spoken, as she returned to the
sde of the Defter-dar the utan hmsef
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 83
hath not a fner. l woud fan hear ts hstory
ere l restore t to you.
That sha you not do, f endm, reped
her crafty guest, f ts possesson gve you
peasure nay, offer me no acknowedgments, l
pray you he added hasty, as hs hostess was
about to speak keep the baube, and l w
te you a. l have aready stated that l
am awatng n tambou a merchant of my
acquantance but l payed you fase when l
peaded poverty as an e tenuaton of my ds-
guse. l am about to confde to you a secret
upon whch hangs my fe, but you w not
betray me and bref sha be the perod whch
ntervenes ere l repay you a hundred fod for
a the courteses that you have avshed on me.
ffendm, the trnket on your fnger s a mere
toy the |ewe s counterfet l came to the
cty wth many such for sae, and l have parted
from them a at a heavy sum, save ths, whch l
retaned n a weak ft of sentment, because t had
been gven to me by my frend ere he admtted
me to a share n hs adventurous traffc. Many
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p
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84 TH M C TH H M.
of the stones wth whch l came aden to tam-
bou have found ther way nto the treasury of
the Padshah, others are n the harems of our
weathest Pashas, whe a few of the meanest are
at ths moment the boast and wonder of the
be ensten. ere my secret dscovered, the
bowstrng woud be my porton but, mean-
whe, so ong as l contnue unbetrayed, l con
pastres faster than the Taraf-hane-f- hmsef.
deep thoughtfuness setted ke a coud on
the stern brow of Hemdoune Hanoum, and she
dd not mmedatey repy to the communcaton
of her guest but, after a whe, she ooked up,
and sad an ousy Do l understand that you
have no other |ewe of the same sort n your
possesson
t ths moment, none answered the guest,
ready but my frend and prncpa, Mech-
med Cadre lshmae, who hmsef manufactures
them, shoud arrve n the cty to-morrow
evenng at the atest and f t be permtted to
hm to share n the smes whch have t up my
overegn. f lnspector of the Mnt.
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 85
own e stence snce sunset, l w answer for the
readness wth whch he w repay the debt of
hosptaty, by permttng the Hanoum f-
fend to seect a do en of the stones, ere he
ofPers them for pubc sae n the be ensten, as a
memora of her own charty and our grat-
tude.
ut he w not know where to fnd you f
suggested the Hanoum.
Doubtessy, shoud l not mysef seek and
conduct hm hther, he w pursue me n van f
reped the Defter-dar for he w scarcey
ook to fnd hs comrade lbrahm n the paace
of a Pasha s wfe.
ou sha descrbe the good merchant to
my trusty save mn sad the od w oman
and you can wrte a few words of greetng
and nvtaton, whch w be hs warrant wth
your frend.
ou say we, ffendm, was the ready
answer but l know not the coour of hs
vest, nor the tnt of hs turban. lechmed s
from the desert, and ony eaves the caravan to
pass over to the Goden Cty. There are many
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p
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86 TH M C TH H M.
of hs name n the be ensten, and your save
may mss hm unt hs farest merchandse s
bartered to the deaers n damonds, and he
has no onger any stones to offer to the Hanoum
ffend, or her ades/
lt s true, sad the crone, after another
pause of thought l woud have kept you
here as a surety for hs comng, but the |ewe
whch you eave wth me convnces me of your
good fath. ou sha depart then to-morrow
at break of day, and at sunset l sha e pect
you back, accompaned by your frend. lt
w pease me to see hs merchandse, and to
hear from hm the tae of hs desert-pgrmage.
he then capped her hands, and a save,
habted n a fowng robe of crmson and god,
hasty obeyed the sgna, and prostrated hmsef
to the earth before her.
aduk, se sad wth pecuar emphass
conduct lbrahm ffend, my honoured guest,
to a chamber near the ha of entrance. t day-
break he w depart hnder hm not l have
tod you my peasure.
To hear s to obey was the bref repy
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#
p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 87
but, as the save ganced towards the Defter-
dar, he coud not whoy concea the astonsh-
ment whch the words of hs rastress had
ected.
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p
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TH M C TH H M.
CH PT ll.
TH Dl M D M CH T. contnued.
ln a short tme a was sence n that house of
mystery. The Defter- dar, greaty to hs sats-
facton, found hmsef odged n a mean apart-
ment openng besde the door of entrance and,
havng narrowy searched hs chamber to ascer-
tan that he coud not be ntruded upon from any
other outet, threw hmsef upon hs bed to thnk
over the occurrences of the evenng. That he
was st n consderabe danger he was fuy
aware : for he comprehended at once that he was
ndebted to the cupdty of hs hostess for even
the questonabe chance of escape whch now
offered tsef. He had marked the sparke of
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 89
her eye when she frst detected the |ewe : he
had observed her nward strugge, ere, n the
hope of greater gan, she had compeed hersef
to permt hs departure : even yet she mght re-
pent nd, as ths ast fearfu refecton crossed
hs mnd, the Defter-dar became uneasy and
restess - fearng he knew not what and at n-
tervas magnng that he detected through the
deep stness the steathy tread of feet and the
rustng of drapery. Hours passed over hm
thus hours whch appeared to hs e cted ma-
gnaton as ntermnabe : when suddeny he be-
came aware that hs fancy no onger cheated hm,
but that some one was besde hm, whose deep
and hurred breathng came hot and troubed to
hs brow.
The Defter-dar sprang nstanty nto a sttng
posture, and woud have spoken : but a sma
soft hand was pressed heavy upon hs mouth,
as the voce of eech-so murmured n hs ear :
hosh buduk we found e cam be
sent or you are ost Hassan s ost and
l sha mysef become the sacrfce of your nds-
creton. e have no tme to ose sten to me
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#
p
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TH M C TH H M.
then attentvey. Hassan s here, bowed by
chans n a oathsome dungeon, where he w be
suffered to e st unt hs frend the Defter-dar,
to whom he has been compeed to appy for vast
sums, refuses further to assst hm. hen the
save who bears hs etter frst returns empty-
handed, aduk and hs comrade w at once end
hs sorrows wth the bowstrng : and l need not
te you, ffendm, that the grave betrays no
secret. He s one of many who are wastng
away ther brght youth not a hundred feet
beneath the spot where l now stand. Thrce
have l saved the Ufe of Hassan, when hs hours
were numbered by hs refusa to wrte those
etters to hs frend. The accursed ove of god
s the mpuse of the ve mstress of ths mpous
house. e, her saves, the creatures whom she
has bought at a prce, and tutored n her wcked-
ness, are taught to make our mserabe beauty
the means of whng to her roof the young and
the weathy and here they are compeed to
drag on a desparng e stence, so ong as ther
prayers for god are answered by ther frends.
ut, Hassan Hassan can you not save hm
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 91
from ths vng death l have watced over
hs e stence as though my own hung upon ts
duraton, for l have earnt to ove hm n hs
msery. l t was who whed hm hther but
now, now, she contnued as her voce became
stfed wth agony : now l woud gady ay
down my bghted and unhappy fe, to know
that he was once more free.
Tchapouk, tchapouk, Haste haste et me
know a, urged the Defter-dar.
l trembed for you a few hours back, pur-
sued eech-so, struggUng to controu her an-
gush l know not why, but, from the moment
of your entrance here, a strange wd hope grew
n my heart that you were fated to save Hassan
and l trembed est your own tae shoud des-
troy you. ut you acted wsey, and for the mo-
ment you are saved. Thnk not, however, that
l am duped by your fcton of the fase damond
trust not that Hemdoune Hanoum, when n
the sotude of her chamber her fendsh avarce
yeds to her fear of detecton and e posure, w
not aso awaken to a convcton of ts fasehood
and suspcous of your motve, pace you at once
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p
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92 TH M C TH H M.
beyond a power of treachery. at not for
the dawn, or you w never see the rse of ano-
ther sun. l have drugged the sherbet of aduk
wth opum he shoud keep the door, but even
now he seeps a seep as deep as that of the
grave. Take the key from hs grde, and fy
return speedy, but be t wth hep and arms
away. l dare not nger another moment fare-
we, and remember eech-so.
s the ast words passed her hps, the Defter-
dar was conscous that she had eft hs sde and
an nstant afterwards a cod stream of ar, enterng
through a conceaed openng n the wa of hs
apartment, assured hm of her departure.
ot a moment was to be ost, and, hasty
se ng the turban and pesse whch ay besde
hs bed, the e cted courter strode senty nto
the ha. n e prng amp st fung a dm
and uncertan ght on the surroundng ob|ects,
and by ts assstance he at once dstngushed the
form of aduk, stretched on hs mat n a heavy
seep. or one nstant, and but one, the Defter-
dar hestated. houd ths nocturna vst be
ony a part of the pot, to nduce hm to e hbt
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 93
suspcon, and thus afford a pausbe prete t for
voence but mmedatey came the refecton
that, f voence were ndeed, ntended, no acton
of hs own woud be requred as an apoogy for
ts e ercse and had not eech-so tod hm that
Hassan yet ved n msery, and sufferng, and
chans The Defter-dar despsed hmsef that
he had yeded even momentary to the prompt-
ngs of hs cowardce and, bendng over aduk
for an nstant to assure hmsef that hs sumber
was not fegned, he possessed hmsef of the huge
key that was hdden amd the fods of the shaw
whch bound hs wast, and ere ong found hm-
sef beneath the broad moonght n the open
street.
The Defter-dar stopped not to admre the
beautfu effects of ght and shade whch pre-
sented themseves as he hurred on, but hasty
pursued hs way to hs own habtaton feeng
as though he had been absent from hs home for
months : so much had he been mpressed by the
rapd and e traordnary events of the evenng.
Mornng was |ust begnnng to break over the
san hs when he reached hs own door, and
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p
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94 TH M C TH H M.
beat oudy for admttance : and he had traversed
hs accustomed chamber more than once, and
e amned mnutey the rch pesse, and the
costy cachemre that composed hs turban, ere
he coud qute convnce hmsef that he had not
|ust awakened from a troubous dream. s hs
thoughts unraveed themseves sowy from the
chaos of memores n whch they were nvoved,
the Defter-dar was gad that he had retaned
these vouchers for hs story, for the more he
mused upon the nght s adventure, the more he
fet ts apparent mprobabty and romance
and, conscous of the mperatve necessty of
speedy and powerfu measures, n order to pre-
serve the fe of Hassan, he knew that he had
but one ne of conduct to pursue and that,
panfu and humatng as t was, he coud not
hope for success through any other means.
ever snce hs dsmsson from offce had the
e -courter sought the presence of the utan
he fet that he had been wronged for a new
favourte, and he had too much sef-respect to
e postuate, where he was conscous that e pos-
tuaton woud ava hm nothng. nd now,
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p
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 95
when years had gone by, and, t raght be, that
hs very name was forgotten by Mourad, he was
about to present hmsef at the foot of the throne
as a suppant as an actor n a wd and ques-
tonabe drama as a mad and foo-hardy adven-
turer.
The resouton of the Defter-dar dd not fater
for an nstant, but hs prde revoted, and he
sckened under hs task, as he bent hs way
10 the ubme Porte to suppcate an aud-
ence of the utan. e was t for hm that he
came n a fortunate hour for the court astro-
oger had predcted that every undertakng of
hs lmpera master durng ths auspcous moon ,
shoud prosper to hs heart s content and, as t
chanced that t had htherto offered tte save
satety to the hgh-hearted monarch, he at once
consented to receve hs dscarded courter, and
to end a favourabe ear to hs petton, be t
what t mght.
ut utan Mourad, when he so gracousy
sgnfed hs peasure, ooked not to be repad by
a tae so wd and strange as that of the -Trea-
surer : and he had scarcey heard t to an end
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p
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96 TH M C TH H M.
ere he e camed earnesty : e hey what s
ths hy, t surpasses our most sangune
hopes There s st adventure to be found n
our good cty hy have you been so ong ab-
sent from our presence, my ord -Treasurer
e have aways respected the man, though we
dsmssed the mnster. nd you are to return
to the haunts of these young Hour, sad you not
so and your frend s to be admtted on your
responsbty
Lght of the ord reped the Defter-dar,
as he st remaned prostrate before the utan
l was compeed to the promse n order to save
my fe for mysef, l have resoved to keep my
word and t s to crave your subme approva
and assstance that l am now a supphant n the
dust before you but the fabe s at an end : the
rest of the adventure must be acheved by force
for none woud venture to share wth me the
rsk of further decepton.
akaum we sha see. ou forget to
whom you speak, sad the e cted Mourad
you sha yet pay your part, even to the end
you sha st be lbrahm f end, and l w per-
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 97
sonate Mechmed Cadre lshma, the manufac-
turer of damonds l Mashaah, t s a good
trade, and one that were we worth the earnng
e sha pave our paaces wth god-dust when
we have mastered the mystery nd now,
wthdraw, f endm : we have of ate had some
defacatons n the pubc treasury, and you
brng us a secret so unooked-for and so we-
come, that we owe you an nstant demonstraton
of our grattude: retre then, Defter-dar, and at
sunset return hther, for we sha ook for you,
and be prepared to start upon our e ped-
ton.
The Mnster, renstated at once n the favour
of the utan and n hs ong-forfeted dgntes,
kssed the hem of the sacred garment, and wth-
drew from the presence to muse over hs un-
e pected good fortune. lt was to ef - abah
that he frst confded t but graduay the
happy ntegence spread through the househod,
and thence to the word beyond and ong ere
the settng sun warned the restored favourte
that the hour had arrved when he was once
more to set forth n pursuance of an adventure
L. l.
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98 TH M C TH H M.
whch had aready so deepy benefted hs for-
tunes, hs ante-room was fed wth ong-obvous
frends, who were suddeny se ed wth eager and
earnest an ety for hs soca and body we-
fare
n arrvng at the paace, the Defter-dar was
mmedatey ushered wth much ceremony to a
prvate apartment, whch he had scarcey entered
when he perceved an ndvdua, pany cad n
the common garb of a merchant, advancng to-
wards hm and he had barey tme to bend hs
forehead to the earth, when the utan e camed
gay : se, lbrahm, my brother wth ths
coarse and somewhat nconvenent garb l have
for a tme doffed the Padshah. e shoud now
be on our way and l can acquant you as we
traverse the cty wth the pans whch l have
formed to ensure the success of our undertakng.
To our task, then, lbrahm The sun w set
ere ong and you were pedged to return to the
hosptabe has of Hemdoune Hanoum ere nght-
fa.
The word of Mourad was aw and the god
of day had scarcey dpped hs goden har n the
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 99
bue waters of the osphorus, when the two ds-
gused merchants beat upon the door of Hassan s
prson-house.
.9
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100 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT lll.
TH Dl M D M CH T contnued.
They were evdenty not e pected for, as
on the occason of the Defter-dar s former vst,
they were detaned for a consderabe tme ere
the door was cautousy opened but, at sght of
the we-remembered face of the merchant lbra-
hm, the save hasty bade them enter, and as
hasty cosed the door behnd them. The words
of hs greetng were courteous, but ts manner
struck both the utan and hs companon, as
dark and threatenng and t was wthout regret
that they obeyed hs bddng, and remaned
aone together n the ha, whe he hastened to
apprse hs mstress of ther arrva.
lf they had been detaned n the street, they
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 101
had no cause to compan of deay on the part
of the od woman. ny a few seconds had
eapsed, ere the rapd shuffng of her shppers
was heard n the dstance, and the two merchants
bent ow before her, as she emerged from the
ong gaery, and stood besde them.
hosh gedn you are wecome she e -
camed hasty.
hosh buduk we found, was the ready
repy of her vsters, as they repeated the saam
aekum.
hy, ths s we, lbrahm, my son T she
sad, wth a sme whose ferceness she coud not
whoy concea after havng payed the truant
n such unseemy stye, as to gve us room to
doubt at once your truth and your honesty, you
re-appear, accordng to your promse, when we
had abandoned a hope of agan recevng you
as a guest. nd ths, then, s the honourabe
merchant your frend, Mechmed Cad re lsh-
mae He s wecome to my house and the
more so that you are hs companon. ut come,
come she added, somewhat mpatenty the
ha s chy, and we waste tme. Then, as she
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102 TH M C TH H M.
moved sowy on before them, attended by the
save bearng a amp, she muttered n a ow-
voce, whch dstncty reached the ear of the
utan, who was mmedatey behnd her : nd
l am to seect a score of stones a score poor
foos, poor foos are they not a mne a
and a fendsh chucke and a cenchng of the
thn bony hands fed up the measure of her
meanng.
ut te me, ffendm, te me, she sad, a
moment afterwards you, lbrahm, my frend,
t s to you l speak, and the e ceent merchant,
your assocate, w pardon me that l negect hm
for a whe te me, l pray you, wherefore you
fed from my dweng ast nght, ke one who
apprehended ev Dd any offer you nsut or
annoyance Dd any wd suspcon, or weak
aarm, prompt your fght Te me honesty,
for l hate mystery.
urey the Hanoum f end |ests wth her
save was the repy of the Defter-dar the
cause as too smpe to need ong seekng.
l had an dream, whch somewhat ruffed me,
and, to rd mysef of ts effects, l passed from
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 103
my chamber nto the ha, that l mght breathe
more freey, when l was attracted by the sght
of the sothfu aduk. l knew at once that he
shoud keep the door, and l remembered that the
safety of Hemdoune Hanoumand her whoe house-
hod depended on the vgance of ths snorng
save. l dd not awaken hm, for the thought struck
me that l coud teach hm a esson more key to
produce amendment than any reproaches and
accordngy, l resoved, even at some ncon-
venence to mysef, to depart wthout hs as-
sstance, n order to prove to hm that hs
suggshness mght, under some crcumstances,
have been the cause of mschef. lf l dd
wrong, the Hanoum ffend w pardon me as
to the saves who sumber when they shoud
watch, what are they havan der they are
anmas
T was shrewdy done, sad the od crone
a deed after my own heart. l have mysef
fnshed the work whch you began so bravey
and there s now no fear that the save aduk
w ever seep upon hs post agan.
s she uttered the words, the party emerged
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104 TH M C TH H M.
from the dark passage aong whch they had
been sowy advancng, and found themseves n
a superb saoon, branty ghted, and occuped
by haf a score of young beautes, among whom
the Defter-dar nstanty recogn ed eech-so.
ut ere he made hs sautaton to the brght
band, he gave one hurred gance at the od
woman, and remarked wth satsfacton that every
shade of suspcon had vanshed from her hag-
gard countenance.
The guests were soon seated on the sumptuous
dvan, besde ther hostess, and supped wth
chbouques and coffee by the far hands of her
attendant madens and then the mpatence of
Hemdoune Hanoum became uncontrouabe,
and she abrupty desred the merchant Mechmed
Cad re lshmae to dspay hs damonds.
The utan bowed ow, and thrust hs hand
amd the fods of hs grde, but suddeny wth-
drew t, and pressed t upon hs brow wth an
e presson of acute pan. r ar he e -
camed convusvey lbrahm, ar, or l fant r
uck quck shouted the hostess n her
turn ook that the attces be frm, and throw
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 105
up the casement see ye not that the ffend
abours for breath.
eech-sG was the frst to obey the bddng
she sprang upon the dvan wth the rapdty of
Hghtnng, and fung the wde casement back
to ts fuest e tent and, as the sweet breath of
evenng came softy nto the apartment, the mer-
chant sowy revved. gobet of water, ten-
dered to hm by one of the ades, competed
hs recovery, and he ost no tme n gratfyng
the curosty of hs hostess.
The |oy of Hemdoun Hanoum amounted
amost to nsanty, as her guest spread before
her some of the costest |ewes of the lmpera
Treasury. Her wasted fngers opened and shut,
as though she were aready cutchng them n
sprt and her eager eyes fastened on them as f
she feared ther nstant dsappearance, and woud
thra them wth a ook.
Guu embrut -f- Matap l eech-
so she e camed, addressng the ndvduas
on whom her gance chanced to fa we have
made a precous harvest to-nght The ransom
ose. t merad. | Moonght.
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106 TH M C P TH H M.
of an mperor nd now we w waste no more
tme upon these smpe dots, who have brought
ther own necks to the bow-strng and she
was aoout to cap her hands, to summon some
one wthout, when the Defter-dar se ed her
forcby by the arm, as she shouted, oos l
Manacs cose the casement, f you woud not
have the kavashr upon us, and ca hther
Memsh and erhat are we to be frghtened
by the mpotent voence of two har-braned
madmen
ne of the madens sprang to the wndow,
but she was hed back by eech-so, who had
aready statoned hersef besde t and the pro-
gress of the others towards the door was arrested
by the utan, who, as he fung hmsef across
ther path, drew a psto from hs grde, and
fred t through the open casement. The report
of the shot was answered by a shr cry from
the mnaret of a neghbourng mosque and the
utan had scarcey wrenched from the hand of
the fendsh od woman a dagger whch she had
amed at hm, ere the room was fu of armed
Cty Poce.
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 107
men. Thck and fast they poured n through
the shvered casements on a sdes of the
dweng and the catter of ther arms, and
ther shr cres, as they pursued each other
through the ntrcate passages of the house,
sounded fearfuy through the sence of the
nght.
The saoon n whch the utan stood n ths
dweng of darkness presented a snguar spec-
tace as the |anssares prostrated themseves
before hm. trown over the rch Persan carpet
were the costy |ewes whch had been scattered
durng the strugge of the Defter-dar wth the
od woman n the centre of the foor stood the
utan, hs brow dark, and hs eye brght wth a
terrbe meanng. ln one corner of the apart-
ment were custered together a group of ovey
grs, spenddy attred, and wan wth fear
whe, on the rch sofa of god and a ure, ay the
gracefu form of eech-so, one round whte arm
fang over the edge of the dvan, and a sender
stream of bood fowng from her bosom to the
foor.
The sgna shot of the utan had been fred
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108 TH M C TH H M.
n haste, and the ba had termnated the fe of
the far and gente eech-so.
My tae s amost tod. The wretched Hem-
doune Hanoum was bow-strung by two of her
own saves, who had been made captve by the
|anssares. Cody and sterny, Mourad, as
they were brought trembng before hm, n-
qured of each hs name and then, seectng
from the number, Memsh and erhat, who had
been destned to the honour of termnatng hs
own e stence, he stood by to see hs w ac-
compshed. The vctm uttered no cry made
no suppcaton but submtted to her fate wth a
reckessness worthy of her mpous fe and,
as her quverng body was fung down by her
e ecutoners, the utan bade them conduct hm
to the prson of Hassan.
The report of eech-so to the Defter-dar was
true n every partcuar. The vauts beneath the
house had been converted nto dungeons where,
surrounded by squaour, fth, and wretchedness,
oaded wth chans, and attenuated by hunger,
the utan found not ony Hassan, but a score
of other vctms, a young men of weath or
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TH Dl M D M CH T. 109
rank, many of whom had been ost to ther
fames for years.
The |oy of the mserabe prsoners may be
magned, when they recogn ed ther deverers.
Hassan fe on the neck of the Defter-dar, and
wept and, as hs chans were struck ofP, he
mnged wth hs grattude an nqury for eech-
so and hs tears ony fowed the faster when he
earnt that she had pershed n the servce of her
affecton.
f the fate of her companons there s no
record but, as they were astern women who
had come under the ban of the aw, t s not
dffcut to magne t whe t s certan that, n
many of the state documents subsequent to ths
adventure, menton s made of a certan Hassan
Pasha, who hed a hgh offce of tate durng
the atter part of the regn of utan Mourad
the econd.
d, romantc, and mprobabe, as ths tae w appear
to uropean readers, t s nevertheess strcty true havng
been drawn from the archves of the Turksh mpre, and
reated by Perousse Hanoum, the Lady ecretary of the
utana me, for the purpose of beng communcated to me,
durng my resdence at Constantnope, n the year 1836.
Mourad, or, as he s styed n ngand, murath H., was a
prnce devoted to adventure, and of great persona courage.
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1 10 TH M C TH H M.
P T ll,
CH PT l .
Tab tab we done, we done e -
camed Carmf Hanoum as the far Mas-
sad|he ceased speakng ah ts a
wondrous tae, and my ears have drank t n
ke soft musc but, truy, as you forewarned
me, t s somewhat of the saddest. The caam
whch traced t must have grown besde a swft
rver, and been fanned by the bree e of even-
ng and, ne brm what can l say me-
thnks that l better ove a tae of happer
ssue.
Pen made from a reed.
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TH M C TH H M. Hl
The young Greek ony reped by ftng her
nstrument from the cushon on whch she had
ad t when she commenced her narratve, and
smng archy at her frend, as, wth rapd
utterance, she poured forth the foowng ba-
ad.
TH L T .
The wnds of our mountans, how gadsome they are
ut the voce of my ov d one s sweeter by far,
s on hs swft rab, as brght as the day,
He comes from my bondage to bear me away.
They have wreath d my dark tresses wth bossom and gem,
ut my heart has no fondness to avsh on them
l was sought by a stranger they made me hs brde,
nd my free sprt pnes n ts passonate prde.
peed speed to the rder who comes ke the wnd
hom no per can daunt, and no fetter can bnd
o sang the sweet voce whch we wecome no more,
or the brde of the stranger has fed wth the gaour l
nough, khatoun darng sad the far
Crcassan n a ow whsper, as a deep bush
manted her brow and bosom l ke your
baad even ess than your hstory, for t tes a
tae to whch t s sn to hsten.
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1 12 TH M C TH H M.
l have done smed her companon, and
now we w hearken to the fa of the fountans,
the murmurng of the wnd n the mmosa trees,
and the song of the caged brds for, truy, they
make sweet musc.
ot ong, however, had the far frends re-
sgned themseves n sence to the cam beauty
of the hour, and the tran of thought whch t
engendered, when a save approached wth nt-
maton that the Pasha purposed payng a vst
to the harem after the evenng mea and. hs
wfe havng sgnfed her readness to receve
hm, the ades shorty afterwards removed to
another apartment, n whch the supper had
been spread by ther attendants.
Cushons of decate pnk satn, sprnked wth
goden stars, were paced besde the sver tray
on whch the mea was to be served napkns of
musn, as whte and fne as gossamer, e qu-
stey embrodered and frnged wth cooured
sks and sver, were ad carefuy across ther
knees and over ther arms tepd rose-water,
poured from a rchy gded vase nto a basn of
the same matera, was showered upon ther
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TH M C TH H M. 113
whte and taper fngers, and the repast com-
menced.
hne of saves, e tendng from the ow
tray to the door of the apartment, passed the
dshes, whch were served sngy, from hand to
hand the one nearest to her mstress settng t
down before her upon her knees.
ot a word was spoken as the mea pro-
ceeded, whch was accompaned by the voces of
haf a do en save-grs grouped together at the
e treme end of the room. There were the de-
cate keftas, bas of hghy seasoned force-meat
tchava, a dsh made of four, honey, and o
kamack, an e quste preparaton of thckened
cream moabe, a speces of nferor banc
mange, much pr ed by the rentas, and eaten
wth powdered sugar and rose-water kbaubs of
amb, served up on skewers of |asmne wood
kubeh, spced meat, mnced, and roed n vne-
eaves, baked crsp domas, a smar prepa-
raton stewed n cream tchorba, or soup of
severa descrptons dred beef, prepared wth
garck, the Turksh substtute for ham and a
the varous provocatves to appette whch f
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114 TH M C TH H M.
up the measure of an renta repast and,
asty, the natona pauf, rchy cooured wth
tomato |uce, and favoured wth quas. herbets
and coffee succeeded : and, havng once more
bathed ther far hands n perfumed water,
Carmf Hanoum and her Greek frend re-
turned to the garden saoon to awat the comng
of the Pasha.
The sun was |ust settng, and the ta syca-
mores whch bounded the vew were geamng
n god and orange whe, as the rays fe upon
the nobe sheet of water mmedatey beow the
casement, they shed a soft pnk tnt upon the
marbe basn, and over the pae bossoms of the
otus fowers.
How far must ths sweet evenng cose
upon the mountans of my beoved and sghed
out the beautfu Crcassan can you not
pcture to yoursef, atnka mou, the gory of
ths rch ght fung over the bessed vaey,
where
ut the kadeun had no tme to ocase her
pcture for, as she was speakng, the tapestry
Lady.
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TH M C TH H M. 115
curtan of the nner door was fted by a coupe
of negro saves, and the Pasha entered the
apartment.
aam aekum, sad the atrap, as the
ades rose to receve hm.
ekum aam, reped hs wfe, as he
advanced towards the sofa whe the Greek,
retrng a few paces, stood sent n an atttude
of deep respect.
efn ay me s your humour good
asked the Pasha, as hs young wfe bent her knee,
and pressed hs hand to her ps and brow.
Gu e good f was the answer my
ord has brought |oy to the heart of hs save,
for he has restored to her the sster of her
sou.
The atrap ganced for the frst tme towards
atnka : pproach, k em my daughter
he sad kndy l have much to thank you
for, when l see the boom and the hght restored
to ths |ewe of my e stence you have been a
skfu physcan : every hakeem whom l have
htherto consuted has been an ass and the
father of asses but you have brought back |oy
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1 16 TH M C TH H l M.
to my harem, as the dawn brngs back Hght.
ho has taught you a sk vauabe as the pre-
cepts of the oran, and sure as the Paradse of
the Prophet How s t that, whe the wse
men of the and have heaped upon my head the
drt of dsappontment, you have spread for my
feet the carpet of content
ah buyuk der the adeun Hanoum has
re|oced n my mnstresy, and we have broken
together the spced bread of memory was the
repy. The heart, when t s sad, ever oves to
fa back upon the past the rver may fow
through many vaeys, but ts waters have a
been fed from the same source, and they cannot
change ther nature.
nd yet, what s the past sad the
atrap phosophcay, as he took from the
hand of an attendant hs rchy ornamented
chbouque, of whch the boudaka, or bow, was
curousy gt and panted s t not bosh
nothng The song that has been sung, the
tae that has been tod, the sherbet that has
been drank, what ava they ashustun n
my head be t They are even ess than
nought l have sad t.
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TH M C TH H M. l l|
tour, |anum t, my sou was hs
ne t e camaton, as he wthdrew for an nstant
the chbouque from hs ps, and turned towards
hs wfe and when, proftng by ths gracous
permsson, she had paced hersef on the e -
treme edge of the sofa on whch he was com-
fortaby estabshed, a moton of the hand m-
ped a smar command to the young Greek,
who obeyed t by takng her pace on a pe of
cushons at the feet of her frend.
eya sad the atrap a moment after
as he ooked up l have been searchng for
the cause of your vaunted ceverness, and l fnd
not n the chambers of my bran one wth
whch l can fee satsfed. Ha true, you are
a Greek, and the women of your naton are
content to turn over the eaves of knowedge,
and to trace the characters of communcaton
themseves, whe the far nmates of our harems
hemduah prase be to ah st quety
upon ther sofas, and, for a few pastres, pur-
chase the abours of others but you do more
than ths you are as a daughter of rangstan
as a sster of the Unbeevers, who wak the
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118 TH M C TH H M.
treets wth ther faces naked, and pour dust
upon the heads of the karabashes, the wse men
of our country, who doube up ther feet upon
the sofa of scence, and pour the sherbet of
study nto the gobet of earnng. Mashaah
rang domous the ranks are hogs and ther
women are the ssters of hetan, and the hand-
madens of bs and the Pasha spat upon
the carpet, overcome at once by ndgnaton and
fatgue.
The women of the ranks, what are they,
that we shoud tak of them asked the Cr-
cassan. Do not ther own husbands hod them
so ghty that they may come and go as they
st, and receve strange men n ther harems,
and st at meat wth them unrebuked re
they not gaours and unbeevers
Tab we sad why shoud we tak of
them, gu um, my eyes reped the Pasha
are they not as ame, wanderng from house
to house unveed, and smng upon every
bey adeh - who smokes from the chbouque of
ther husband |ab wonderfu
Dancng grs, f on of a Lord,
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TH M C TH H M. 119
Have you ever ooked upon one of these
unhappy ones asked the Hanoum an -
ousy.
ut once, |anum, and that was at tambou,
before l took possesson of my pashak and,
ouf and agan he assumed an e presson of
ntense dsgust. he had nether turban upon
her head, nor henna upon her hands hen l
peered at her from behnd a curtan, for l
woud not enter her apartment, she had a
Pranksh caam n her hand, and she was tracng
upon the eaf of an open voume a knot of
fowers that was yng before her and l swear by
the oran that l coud scarcey te the precse
bossom to whch the prophet had gven fe.
ho coud breathe the breath of peace n a
harem where hs women coud augh at hm to
hs beard
Mashaah who ndeed murmured the
young wfe and for a tme there was s-
ence.
atnka, whose ebec ay besde her, weared
of the du common-paces to whch she had
been so ong compeed to sten, swept her
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120 TH M C TH H M.
hand across the strngs of her nstrument,
and at once changed the current of the Pasha s
thoughts.
Pekah very we, he sad, smngy, be
t so we w have musc. nd, wthout fur-
ther bddng, the maden poured forth one of the
wd meodes of her country.
l have been thnkng of you as you sang
sad the atrap, as the stran ceased, and the
young Greek remaned wth her head bent over
the ebec, to concea the arge tears that were
standng n her eyes and as l have no
more mportant occupaton than to sten, l
woud fan hear your hstory, and termnate
a perpe ty of whch t fatgues me to at-
tempt the souton. Do l say we, Carm-
f, |anum, sha she te us the tae of her
fe
s my ord ws sad the Crcassan n
a ow meanchoy accent she ves but tq
obey you.
The young Greek passed her hand before
her eyes, fung back the custerng brads
whch had faen over her face, and, after havng
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TH M C TH H M. 121
contnued sent for a moment, turned a ong
speakng ook upon her frend, and commenced
her story.
L. l.
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122 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT .
T M a natve of co, of that decous
sand whch, mrrored n the cear waters of the
gean, and rch n a the prodga gfts of
nature, appeared to have sprung from the bue
depths of ocean to gve to man a renewed
gmpse of the forfeted but unforgotten den.
l dare not deta to my ord, as my Greek heart
woud dctate, a the horrors to whch my brth-
pace became a prey. gan the serpent stoe
upon the cam happness of nnocence and agan
man was drven out nto the wderness of the
word but ths tme t was wth bood and
tears
Mashaah broke n the Pasha f you
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TH M C TH H M. 123
put many words to the frng of a town and
the murder of a few thousand revoted Greeks,
your narratve s key to ast to the ne t ama-
an ut go on t may perchance mend as
you proceed akaum we sha see.
The cry of bood rose to Heaven pursued
atnka, heedess of the nterrupton, and
rathe- speakng to hersef than addressng the
Pasha and n Heaven s good tme t w be
answered How many happy ones dd a bref
day make orphans hreks and groans rang
through the groves whch had so atey re-
sounded wth aughter and musc and the
gracefu hmbs that had ed the romaka under
the shade of the ta sycamore and the droopng
safsaf, ay mamed and beedng by the way-
sde. was terror and dsmay and my
affrghted mother, se ng wth frantc haste my
brother and mysef by the hand, hurred us
aong by-paths tte frequented, and qute
unknown to our enemes, to a cavern n the
rock, whch had aready afforded refuge to a
score of other fugtves. Meanwhe the fames of
gyptan wow.
g2
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124 TH M C TH H M.
the burnng vages rose nto the ar n voumes,
and the occasona dscharge of musketry con-
tnued throughout the nght. My mother sat
upon the ground, wth her head bured on her
knees, my brother was besde her, and l ay
at her feet, and sept, overcome by fatgue and
terror.
Through the agency of a reatve, who ost
hs wfe and chdren durng the massacre, after
four tedous and mserabe days spent n the
cavern, durng whch we subssted on she-fsh
and wd berres, coected by the bodest of the
wretched company durng the nght we escaped
n the fra bark of a fsherman whom the hope
of gan had nduced to hover about the sand,
and who anded us ere the day was spent on a
beak rock, where we contnued unt we coud
safey transport ourseves to thens our fathfu
fsherman suppyng us wth food, and ut-
matey nformng the frends to whom we were
an ous to be conveyed, of our desttute and
mserabe condton,
Landed n Greece, we were n comparatve
securty and the unce of my mother, a weathy
merchant, wthout any nearer reatves than
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TH M C TH H M. 125
ourseves, avshed upon us every u ury whch
hs affecton coud procure or devse but my
poor mother s heart was broken and, whe l
was yet a chd, she was ad beneath an acaca
tree to rest.
e were now whoy dependent on ge
neste, our unce, and we became to hm as
chdren a the advantages that god coud
secure he poured forth upon us but even that
effort woud not satsfy hs ove. e were
about to be transported to rangstan, to a sea-
port of the Gaus, touchng on the guf of
Genoa, and there
ah . n the name of the Prophet,
how say you Have you been n the and of
the nfde e camed the Pasha, suddeny
aroused from hs ndfference know you not
that the country of the Unbeevers s but a
men khaneh, a post-house, on the road to |e-
hanum
hekur ah heaven be prased, the soe
of my foot has never been pouted by treadng
the so of the gaour reped the young Greek,
wth a quet sme. l was about to nform your
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p
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126 TH M C TH H M.
hghness that the feucca was at anchor before
the cty, when a rank stranger arrved wth
hs ony chd at the house of one whom ge
neste oved, and n whose company he passed
a great porton of hs tme. hen they anded
n Greece, t was evdent to a who ooked upon
the stranger that he had come there ony to de.
Hs eye burnt wth a ferce ght whch was
amost da ng, and there was a boom upon hs
cheek better suted to a strpng than to one
whose head was whte wth the snows of age.
The rank was devoured by the dsease whch
s the pague of hs country and the hakeems
of hs own and had sent hm forth n despar
from the fogs and snows of hs unhappy cme
to our more gena ast he had passed rapdy
from one far sand to another, wth the restess-
ness of hs dsease and of hs peope unt, fee-
ng that the ange rae was rapdy fodng
hs wngs about hm, he resoved to vst Greece,
though we he knew that t must be hs bura-
pace.
l have spoken of hs chd t was a daughter,
wth eyes ke the bue heaven that foods the
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TH M TH H M. 127
word wth beauty, and har as goden as the
ast rays of the settng sun. as she hoped
on to the ast and, when ah at ength re-
caed the breath that he had gven, and she was
eft aone, she prayed n her angush that the
same stone mght cover them. he ved on, how-
ever, for the prayer of the burstng heart was
set asde n mercy and she became an nmate of
my unce s house. rom her l earnt the ore of
the ranks, and, when she at ength foowed
her father to the grave for the posoned shaft
whch had struck down the strono man urked
aso n the vens of the goden-hared chd of
hs ove we mourned for her as though she had
been of our own bood.
ffars of commerce cang ge neste to
Crcassa, he determned, n order to remove the
meanchoy whch had fastened vampre-ke
upon my heart, to carry my brother and mysef
wth hm upon hs nterestng e pedton. Then
and there t was, your hghness, that, for a few
bref and happy months l en|oyed the frendshp
of the beautfu Carmf Hanoum, whom may
ah ong preserve n oveness hen hs
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128 TH M C TH H M.
affars were setted, my unce pned for hs own
and, and the famar comforts of hs own roof
but my brother s boder sprt had become
enamoured of the mountan fe, and the ge-
nerous hosptaty of Crcassa, and he resoved
to foow out hs fortunes n the war whch the
brave mountaneers were wagng aganst the
Muscovtes. Heaven was mercfu, for, on our
return to thens, our feucca was taken by a
Turksh vesse my unhappy unce ded hke a
brave Greek, wth hs weapon n hs hand and,
for mysef, and the voce of the maden
fatered, and the btter tears of angush fe
upon her bosom l am pursung my destny
nursed n bood, and reared n e e, l am
now wearng away my youth n savery
ay, not so, khatoun e camed the Cr-
cassan, throwng her whte arms about her
frend, heedess of the presence of the Pasha
your sorrows now are ended, your fe sha be
one of sunshne, and they who oppress or n|ure
you sha be the enemes of the atrap.
Tab we sad: echoed afua Pasha
l w puck out ther beards, and f ther
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TH M C TH H M. 129
nostrs wth ashes. ut we have ad enouf:h
of gref et your saves be summoned, f en-
d mou, that the dance may dry up your tears,
whch are pourng out ke the fountans of the
desert. lnshaah l woud rather see the fowers
when the sunshne rests upon them, than when
the shower fas heavy on ther heads, and bends
them earthward/
Carmf Hanoum capped her hands, and the
dancng grs of her harem speedy entered,
greaty to the satsfacton of the atrap who,
when he commanded the narraton of atnka,
had by no means antcpated so goomy a hstory
and who was far better amused by the monotonous
twangng of the wry Turksh mandons, and
the meanngess movements of the saves, than
he woud have been by a the fabes of the wy
chehera ade hersef.
To the dance succeeded a shr chorus of
voces, suffcent to have cracked the drums of
any ears save those of an sman and, when
the muscans had performed ther prostratons,
and qutted the apartment, Carmf Hanoum,
an ous to renstate her frend n the good
g5
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130 TH M C TH H M.
graces of her husband, whose favour had ev-
denty been much essened by the saddenng
nature of her story, by whch he had neary been
put to seep, and, at the same tme to dmnsh
ts effect upon her own sprts, roused hersef
by a voent effort, and sad aughngy
The moon s as brght to-nght as the
sword of the Padshah ts an hour for a ove-
tae aye, and one of happy ssue. Have you
none such, gu um ak see you have but
to ook at those threads of sver fung over the
eaves ke a net-work, n order to weave a thou-
sand gadsome fances, and to dspe at once the
goom of the atrap, who has done nought but
sgh snce the sngng women eft the apartment.
Gu e gu e good, good smed the
Pasha, ts a good thought, |anun my sou :
but we w have no more revots, nor prates,
nor rank women wanderng nto far ands to
de, nstead of watng quety upon ther sofas
the comng of rae as they woud have done,
had they covered ther faces, and not eaten drt
from ther chdhood. ut frst and he
capped hs hands, and sad gravey to the negro
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TH M C TH H M. 131
who answered the summons, Chbouque, cah-
veh getr brng ppes and coffee ere he
turned gay towards the young Greek, and
added, wth a sef-gratuatory chucke at hs
own wt. rst pass the sponge of obvon
over the parchment of memory, and fod your
feet upon the cushon of deght for f you fa
to make me augh ere l eave the harem, l w
condemn you to prepare your pauf wth green
rce so et your words be your saves, that they
may make smes as pentfu n my harem as
roses n the gardens of shapor.
The far Greek bowed her head, and ad her
hand upon her heart and ps and, when the
cafe|hs had retred, prepared to obey the
Pasha by reatng the story of
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132 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT l.
TH D .
ot above a hundred years ago, there hved
n the cty of tambou, near the mosque of
utan a|a et, a shaw merchant named ue-
man, to whom the Prophet had been auspcous,
and who had consequenty accumuated mmense
weath. or s ty-fve years he had been con-
tent to see hs harem occuped on by hs
very aged mother and her saves but at the
termnaton of that perod, as he was one day
sttng n the haw a ar, hs attenton was
attracted by the statey form and gracefu car-
rage of a femae, who paused for a moment
besde hs carpet to e amne a magnfcent
cachemre of Lahore, whch he was n the act of
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TH D . 133
dspayng to a rank customer, and then
hasty passed on, attended by a save.
The rank purchased the shaw, and the
brght eyes of the far pedestran had so far
favoured hm, that he dd not pay above a
thousand pastres more than ts vaue ueman
havng, n hs temporary bewderment of sprt,
named to the Gaour the very sum whch he
woud have demanded of a True eever and,
when the merchant had carefuy deposted the
god n hs tobacco purse nstead of the more
egtmate receptace destned for hs gans, and
had nhaed n sence the aroma of a newy-
repenshed chbouque, he was aroused from hs
ft of musng by the voce of hs neghbour
a|b, an dranopotan by brth, and, ke hm-
sef, a shaw merchant by professon, who had
wtnessed the bargan wth some surprse but
wth that quet phosophy of non-nterference
common n the ast.
ah mouteyemmn eeye ah grant
that t may be of good omen to you : he sad
camy. The dog of an nfde was ready wth
hs god, and pad t fary but you, me-
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134 TH M C TH H M.
thnks, were somewhat over-hasty on your sde,
or you mght have counted t up to a heaver
sum. ven the ght-footed daughter of od b-
duah, the sversmth, stopped for a moment as
she passed, n wonder at your far deang wth
a Gaour.
Mashaah ah be prased the eye
must be keen that perces the fods of a y ash-
mac, retorted the other, thoroughy aroused by
the sub|ect How know you, f endm, that
bduah has a daughter or that the gr who
|ust w aked through the ba ar was hs chd
To your frst queston, l answer that my
wfe asked her for our son Haf , but t was
not hs ksmet hs fate to be peasng n the
eyes of the od man and to the second, that the
negress who foowed her was reared n my own
harem, and bade God guard me, as she stepped
besde my carpet.
ueman smoked on after ths short daogue
n sence : a new dea had sprung nto e stence
n hs mnd and he remaned quety revovng
the sub|ect unt an hour before sunset, at whch
e worn by Turksh women.
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TH D . 135
perod the tcharch coses when, havng e -
hausted hs ast ppe, he roed up hs carpet,
secured hs costy merchandse, and waked
sowy homeward.
lt s my feech my consteaton he
murmured to hmsef, as he cast off hs sppers
at the door of the harem, and proceeded to pay
a vst to hs mother hat s to be, w be
nd havng nduged n ths consoatory and
soothng refecton, ueman the shaw mer-
chant phosophcay resgned hmsef to hs
fate ah kerm ah s mercfuP he
sad quety, as he took possesson of a cushon
near the sofa on whch hs aged and wdowed
parent sat supported by pows : ah kerm
my home has htherto been one of sohtude,
and the har of my mother has grown gray wth
years and as yet she has had no daughter to
pour water nto her gobet, nor coffee nto her
cup but ths must not be for ever l have
sad t.
ah kerm echoed the od woman n her
turn : the Prophet has heard my prayer. l
Great change,
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136 TH M C TH H M.
w see Harnet the save-merchant, before the
set of to-morrow s sun.
ay, not so was the repy l have
heard that bduah the sversmth, he who
wrought the manga for the utan s new pa-
ace, hath a daughter men speak we of hm,
and hs beard s whte. l w marry the gr.
Pekah very we answered the aged
crone : then w l see the Hanoum, her mother
the lmaum sha be warned and ne t week her
foot sha be on your threshod.
bduah hath refused her to Haf , the
son of a|b observed the sutor wth a sudden
msgvng.
nd what of that asked hs mother
sharpy s t not bosh nothng Haf s
a mere boy, and the came s not yet foaed
whch w carry hm to Mecca.
ven on the morrow dd Gundu Hanoum
(for thus was the mother of ueman caed
Gundu sgnfyng Dayght, though the sun of
her morta sky had ong been set, and her e -
stence dwnded away nto a mere goamng
bra er for hodng heated cha oa.
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TH D . 137
and Hanoum, beng transated, readng as ady
or mstress :) even on the morrow dd she set
forward upon her nterestng errand. or had
the aged ambassadress the most remote doubt as
to the success of her msson : true, the sver-
smth had refused to gve the maden to Haf ,
the frst-born of a|b, the dranopotan but
a|b was not a man of substance, and the son
fed ony upon hs father s fortunes whe
ueman
lt was at ths pont of her musng that the
araba, or attced carrage, of Gundu Hanoum
stopped before the harem of the mother of
Haf and when the araba|he had beaten upon
the door, and t had been opened by some n-
vsbe means from wthn, her saves sowy
fted her from her cushons, and bore her nto
the ha of bduah s house, whence she was
supported up stars and, havng traversed a wde
corrdor surrounded by the women s apartments,
she was ushered nto the prncpa room of the
harem, and the presence of ts mstress.
ouroum you are wecome sad the
ady, rsng courteousy from her sofa, as the
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138 TH M C TH H M.
guest entered and she motoned the decrepd
od woman to the pace of honour ou are
wecome, though l know not whence you are,
nor on what errand you come. nd whe the
vster, havng put off her sppers, setted her-
sef comfortaby at the upper end of the dvan,
she capped her hands, and a save entered wth
coffee.
Long sat the two women sde by sde n s-
ence and, when the coffee had dsappeared, the
wfe of bduah prepared a chbouque for her
guest, and, havng duy paced on the summt of
the tobacco a sma pece of ghted charcoa, she
offered the ppe to her vster wth her own
hands, who receved t wth a courteous saam
aekum.
ou are the wfe of bduah the sver-
smth commenced the od woman at ength,
after she had mbbed the aroma of the tobacco,
and that the rased crce of ght whte ashes
had formed round the bow of the chbouque,
whch betrays that the vrtue of the scented
weed s we ngh evaporated you are the
astern sautaton.
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TH . 139
wfe of bduah the sversmth, and l am the
mother of ueman the shaw merchant, who
ves wthn the shadow of the mosque of utan
a|a et you have a far daughter and my
son s one who can we afford to favour hs
pauf wth spces do l speak ceary
ou speak ceary responded her audtor
wthout the sghtest gesture of surprse, and
drawng as she spoke a onger stream of vapour
through the sender ppe of |asmne wood whch
she was hersef smokng.
l woud see the gr foowed up the od
woman.
nd why not ready re|oned her new
acquantance hemduUah Prase be to
ah she has eyes ke oysters, and ps as
ruddy as the dye of horasan why shoud l
bd her hde hersef when a mussafr a guest,
desres to ook upon her
nd agan she capped her hatds, and, on
the entrance of an attendant, bade her summon
Hemas Hanoum to her presence.
The maden obeyed wthout deay and even
as she made her gracefu obesance at the thresh-
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140 TH M C TH H M.
od, ere she advanced deeper nto the apart-
ment, the keen eye of the od woman had de-
tected n her ntended daughter-n-aw a the
charms whch she had senty setted n her own
mnd to be mperatve and ndspensabe n the
wfe of her son. he was ndeed, as her name
mped, a damond among women she had
the heght and grace of her Georgan mother,
but her eye and brow were those of her Turksh
father. lt may seem somewhat apocrypha to
date on eyes whch her own parent had |ust
kened to so uttery unsentmenta an ob|ect n
natura hstory as an oyster but the sme w
nevertheess bear anayss as we as most her
eyes were fu, and round, and cear, and, more-
over, deepy frnged wth ashes as back as
nght she was pae, very pae but ere the vst
of ueman s mother ended, her cheek had
fushed nto a dye that woud have shamed the
roses of Gurgstan her ong dark har fe n
masses upon shouders as whte and poshed as
vory : and she moved wth a grace that ent a
new charm to her beauty.
lnshaah l trust n ah she s no
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TH D . 141
urd sad the wfe of bduah, as the ovey
Hemas Hanoum rased the wthered hand of the
vster to her ps : she s worthy to be the
wfe of a True eever.
he s worthy echoed the other hgh con-
tractng party, wthout removng her sharp gray
eyes from the countenance of the far gr she
sha be the wfe of ueman, even of my own
son.
The maden started panfuy, and rased her
downcast eyes wth an e presson of acute suf-
ferng her p trembed, but she dd not venture
to gve voce to the words that quvered there
and she amost bounded from the room as her
mother bade her retre.
The decaraton of Gundu Hanoum was
fufed to the etter one short week behed the
young and ovey daughter of bduah the
wfe of ueman the shaw merchant. he
wept bttery as she was borne nto the harem
and she cosed her eyes as the dancng grs
moved aong before her, and turned asde her
head as the sngng women peaed forth her
brda song. ln short, t avas not to make a
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142 TH M C TH H M.
secret of that whch her husband was not sow
to dscover the peeress Hemas Hanoum had
gven away her heart ere the aged mother of
ueman went on her matrmona msson to
the harem of bduah the sversmth.
ut who was the favoured over ho shoud
say ln takng a wfe, the worthy haw-mer-
chant had secured at once a msery and a mys-
tery. He sought to wn the secret by tender-
ness but the sentment of s ty-fve ong years,
wrtten n wrnkes on the brow of a new made
husband, s no key to open the heart of a young,
and pretty, and pre-occuped wfe. The Ha-
noum, hs mother, endeavoured to gan her
pont by taunts and menaces, but she was ony
answered by tears, from whch nothng coud be
earned save that there was a secret 5 and ths
ony made the matter worse.
How many seepess nghts dd the unhappy
ueman pass n van endeavours to remedy an
ev whose e act cause he coud not even fathom
nd how often dd he swear to hmsef by the
beard of the Prophet that he woud outmatch n
cunnng every over n tambou, though they
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TH D . 143
shoud be eagued wth hetan to do hm
wrong.
or one whoe weary month he sat n the
ba ar, apparenty ga ng on the passers-by,
but n reaty wth hs eyes turned nward, and
hs thoughts pottng treason aganst hs ege
ady and wfe. t ength the eectrc spark was
struck, and the umnous atom grew nto breadth
and form t s true that for a tme the breath
of the ovng husband came thck and hard as
he revoved the dfferent bearngs of hs scheme,
but the more he refected, the more he became
reconced to the dea and when, n a prvate
conference wth hs mother, t had receved her
sancton and approva, he hestated no onger to
prepare an effectua remedy aganst a over-ke
stratagems on the part of hs unknown rva.
eneath the house of ueman was e cavated
a vaut of some e tent, whch, wth consderabe
abour, was fashoned by the |eaous merchant
nto a spacous and comfortabe apartment, save
that the ght of heaven coud not penetrate ts
goom and ths subterranean was approached
by a ong vauted passage, aong whch, for bet-
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p
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144 TH M C TH H M.
ter securty, he paced, at reguar dstances, seven
doors strongy pated wth ron and fastened wth
ocks, each dfferent from the other, and to be
opened ony by the key that appertaned to t.
The surpr e of the young wfe may be ma-
gned when she was ntroduced nto ths vng
grave, and tod that t was to be thenceforward
her abdng pace. he wept, she knet, she even
shreked n her angush, but the heart of u-
eman was steeed by |eaousy, and tardy-
awakened ove. or, as he took some troube to
e pan, woud she be so much to be pted as
she seemed to apprehend, for, wth the e cepton
of ght, berty, and fresh ar, nothng n reason
woud be dened to her. ut the young beauty
was deaf to a hs rhetorc she saw ony n the
subterranean, n whch she was to be mmured
wth the fathfu negress who had foowed her
from her father s house, at once a prson and a
tomb nor dd the passonate protestatons of her
husband reconce her n the sghtest degree to
hs very orgna arrangement. ever were the
nconvenences of e cessve attachment more
strongy deveoped and after an hour useessy
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TH D . 145
e pended n sententous consoaton, the mer-
chant was fan to ascend to the eve of the earth,
eavng hs ovey vctm bathed n tears of most
sncere dstress.
ow t so chanced, that the house ad|onng
that of ueman the shaw merchant had ong
been unnhabted, and was key to contnue so,
for the wndow panes were shvered, the roof had
faen n, n many paces, and the suns of summer
and the rans of wnter had combned to render
t as fororn and unnvtng as any tenement
coud we be and the Merchant congratuated
hmsef that t was so, for the gref and terror of
hs young wfe had been more vocferous and de-
monstratve than he had antcpated and he
fet a the nconvenence whch mght have ac-
crued to hmsef from a possbe nterference on
the part of a neghbour.
ere ths the tme or pace for mora ng,
or were the habt of so dong more popuar
than t s, l mght be tempted at ths pe-
rod of my story to pause a tte, and to remark
on the proneness of purbnd human nature to
e ut over the very crcumstances whch are
L. l. H
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146 TH M C TH H M.
frequenty the most nmca to the success of
ts pro|ects but as t s, l w not nduge my-
sef wth dgresson and ths resouton brngs
me back at once to the prson-chamber of the
far and -fated Hemas Hanoum.
hat care l for my beauty she e camed
peevshy, cuttng short the an ous e hortatons
of her attendant, who sat on a cushon at her
feet l detest the very atmosphere he breathes.
Tchf ut wretch ha l brad my har for
hm, and stan my hands wth henna to gve hm
peasure lf l am mad, et hm send me to the
Tmerha e there at east l sha fee the
breath of Heaven, and ook on the bue sky
nd soon, soon she added, wth a fresh burst of
passonate gref l sha beftted ony for such
a home.
Tme wore on heavy enough n the subterra-
nean, though ueman rarey faed to vst each
day the ady of hs heart, who met hs affecton
ether n suen sence, or wth vehement re-
proach but a Turksh husband cares htte for a
storm of words t s ony a woman she must
Lunatc syum.
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TH D . 147
be suffered to say a that she sts her anger s
bosh, nothng she s better when she has
poured forth her dssatsfacton and upon ths
prncpe stened the husband of the ncarcerated
far one, wthout swervng one ota from hs pur-
pose and upon ths prncpe he bore the tem-
pest meeky and consoed hmsef by doube
ockng each of the seven doors, as he re-ascended
to the ght, and never sufferng the precous
keys to be deposted esewhere than amd the
fods of the shaw that he wore about hs wast.
h2
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148 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT ll.
TH D . contnued.
weary weeks had passed snce Hemas
Hanoum frst became the tenant of the vaut,
when, as she sat one day stessy passng the
beads of her chapet through her sender fngers,
she detected a strange nose n a corner of the
subterranean and so much was she perpe ed
to defne ts cause, that she awoke her companon,
who ay seepng peacefuy upon a mat thrown
on the foor, not haf a do en paces from her
sofa: ake, enp wake, l say she cred
mpatenty e var what s that some one
s n the apartment.
ffet oUah much peasure attend you we
sha then see a new face sad the negress
quety, as she passed her hand over her eyes,
and rose to a sttng posture ut where, f-
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TH D . 149
fendm, s the mussafr rchey yok there s
nothng we are st aone as when l ay down
to seep.
avash, yavash softy, softy whspered
the mprsoned beauty, pressng her fnger on her
p hear you nothng
othng, save a rat who has ost hs way n
the dark, and woud fan take a short cut
through our under-ground harem. Hah the
Prophet pardon you, ffendm, for you have
spoed the sweetest dream that has gaddened
my seepng hours snce
Hst l te you, ts no rat now ah
shed us what can t mean
The save, seeng the terror of her mstress,
and beng by ths tme wde awake, stened n her
turn. ln fve seconds she decded that her frst
guess had been a correct one, but n fve mnutes
she confessed that such coud not be the case.
nd, n truth, t was not wonderfu that the two
ncarcerated women shoud nstnctvey draw
coser together, and throw ther whoe sous for
the Turks have aways aowed that ther women
have sous, whatever t may have peased uro-
Guest.
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150 TH M C TH H M.
peans to decare to the contrary and throw
ther whoe sous nto ther ears, as the myste-
rous nose contnued wth scarcey any nterms-
son. lt was not precsey a knockng, nor qute
a scratchng, nor atogether a grndng t was a
strange rreguar compound of each and a of
these and the ony decson to whch Hemas
Hanoum and her ebony-cooured attendant coud
come on the sub|ect, was, that some person or
thng was strvng to make a way nto the vaut.
Havng arrved at ths concuson, ther terror
began after a tme to grow nto curosty. hat
coud t be hat coud t mean The young
beauty ooked towards her save, and murmured
out lf t shoud be my father and the save
n her turn ooked towards her mstress, and n a
tone as ow as the ast whsperng of the wnd on
the ocean-rppe, reped to the suggeston by
sowy sayng lf t shoud be your over
The sentence was no sedatve, for the cheek of
the young wfe crmsoned, and her heart began
to beat panfuy and meanwhe the knockng,
scratchng, and grndng went on wth an nde-
fatgabty whch dd nfnte credt to the per-
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TH D . 151
severance of the operator. The upper end of
the vaut, where t touched the subterranean of
the ad|onng dweUng, was secured by some of
those huge bocks of stone whch are frequenty
to be seen n the most ancent quarters of tam-
bou, and seem to have been hewn by the Ttans
they were, moreover, unted by that mysterous,
and amost ndestructbe cement, of whch the
secret s now supposed to be ost and, atogether,
no |eaous husband coud possby have devsed
a more sod or satsfactory speces of partton
between hs own house and that of hs neghbour.
ut what ava even bocks of stone, or oman
cement, aganst the resoute determnaton of
headstrong passon The compcated nose
went on day after day, unt the two prsoners
became so thoroughy accustomed to t, that t
was no onger a cause of fear, though, amd the
monotony of ther e stence, t st remaned a
sub|ect of curosty and conversaton.
lt was somewhat remarkabe that the nvsbe
workman, as though gfted wth the power of
seeng through the stone that he found t so df-
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152 TH M C TH H M.
fcut to penetrate, never contnued hs abours
durng the day vsts of the Merchant the n-
stant that the key of ueman turned n the
ock of the seventh door, a was as st as the
grave and perhaps t was equay strange, that
nether of the women ever vounteered to the
Merchant the sghtest menton of the crcum-
stance. lt mght be that n the e ctement of hs
recepton t escaped ther memory : or t mght
be that they consdered the ncdent to be ato-
gether nsgnfcant, and therefore unworthy of
attenton. l cannot take upon mysef to e pan
ther motve, but, be t what t woud, t shrouded
tsef n sence.
lt w ready be beeved by those who
have the advantage of ueman, and who are n
possesson of the secret, that the nose became
graduay ouder as the work advanced and
that, when once a huge stone was dspaced from
ts egtmate poston, the two trembng women
for they dd trembe more voenty than ever
when they saw the oosened mass actuay yed
to some e terna force were a eyes, as they
had ong been a ears, to dscover the cause
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TH D . 153
of the mystery. Hemas Hanoum was the frst
to recover from her panc, as a very handsome
head appeared n the chasm, whch was qucky
succeeded by a ta, sght, gracefu fgure, that,
havng passed the narrow space wth some dff-
cuty, started suddeny nto a standng posture
and then, quck as thought, was prostrate once
more at the feet of the young beauty.
Haf murmured the ow voce of the
merchant s wfe.
My far, my oved, my ong-ost hour
answered the youth, as he covered her sma
hand wth ksses : utana of my sou as t
for ths that they refused you to me to bury
you beneath the earth ere the Prophet had beck-
oned back your sprt as t for ths. and
tears of mnged |oy and btterness sweed n hs
arge dark eyes.
lt s my fate sad Hemas Hanoum
mournfuy : t s my fate and you have done
, Haf , to seek me out. as l not sad enough
n my onehness that you brng me a deeper
gref. e brm what can l say ou are a
madman
H 5
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154 TH M C TH H M.
The nghtngae sngs to the rose when the
sun has set was the meek repy : l have
earnt a esson of a sy brd and sha l be
chdden by the fower whch has won my wor-
shp
lf l chd you not n brghter days sad
the weepng beauty how coud l chde you
now nd yet, Haf
gu um |anum oh, my eyes my
sou commenced the over
nough, enough of ths nterposed the
save abrupty : we ose tme you ove each
other a way of escape s open et us fy to
the mountans.
Peace, enp sad her mstress sterny:
am l not the wfe of ueman
ou are a chd retorted the negress un-
ceremonousy see you not that the young
ffend s your feech your consteaton
you put out the ght of your own star
you backen your face because your father sod
you to a greybeard s god and eat drt wth
hm when you may share the pauf of one who
oves you
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TH D . 155
nd as the energetc enp paused for breath,
Haf ooked up at the trembhng gr, and whs-
pered he says we w you ndeed do
ths
Lsten to me sad Hemas Hanoum,
who at once perceved that she shoud have
to contend wth the peadngs of her own
heart, as we as those of both her com-
panons and who w as an ous to gan tme,
est, n ths frst moment of happy emoton,
she mght be nduced to take a step, aganst
whch reason and proprety ake revoted and,
wth the ready tact of her se n a countres,
and under a crcumstances, she adopted at
once the tone and manner best ftted to wn her
over to a compance wth her condtons. Lke
the ev enchanters of the ast, and the spoed
beautes of every and, she nssted on the per-
formance of feats whch she affected to beeve
mpossbe, but on whose accompshment she
bound hersef to unte her fate wth that of Haf ,
and to fy wth hm from tambou for ever.
ln van dd the young man argue, e postuate,
and pead he wasted ake hs tme and hs eo-
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156 TH M C TH H M.
quence, for Hemas Hanoum was frm. l
have sad t, Haf , and thus ony may you hope
to wn me remember, too, for how many weary
weeks l have been bured here, and sha l not
be revenged upon my tormentor etween the
entrance of the vaut and ths apartment there
are seven doors, and so many tmes must you de-
ceve ueman n some wse, so thoroughy that
he may beeve hmsef the sport of a fou fend
wthout havng power to free hmsef from the
thra and you must, moreover, so conduct
your machnatons as to make me a party n
every pot. ou need not doubt but l sha pay
my part we, and my fathfu enp aso
Have l not grown up wth hm from a
chd nterposed the negress and w not
my heart be wth hm whe he waks the earth
lnshaah l sha not mar hs pottng.
fter a tme Haf became more reconced to
the whm of hs mstress : for, wth the sangune
and |oyous sprt of youth, he antcpated ony a
successfu ssue to each adventure, be t as wd
as t mght and the two thoughtess and happy
overs happy n spte of a the dangers and
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TH D 157
dffcutes by whch they were surrounded
aughed hearty, ere they parted, at the mere
antcpaton of the dscomfort they were prepar-
ng for the Merchant.
Prudence, however, ponted at ength to the
dspaced fragment of wa, whch must, to nsure
the success of ther schemes, be carefuy re-ad-
|usted ere the ne t vst of ueman and as
Haf prepared to depart, Hemas Hanoum un-
casped from her sender wrst a costy braceet
we known to her husband, whose brda gft t
had been, and tendered t to her over l
need not te you how to use t she sad
smhngy enp and l w not fa n our
parts the stone sha be suffcenty oosened, as
soon as the ffend departs, to enabe you to re-
move t by a sght effart, and to restore the
|ewe ere he can turn the keys n hs seven ocks
and now, farewe.
Haf obeyed, and eft the vaut the stone
was roed back nto ts pace the rubbsh that
he had fung nto the apartment carefuy swept
away and then the wary save stretched across
that porton of the wa the sken cord on whch
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158 TH M C TH H M.
hang the embrodered napkns used by Turksh
femaes n ther abutons after each mea.
They had scarcey termnated ther task, when
the echoes of the subterranean betrayed the ap-
proach of the haw Merchant, who came to pay
hs day vst ere he departed for the Tcharch.
He found hs young wfe angudy recnng on
her cushons, and companng of ndsposton,
whch she attrbuted to the unwhoesome atmos-
phere of her prson-chamber. ueman endea-
voured to soothe her, but she ony became more
sent and suen and he eft her wth a promse
that she shoud not be much onger an occupant
of ths goomy abode, snce nether the u u-
rousness of ts arrangements, nor hs own argu-
ments, had power to wn her to an approva of
her poston.
Mashaah what have l done she fa-
tered, when she was once more eft aone wth
her attendant shoud he ndeed now yed to
the prayer to whch he has so ong contnued
deaf, l sha have runed my own cause, and
broken the heart of Haf .
Dry your tears, ffendm, and assst me to
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TH D . 159
remove the stone answered enp camy br
chey yok there s nothng to fear the ffend
ony seeks to amuse you wth words and, even
were t otherwse, the son of a|p must use your
|ewe wth ess wt than l take hm to possess, f
he does not make your |eaous |aor ook coser
than ever to the ocks of hs seven doors.
atsfed of the truth of the remark, the pretty
prsoner rose from her sofa to ad the efforts of
her more far-seeng companon, and they ready
roed back the frendy stone suffcenty for
ther purpose and then, wth beatng hearts
and attentve ears, awated mpatenty the ter-
mnaton of the frst adventure of Haf wth the
Merchant.
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160 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT lll.
TH D contnued.
ueman was squatted on hs carpet, gravey
knockng the ashes of an e hausted chbouque
from the bow of mouded red cay n whch they
had burnt away, and was preparng to renew the
u ury, when the young and handsome son of
a|p, the dranopoHtan, who occuped the ad-
|onng counter to that of the worthy husband of
Hemas Hanoum, ounged sowy up to the sta-
ton of hs father, and conversed wth hm for a
whe on the merts of some merchandse whch
he had been dspayng wthout success to a de-
parted customer or, rather, to one who he
had hoped woud have become such.
l have done nothng to-day, nothng sad
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TH D . 161
a|b, n repy to the nqury of hs son save
fod and unfod to no purpose. l must surey
have been smtten by the v ye, for the s-
ar gha, who purchased cachemres of me ast
year to the amount of two hundred and s ty
thousand pastres, passed through the ba ar
ths mornng, wthout turnng a gance towards
me as l sat among my merchandse and when
hs ppe-bearer, who had good reason to remem-
ber the bargan, approached hm wth f en-
dm, ths s a|b of dranope/ he answered,
hasty, hat of that do l owe hm god that
l am not free to pass on as l st and n haf
an hour l saw hm depart, foowed by the ne-
phew of amk the one-eyed, amost staggerng
under the weght of hs burthen. The Ch-
bouque|he gave me a ook as he passed, whch l
transated easy nto an avowa that amk had
not acted by hm as generousy as l had done,
and that he was by no means satsfed wth the
change. ut what do l say m l a woman
that l vent my dsappontment n words ls
not my beard whte
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162 TH M C TH H M.
sh me better fortune sad Haf l
have a |ewe to se. nd he drew from
beneath the fods of the shaw that grded
hs wast a bag of god-embrodered cachemre,
whence he took a sma parce contanng a
braceet. The ornament was a pecuar one t
was a chan of fne god, curousy worked, ts
nks beng wrought to resembe the mnute scaes
of a serpent, and each at ts pont beng tpped
wth a ruby whe the head of the repte was
formed of one arge emerad, nto whch two
brant drops had been ntroduced to repre-
sent the eyes.
Mashaah murmured a|b, f ng hs
ga e ntenty on the costy stone that casped the
|ewe, wth a the dscrmnatng admraton
bestowed n the ast on gems of prce Mash-
aah ts a drop of ght on a sprng eaf ts
a gaud for a utana nd wthout a mo-
ments deay he stretched the hand whch hed
t towards hs neghbour, sayng earnesty
How thnk you, endm ls t not a nobe
gem
ueman receved the |ewe camy, but he
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TH D . 163
dd not ong ook on t wth a pacd brow the
bood rushed n a voume to hs cheeks and
forehead, the fre fashed from hs eyes, he
thrust back hs turban, and gasped for breath
ou woud se ths baube, young man
he sad, n the cod deep accent of concentrated
passon and l, perchance, woud become a
purchaser but honest men do not pay away
ther god for thngs ke these wthout frst
earnng somewhat of ther hstory l woud
fan know
hat woud you have me te you asked
Haf , wth a sme whch roused, as he beeved
that t must do, every suspcous pang of the
|eaous husband, who had at once recognsed the
|ewe houd l say that t was gven to me
by a woman, were t not bosh nothng ou
must see that t s a woman s toy, and, as such,
useess to me and you woud hod me as a van
boaster a saka-s , a no-beard.
gan ueman gasped for breath. l w
buy the |ewe he sad hoarsey yes, l w
buy t eave t wth me for to-nght that l may
ascertan ts vaue, and to-morrow l w pay you
the god.
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164 TH M C TH H M.
That may not be, ffendm camy reped
Haf l w trust no one wth the trnket
unt t ceases to be my property. ha l heap
drt on my own head
ut l have not wherewtha to purchase t
unt l return to mne own house urged the
merchant.
To-morrow then l w treat wth you,
shoud no one ease me of t meanwhe and
Haf stretched forth hs hand to resume pos-
sesson of the braceet. or a moment, how-
ever, ueman dd not rea hs hod, hs fngers
had nstnctvey cosed over the treasure as he
marked the acton of the youth but suddeny a
thought appeared to strke hm, and he sur-
rendered t up wth a men of as much ndf-
ference as he coud assume.
Pek ah, pek ah we, we, to-morrow be t
then to-morrow, or the ne t day, or at the
openng of the comng week, as may best sut
your esure. ay, how know l, and he forced
a grm and ghasty sme, how know l that l
may not have outworn my fancy when we ne t
meet
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TH D . 165
ven as you w reped the youth, takng
hs pace besde hs father, and affectng to
occupy hmsef wth a mercante cacuaton,
whe he was n fact narrowy watchng every
moton of hs e cted neghbour l sha fod
my feet upon the carpet of patence what s
wrtten w come to pass l
ueman fed a fresh ppe, and strove to be
composed, but the effort was beyond hs strength
there was a nervous quverng of the eyeds and
twtchng of the upper p, whch betrayed the
w orkngs of hs sprt. Turk though he was,
there s a boundary beyond whch even a Turk s
apathy cannot hod out, and at ength he reached
t a cod dew stood on hs forehead, a ch
came over hs heart, a thousand frghtfu phan-
tasms danced across hs bran, and he fary gave
up the strugge. fter utterng a few hurred
and amost naudbe drectons to the ad who
attended hs commands, he rose sowy from hs
carpet, and, carefuy puttng asde hs ch-
bouque, he resumed hs sppers, and offered hs
farewe greetng to a|b and hs son. l have
busness wth the gerne Hussen he sad, as
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168 TH M C TH H M.
he sowy moved away the ba ar s du to-
day, and l w proft by the opportunty.
Haf returned hs partng sautaton wth an
ar of preoccupaton admraby acted and when
ueman suddeny stopped at the dstance of a
hundred paces, and ooked back, there st sat
the son of a|b, the pen n hs hand, the paper
restng upon hs knee, and hs head bent down
over hs occupaton. ut there were eage eyes
under that ampe turban whch were otherwse
empoyed than n decypherng the ntrcate cha-
racters of the scro before them and no sooner
had ueman turned nto another branch of the
Tcharch, than Haf , sprngng from hs seat,
and oversettng n hs haste a pe of brght
patterned shaws, that n ther fa made a
ranbow-ke confuson on the narrow path,
rushed hasty round a neghbourng corner, and
few, as rapdy as hs sppered feet woud carry
hm, to the empty house ad|onng that of the
|eaous husband. He had not been deuded by
the subterfuge of hs vctm, and he knew that
he had not a moment to ose. ccordngy he
turned the key whch he carred n hs grde,
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TH D . 167
wthout the deay of an nstant, n the haf-rusted
ock, and drew the door after hm, threw off bs
encumberng sppers n the passage, and, bound-
ng down the steps that ed to the vaut three or
four at once, had |ust tme to fng the braceet
through the aperture n the wa, and to force
back the stone, ere the approach of the Merchant
became audbe.
The young wfe, on her sde, was not de
she hasty casped the |ewe on her arm, and,
fodng hersef cosey n a shaw that enveoped
her head and shouders, ad hersef aong the
sofa ke one sufferng from ndsposton whe
enp, as e pert n decepton as her mstress,
squatted on the foor, bused n the manufacture
of emon sherbet.
s the Merchant entered the vaut, he rased
the amp that he carred above hs head, and
gared suspcousy around but a was cam,
and st, and undsturbed so cam and so st
ndeed, that t smote upon the heart of ueman
from ts contrast to the heat and hurry of hs
own emotons hosh gedn you are we-
come 3 whspered the negress, affectng to de-
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1G8 TH M C TH H M.
precate the sound of the husband s approachng
step but tread softy, f endm, for she has
|ust faen aseep.
ster of hetan sad the merchant n
repy what treason are you hatchng here to
ft your neck for the bowstrng Do you take me
for a dvane an dot
The mperturbabe enp ony answered by
rasng her ebony hands n wonder, and rong
her eyes unt nothng save the whtes were
vsbe.
Te me perssted ueman n the same
subdued voce n whch he had before spoken
te me, mother of a dog, who has been
here
Here echoed the save stupdy.
ye, here, n the boudroum the subter-
ranean a man a young man a dev l
Hoy Prophet has a dev been here
e camed the negress n her turn, wth a ook
and accent of horror and a young man too
Dd they come together
Ths was too much the patence of the Mer-
chant coud hod out no onger t was too
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TH D . 169
papabe hs suspcons were but too we
founded he had been duped he ueman
he, who had even bured hs wfe n the bowes
of the earth from the eyes of the whoe word
had been payed upon cheated by a coupe
of fase pottng women, one of them a mere chd
He requred ony the evdence of hs eyes to be
fuy, fatay, convnced of hs msfortune the
seepng beauty, whom hs entrance had faed to
rouse from her sumber, no onger wore the
|ewe whch he had casped upon her arm when
he had wecomed her to hs house she woud
not venture to te hm that she had ost t for
was not that subterranean her word and thus
she woud be the nstrument of her own de-
structon. or a moment the heart of the Mer-
chant quaed she was so young, so far, so
sad but he remembered the haf e utng, haf
supercous sme of the son of a|b when he
spoke of the |ewe, and he hasty approached
the sofa, and fung back the shaw n whch she
was enveoped.
t the young Hanoum sept, or appeared to
seep nor coud the e cted Merchant satsfy
L. l. l
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170 TH M C TH H M.
hmsef of her treachery wthout awakenng her,
for her head was powed upon the very arm
that shoud have worn the braceet. or
another moment he paused and t was not sur-
prsng that he shoud do so, for a pretter pc-
ture than that beneath hs eye t had never been
bs ot to ook upon. Her arms, from whch the
ong open seeves had faen back, were as whte
and smoothy-mouded as marbe and the ong
dark har that was scattered over her shouders
formed a strong contrast from the pure pae
beauty of her compe on. brght crmson
spot was upon her cheek, deeper than mere seep
woud have caed up but she had aready
sted the beatng of her heart, and she breathed
genty and camy ke one to whom sumber was
ndeed repose. The varous tnts of her gaudy
costume shewed gay n the ght of the amp
and the tte naked foot that peeped from be-
neath the ampe tchava, or pantaoon, of party-
cooured chnt , geamed out ke a snow-
fake.
Gu e pek gu e pretty, very pretty
murmured the Merchant nvountary but at
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TH D . l|
the nstant the mage of Haf , and hs nsutng
trumph, once more rose up before hm, and
steeed hs heart. ake, Hemas he cred
sterny wake, ts your husband cas you/
Mashaah e camed the young wfe
openng her deep eyes, but wthout aterng her
poston are you returned you had been
here aready to-day, and now you come ony to
awaken me from a dream n whch l had qute
forgotten vou and your tyranny.
nd s ths the fashon of your recepton .
demanded the enraged Merchant but l w
endure your woman-whms no onger. th
your chdsh foes, your de tears, l coud have
borne wth patence l have borne them but
you have become a dog, and the mother of dogs
you have eaten drt you have backened
your face, and defed the grave of your father
e bUrm what can l say hat have
l done asked the young Hanoum, who, secure
as she knew hersef to be n the possesson of her
braceet, yet quaed beneath the deep stern pas-
son of the Merchant How can 1 answer
upbradngs that l am unabe to comprehend
Te me at east
2
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172 TH M C TH H M.
ather te me burst forth ueman,
goaded to madness by the pacdty of the cu-
prt rather te me, sster of the v ne, to
whom have you gven the |ewe that l paced
upon your arm when l was foo enough to take
you to my home
Gven t sad hs wfe n we-counter-
feted astonshment, as she camy wthdrew her
arm from beneath her head, and e tended t,
encrced by the braceet, towards her husband,
whe the negress, rasng her spread pams n
the ar, groaned audby as though she were
mournng over the departed nteects of her
master |ab wonderfu Gven t she
repeated, as f doubtng that she had reay
comprehended the queston. To whom coud
l gve t, even were l dsposed to part wth the
pretty baube, save to my fathfu enp, who
has as tte occason as mysef to wear gems
where no one can see them
The Merchant coud not beeve hs eyes
but yes there was the |ewe and that whch
Haf had offered for sae, ceary, therefore,
coud not have been hs wfe s he took t from
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TH D . 173
her arm he e amned t narrowy had not
the thng been mpossbe, he coud have sworn
and yet, he shoud papaby have been a per-
|ured man, for he had never parted from hs
seven keys the ocks had assuredy not been
tampered wth, and there was no other outet
from the vaut. lt was wth a deep and amost
hysterca respraton that ueman once more
fastened on the ornament, fuy persuaded that
he must have been actng under some deuson of
wtchcraft, and keeny conscous of the fu rd-
cue of hs poston. t that moment he woud
amost have re|oced had hs suspcons been
confrmed, for then, at east, he woud have been
|ustfed n hs own eyes for the voence wth
whch he had acted towards hs young and nno-
cent wfe as t was, he fet that he must make
a very sorry fgure, and he coud not mme-
datey decde upon hs best mode of acton. or
dd the Hanoum and her handmaden afford hm
much space for refecton they were conscous
of ther advantage, and resoved to ava them-
seves of t to the utmost, and the poor haw-
merchant was consequenty assaed wth such a
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174 TH M C TH H M.
tempest of reproach, vtuperaton, and tears, as
had we ngh drven hm mad, ere he was
aowed once more to hear the sound of hs own
voce, and permtted to pour forth hs regrets for
an ntemperance nto whch he had been betrayed
by crcumstances that he was ake unabe to
fathom or to e pan.
Peace was, however, utmatey procamed,
for the femaes, conscous that they were not
atogether so bameess n the affar as they were
now beheved to be, and rememberng that the
purgatora suff erngs of the -fated merchant
were ony commencng, were gracousy peased
to be pacfed by sow degrees, and to accept the
promses of ther vctm that he woud never
agan offend by hntng that hs wfe was a
famy conne on of the v ne, or poutng
the grave of her unoffendng parent. nough
of doubt, nevertheess, remaned upon the mnd
of ueman, though he coud not have shaped
t nto a tangbe form, amd a ths mystfcaton,
to nduce hm, ere he departed, to stea another
ong wary ook round the vaut and, after ock-
ng each of the seven doors, to hod hs amp
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TH D . l|o
cose to the key- hoe, and to e amne most nar-
rowy the mechansm of the fastenng, about
whch t must, however, be admtted that he
knew nothng whatever but t s a satsfacton
to nvestgate cosey and carefuy, and to form
our own |udgment, even of thngs on whch we
are profoundy gnorant and so the Merchant
found t, as, after cosng the ast door, he re-
tred to hs own apartment, perfecty satsfed of
the utter mpossbhty of any entrance nto the
prson-chamber, save by means of hs own pre-
cous keys.
ut one undertakng had been successfuy
accompshed, and Haf had now ony to con-
tend aganst s of the seven doors
lt needs not to be tod that, on hs ne t meet-
ng wth the Merchant, he reped to hs nqures
by assertng that he had dsposed of hs |ewe to
another purchaser, nor that the answer added to
the bewderment of ueman. He knew not
why, but he had assuredy never e pected to see
t agan n the hands of the young man, nor to
be urged a second tme to make t hs own pro-
perty on the contrary, he had fet a most un-
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176 TH M C TH H M.
peasant presentment that such woud not be the
case and yet, when hs e pectatons were reased,
fresh doubts, and pangs, and wonderngs as-
saed hm. ut be t as t mght, what coud he
do more than he had aready done hat
ocaty coud be more secure than that n whch
he had mmured hs wfe. rgo, he must forget
the mysterous resembance of the two braceets,
for t coud of course be nothng more and
dsmss the sub|ect from hs mnd atogether.
ow ths was perhaps the wsest concuson to
whch the worthy Merchant had ever come n hs
fe, and t s probabe that n tme, had nothng
occurred to renew the mpresson of the ncdent,
hs practce mght have rvaed hs theory but
hs ksmet hs fate had ordaned otherwse.
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TH D . 177
CH PT l .
TH D contnued.
ueman had a frend who was Perfume-
merchant to the utan. man of mark was
adomer ourren tem, and we sked n the
composton of sweet and subte scents. very
fower of the ast had n turn gven up ts
decous breath n hs crucbes and ppkns but
there were certan secrets whose resuts were
reserved for the e cusve use of the lmpera
Harem. o save n the tcharch wore a gayer
vest or a more eaborate turban than the bys-
snan confdant of adomer ourren tem, or
fed wth a better grace the mnute essence-
bo es of vory nto whch the more costy
perfumes were compressed. o Mussemaun
5
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| 78 TH M C TH H M.
smoked a more prncey chbouque, or cnctured
hs brows wth a more magnfcent cachemre
than adomer ourren tem hmsef he ooked
around hm camy on the rva estabshments
of the tcharch, and defed competton.
ow t so chanced, that, about a week after
the adventure of the braceet, the skfu cent-
merchant made a dscovery whch, Turk though
he was, we ngh turned hm mad wth deght.
ever was so e quste a perfume as that whch,
after a score or two of costy e perments, he
succeeded n producng. The ttar-gu tsef
was fetd besde t The byssnan save who
had asssted n the work fung hmsef aong the
foor n a paro ysm of e tacy, and roed hs
huge eyes, and casped hs ebony hands ke a
unatc whe even the statey, and ordnary
mperturbabe adomer ourren tem hmsef
apostrophsed ah and the Prophet as though
he had succeeded n convertng a the Chrstan
raahs of the mpre to Mohammedansm.
lt was at ths moment that ueman, a pr-
veged person at a tmes, entered the spcy
aboratory of the e cted cent-deaer and, n the
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TH D . 17
frst moment of e utaton, nothng coud be
more smpe than that adomer ourren tem
shoud ntroduce to hs frend the decate com-
poston whch he was at that moment ready to
beeve woud go far to mmorta e hm. The
rentas ove perfumes beyond a other u -
ures and t s therefore not surprsng that, as
the e quste aroma entered hs nostrs, ue-
man the shaw merchant shoud stroke down
hs beard, draw a ong- breath, and stagger to
the sofa, as though overwhemed by ts sweet-
ness.
aah n the name of the Prophet,
whence comes t. he murmured, when he coud
agan command hs voce He who dsted t
must have been born of a rose, and nursed n the
fower-garden of Paradse l woud gve a
cachemre of Lahore for a gded fagon of that
surpassng essence.
hat sha l say was the repy of the
fattered adomer ourren tem l t was
who caught the breath of the Hour, and mpr-
soned t n ths qud for the gratfcaton of our
lmpera master and unt the utan hath
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180 TH M C TH H M.
quaffed t n hs sherbet, how may l dspose of
even the ghtest drop to one of hs saves.
nd when he sha have nhaed ts match-
ess sweetness foowed up ueman f he
does |ustce to ts wse nventor, he w forbd
that t shoud be purchased at w n the tchar-
ch, and thus
ou are rght, my frend f sad the cent-
merchant, and you, at east, sha foresta the
prohbton. our feech hath guded you here
n a happy moment l w gve you some of
these drops of my sou acarac and the
attentve save bent forward to receve hs n-
structons gve to the ffend of ths pre-
cous perfume as much as w f the smaest
bo n the fourth drawer on the rght hand.
Have a care that the woo on whch t s poured
be of the fnest and softest quaty, and that the
cover of the bo ft to a ncety, for the essence s
subte, and l woud not that he shoud perfume
the tcharch as he passes aong.
The save bent ow, and prepared reverenty
to obey. The bo ndcated was most mnute,
curousy turned, and coud be hermetcay
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TH D . 181
cosed the woo was wth some dffcuty ntro-
duced, and the precous qud poured sowy,
drop by drop, as though t had been bood
wrung from the heart. ueman receved t as
t beseemed hm to accept so costy a gft and
whe the deghted adomer ourren tem
stened to hs profuse and hyperboca e pres-
sons of admraton, and gave drectons for the
securty of the wondrous producton of hs
genus, the haw-merchant was nwardy n-
dugng a feeng of sef-gratuaton at the for-
tunate chance whch woud enabe hm to offer
to hs yet suen wfe a gft that must at once
nsure hs favour.
lt was consequenty wth a ghter step than
usua that ueman bent hs way homeward on
the cosng of the tcharch, and, when hs even-
ng mea was ended, descended to the subter-
ranean. Hemas Hanoum ad asde her ebec
as he entered. lt was no part of her system to
aow hm to thnk that she passed a snge mo-
ment of the twenty-four hours n seekng to
dvert her thoughts from hs tyranny and her
own msfortune and she was ony more cod.
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182 TH M C TH H M.
and suen, and ungracous, than her wont when
he approached her. ut what astern woman
woud not have been meted by such an offerng
as that of ueman new and decous
perfume to be forbdden, moreover, to a save
the lmpera famy How douby charmed
was the young wfe of the haw-merchant when
she had earnt the hstory of her treasure as
ever husband so assduous to torment hmsef
Ths was ndeed a two-edged scmtar ay,
so gad and gay was her sprt, as she deposted
the essence-bo carefuy amd the fods of the
shaw that grded her wast, that she yeded at
once to a desre whch he had often e pressed,
and she had as constanty refused to gratfy, by
resumng her nstrument, and payng and sng-
ng unt ueman fanced hmsef n the seventh
heaven
ln a few hours the essence-bo was n the pos-
sesson of Haf .
lt must surey have been through the agency
of some mp of darkness that a|b the dra-
nopotan and the husband of the pretty Hemas
Hanoum chanced to be neghbours n the tchar-
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TH D . 183
ch, for t gave to the pots of Haf a the
effect of chance. othng coud be more smpe
than that he shoud afford to hs father the op-
portunty of sharng hs en|oyments and ac-
cordngy there was no appearance of desgn n
hs hurred address, as he seated hmsef besde
a|b, and drew forth hs new treasure.
Mahomet be prased he sad smngy
new stars and new fowers sprng to fe about
us each day of our e stence.
oud that they were new customers t
woud be more proftabe to the merchants of
the cty reped a|b dry stars and
fowers are pretty thngs enough, but they w
nether turn to pauf nor pastres.
f the stars t s true that nothng can be
made pursued the young man n the same
|oyous tone n whch he had commenced the
conversaton but fowers boast not ony
brghtness and beauty
Pshaw are you gong to tak n verse, ke
your Persan namesake asked hs father,
whose temper had been somewhat ruffed by a
mornng of deness.
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184 TH M C TH H M.
oud that l mght, do l e cam n my
turn sad hs son but l am smpy gong to
prove to you, better than by words, that fowers
are not to be consdered as mere toys. l w
not tak of the sghs of roses, caught and changed
nto attar-gu, nor the sweet scents of |asmne,
and a score of other bossoms, prsoned n m-
nute fagons, and makng summer wherever ther
breath s suffered to escape. l w rather con-
found you at once by an argument nto whch s
crushed the combned perfume of a word of
fowers and here t s and he paced n the
hand of hs father the sma vory bo that had
been confded to hm by the wfe of the haw-
merchant.
There s but one ah, and Mahomet s
hs prophet murmured a|b, sowy swng-
ng hmsef backward, as he nhaed the odour of
the new essence. e brm what can l say
Ths t s to ve n the country of the True
eevers. They tak to us of rangstan s
my face backened, that l shoud beeve that
the dogs of Gaours have |oys ke these n ther
own ands, where they never see the sun .
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TH D . 189
H a a and agan he stroked down hs
beard as he drew n the sweet savour of the
essence what are the gums of raby or the
roses of Gurgstan besde ths
o we ndeed dd the worthy dranopotan
apprecate the en|oyment, that he dd not appear
key to offer a porton of hs peasure to ue-
man, who sat enveoped n the scented fumes of
hs aonca tobacco, apparenty qute unmoved
by the raptures of hs neghbour. uddeny,
however, a|b remembered that a gratfcaton,
of whatever descrpton, s greaty enhanced by
partcpaton and sympathy and upon ths
prncpe he bent towards the rva haw-mer-
chant, and proffered to hm the tte bo .
Tchabouk, tchabouk -quck, quck cose t
carefuy as you restore t cautoned Haf ,
wth an ar of e treme an ety : l woud not,
for a the rches on the sheves of adomer
ourren tem, the utan s scent-deaer, that
a breath of ths precous compound shoud
escape.
ut the petrfed shaw-merchant heeded hm
not he sat ga ng from Haf to the vory
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186 TH M C TH H M.
bo , and from the vory bo back agan to
Haf , ke one who s not qute certan that he
does not dream. He unscrewed the d, he bent
down hs head, and hurredy nhaed the pre-
cous perfume, and agan he f ed hs arge,
dark, fashng eyes on the son of a|b.
ls t not a breathng of Paradse T asked
the young man, wth a sef-gratuatory sme.
nd you obtaned t, where gasped out
ueman.
ok, yok no, no l am not bound to
name the hour who pad me so rchy for a ght
fattery was the repy but ths much l may
confess, that where l won the braceet, there
aso l ganed the essence.
ueman ground hs teeth, but he dd not
artcuate a syabe.
eware, Haf sad hs father, depre-
catngy where the rose grows, there does the
thorn foursh and the |eweed ht ever be-
tokens the keen weapon.
ut what f l secure the gems, and defy the
bade asked the young man.
lt s makng your horse s brde out of a
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TH D . 187
bowstrng foowed up the an ous parent
et ths gft be the ast.
Haf ony smed agan, and, as he dd so,
hs eyes met those of the agtated ueman
hat sha l gve you for ths toy . he de-
manded hurredy.
e brm what can l say ot a the
sks n the tcharch of roussa shoud buy t of
me sha l f my own mouth wth ashes and,
as he spoke, the youth e tended hs hand to re-
gan possesson of the treasure.
ny et me shew t to adomer ourren
tem urged ueman l know not ts name,
and l woud fan become the possessor
Hay, hay so, so Thnk you that l
w suffer t to be hawked through the ba ar
ke some van merchandse asked Haf
angry | lashaah, l am not so base.
The dscomfted ueman ony sghed, and
renqushed the fary bo to ts owner : ths
tme there coud be no mstake there was not
ts feow n tambou he had been too sow n
detectng the frst artfce of hs pottng hep-
mate but now now he shoud confront her on
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188 TH M C TH H M.
the nstant, ere she had tme or opportunty to
dupe hm twce he was bewdered, mystfed
there must be wtchcraft n t but, strong n hs
sense of wrong, he woud defy the v ne
hmsef to-day to cheat hm wth a e nd
wth ths audabe convcton he shuffed off hs
carpet, thrust hs feet nto hs sppers, and,
wthout the courtesy of a partng word to hs
companons, hurredy proceeded towards hs
dweng.
ut, aas for the worthy Merchant the very
precauton whch shoud have secured hs safety,
proved hs bane, for he was so ong engaged n
unockng hs seven doors, that the vory bo
arrved n the prson-chamber before hm and,
as he turned the ast key to the accompanment
of the hgh cear voce of hs wfe, who was
warbng out a ove-baad, he had the gratf-
caton of fndng her engaged at a game of ba
wth the bo tsef, whch she was droppng from
one hand to the other n reguar tme wth the
stran her decate tte fngers cosng and
uncosng over t, and her far round arms geam-
ng out n the amp-ght ke water-es.
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TH D . 189
ueman was petrfed He rubbed hs eyes,
and pnched hmsef to ascertan whether he
reay was awake he darted forward, and
se ed the toy from the hands of hs pretty
captve, for whch he was rewarded wth a frown
and a pout he e amned t narrowy, and there
t was the very same a sma rose n the
centre of the d, three rngs round the outsde,
and a faw n the vory about the s e of a pn s
head He had seen a ths n the tcharch
he had amost waked hmsef nto a fever to
prove that he had been payed upon and cheated,
and here was the bo
ln the agony of hs ama ement he seated hm-
sef besde the young Hancum, and, as soon as
he had recovered hs breath, he tod her a.
hen the tae was ended, the happy husband
was gad that he had done so, for never were
two women more overwhemed wth wonder.
Hs wfe cast up her brght eyes, and crept
coser to hm as she murmured somethng about
demons and magc and emp whspered that
the vctm of ths dark sorcery woud do we to
summon a dervsh of the sect of the Mevaves,
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p
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190 TH M C TH H M.
and be e orcsed. ueman stened to the
counseng of hs trembng prsoners, and pro-
msed to thnk serousy of ther advce. ever
snce ther ncarceraton n the vaut had they
been so gente and so courteous and, athough
a pang and a doubt woud now and then cross
the mnd of the Merchant as he ent a wng
ear to ther surmses, and suffered hmsef to be
soothed by ther suggestons, he soon banshed
a mstrust for was t not worse than foy to
beeve that a |eweed braceet and a bo of
essence coud escape through stone was and,
more absurd st, be n two paces at once
nd yet but what avaed t to dwe upon
the sub|ect There were the ocks, the was,
and the doors and, consequenty, however
strange, and unaccountabe, and bewderng
such concdences undoubtedy were, they coud
be ony concdences after a. ueman was
a wse man n hs own way, a man of fore-
thought and precauton, wth an energy of sef-
confdence whch aways made hm wnd up hs
refectons wth the comfortabe and sef-gratu-
atory menta apostrophe of lt cannot be
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p
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TH D . 191
otherwse l am not the person to be taken n
l have ved too ong to be duped by foos :
and ths was the murmured accompanment to
the echo of hs footsteps as he sowy ascended
from the vaut on the present occason 5 and
scarcey coud he have e tngushed hs amp on
arrvng at the head of the star, ere the stone
was roed away that gave ngress to the prson-
chamber of the pretty Hanoum, and a chorus of
aughter, where a deep bass bended wth an
harmonous tenor, rang through the subterra-
nean.
The |oy of Haf was great he had opened
a second ock he had fung back two of the
seven doors
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p
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| 92 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT .
TH D contnued,
ueman dened no en|oyment save that of
ght and berty to hs young wfe. Those
we-beoved u ures of Turksh women, shaws
and damonds, he avshed on her wth as much
profuson as though she possessed the oppor-
tunty of e hbtng them to the admraton and
envy of her acquantance : and t was but a few
days after the adventure of the essence-bo that
he carred wth hm, on hs vst to the vaut, a
cachemre of a new and rare descrpton, the
frst whch had been seen n the tcharch of
Constantnope.
shaws of prce n the ast beng woven
n pars, ueman, as he made the purchase
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p
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TH D . 193
of a stranger wth whom he had never be-
fore traded, nqured eagery for ts feow,
when he was nformed that, the pecunary
means of the Merchant havng become mpared
by a ong and unsuccessfu specuaton, he had
been permtted, through the courtesy of a frend,
to possess hmsef of one of these costy peces of
merchandse, athough he was unabe to pay
down the sum necessary to make hm the owner
of both and that, n consequence of ths arrange-
ment, none coud be found n the cty of the
same pattern and te ture.
Groups of mnute and fne - wrought fowers
were scattered over a ground of fant yeow,
and a few threads of green were woven nto a
border of crmson, of so rch a dye that t ooked
as though the woo had been staned wth the
|uce of the pomegranate bossom. The Mer-
chant added hs prvate mark to those whch
were aready mpressed on the paper tcket, re-
garded n the ast as an addtona ornament,
and aways conspcuousy dspayed n token of
the freshness of the shaw, ere he unfoded t
L. l.
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p
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194 TH M C TH H M.
before the admrng eyes of hs wfe and her
attendant.
The pretty Hanoum smed her thanks for the
costy gft, and n fve mnutes t was gracefuy
foded about her wast the rch crmson border
n strong reef on the sky-bue tchava, and the
pae yeow centre rendered st more decate n
tnt as t contrasted wth the deep purpe vest.
The nteror of the vaut woud have been at
that moment a study for the orentased penc
of Pckersg the angud beauty of the young
wfe, who sat upon her cushons on the ground,
besde the sofa honoured by the occupaton of
the Merchant, n hs fowng robes of ruby-co-
oured coth, ampe turban, and amber-pped
chbouque, was softened nto deeper oveness by
the fant ght of the dstant tapers, grouped to-
gether on a sma stand at the e tremty of the
apartment whe, mmedatey n ther broadest
gare, squatted the negress n an antery of whte
cotton, wth her ong har fang over her shou-
ders n a score of mnute brads, and her arge
eyes f ed earnesty upon her mstress. The
sofa gttered wth god frnge, and the cushons
uter dress.
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p
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TH D . 195
were gay wth embrodered fowers a the
showy toys of a Turksh harem were avshy
strown n every drecton and, as the arge deep
eyes of the Hanoum wandered over the chamber,
a sme rose to her p, whch, by whatever fee-
ng t mght have been summoned there, added
to the brghtness of her pure and pad beauty.
o wonder that the Merchant, as he ga ed upon
her chdke oveness, congratuated hmsef
upon hs sagacty and cauton no wonder that
as he ooked upon her angud grace, and the
dove-ke dreamness that dwet n her dark eyes,
he fet at once the foy of hs passng doubts.
he had not energy to pot aganst hs peace
lt was wth a somewhat co combca swng n
hs gat that Haf , a day or two subsequenty to
that of whch l have |ust spoken, approached the
husband of Hemas Hanoum as he sat n hs
usua pace n the tcharch and, after sautng
hm wth nfnte poteness, begged hm to take
the troube of e amnng the cachemre that
formed hs turban, as he had been desred to
purchase a smar one for a frend who was about
to depart for myrna, and who was ready to
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p
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196 TH M C TH H M.
pay down the prce whch mght be agreed upon
between them.
l woud have sought t among the baes of
my father pursued the young man, as he un-
foded t from hs brow before the fascnated eyes
of the astonshed Merchant but l shoud ony
have wasted tme, for we know l that he hah
not such a cachemre, though t mght be pad
for by a the pastres n the lmpera treasury.
o, sad l, as l passed the threshod of my
home l w away at once to ueman f end,
he ony can be the owner of such a shaw as
mne, for has he not the newest and the rchest
goods n the tcharch. Have l sad we, f-
fendm Can you par me my cachemre
ut the merchant answered not hs ga e was
rveted not by the fne and decate te ture
of the costy shaw not by the deep rch tnts
of ts gorgeous border but on the tte tcket
where-he recognsed hs own prvate mark f
ueman was rght when he resoved ths tme,
whatever mght be the consequence, not to re-
store the shaw to Haf unt he had assured
hmsef beyond a possbty of decepton, that
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p
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TH D . 19
t was not hs own property. es et the
consequence be what t mght he armed hmsef
resoutey aganst reproaches, threats, and vo-
ence, for he was prepared for a these and,
graduay recoverng hs sef-possesson as he
formed ths doughty resouton, he affected for a
tme to be carefuy e amnng the quaty of
the cachemre, n order to coect hs deas, and
to determne on hs mode of acton. few mo-
ments suffced for ths and keepng, wthout
apparent desgn, hs hod of the pr e, he rased
hs eyes to those of the young man, and, sowy
removng the chbouque from hs ps, sad
quety.
ls the ffend, your frend, prepared to pay
down a heavy sum for the good s
Havet yes answered the youth camy.
Then to-morrow l may perchance be ready
to dever t up and agan ueman e amned
the tcket y vah ts not often that l have
seen so costy a shaw. Dd you purchase t n
the tcharch
Purchase t echoed Haf , wth another
of those mockng smes whch had aready mad-
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#
p
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198 TH M C TH H M.
dened the Merchant on a former occason
where was the son of a|b to fnd pastres
enough to buy such a cachemre as that Mash-
aah l shoud be ong n countng them.
ut t s your property, snce you have |ust
untwsted t from your brow
hemduah prase be to ah ou
have sad we, f endm t s mne but that s
not my errand to-morrow then you w par t,
and te me your prce nd, as he spoke, he
took hod of the shaw, and woud have drawn t
from under the hand of the Merchant, but ue-
man s fngers cosed over t wth a frm grasp,
as he prepared hmsef to contend wth the n-
dgnaton and anger of ts decared owner.
avash, yavash softy, softy, ffendm
he sad, n a grave and statey tone ths s
not a queston of matchng a porcean cup, nor a
cay chbouque-bow many thngs are to be
consdered and ascertaned. Learned as l am n
the ore, l cannot carry away wth me the e act
te ture of the cachemre, the quaty of the woo,
nor even the ntrcaces of the pattern, and the
shades of the dyes you must eave the shaw
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p
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TH D . 199
wth me, n order that l may compare t wth
that to whch l have aready kened t n my
mnd and to-morrow l w brng you the two
together.
Haf aughed a ght augh. ou |est wth
me, f endm he sad tauntngy l know
you to be a rch man, and l beeve you to be
an honest one, but l w not therefore part from
my property as though l cared not
l w depost ts vaue wth you n god
nterposed ueman and when l return the
shaw, you can restore the pastres otour
st.
e t so sad the young man camy and,
throwng off hs sppers, he seated hmsef be-
sde the merchant and, havng ghted hs ch-
bouque, smoked on n sence, whe the more
than ever bewdered ueman counted out the
depost money on the carpet between them.
Pek ah t s we were the ne t words
he uttered, as the goden and gtterng pe of
con was transferred to hs purse a not, l
pray you, at ths hour to-morrow wth the feow
shaw, and l have no fear that we sha cav for
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p
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200 TH M C TH H M.
the prce. Then, shakng the ashes from hs
ppe, he put up the money, resumed hs sppers,
and waked away, eavng ueman n possesson
of the cachemre.
Long sat the merchant ga ng at the ranbow-
ke sub|ect of hs new mystfcaton. He was
more perpe ed than ever. He coud vow upon
the oran that ths was hs own shaw the
present that he had made to hs wfe the
costy pece of merchandse to whch he had
proudy aff ed hs prvate mark and there
was the mark there was no mstakng hs ms-
fortune the father of ev was assuredy m ed
up wth the transacton, for the shaw must have
been conveyed to Haf , ether through the
bowes of the earth, or on the bosom of the ar
be that as t mght, and he coud not attempt the
souton of the probem, he now hed the shaw
and he resoved not to rea hs grasp for a mo-
ment, unt he confronted hs wfe wth her per-
fdy, and forced from her a confesson of the
truth.
ctng upon ths determnaton, ueman
carefuy foded the cachemre, and odged t
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TH D . 201
safey beneath hs ampe robe and, havng seen
hs merchandse duy secured by hs attendant,
bent hs steps homeward, wth vsons of bow-
strngs, sacks, and overwhemng waters, chasng
each other, ke the spectre-hounds of the raban
fcton, across hs over-heated bran. lt s a sn-
guar fact, and one whch t woud be dffcut to
e pan, but t s nevertheess true, that, as he
moved sowy through the crowded streets, and
e changed sautatons wth hs acquantance, he
coud not decde whether he wshed to prove hs
wfe unworthy of the e traordnary ndugence
wth whch he had treated her, or not. lt was
ve atous, certany, to ose the dea of beng, f
not qute oved, at east reverenced and feared,
and, above a, obeyed whe, on the other
hand, t was provokng to be duped, and myst-
fed, and pursued by constanty-recurrng doubts.
Ths day must, however, decde a and he
magnanmousy resoved to proporton the pu-
nshment of hs wfe to her apparent contrton,
and to hs own convcton of her repentance and
probabe amendment.
ndy thoughts and reentng feengs were
5
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202 TH M C TH H M.
creepng over hm as he descended the star to
the vaut. Hemas Hanoum was so young, so
pretty, and so gracefu, t woud be ten thou-
sand ptes to drown or to e e her and he
had arrved at a frm determnaton to push hs
forbearance to the e tremest mt, when, on
arrvng at the ffth door, hs ear caught the
dstant echo of a femae voce, and he became
conscous that hs ntrgung and fase-hearted
hepmate was actuay at that very moment
that awfu moment, freghted as t was wth the
chances of fe or death when he hed n hs
hand the scaes of severe and rgd |ustce,
whch hs snge breath woud suffce to turn
aganst her actuay sngng to her ebec, as
though nether doubt nor danger e sted n the
word
Ths was too much even for a Turk s pho-
sophy, and he accordngy fung back the two
remanng doors wth a more rapd hand and
hs brow was crmson as he stood before the
pretty cuprt, prepared to overwhem her wth
cuttng reproaches, and ndsputabe proofs of
her unequaed gut. ut, ere the frst sentence
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TH D . 203
had passed hs ps, hs words were arrested n
the utterance for, as the young Hanoum, ac-
cordng to custom, ad asde her nstrument on
hs entrance, he at once dscovered that her wast
was grded wth the shaw the shaw that was
even yet hdden beneath the fods of hs robe
the shaw whose counterpart had never been
seen n tambou
The Merchant gasped for breath, and the
amp fe from hs hand upon the snowy lndan
mattng that covered the foor, amd the aughter
of hs wfe, and the reproachfu e|acuatons of
her more thrfty attendant but he heeded
nether the one nor the other as he rushed for-
ward, and, se ng a corner of the cachemre,
ooked eagery for hs own prvate mark upon
the tcket. Hs search proved successfu : there
t was and hs ne t acton was to tear the
shaw whch he bore about hm from ts hdng-
pace a second suffced to draw t forth and
who sha descrbe the astonshment of ueman
when he found hmsef unabe to dstngush
between the two they were ake to a thread
to a shade and to crown a hs mark hs
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204 TH M C TH H M.
own prvate and pecuar mark was upon
each.
hat means ths asked the young
beauty, as she possessed hersef of the newy-
arrved cachemre Dd you not te me that
tambou hed not the feow-shaw to mne
nd are not these two as hke as twn roses
Chok chay that s much do l speak ceary
ou say truy you say truy gasped the
Merchant : they are ake, qute ake woven
n the same oom dyed n the same copper
marked by the same but no, no f l reay
ve, and do not dream, they cannot have been
marked by the same hand. lt s an nventon
of atan a pot hatched by the v ne.
en ektar der you are the master but
what new mystfcaton s ths demanded
Hemas Hanoum pettshy ls t not enough
that you shoud vaunt your own generosty n
gvng me a shaw of whch even the utan
hmsef (may hs shadow never be ess ) mght
be proud, and whch he coud not purchase n
tambou but you must come to pace another
precsey smar under my very eyes, to prove
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TH D . 205
that you had made me an easy dupe Unhappy
woman that l am, to be frst bured ahve, and
then treated ke a wayward chd by my own
husband
Peace peace, e camed the Merchant,
mpatenty : oman you do not know you
cannot guess
l do not wsh to know, and l w not
guess broke n hs wfe n a hgher key :
ffet oah much good may t do you
you are a dvane an dot you do not speak
Turksh your words are dark, and your face
s backened ho am l that you shoud have
made me your wfe
ueman ony sghed he was too wse to
answer the revngs of a woman and he foded
up the mysterous shaw wth a steady eye,
though hs heart beat more tumutuousy than
usua. He stayed not to apoog e for hs
abruptness, nor to e pan hs perpe ty but,
takng hs amp from the hand of enp, who
had bused hersef n retrmmng t after ts fa,
he waked senty out of the subterranean.
Long and oud was the aughter that foowed
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205 TH M C TH H M.
cosey on hs departure, and the ast key was
not turned n ts ock ere Haf was seated at
the feet of hs mstress, detang to her the scene
of the mornng.
l woud have gven a thousand pastres to
have seen hm when you so ready consented to
eave the cachemre n hs hands, sad the Ha-
noum gay : and to watch hm as he counted
out hs darng god, and paced t before you
ut, now te me, Haf , how your frend be-
came possessed of ths rare shaw, and eft you
ony the task of counterfetng ueman s mark
upon the tcket.
Ts a smpe tae, my utana : reped
the youth, as he ooked nto her aughng eyes
and requres no kho|a no scrbe, to record t.
My frend oureddn fe from hs came as he
was |ourneyng to tambou, and was grevousy
brused : when a certan merchant, who traveed
n hs company, tended hm ke a brother, and
bore wth hm through a hs hours of sufferng.
oureddn was not one to forget such kndness :
he reads the oran day, and gves freey to the
poor how much more ready then dd he open
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TH D . 207
hs hand to the frend of hs sckness He ony
hestated as to the means of servng hm,
when, as f guded by the Prophet, the Merchant
hmsef suggested the method, by thus ad-
dressng hm as they rode sde by sde together
through the gate of cutar : f endm, sad
the merchant, you are a weathy man, and a
pous one : you are ever ready to hep the
needy, and to uphod the weak l pray you do
me a grace l know that your baes are precous
and l have heard that among your merchandse
are shaws of so fne a fabrc, that they seem to
|bave been woven by the Hour. e me, l pray
you, one of these at an easy prce, that l may on
my arrva n tambou dspose of t n the
tcharch, at a rate that may hep to defray the
cost of my voyage for my affars have not
prospered, and l am oth to return to the house
of my father, and render up so poor an account
of my venture. e t so, answered oureddn
cheerfuy and, when they reached the khan
where he had resoved to house hs goods, he
opened a bae of shaws, contanng among others
that whch you now wear, and the one that
l borrowed and carred to your husband.
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208 TH M C f TH H M.
The Merchant was struck wth the spendour
of the cachenres, but even athough oureddn
offered them to hm at the prce that they had
cost n the oom, he yet wanted god to make up
the sum and t was at ast arranged that he
shoud become the possessor of one of these ony,
takng wth the remander of hs pastres another
of nferor vaue. n arrvng n tambou he
dsposed of t, doubtessy wth great advantage,
to ueman whe l chanced to remark ts
feow when e amnng the merchandse wth
whch oureddn proposed to trade at e-
vastopo, whther he was bound when he had
arranged hs affars n ths country. The rest of
the tae s not worth teng and you are bound
from ths nstant to confess that l have opened
three of the seven doors
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TH D . 209
CH PT l.
TH D contnued.
bout a week eapsed after the adventure of
the shaws, when, as ueman was one mornng
sttng n the saeraek, or man s wng of the
house, smokng hs ast ppe prevousy to re-
parng to the tcharch, a save nformed hm
that a negress, who refused to te her errand,
craved to see hm for a few moments. The
Merchant pshed, and pshawed, and con-
tracted hs brows wth mpatent annoyance, for
he had qute enough to do to arrange hs own
affars, wthout nterferng n those of others
but he nevertheess consented, after a moment s
deay, to receve the appcant, be she whom she
mght and accordngy, eavng her sppers at
Lteray, where the man s honoured.
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210 TH M C TH H M.
the e tremty of the passage, the stranger ap-
proached wth a successon of owy prostratons,
as far as the door of ueraan s apartment.
very one knows that the y ash mac worn by the
Turksh women n the streets conceas the whoe
of the face save the eyes, and that the ampe
ferd|he of coth enveops the form so cosey as
to dsguse the whoe of ts outne but those
who have resded n the ast for any ength of
tme are qute aware that t s possbe, despte
a these precautons, to gve somethng more
than a guess at the dentty of the wearer : and
thus, as the negress stood before hm, the Mer-
chant started, for he thought he traced a snguar
keness n the stranger to the save who shared
the prson-harem of hs wfe.
There s but one ah commenced the
ntruder, as soon as she found hersef aone wth
the Merchant Do l stand before ueman,
the son of Gundu Hanoum
ou stand before hm answered the
host.
l have a message for ueman ffend pur-
sued the save and ekh katet there s some-
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TH D . 211
thng n t a message from a young and an ous
beauty, who craves of hm a grace, whch, f he be
the bey adeh that men deem hm, he w not
refuse.
hat you say s de : nterposed the Mer-
chant bosh der t s nothng l am a grave
man, and my beard s whte.
May t never be pucked out sad the
negress soemny. hat sha l repy to my
mstress P ha l
ho s the Hanoum f end, and who are
you yoursef . demanded the rrtated ueman,
whose suspcons were strengthened by the voce
of hs strange vster, even muffed as t was
beneath her yashmac. l sha gve no pedge
unt l know wth whom l have affar. Mash-
aah l am too od to be cheated by a woman.
May my face be backened: urged the
save earnesty, usng n her energy an e|acu-
atory sentence whch savoured strongy of super-
erogaton : may my face be backened f l
seek to deceve so pous and worthy a Musse-
maun efn ay me s your humour good
tfendm, l was tod not to betray to you the
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212 TH M C TH H M.
ame of the young beauty, nor even to menton
my own but who sha dsobey your bddng
lnshaah l am not so bod, when my foot
s on your foor, and my sppers are at your
threshod.
peak then sad the Merchant, l s-
ten.
Hassan s a man of substance : commenced
the negress he has goods n the tcharch,
and god n the saemek a caque on the
osphorus, and an araba n the cty streets. lf
affecton coud have been bought ke un wrought
sk, and fashoned nto form ke beaten sver,
the wfe of Hassan mght have oved hm but
ove, f endm s ke the wnd : t comes and
goes as t sts, and no man can buy t wth
treasure, nor fetter t wth bonds nay, had
Hassan bured hs young wfe n the bowes of
the earth, and robbed her of the gorous day-
ght whch ah gave ake to a, he must
know tte of the se who s not qute aware
that she woud have cheated hm at ast. ut
why do l say ths to you, ffendm to you, who
need no words of mne to convnce you of the
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TH D . 213
fact m l a dvane an dot that l tak
thus to ueman the son of Gundu Hanoum,
who knows a thngs e apaura what can l
do
omethng between a sgh and a groan es-
caped from the Merchant, but he dd not utter a
syabe.
Let not the ffend magne, however,
resumed the negress, that Hassan dd so bury
hs far young wfe hekur ah he was too
good a Musseraaun thus to provoke the wrath
of the Prophet no, no, he knew better. re
there not aws n tambou ls there not a
strong cord, and a swft current, f a man reay
wshes to se hmsef to hetan, and to defe
hs own grave hy then shoud he act ke a
madman, and be aughed at to hs beard r
ths s then bosh nothng : sad the
Merchant angry why do you tre my ears,
and devour my tme wth empty taes say your
errand, and eave me to my thoughts.
ou are a wse man, f endm and l am
but a woman, was the repy ah br
God aone knows as for me, l was ony en-
deavourng to e pan
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214 TH M C TH H M.
wse head spareth ts tongue sad the
host sententousy few words make wsdom
you waste tme.
The save foded her arms before her, and
bowed her head meeky on her bosom as she
contnued Hassan brought a wfe nto hs
harem, but she never gave hm her heart. How
coud she Hassan suspected that she oved
another. He was a wse man n ths at east, for
she dd. hy dd the Prophet pant roses n
the gardens of Paradse, save that they shoud
be gathered
nd who s ths Hassan of whom you
speak agan demanded the Merchant, as he
suffered the smoke from hs chbouque to
escape, and ro away n dense curs over hs
mustache : who s ths Hassan who mated
hmsef so
He sts on the fourth carpet n the e en-
sten sad the save, and he s knsman to
the Cad.
nd hs wfe.
as the daughter of Hakf the seke|he,
Confectoner.
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TH D . 215
near the tmedan Gu-sy Hanoum, the
prettest gr n that quarter of the cty.
nd what woud she ask of me. nqured
the Merchant, somewhat mofed by the eabo-
rate candour of hs companon.
The chur her husband has refused to gve
her a new cachemre for the feast of the aram,
because, forsooth, he suspects her of
ok, yok no, no l w assst no pottng
wfe to deceve her husband broke forth
ueman n a transport of vrtuous ndgnaton.
Get you gone there are easy dupes n the
tcharch who, havng been fooed themseves,
w be gad to ad n the good work of hood-
wnkng others : but l am not of these, woman
l am not of these. eturn to your hght ms-
tress, and te her
avash, yavash not so fast, f endm, not
so fast nterposed the pertnacous save l
have as yet tod but haf my tae. ln the
shaw-ba ar sts a worthy merchant named
a|b, an dranopotan by brth, who has a
son caed
osewater.
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216 TH M C TH H M.
Haf / e camed her stener, aroused at
once nto attenton.
ou have sad we, endm he s ndeed
named Haf , and t woud seem that you know
hm. lf t be the same of whom l speak, he s
a ta youth, wth arge dark eyes, and a sme
ke daybreak
The Merchant made a gesture of mpatence,
and knocked the ashes from a ppe whch was
but newy repenshed nd what of ths
young man he asked peevshy.
He has seen the Hanoum ffend, and oves
her : was the quet repy He has earnt that
she desres a new cachemre, and he has offered
to procure for her the rchest shaw n the cty
f she w buy t wth a sme.
upek dog and the son of dogs hs
beard s not yet grown muttered ueman
beneath hs breath but the quck ear of the
negress caught the words, and she answered
ready, ven so sad my mstress ems,
whspered she as he spoke am l a chd to be
won by a strpng sha l se mysef to a boy,
Paraso.
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TH D . 217
when l have ony to ask the ove of a man, and
wn t.
he sad we, murmured ueman, sen-
tentousy the wfe of Hassan s a wse
woman, and deserves to eat her pauf n
peace. ashustun on my head be t
he has set her heart on a new cache-
mre, pursued the save, heedess of the nter-
rupton but she has no god, and Haf
has resoved to tempt her to-morrow wth the
chocest n the tcharch : she must have a shaw,
or she w fa sck, and, shoud she fa sck, she
w ose her beauty, and then the brghtest
carnaton n tambou w be wthered for ack
of a few hundred pastres uness, ndeed, the
ffend before whom l stand w consent to
receve n e change some |ewes, for whch her
fancy s outworn, and whch w se we n the
be en sten.
nd why not asked ueman, who had
forgotten hs suspcons n the |oy that he fet
from the hope of outwttng Haf how me
the damonds, and l w te you at once f l
can venture on the traffc.
L. l. h
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218 TH M C TH H M.
staferaah Heaven forbd Does the
ffend magne that the young Hanoum woud
ntrust me wth the |ewes before she earnt hs
determnaton r that she w not desre to
seect her own cachemre o, no, f the
ffend consents to effect the e change, he w
have an opportunty of makng hs own bargan
wth the far wfe of Hassan, who has aready
ooked upon hm from behnd her attces, and
seected hm from among a the merchants n
the tcharch, because she saw hm wth peasure.
ha t be so, ffendm
The futtered and fattered ueman dd not
mmedatey repy a thousand suspcons of
fou pay rose up before hm and, as hs ong
ga e fastened on the negress, and hs ear drank
n her accents, he coud not dvest hmsef of the
beef that t was reay enp who stood before
hm, or hetan hmsef n her keness but then
agan a was uncertanty, and Haf what
woud he not gve to crcumvent the pottngs of
hs arch-enemy for as such he coud not forbear
consderng hm Do you take me for a foo
a madman he asked quety that l
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TH D . 219
shoud set my foot n the harem of Hassan the
|eweer, and brng my neck to the bowstrng
m l a boy, ke the son of a|p, that l shoud
do ths thng
nd s the daughter of Hakf an dot, that
she shoud share her pauf wth dogs, and
backen her own face asked the negress n
her turn re there no harems n tambou
save that of Hassan her husband ah buyk
der ah s great the ffend s as a man
who dreams.
The Merchant started. He had never com-
mtted the foy of compromsng hs persona
safety, even n hs youth and that he shoud now
vountary encounter an amost certan per for
the mere gratfcaton of thwartng a van and
froward boy, was an e cess of rashness and n-
dscreton from whch he shrank wth very natu-
ra repugnance. l w answer you to-morrow
on ths pont he sad, at ast et me see you
before the noon -tde prayer n the ba ar, and
l w te you my decson.
re that hour the shaw of Haf w be n
the harem of Hassan s wfe but be t as you
2
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220 TH M C TH H M.
w and, as the save spoke, she pressed her
fngers to her ps and brow, and moved to de-
part.
Lsten to me e camed the Merchant
sterny, as he rose suddeny from the sofa, and
ad hs hand upon her arm l am no onger
to be cheated ke a chd you are enp, the
save of Hemas Hanoum my wfe how you
came here l know not, but t must have been by
the agency of some devsh magc l have
watched you narrowy Deny t not you are
the pottng sster of hetan to whom l owe the
mseres of months, and hence you depart not unt
l have vsted the vaut. houd my suspcons
be correct, make your peace wth ah whe
you may, for you have not ong to ve and,
as he spoke, he ponted wth hs outstretched
fnger to the wndow, through whch mght be
seen, n the dstance, the brght rppe of the
osphorus dancng n the sunght but f l
have deuded mysef, l sha not detan you ong
and l swear to you, by the beard of the Prophet,
to foow you whthersoever you st.
nd why shoud l wsh t othervvbe
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TH D . 221
asked the negress, shakng off hs grasp m l
not your save and are there not st many
hours to sunset l have tod you that my name
s ems, and that l serve Gu-sy Hanoum, the
wfe of Hassan the |eweer/
nd l have tod you, n mv turn, retorted
the Merchant that l am no onger to be fooed.
hat l have sad s sad.
lt s sad echoed the vster, as she camy
squatted dovvn upon a cushon whch chanced to
be near her, wth an unmoved gesture of at-home-
ness, that more than ever convnced the angry
ueman of her denttv. ut the f end
w do we to return qucky, as my mstress
may requre my servces meanwhe, l w
te my tusbee, and wsh good speed to hs
errand/
The Merchant dd not vouchsafe a repy, but
contented hmsef wth desrng two of hs ser-
vants, who were oungng n the ower ha of the
house, not to suffer the negress to escape and,
after ths very natura precauton, he ghted a
amp, and proceeded as fast as hs agtaton
woud permt to the prson of hs wfe.
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222 TH M C TH H M.
s the ast door few back, the rrtated hus-
band became nstanty aware, even through the
unusua goom of the subterranean, that t was
tenanted as usua by two ndvduas. n the
sofa sat Hemas Hanoum wth a crcuar mrror
n her hand, stanng her eyebrows wth the
|uces of a nut whch she had been burnng on
the cande that stood on a sma tabe besde her
and mmedatey beneath the amp, at the other
e tremty of the vaut, e prng at the very mo-
ment of hs entrance, as t appeared from ack of
o, was spread the prayer-carpet of the save,
who, wth the ong whte coth twned about her
head and face, wthout whch the Mussemaun
women never repeat ther orsons, was devouty
engaged n her nama . The Merchant actuay
trembed wth rage and mystfcaton there
she was at ntervas pressng her ebony-
cooured hands upon her knees and her naked
feet showng ke two umps of charcoa on the
crmson ground of the carpet pousy ndffer-
ent to hs entrance and whoy unconscous of
Devotons.
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TH D . 223
the absurd error nto whch she had been the n-
nocent means of betrayng hm. o earnest was
her devoton, moreover, that, as she bent down
n the pauses of the prayer, sundry ow groans
escaped her, whch, had she been otherwse en-
gaged, woud have appeared rather to be hyste-
rca efforts to subdue a movement of mrth, than
conscence-strcken demonstratons of hoy suf-
ferng as t was, however, the worthy Merchant
saw at once that he had commtted a new foy
and, even whe he sustaned a ds|onted and un-
satsfactory conversaton wth hs wfe, hs
thoughts were wth the captve negress n the
saemek who, on her return to the harem of
the daughter of Hakf, woud not fa to make
merry at the e pense of the |eaous husband.
He was aso conscous of havng betrayed a se-
cret not atogether cacuated to decrease the r-
dcue and thus he deemed t e pedent to
make a hasty retreat from the prson-chamber,
n order to berate hs new captve, whom each
added moment of restrant coud not fa to e -
asperate nto a resouton of more determned
revenge. He accordngy nformed Hemas
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224 TH M C TH H M.
Hanoum, whose eyebrows had by ths tme been
taught to form a curved ne a across her fore-
head, that he had pressng busness at the tchar-
ch and, after bddng her consoe hersef n her
captvty wth her ebec, and eavng besde her
a sma basket contanng a pauf made of quas,
he resumed hs amp, turned another ast, un-
ovng ook on the devout negress, and was soon
on hs way through the vauted passage to the
saemek.
The key had turned n the thrd door whch
parted hm from hs prsoners, when the kneeng
fgure sprang ghty nto an uprght atttude
and, fngng asde the prayer-coth that had
bound ts head, stood before the aughng He-
mas Hanoum, at east a foot too ta for the ne-
gress enp. The shaven sku, wth ts one
ong ock of sky back har, was soon conceaed
beneath an ampe turban the dye washed from
the face, hands, and feet of the mpostor the
trang antery e changed for a tght vest and
grde of shaw and the pretty Hemas Hanoum
and the adventurous Haf bused, amd ther
merrment, n preparng, over the gowng char-
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TH D . 225
coa of the bra er, the savoury pauf of the
mystfed ueman who, on hs arrva at the
apartment n whch he had eft the negress,
found her st squatted quety on the cushon,
and wth more haste than courtesy bade her
summon hm on the morrow to fuf hs pedge.
The save rose, bowed humby before hm, and,
wthout utterng a syabe, passed nto the street.
ut she was conscous that she was dogged by
one of the househod of the Merchant and t
was, moreover, so ong snce she had en|oyed a
sght of the sun and the buste of the cty streets,
that she arrved at the empty house besde that
of her master by as many turnngs and wndngs
as a Greek prate n the rchpeago and the
pauf had been heated, and the far fngers of
the pretty Hanoum had dpped wth those of her
over n the dsh so often, that, ere the entrance
of enp had been effected through the agency
of Haf , the feast was at an end and the
fatgued and hungry negress was fan to content
hersef wth the recs of the yesterday s mea.
ut ths was no msfortune to one who had so
merry a tae to te and hearty dd the three
5
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226 TH M C TH H M.
potters augh ere the over departed, at the
bod devce by whch they had unocked the
fourth door of the prson-chamber.
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TH D . 227
CH PT ll.
TH D contnued.
n the morrow, ueman was seated among
hs merchand e n the tcharch an hour before
hs usua tme but hs brow was dark, and hs
mood more than ordnary tacturn. He re-
membered, and, rememberng, he deepy re-
gretted, the pedge that he had gven to the
negress. He had, moreover, passed a wretched
nght he had dreamt of brght eyes and ruby
ps, t s true, but he had unfortunatey dreamt
of them n con|uncton wth dark-browed negroes,
and darker-browed husbands. He had en|oyed
a vson of a more than earthy beauty, who had
wecomed hm to her presence wth the assurance
that he stood before the favourte wfe of the
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228 TH M C TH H M.
utan but, whe he ga ed n wonderng adm-
raton, mnged wth a very powerfu degree of
respectfu terror, he had been surrounded by
armed saves, thrown on the ground, bowstrung
wth the rapdty of ghtnng, and fnay had
awoke |ust as the rapd current of the osphorus
was consgnng hm to the tender merces of the
ack ea.
ow ueman was not a man of prowess,
but a man of peace he despsed the |ews, and
hated the |anssares: he had nether taste for
adventures, nor affecton for danger and, when
he rased hs head from the pow, he thanked
ah and the Prophet, from the very depths of
hs sprt, that t was a a dream and a moment
afterwards he shuddered at the recoecton of
the pers to whch he had actuay sub|ected
hmsef through hs own headstrong and cause-
ess |eaousy. lt was, consequenty, to escape
from hs unquet thoughts and sef-reproach,
that he hurred to the tcharch wth such un-
wonted dgence, n the hope of fndng amuse-
ment n the passng scene but ever and anon,
as he saw the geam of a yashmac n the ds-
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TH D . 229
tance, a cod ch crept over hm, and made hs
shaven head fee for an nstant as though t were
covered wth brstes.
Hour after hour wore on, however, and he
began to nurse a vague and tmdy nduged
beef that the wayward beauty had repented
her bod enterpr e, and even to hope that she
had suffered hersef to reent n favour of Haf ,
and had accepted hs offerng when, as he was
carefuy read|ustng the fods of a shaw whch
had been hasty put asde on the prevous day,
he saw the son of a|b approachng hm wth a
rapd step.
hosh gedn you are wecome : sad the
Merchant, as the young man stopped besde hs
carpet, wshng hm, at the moment n whch he
uttered the greetng, safey deposted n the
great cemetery of the cty : affet oah much
peasure attend you can l serve you n aught
or are you ony whng away the tme unt the
md-day prayer
ay, not so reped Haf , as he returned
the sautaton. l am hurred even more than
my wont on ths occason and, therefore, pray
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230 TH M C TH H M.
you to show me, wth what speed you may, a
the cachemres of Thbet on whch you can ay
your hand. My father s stock s e hausted, and
l am commssoned to make a purchase for the
wfe of a rch ey.
f a ey, sad you demanded the
Merchant, as unconcernedy as he coud, whe
he was n the act of takng down some mer-
chand e from one of the sheves. re you
sure that her husband s a ey
Havet yes she s the wfe of Hassan
ey, who served for severa years n Trpo, and
who now nhabts a house near the fortress of
the even Towers. he desres a new shaw for
the feast of the aram.
nd she has commssoned you to seect t
for her s t so asked ueman, as he ooked
steady towards the youth.
Mashaah that were a tae for a mas-
sad|he aughed Haf ts the good
ey hmsef who has charged me to make the
bargan : and l must make a successfu one, or
t w fare wth me, for Hassan s not a man
Professona story-teer.
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TH D . 231
to trfe wth. He has been so many years
accustomed to have every thng hs own way,
that he s not partcuar about the proprety of
the manner n whch he manfests hs dspeasure.
l never ook at hm wthout fancyng that l see
a bowstrng peepng from amd the fods of hs
grde.
ueman actuay shvered wth terror as he sat.
|ust now, whspered Haf confdentay,
as he bent towards the Merchant a gves
way before the beautfu young Gu-sy Hanoum
hs new wfe but her favour s precarous, for
t has been nsnuated to the ey that she s not
so devoted to hm as t behoves her to be. ut
who sha say and he ooked up archy nto
the face of hs stener.
aah bah by the Prophet are we
Mussemauns that we thus tak together of a
woman murmured ueman deprecatngy :
what s t to you or to me, ffendm, f t be
so or no
gan Haf aughed. ou say we to
us t s ndeed bosh nothng. o now we w
e amne the shaws.
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232 TH M C TH H M.
ut the husband of Henas Hanoum had
heard too tte or too much too tte as t
regarded the unknown beauty hersef, and too
much as t regarded her husband, for a man
who was bound hand and foot to rsk hs fe n
the furtherance of a woman s caprce. et how
to ead back the dscourse to the pont at whch
he wshed to arrve, he knew not for the Turks,
even among themseves, do not make ther
women a sub|ect of conversaton or comment
and thus, wth a the terrors of the uncom-
promsng ey before hs eyes, couped wth the
conscousness that he was about to beard hm n
hs very den, he was compeed to turn over
shaw after shaw, and to e patate on the beautes
and quates of each, whe vsons of fear, and
per, and |eopardy, were crowdng across hs
bran.
hat have l to do, he asked hmsef
amost aoud, wth the ght-headed and wfu
wfe of another man, and that man, moreover,
a ey and a soder. avret der t s a woman.
Have l not counted neary seventy years snce
the Prophet frst bew the breath of fe nto my
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TH D . 233
nostrs ls not my beard gray, and my hand
weakened ls t for me to measure mysef
wth boys ut a these refectons avaed
nothng and, |ust as Haf , after quarreng
wth the quaty of one shaw and the cost of
another, had fung asde the ast wth a ds-
sentent gesture, decarng that he shoud not
dare to meet. the ey f he made no better
bargan than those offered to hm by hs father s
frend, a negress, whose yashmac amost covered
her eyes, waked quety up to the Merchant,
and, wthout notcng the vcnty of Haf , sad
n a cam tone, The ffend awats you hard
by l am to conduct you to hm. nd the
paray ed ueman, wthout a word, cast a hs
costy goods upon the foor of the tte store-
room behnd hm, ocked the door, and, shuffng
on hs sppers, prepared to foow hs ebony-
cooured gude, ke one under a spe.
ne gance, and but one, passed between the
save and Haf , and that was unnotced by the
Merchant, who was absorbed n the trembng
dscomfort of hs own terrors and n the ne t
nstant the heavy-draped negress was threadng
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234 TH M C TH H M.
her way aong the narrow streets of the tcharch,
foowed at some dstance by her vctm.
They moved onward very sowy, for the
pathways were thronged wth passengers but at
ength they emerged nto the open streets of the
cty, and ueman remarked, wth somethng
ke a sensaton of |oy, that ther road dd not
e n the drecton of the even Towers, whence
t was evdent that the troubesome beauty coud
not purpose to receve hm beneath the roof of
her husband.
n turnng an abrupt corner, the Merchant
found hmsef suddeny n a street tte fre-
quented, and, as t chanced, at that moment saw
no human beng near hm e cept hs mysterous
conductress, who was standng a few paces from
the openng, evdenty awatng hs approach.
He dd not acceerate hs pace, however, but
rather waked more sowy, for he dreaded a
communcaton wth the dusky pece of myst-
csm who had begued hm nto hs present pre-
dcament whe the save, on her sde, appeared
perfecty ndfferent to every thng save the
ob|ect that she sought to attan, and contented
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TH D . 235
hersef by e camng, when he at ength reached
her sde o far, so we ghty fas the foot
of hm who s summoned by a Pasha s wfe :
afern we done, f endm the Hanoum w
re|oce to fnd that her bddng has been so
|oyousy obeyed.
cod dew rose to the brow of the worthy
ueman, but he dd not dare to ask a queston,
as the save, havng uttered her e traordnary
address, agan moved forward. The wfe of
Hassan the |eweer had grown nto the favourte
of Hassan ey, and agan nto the consort of a
Pasha, wthn the twenty-four hours snce he
had frst heard of her There was but another
step to take he had now ony to earn that she
was an nmate of the utan s harem, and hs
doom woud be seaed He remembered hs
dream, and trembed and, as the n egress from
tme to tme ooked back to assure hersef that
he foowed, he each moment e pected to have
the dreaded ntegence poured nto hs quang
ears. ut no such msfortune as ths befe hm
for hs companon never addressed hm agan
unt they reached the narrow and squad street
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236 TH M C TH H M.
whch termnates n the Tchernbere Tasch, or
urnt Par. Ths ceebrated coumn was at
that perod neary perfect the fgure of poo,
one of the masterpeces of Phdas, whch had
orgnay crowned t, was ndeed gone but the
decate garands of oak-eaves, that encrced t
at reguar dstances from ts base to ts summt,
were yet perfect and the marbe was but sghty
staned wth fre-marks.
bout mdway of the street the negress paused
before the gate of a dreary-ookng house and
havng f ed one ong, sgnfcant ga e on the
Merchant, beat upon the door, and was nstanty
admtted. ueman took severa turns aong
the rude and rugged pavng, and deayed as ong
as he safey coud, ere he reuctanty foowed
her e ampe, and then, wth a trembng hand,
he rased the ponderous knocker, and heard ts
harsh sound sowy de away n the vod be-
yond.
He was not kept ong n suspense. The
door few back, and, as he passed the threshod,
cosed sowy behnd hm hs od acquantance
eras was n watng, and he obeyed her sent
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TH D . 237
gesture, and foowed her through a ong and
dusky passage, whch ooked as though the day-
ght had never penetrated ts goom. There
was no mattng upon the foor and, even
steathy as he moved aong, the unfortunate
Merchant coud hear the echo of hs own foot-
steps, and amost the beatngs of hs heart.
very tae of terror to whch he had ever s-
tened came fresh to hs memory and he sub-
mtted to hs fate unquestonng, ke one who
fe that he had gone too far to recede, and that
escape was now hopeess.
The passage termnated at a door, before
whch hung a tapestred curtan, and the negress,
havno funo- t asde, bade hm enter wthout
ceremony. or the frst moment he coud not
dstngush anythng, though he was conscous
that the save was st besde hm but n the ne t,
a strong gare burst forth from the upper end of
the chamber, as a hand fung upon the bra er
by whch the apartment was heated a quantty of
aromatc wood. hen the smoke ceared away,
ueman coud |ust dscover that a femae, whose
dress gttered wth god embrodery, ay recned
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p
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238 TH M C TH H M.
upon a pe of cushons spread on the foor and,
whe he was yet empoyed n endeavourng to
obtan a vew of her features, she capped her
hands, and haf a do en saves entered wth
ghts.
ueman rubbed hs eyes, and fanced that he
must be the sport of a dream. The whoe
apartment was the very embodyment of spen-
dour and u ury. lt was ke awakenng n the
Prophet s paradse after the seep of the grave.
The foor was covered wth Persan carpets the
sofas were sprnked wth embrodered fowers,
and ooked ke a petrfed parterre draperes of
gorgeousy tnted sk veed the attced wndows
and, n the mdst of ths scene of costy com-
fort recned ts unveed mstress, n a vestment
so respendent wth god and |ewes, that the
da ed Merchant cast down hs eyes, ke one
who has nadvertenty ooked upon the sun.
ut he was not ong suff ered to reman n ths
atttude of sent wonder. voce whch
sounded strangey famUar to hs ear bade hm
wecome, and nvted hm to approach and, as
he advanced further nto the apartment, hs eye
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TH D . 239
fe on a group of spenddy-dressed saves, who
were standng near the couch of ther mstress.
Coffee was served to hm n sence and then a
chbouque of cherry-wood, wth a mouth-pece of
the fnest and paest amber, was put nto hs
hand by an attendant, young, beautfu, and
gracefu, who bore so strong a resembance to
hs mprsoned wfe, that he started as he took
the ppe, and amost suffered t to escape hs
casp.
ou have done me much grace, ffendm
sad the ady of the reve, as soon as the proper
ceremones had been observed towards her guest :
khosh gedn you are wecome and l am
gratefu to you for runnng so great a rsk to
nduge one of my de caprces. The Pasha,
my husband, s |eaous and yn -eyed, and we
sha be fortunate f we contrve your departure
wthout e ctng suspcon. ut we w not
tak of hm My save ems, by whom you
were summoned, has doubtessy tod you that
a new whm, on whose gratfcaton l am,
as usua, determnedy bent, has compeed
me to appy to your generosty. ana bak .
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240 TH M C TH H M.
ook at me am l one to be thwarted l need
not e pan more l w merey put before
you the toys whch l desre to gve n e -
change for one of your most costy cachemres.
l know a the rsk that l ncur n order to work
out my peasure, and l am gratefu to you for
havng so wngy shared t. |oy and fear are
not more opposte n ther effects than n the
feeng whch they e cte towards those who are
our partners n the emoton n |oy, we fnd the
peasure doubed by partcpaton whe, n
fear oh, ffendm, you know not, you cannot
guess, the sensaton wth whch a young, and
pretty, and dosed wfe ooks upon the nd-
vdua, who, at the moment when he pays
homage to her beauty, s conscous that, shoud
hs devoton be dscovered, he can save her by
offerng hmsef up a wng sacrfce to her
offended husband Coud l not at ths nstant,
were the Pasha to ntrude nto the harem, vow
that l knew not your errand, and had never
sanctoned your entrance othng coud be
more smpe and as to the resut of such a de-
caraton, t were van to e patate on t Mash-
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TH D . 241
aah Hassan Pasha s too methodca to eave
any one n doubt on such a sub|ect. Gu-sy
Hanoum, he w say to me, you are the hght
of my eyes, and the sun of my sky, and rather
woud l put out the beam of the one, and mss
the warmth of the other, than know that they
had been shared by the overegn of the word
the Padshah of the most gorous empre of the
earth
The Merchant wped the gatherng damps
from hs brow, and ony groaned a repy.
orkma fear not what care l for a
these ove-sentences : pursued the ady, w
they buy me a cachemre, or gve me a peasant
dream re they not mere words Perhaps
you have a far wfe n your harem, ffendm
nay, l am sure you have, for your beard s
whte, and your days are numbered, and you
woud be a dvane an dot not to seek some
soace for your age n brght smes and gente
words and f you have a wfe, young, and
pretty, and ready-wtted, as women w be,
though a good Mussemauns woud fan see
them otherwse, you must know that she woud
L. l. M
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p
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242 TH M C TH H M.
rather have one purse than a score of comp-
ments from you at east. et wherefore waste
your tme wth de tak, when every nstant
may be fraught wth danger Dran and,
as she spoke, the save who ooked and moved
ke the Merchant s mprsoned wfe, advanced,
and bent meeky before her show to ue-
man ffend the toys whch l desre to barter
wth hm.
he was obeyed on the nstant the attendant
senty wthdrew, and n a moment returned,
bearng a tray, whch she deposted at the feet
of the vstor. lt was covered wth a god-em-
brodered napkn, whch was hasty thrown asde,
and the frst ob|ect that met the eye of ue-
man was a |eweed braceet, whose form and
settng were as famar to hm as the precepts of
the oran. esde t ay an essence-bo of
vory, sma, and quanty-fashoned and both
were powed on a costy cachemre of pae
yeo , wth a border of green and crmson
Let those who have wrthed under the vsta-
Generay contanng 500 pastres (or 5) a lmpera
presents n spece are made n purses.
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TH D . 243
ton of the nght-mare pcture to themseves the
sensatons of ueman He ooked ong and
earnesty on the ob|ects of barter as they were
spread out before hm he handed them each
n ther turn, and they were a rea and pa-
pabe they were offered to hm for sae, and he
coud sw ar that they were hs own ln hs
bewderment he turned towards the Pasha s
wfe, and ga ed keeny and nqurngy upon her.
The haughty beauty bore hs steady ook un-
shrnkngy : not a bush, not a word escaped
her and t was strange how the e presson of
those arge dark eyes added to the mystfcaton
of the Merchant there was a mockng ght n
them that wthered hs very sou He had seen
them before, he knew not where nor when : hs
memory payed the trator, and hs senses reeed :
and meanwhe there ay the braceet, the es-
sence-bo , and the shaw the ferocous Pasha
n perspectve the mprudent beauty n pre-
sence and a coud of phantoms, shapeess, n-
defnte, and mystca, wrthng and wndng
through a the ntrcate anges of hs mag-
naton. There too stood the save, the young
m2
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p
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244 TH M C TH H M .
and mysterous save, who ooked and moved
so ke hs own wfe The Merchant nstnc-
tvey bured hs hand n hs grde ths at
east must be a deuson, for there were the
keys : and hence t was ony far to nfer that he
was under a spe that the v ye was on
hm and that the braceet, the essence-bo , and
the yeow cachemre, were a phantoms, en-
gendered by the fever of hs own over-heated
bran.
he he was yet abandoned to hs bewder-
ment, the saves, as f to ncrease t, struck up
a wd, shr concert of voces and ebecs, whch
rang through the saoon, and whsted n the
ears of ueman ke an east wnd. e ngh
maddened by the nose, the mystfcaton, and
the terror, whch grew deeper each moment from
the necessty of ts conceament, the unhappy
Merchant began hurredy to offer he scarce
knew what, for the hated ob|ects of barter and
an ous to escape from the scene of torment,
swore to the dark-eyed ady of the reve that she
shoud turn over every bae n hs store, and seect
the shaw whch peased her, be ts vaue what
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TH D . 245
t mght. The offer was accepted on the nstant
nor was an effort made to detan the bera
ueman when he had pedged hmsef to ob-
serve, and fathfuy to fuf the compact whe,
on hs part, he as wngy consented to eave
behnd hm the vauabe pedges that were to be
gven n e change. He ost not a moment n
descendng from the sofa, and shuffng on hs
sppers and havng made hs obesance to the
hostess, who was sunnng hersef n the ght
of her own eyes, as they were refected from a cr-
cuar mrror set nto a frame of ostrch fea-
thers, he fted the tapestry hangng that veed
the door of the gorgeous apartment, and
passed nto the vod and echong gaery be-
yond.
ut no offcous ems foowed to gude hm
through the dark abyrnth no companonshp
save that of a oud and mockng pea of aughter
from the party whom he had |ust qutted, begued
the dffcuty of hs progress and even that ded
away as suddeny as t had burst forth. ot a
snge amp shed ts protectng ght to save hm
from yawnng starcases and goomy passages and
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p
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246 TH M C TH H M.
he wandered on sowy and panfuy, wth fear
and trembng, bewderng hmsef more and
more n the ntrcaces of the budng, n sence
and n darkness, unt after the apse of an hour,
when he dstngushed n the dstance the gm-
merng of a scky ght, towards whch he
cautousy advanced, n the hope that t mght
afford hm a mean of escape from hs macous
enemes. ot a sound was to be heard as he
neared the beacon, save the du echo of hs own
footsteps and he consequenty became suff-
centy reassured to qucken hs pace, and to
pass wthout hestaton the threshod of the vast
and apparenty empty apartment n whch the
amp was burnng. ut he had no sooner done
so than the door cosed wth voence behnd
hm, cuttng off a hope of escape by the ga-
ery aong whch he had passed, and the scky
amp gave out one strong burst of ght,
and nstanty e pred. ln that bref nterva,
however, momentary as t was, the trembng
Merchant dscovered the whoe e tent of hs
msfortune nor was any tme permtted hm for
preparaton : n an nstant he was se ed f|ung
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TH D . 247
on the ground hed down by powerfu hands,
amd ow and mockng aughter and n fve
mnutes he had fanted beneath the bastnado.
The sun was brght upon the domes and
mnarets of the cty, when ueman the haw-
merchant panfuy stretchng hs mbs, and
openng hs haggard eyes, found hmsef e -
tended on a marbe sab n the rmenan ceme-
tery of Pera, beneath the ght shade of a
bossomng acaca. He mght we have beeved
that a the scene through whch he had atey
passed w as but a hag-rdden dream, had not the
swoen and smartng soes of hs dshonoured
feet assured hm to the contrary. He coud not
doubt the e tent of hs wrong and f he dd not
nstanty ay hs compant before the Cad, t
was smpy because he was unabe to make hs
way to the osphorus, and to pass over to
tambou unasssted.
evera hours were consequenty wasted, to
the great dsgust of the Merchant, among the
Chrstan graves, ere he was gaddened by the
approach of an rmenan |eweer, who came,
as hs wont was towards sunset, to smoke hs
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#
p
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248 TH M C TH H M.
chbouque besde the grave of one of hs reatves.
ueman knew hm we, as he had often traded
wth hm n the be ensten and to hm, there-
fore, he confded, wthout hestaton, the hstory
of hs dscomfture, takng care, however, as he
subsequenty dd n hs compant before the
Cad, to concea the fact of femnne agency and
contentng hmsef wth the decaraton that he
had been decoyed to ths house of mystery for
the purposes of commerce.
y the agency of Takour- gou, the rme-
nan |eweer, a carrage was soon procured, n
whch the sufferng ueman was safey de-
posted on the wooden per at Topp-hanne, and
there embarked n a caque for tambou where,
on hs arrva at home, he ost no tme n ayng
hs case before the Cad, and demandng |ustce.
Hs descrpton of the house was so crcum-
stanta, and he was so postve as to ts accuracy,
that the offcers of |ustce found t at once, and
thundered for admttance wthout a moment s
hestaton but the sturdy strokes whch they
beat upon the door ony produced a ong-sus-
taned echo as they ded sowy away n the
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TH D . 249
dstance and when at ength ther mportunty
e cted the attenton of the neghbours, an od
crone, cosey muffed n a scarf of bue and
whte checked nen, tottered forth from one of
the most squad-ookng tenements of the
wretched street, and devered up the key of the
empty house, wth an assurance that t had been
ong unnhabted and that her son, who was
pursung hs trade n one of the rchpeegan
lsands, and whose patrmony t was, desred
wth a hs heart to dspose of t, even at a
oss.
The foowers of the Cad eft the wthered
woman to pour forth her nformaton to the haf
do en ndvduas whom the outcry n the street
had attracted, and rushed through the entrance-
court nto the desoate gaery beyond. ut
they dscovered no ob|ect n any one of the
empty and mouderng apartments w hch bore
testmony to the truth of the Merchant s story.
eather-staned was faded frescoes, pee-
ng from the negected cengs doors hangng
oosey upon broken hnges and casements from
whch the pershed attces were droppng n
M 5
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p
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250 TH M C TH H M
fragments were about them n every drecton,
buvt not a trace of recent nhabtaton was per-
ceptbe and, after havng traversed the whoe
budng, and searched every room and gaery,
they were compeed to vacate the premses wth
a frm convcton that the Merchant had msed
them, and had atogether mstaken the ocaty
of hs dsgrace.
ut t was not so: and durng the nterva
whch succeeded ere the enraged and baffed
ueman had reganed the use of hs feet, and
was once more enabed to vst the subterranean,
many a |est and |be of whch he was the sub|ect,
had ghtened the tedum of the prson-harem
and more than once had Haf twned about hs
head the costy caemker, n whch he had
enacted the Pasha s wfe and practsed before
the ana (or hand-mrror) of the treacherous
Hemas Hanoum the same angushng grmaces
wth whch he had favoured her unhappy hus-
band.
e mght the youthfu over e ut over the
Panted handkerchef.
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TH D . 251
success of hs treacherous artfces for fve of
the seven ocks were now unoosed, and more
than haf hs adventurous task was accom-
pshed
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252 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT lll.
TH D . contnued.
ueman was one mornng descendng to
the vaut, when, as he was turnng the key of the
ast door whch separated hm from the prson-
chamber, he was started by the sounds of
voent contenton and he paused for a few
seconds ere he entered, n order to acquant hm-
sef wth the cause of the outcry. Hgh and
shr rose the voce of hs young wfe, but
hgher and shrer st were the tones of
enp and the ama ement of the Merchant was
e treme when he dscovered that the gente
Hemas Hanoum was actuay n anger aganst
her ong-favoured attendant and that the pam-
pered negress, forgetfu of a the ndugence
and kndness of her mstress, was castng back
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TH D . 253
every reproach, and retortng every n|urous
epthet. Had ueman seen a purse of god
upon hs path, he coud not have been more re-
|oced quet sme payed about hs p, and
he stroked down hs beard wth a gesture of
compacency and sef-gratuaton truy envabe.
ow every mystery woud be unraveed f,
ndeed, as he was st sometmes ncned to sus-
pect, the tenants of hs pretty prson were prvy
to a hs annoyances. quarre between the
consprators woud necessary nvove dscovery
for what angry woman ever kept the secret of
her adversary Thus the Merchant Hstened
wth a hs ears 3 and the contenton contnued
ong enough to convnce hm that the begerents
woud show each other no quarter w hen hs ap-
pearance afforded to them the opportunty of
revengng ther magnary wrongs.
ut wth a hs powers of hearng on the
stretch, ueman coud not gather amd the
voence of the quarre a snge sentence tendng
to throw any ght upon the sub|ect on whch he
was an ous to be better nformed and, ac-
cordngy, makng a great rattng wth the
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p
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254 TH M C TH H M.
tupendous bunch of keys that he carred n hs
hand, he utmatey threw back the door, and
stood before the fushed and furous women,
who seemed we ngh e hausted by the voence
of ther contest.
l sha not stop to deta the torrent of words
by whch the Merchant was assaed : suffce t,
that one pucked hm by the seeve, and that the
other twtched hm by the robe that one
pued hm one way, and the other dragged hm
the other that one screamed nto hs rght ear,
and the other nto hs eft that they tea ed,
tormented, and amost terrfed hm, ere he coud
produce the sghtest appearance of peace, and
make hmsef master of the very obscure and
mystfed cause of contenton.
trange and startng nferences had escaped
both from the ady and her attendant, as the
war of words went on and ever and anon the
Merchant magned that he had gmpses of a
mystery whch he woud fan have fathomed
but even as he seemed about to grasp t, t
euded hm, and he remaned fuy as bewdered
as ever.
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#
p
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TH D . 255
ln van dd he attempt to pacfy hs far and
furous wfe she was resoved she mght be a
prsoner he mght deprve her of the ght of
heaven, and the free ar whch was the hertage
of the happy but he shoud not compe her to
share her dungeon wth one who had become
hatefu to her. ay more f ueman per-
ssted n retanng the obno ous negress n hs
servce, the determned tte beauty threatened
hm wth her endurng and unmeasured wrath.
he shoud be sod absoutey sod n the save-
market dsposed of to the best bdder banshed
for ever from a chance of offendng the eyes of
her rate mstress and, despte hs better reason
for, amd a the decamaton and voence of
hs wfe, ueman was qute unabe to ascertan
of what crme enp had actuay been guty
he was compeed to acquesce n a that was re-
qured of hm, and to promse that he woud
wthout deay, purchase a younger and more
submssve attendant for hs angry hepmate.
th some dffcuty he, however, prevaed on
the young Hanoum to retan the negress unt
he had decded on her successor and, havng
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p
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256 TH M C TH H M.
carred ths pont as an especa favour to hm-
sef, he qutted the vaut, eavng both the women
sent and suky.
n the morrow the Merchant sauntered to the
save-market hs brow was couded, and hs
humour dark for he was too fuy convnced of
the powers of eocuton possessed by enp, not
to fee panfuy certan that hs prson-harem
woud afford a frutfu topc for verba dspay
n the ne t famy of whch she became an
nmate. ueman dreaded rdcue wth a most
hoy dread and he actuay shvered as he re-
membered how egtmate a sub|ect hs |eaousy
had supped to the dscarded negress. ut for
ths ev there was no remedy, save retanng the
denquent n hs own servce and ere he
reached the encosure approprated to the sae of
urd and byssnan saves, he accordngy de-
termned to effect a purchase f possbe, n order
to pacfy hs wfe and then to propose to her
the u urous aternatve of retanng both the
saves n her servce. The more the Merchant
pondered on hs scheme, the more feasbe t ap-
peared 5 for he deemed t ony probabe that a
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#
p
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TH D . 257
torm whch had arsen so suddeny, mght as
suddeny be camed and that the morrow mght
see the dsgraced favourte renstated n the good
graces of her mstress. The thought was a pea-
sant one and as ueman moved on nto the
centre of the market-court, he passed hs hand
caressngy down hs beard for ths transent
tempest had at east proved to hm beyond a
further doubt, that the e traordnary and mys-
terous annoyances whch had atey ruffed hm,
had not orgnated n the vaut.
owy, therefore, and compacenty, the Mer-
chant stepped nto the mdst of the groupes who
were squatted on ther rugs and mats under the
broad sun, and aughng out ther thoughtess-
ness as they wated to be purchased. nce or
twce he paused, attracted by a merry face, or a
brght eye but he resoved to make the tour of
the court ere he commtted hmsef by word or
sgn and accordngy he pursued hs way unt
he stood besde a sotar negress who, veed,
and cad more decenty than the generaty of
those by whom she was surrounded, appeared to
be whoy absorbed by her own thoughts.
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#
p
d
258 TH M C TH H M.
ueman started as hs eye fe upon her he
paused upon hs path, and fastened hs ga e on
the apparenty unconscous negress ke one fas-
cnated and then he senty beckoned to an
aged, coarse-ookng Turk, who was quety
smokng hs chbouque on a faded Persan carpet,
a few paces from the save.
he s yours sad the Merchant en-
qurngy, as the hoary deaer n human bengs
deberatey obeyed hs summons.
he s mne, was the bref repy.
l woud see her, pursued the Merchant.
aha es maradek ah preserve you
the f end s ord, and l am hs save sad
the owner of the negress, as he ponted to the
yashmac whch she wore. Musna, unve.
thout the deay of a sncment he was
obeyed. The woman unwound the scarf of far
whte musn whch had conceaed her face, and
stood before hm wth a sme upon her ps.
enp e camed the e cted ueman
but hs e|acuaton was met by a stod and un-
conscous ook from both the save and her
master. nswer me. ster of hetan he
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TH D . 259
perssted, answer me for your fe, how came
you here
man groaned out her owner but the
negress dd not move a musce.
|ab chay they are wonders both
cred the furous ueman, turnng fercey on
the od man. Dog whence came ths woman
ln what hesh pot have you engaged, that you
brng her here to augh at me to my beard
re there no aws n tambou, that you dare to
trfe thus wth one who trades n the cty, and
spreads hs prayer- carpet n the mosque of t.
opha m l a gaour, that you thus defe
the grave of my father
h vah mercy on us hat means my
ord asked the save-owner n hs turn : ls
not the woman an byssnan and dd l not
buy her honesty at the market of dranope.
hen the sun rose ths mornng, four of them
occuped my carpet: the day s we ngh spent,
and Musna aone s eft: the rest have found
purchasers among the f ends of the cty.
ven she hersef shoud have been provded
wth a new master ere ths, had l not demanded
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260 TH M C TH H M.
a heavy sum for one so we sked n house-
wfery. young gaant cheapened her ony an
hour snce for the harem of hs mother, and we
parted for a hundred ptfu pastres Look at
her, f endm f, ndeed, you ack a save to
tend your daughters and surey my ord, whose
beard s whte, hath daughters for you w
scarce meet wth one so skfu n her dutes.
Haf haf shame shame mpatenty
nterposed ueman : l te you, rogue and
|ugger as you are, that the save s aready
mne, and l dare her to deny t.
man aman aas aas sghed the
od man n hs turn, affectng a ook of deep
concern r woud that the strcken one coud
obey your bddng.
hat mean you, hoary snner . demanded
hs angry stener: ne odou what has hap-
pened l am weary of ths foy, and can bear no
more.
n my sou be t answered the save-
deaer, wth a gesture of deep humty, whe
the negress camy and deberatey read|usted
her ve: ho sha murmur aganst the
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TH D . 261
decrees of ah, and the w of the hoy
Prophet ere t not so, the pastres had. been
mne, and l had ong ere ths shaken the dust of
the cty streets from my feet Musna s skfu
n the harem, and ready at the bath but my
ord bds her speak, and she cannot obey hm
she s swft of foot, and wng of hand, but
words are dened her Musna s dumb -
The Merchant ooked ncreduous, and hs
resouton was taken at once . osh der t s
nothng he sad hasty even thus l w
purchase her name your prce, and f you be
nether a |ew nor a Gaour, the save s mne.
The end w pardon me that l ntrude
on hs prvacy sad a detested voce cose to
the ebow of the e asperated ueman l
come but to pay over to Mustafa a few hundreds
of pastres for an byssnan save, and l w
mmedatey retre. lnshaah the purses are
true, and the negress s mne, s t not so, Mus-
tafa nd Haf turned to the od man, who
was engaged n countng the money whch be
had put nto hs hand.
he s your s sad Mustafa gravey and
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262 TH M C TH H M.
motonng to the negress to foow her new
master, he was about to address the haw-
merchant, when he was nterrupted by an angry
e camaton, as ueman fung hmsef across
the path of the save, and dared her to foow
the son of a|p.
ut the dumb woman, apparenty unsuspcous
of hs meanng, merey moved asde, and made
her way to the gate by a ess drect ne whe
Haf , wth a ght augh, affected to treat the
nterference of ueman as a |est, and sad gay
as he moved away The f end may be rght
n deemng my bargan a poor one but my
mother hath aready many about her who have
the gft of speech, and to her t w be tte
drawback that l brng her one who cannot add
to the outcry.
The haw-merchant teray gasped for breath
he dared not offer any open voence, nor detan
the woman by force, est he shoud be se ed by
the kavashr, as a dsordery person, and hur-
red before the Cad whe, mnged wth hs
rage, came an ntrusve memory of hs former
Poce of the cty.
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TH D . 263
mstake, when he made a prsoner of the save
ems, who had doubtessy amused her ms-
chevous mstress, and the whoe harem, wth an
embeshed verson of hs |eaousy, and of the
hnts whch n hs anger he had nadvertenty
suffered to escape hm. Under these crcum-
stances he consdered t more e pedent to permt
the departure of the mysterous negress and her
purchaser and to endeavour, ths tme at east,
to entrap them ere they had esure to re|oce
over the success of ther new scheme, shoud
they ndeed be wound up n the web of hs an-
noyances.
ut the feech the consteaton of ueman
was adverse. n araba, drawn up by the sde
of the street, receved the save and the drver,
havng bent for an nstant towards Haf , who
gave hs drectons n so ow a voce as to be n-
audbe to the bystanders, drove off at a pace as
rapd as the defectve pavement woud permt.
The resut requres tte e panaton for the
speed of the Merchant was no match for that of
the carrage and when he at ength reached the
vaut, he was more ve ed than surprsed to be
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264 TH M C TH H M.
haf deafened by the peas of aughter whch
resounded through the subterranean and to fnd
the ady and her attendant, n the fu fow of
confdence and harty.
f endm, commenced the Merchant sterny
l have purchased for you a new save, who w
be wth you to-morrow and l have transferred
e np, at some pecunary oss, to a Caesaran
Merchant, who has been deputed to suppy the
wves of the Pasha of the Dardanees wth four
attendants. To-nght, therefore, she w reman
n the vaut, but at dawn her new master w be
here to cam her.
ghour oa heaven speed you that were
a tae worth teng aughed hs wfe. now
you so tte of a woman s nature as to beeve
that she w nurse her wrath for so many hours
lf you take enp from me l sha fa sck
l w nether touch my ebec, nor sng the
baads to whch you ove to sten. ee then f
you wsh to part us.
The Merchant ground hs teeth, and a hs
doubts and suspcons came back upon hm
but he was poweress and proftng by past e -
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TH D . 265
perence he resoved to affect an ndf erence
whch he was far from feehng and to endeavour,
by appearng unconscous that any mystfcaton
was ntended, to throw the consprators off ther
guard, and thus take them n ther own tos.
ctng upon ths somewhat tardy resouton,
ueman smoothed hs ruffed brow, caed a
sme to hs rgd ps, and gave a ready assent to
hs wfe s new arrangement, to the no sma
astonshment of hs tormentors, who were pre-
pared for an obstnate opposton. nd so ong,
ndeed, dd he nger n the vaut, that the
pretty Hanoum began to fear that the patence
of Haf woud fary fa hm ere the departure
of her ncomprehensbe husband
t ength, however, ueman departed, qute
unconscous of the ne t and fna surpr e whch
awated hm and when he was out of hearng,
Haf sprang aughngy through the chasm,
and bounded nto the centre of the foor.
|oy |oy he e camed, as the young
beauty rose from the sofa to receve hm s
of the doors are conquered s of the ocks are
shvered s of the keys are ost and for the
L. l.
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266 TH M C TH H M.
seventh, my utana for the seventh and the
ast, we have an easy remedy. The araba yet
wats whch brought our fathfu enp from
the save-market, where she payed her part ke
the favourte of a Padshah the caque dances
on the rppe at the per that |uts nto the
harbour besde the Gate of the Garden that
trusty caque whch s to bear us across nto
sa there a s prepared for our fght and
when once we have reached the mountans, we
may defy a the |eaous husbands n tambou.
ut you weep, my hour Lght of my eyes,
and shadow of my e stence do you regret
that your word s pedged
or a moment the weepng Hanoum made no
repy : her woman-sprt quaed for an nstant
but her resouton was taken and, pacng her
hand n that of her over, she turned on hm a
sme, n whose ght her tears were forgotten.
enp, meanwhe, was busyng hersef among
the wardrobe of her mstress, whence she
brought a goden braceet, a cachemre shaw,
and a bo of essence the prayer-coth n whch
n mperor.
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TH D . 267
Haf had enacted the kneeng save the head-
dress that he had worn as the Pasha s wfe, and
the dark ferd|he n whch she had hersef
fgured n the save-market and havng ad
them separatey upon the tabe, she dsturbed
the tete-a-t te of the overs, to remnd them
that her porton of the comedy was concuded.
Mashaah our good enp hath more
prudence than we can boast, my utana e -
camed Haf we waste moments that we
can spare here are s of our successfu
engnes and here and as he spoke he took
from amd the fods of hs grde seven keys, s
of whch he broke deberatey one after the
other, and added to the separate heaps one
ony remaned entre, and that he ad aone and
apart.
un of my sky he murmured, as the
muffed Hanoum prepared to foow hm through
the subterranean Tchabouk, tchabouk, gde-
m quck, quck, et us go our sands are god
unt we have eft tambou behnd us they
must not run to waste and bak, |anum see,
my sou he who was your husband at east
n2
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268 TH M C TH H M.
owes me one debt of grattude for l have eft
hm a goody key wth whch to secure the door
of hs pretty prson-cage, when hs brd s
fown
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TH M C TH H M. 269
P T lll.
CH PT l .
y the sou of the Prophet ts a good
story e cakned afua Pasha l know not
when l have heard a better ut was not
ueman the haw-merchant an ass, and the
father of asses, to et hs beard be pucked out,
handfu by handfu, by a par of pottng wo-
men, and a strphng ah buyuk der ah
s great he coud have had no more wt than a
dromedary.
nd what became of the kupek the dog
of a husband P demanded the aughng Carmf
Hanoum : Dd he keep hs ne t harem above
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270 TH M C TH H M.
the earth or dd he try the same e perment a
second tme
Hstory makes no further menton of hm
reped the young Greek, wth assumed gravty.
hat shoud t te of a man who had paced
hs reance on seven morses of meta, when he
mght have been safer by far had he trusted to
appearances from the frst, and not taken to hs
house the promsed wfe of another There s
a better mora n my story, kadeun she con-
tnued, turnng towards the Crcassan, to those
who ook for t, than appears upon the surface.
The god-seekers do not carry away n ther
vesses the water of the stream, but they wash
the sand when they woud fnd the ore.
avash, yavash softy, softy f sad the
atrap : we care not for any thng further
than the fabe tsef the mora s but beng t
sets one to seep.
our hghness drnks of the mrage, ke
one who wanders n the desart nterposed
atnka the tae that l have tod s no fabe
and the overs yet ve.
arcotc.
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TH M C TH H M. 271
Pek ah t s we done sad the Pasha
yawnng : s for the Merchant, he was a
domous a hog and they spced hs domas
for hm after a wse fashon but you have mea-
sured your tae wth a mtka, and have fed t
to overfowng, for the nght has grown on us
snce you began t. Had t not been a good
story, you woud have been crammng our
mouths wth hashsh -f but t has truy been as
ght as the ar-bag of a came,| and our eyeds
are scarcey yet weghed down.
lt was, as the atrap had remarked, wearng
deep nto the nght and when sweetmeats and
coffee had agan been served, he descended from
the sofa, resumed hs papooshes, and returned
to the saemek, eavng the two frends once
more together.
l cannot seep, khatoun sad the Crcas-
san : your tae, merry as t was, has troubed
me. Have we not been aughng at the Pasha
to hs beard
Turksh measure. f arcotc.
hen these anmas are dstressed on ther passage
through the desart, they bow from ther mouths a ght bood-
tnted skn whch preserves them from the foatng sand.
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p
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272 TH M C TH H M.
Hs hghness woud not sten to the mora,
|anum f reped the aughng Greek hs wt,
ke the pety of a santon, sometmes seeps, and
he cares not to have t awakened. He w
dream peasant dreams on hs sofa to-nght
Care not for hm, but rather et us pass nto the
garden, and breathe the sweet ar of the me-
bossoms for my bran throbs wth fatgue, and
the soft odours of the fowers w cam ts
puses.
fond sme was the ony answer, as the
Crcassan thrust her sma feet nto her embro-
dered sppers, and ed the way to the paace-
terrace. Thence they descended, by a fght of
marbe steps, nto the parterre and havng
ngered awhe besde the basn, to see the scaes
of the god fsh wth whch t was fed gtter
n the moonght, they sowy entered the me-
avenue.
The nght wnd was makng gente mnstresy
wth the eaves, and the fowers were pourng
themseves out n perfume, whe the fa of the
many fountans came soothngy to the ear, and
competed the u ury of the hour.
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TH M C TH H M. 273
lt s n moments ke these sad atnka,
as the two ades fung themseves down among
the cushons whch a save who foowed them
heaped above a Persan carpet, under a statey
tup tree moments of e terna cam, when
the moonght seems to sumber on the beautfu
bosom of the earth, that the ashes of the past
sweep n couds over the sou. Carmf, does
not your sprt fa back upon the days when,
oved and ovng, as woman oves and s oved
but once, your arm wreathed n that of nas-
tasus, you wandered, surrounded by an atmos-
phere of deght, among the scented groves and
besde the sparkng streams of your decous
and hen the words of your chosen one
rose on the ar ke perfume and the ght of hs
eyes outshone the watchng moon re the tes
whch bnd you to the Mosem so hoy as those
whch nked you to your frst ove The chans
may be goden, but st they are mere fetters
and the free sprt sckens beneath constrant.
f what ava, sster of my sou, are such
nqures asked the Crcassan n repy
ksmet t s my fate ou have but to ook
n5
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274 TH M C TH H M.
on my dm eye and my faded cheek, and to
remember what l once was, to fee how tte a
ths spendour has touched my heart, though l
have been compeed to bow before the power of
my consteaton. Coud l purchase wth a year
of ths empty and proftess profuson one hour
such as those to whch you have |ust auded,
how gady woud l crush a my future fe nto
a few short days, and ve t out at once n hap-
pness
a to ne there t s retorted the young
Greek your heart pays the rebe, and yet
you affect to fee horror at the thought of eman-
cpatng yoursef from your present thra.
Thnk you that, once more free, l woud waste
an hour n the harem of the Mosem, were t
not from a convcton that the day s not far ds-
tant, when
ay, nay, no more of ths to-nght mur-
mured the Hanoum, as she turned asde her
head, and her tears gttered n the moonght
my dreams are aready ev, and yet l sorrow
to awaken. The deep and hopeess gref to whch
l was a prey ere your arrva has been e -
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TH M C TH H M. 275
changed for an angush far more acute, and yet
to whch l cUng as though t were a |oy.
atnka smed, and for a tme there was
sence, whe the Crcassan was eft to her own
thoughts, from whch she started suddeny, and
turnng towards her companon, asked an ousy
How w you contrve to nform hm that we
are here
m l not a Greek demanded atnka
sorrow has taught me subtety. re ths he
must be on hs way.
gush of tears from the beautfu Crcassan
repUed to the ntmaton, as she threw hersef
upon the bosom of her frend, and wept aoud.
hy, ths s de, khatoun sad the Greek
soothngy your fate s n your own hands
you have but to bd me drve hm hence, and he
w obey you, and carry hs broken heart to hs
own and.
He has perchance forgotten me sobbed
out the far Carmf.
Do the fowers forget the sun, or the ake
the moonght Come they not at ther apponted
hour. herefore then shoud you, who are
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276 TH M C TH H M.
brghter than the fowers, and farer than the
moonhght, doubt that your over w fy to your
feet when he s summoned there
The argument was unanswerabe for there s
no consoaton so satsfactory to a pretty woman
as that whch s deduced from her own beauty
and athough, n the present nstance, the far
mourner asked no further assurance of her
over s probabe advent, she began to consder
t as ess doubtfu than t had appeared a mo-
ment back and t was consequenty wth a
brght sme that she stened to a thousand
trfng, but, to her, nterestng detas, whch
her companon poured nto her wng ear as
the tme went by unheeded. The attendant
saves, who occuped a mat a short dstance from
ther mstresses, had ong faen aseep, ued by
the pashng waters and the sghng wnd but
the dreams of the two frends were wakng
dreams, rendered the more deghtfu from a
sense of ther reaty.
atnka was the frst to remark that the sha-
dows were growng shorter and fanter, and the
nght amost spent.
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TH M TH H M. 277
e are payng truant strangey from our
gded cage she sad, as she pressed her ps
to the brow of her companon and may
chance to prove our mprudence to-morrow
by our sufferng and est we shoud have
aready ncurred ths penaty, l w, ere we
eave the garden, sng to you a song whch you
must we remember, for t was a trbute to your
own brght eyes, n one of the aughng hours
when our vsons were ony of |oy. ou cannot
have forgotten t for l, who dd but sme be-
cause you were happy, can yet see the mnstre,
seated at your feet beneath a cedar-tree, hs
mandon n hs hand, and hs ga e rveted
on the brow of hs beoved. Lsten and
she swept the strngs of her ebec, and sang
her wd baad to a meody whch s some-
tmes the accompanment of the gracefu o-
maka.
G TH G L .
l ve heard of ses beyond the sea
here summer nether fas nor fades.
here eaves are ever on the tree,
here verdure ever cothes the gades
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278 TH M C TH H M.
l ve heard of brds so gay and brght.
That as they hover round the bowers
hose bossoms v roo the noonday ght,
They ook ke far and fyng fowers.
l ve heard of cora caves, beneath
The heavng bosom of the ocean
here many a sea-nymph twnes her wreath,
nd warbes out wth tunefu breath,
Her young and beautfu emoton
l ve heard of mountans beak and bare,
hamng wth barrenness the vson,
hch yet embosomed gems as rare
s ever shone n has ysan.
l ve heard of fountan goddesses,
th droopng head and fowng curs,
ho, n ther qud boddces,
hene er they wept, shed tears of pears
l ve heard of sera sprts, fttng
ln beauty through the summer beam
l ve heard of rver-nymphs, cam sttng
esde some eaf-embowered stream.
ln short, l ve heard of many thngs,
beautfu, and brght, and free
nd md these fond magnngs.
Lady, ray thoughts have fown to thee
l take the sunshne of the ses,
Those homes of everastng sprng
nd as l con them nto smes,
Upon thy brow those smes l fng.
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TH M C TH H M. 279
nd the brght brds l end ther grace,
Ther buoyancy, and happy voces,
To thy gad tones, and that far face,
hch every heart and eye re|oces
ut when l come to nymphs and fays,
To goddesses, and sprtes ceesta,
l drop a metaphorc ays,
nd thank the fates that thou rt terrestra 1
or n thy young and sparkng beauty
Thou art to me more far by far,
Than f l tendered mere p-duty
To thee, n sembance of a star.
es, rather woud l wreathe around thee,
garand of each fower that bows,
Than have to te that l had found thee
sprte, soft seepng n a rose
nd twere far peasanter wth thee
er gem-ned rocks to cmb and camber,
Than thne enchanted form to see
ncosed wthn a wa of amber.
Thus then, though dy l may dream.
nd ken thee to thngs ceesta
l say agan l ove thy beam
The better that t s terrestra l
h we ndeed do l remember t e -
camed Carmf Hanoura, caspng her hands
passonatey but t was now the turn of the
young Greek to preach prudence, and to urge
the necessty of returnng to the house.
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280 TH M C TH H M.
eepess eyes w be dm she sad,
smngy : and ate vgs make a du harem
there are yet some hours to the dawn : et us n,
and to rest whe we may, kadeun t s now too
ate ake for smes or tears.
ln haf an hour the harem of afua Pasha was
bured n seep.
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TH M C TH H M. 281
CH PT .
Meanwhe, a more actve scene was trans-
actng esewhere. Tatar, who had been pro-
fusey recompensed, was despatched to Crcassa,
to the dweUng of the young Merchant, nas-
tatus Manoopoo, wth a scro of parchment,
nscrbed wth decate Greek characters. The
mssve was receved wth a deo ht whch won
goden acknowedgments of hs fdety from the
over who asked not by whom t had been
ntrusted to hm, but retaned hs servces as hs
own gude on hs |ourney to the provnce of
afua Pasha. short tme suffced for the
arrangement of hs affars, whch he paced
under the superntendence of a Greek frend :
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282 TH M C TH H M.
and haf wd wth the |oy of fndng hs sster
st n fe, when he had so ong wept her as
dead and of earnng the undmnshed affecton
of the beautfu gr to whom he had gven
hs heart he bade adeu to Crcassa, accom-
paned by af, hs Tatar gude, wthout havng
framed one feasbe pan for the reguaton of
hs future proceedngs and contented, n the
frst rush of hs deght, to breathe the same ar
as hs oved ones, and to trust to hs happy fate
for the future.
nastatus Manoopoo was, perhaps, n the
most envabe frame of mnd, as he gaoped
hs feet steed among the mountans to whch
man can attan n ths word : careess of the
past, en|oyng the present, and wthout a fear
for the future Had not the dead come to
hfe, and the ost one been found hy then
shoud he dread what was to foow he
woud fy wth hm she woud eave her gded
prson, and once more ve over agan n hs
company those gorous hours whch the horrors
of war had termnated so abrupty.
uch were hs thoughts, as, foowed by af
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TH M C TH H M. 283
the Tatar, he reached on the second day of hs
|ourney a ovey vaey, yng ke a huge
emerad at the mountan-foot, and traversed by
a far stream, whch, fed by a sprng n the hgher
ands, and fang n a natura cascade down the
face of the rock, formed n the bottom a ovey
rver fowng above party-cooured pebbes and
sparkng sand, and overarched at ntervas by
groups of forest-trees, among whch the statey
and umbrageous mape and the decate weepng
brch were conspcuous whe tufts of mmosa
and henna bushes, wth ther mnute bossoms,
as whte and as sweet as the fowers of the |as-
mne, made the ar bamy wth ther fragrance.
torks and cranes few over ther heads, and
numbers of pheasants rested among the branches
of the ta trees, whch were aso voca wth
sngng brds. The wd vne fung ts eafy gar-
ands from stem to stem, and the grapes were
hangng from t n bushng custers, woong the
hand of the traveers. umbers of the |erhuah
or eapng mce, common n the country, were
The |erhuah (otherwse Gerboa) or eapng mouse of
Crcassa, s aso a natve of orthern frca, uba, and
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284 TH M C TH H M.
sportng on the banks of the rver and the turf
beneath the trees was enameed wth fowers.
lt was a scene that enu eer, the Persan
Caude, woud have oved to pant and here
the traveers sprang from ther saddes, n order
to en|oy ther noon-tde mea upon the grass
and whe af was kndng a fre, and preparng
ther repast, the over waked apart on the
margn of the stream, and ost hmsef n vsons
of deght, such as coud ony be rea ed n
Perstan.
The sun, rdng n md course, fe branty
on every surroundng ob|ect, and rendered the
freshness of the runnng water, and the cooness
of the ong grass beneath the trees, douby re-
freshng and t was not unt he had been twce
summoned by hs hungry companon, that Ma-
noopoo abandoned hs decous revere, to
mnster to the grosser necesstes of e stence.
nd even then, when the repast was spread
gypt t s about the s e of a squrre, egged ke a
kangaroo, and has ong ears t has a habt of ayng ts ta
fat upon ts back, and eapng to a consderabe heght or ds-
tance from whch pecuarty t derves ts name.
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TH M C TH H M. 285
out before hm, the young Greek coud scarcey
wthdraw hs eyes from the gorous andscape
hs heart overfowed wth happness, and ature
seemed to sympathse n hs |oy whe a
around was so thoroughy n unson wth the
harmony and eastcty of hs own feengs, that
Manoopoo dd but scant |ustce to the mea, to
whch hs companon was payng homage as de-
vout as ever Ghebre avshed upon the sacred
fame of hs fath.
lt was amost wth regret that the young Greek
once more rose from hs far and fragrant restng-
pace, and prepared to resume hs |ourney. ut
the remembrance of the beautfu Carmf perced
through the msts of memory ke a brght star
and as he vauted nto hs sadde, and struck the
sharp spur nto the fank of hs feet-footed rab,
the nam.e of hs young ove was on hs ps, and
hope agan buoyant n hs heart.
My ord oves ths far scene sad af, as,
after a bref space, the young over once more
checked hs gaant horse, and ga ed around
hm and n truth t ooks as though |oy had
but her nest among ts branches, and Love
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286 TH M C TH H M.
rocked her frst-born on the rver-bossoms : and
yet, l have heard a darker tae tod of as smng
a vaey as ths : a tae n whch the muddy tor-
rent of msery overfowed the brght pan of
youth, and the rude hand of voence casped the
mante of hepessness : but, after a, what are
these fabes of past tmes are they not bosh
nothng.
ay, not so, af reped Manoopoo
there s much to be earnt from the egends of
the massad|hs, f we ony read them arght.
Te me ths tae as we ascend the mountan t
w begue the way.
The Tatar smed and havng fung the
brde on the neck of hs steed, at once comped,
wth the ar of one who fees that he s confer-
rng a beneft.
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TH T T T L . 287
CH PT l.
TH T T T L .
ln the famous cty of chamache, the capta
of the provnce of chrwan n Persa, ved a
Merchant named , who, from hs mmense
weath, was consdered as a second aroon. He
traded wth the ranks n raw and wrought
sks, and the wove cottons of the est wth the
Muscovte deaers n furs, eathers, and metas
wth the Tatars n horses and wth the |ews
may ther fathers graves be defed -- n god
and sver, brocades and weapons, wooen goods
and tapestry: n short, there was no caravan
passed n or out of the cty n whch the Mer-
chant had not a arge venture and so
favoured was he by the Prophet that he seemed
The Croesus of the ast.
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288 TH M C TH H M.
to ve ony to prove the faacy of the proverb,
whch says that, for every pear of prce that sees
the sun, the dver must descend a score of tmes
to the bottom of the ocean. Certan t s that,
as often as he dpped hs rght hand nto the
bow of fortune, he drew up the gem from the
depth.
Moreover, the Merchant had a son a youth
of prde and promse and of a dsposton so
gente that t seemed as though he had been
nursed by the Pers, and fed wth the honey-dew
that the eary bee rfes from the rose. ven as
the a ure ve of the frmament hdes the ten
thousand hours who ve amd the sunbeams, so
dd hs modesty concea from a, save a chosen
few, the dvne perfectons of hs nature.
Mohammed, for that was hs name, was one
day wakng n the peasant and ferte envrons
of the cty, musng over the runed wa of the
southern quarter whch was demoshed by hah
bbas, and sghng n the genteness of hs
sprt at the crue effects of voence, when the
sowy-snkng sun, powng ts goden brow on
ts cushon of crmson and purpe, warned hm to
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TH T T T L . 289
return to the house of hs father n tme for the
evenng mea.
s he passed sowy aong one of the nar-
rowest and east-frequented streets of the cty,
hs ear was suddeny outraged by the voce of
angush and advancng an ousy n the quarter
whence t came, he saw an od man of stern as-
pect, who, wth ferocous gestures, was urgng
on the wa s guard to tear a young and beautfu
femae, whose ve had escaped n the strugge,
from the arms of her aged parent, whe she
rent the vaut of heaven wth cres and sup-
pcatons.
Mahoramed sprang forward Hke the ght-
hoofed deer before the tread of the hunter, and
at once nqured the cause of ths ron-hearted,
voence as the maden turned asde her grace-
fu head wth a bush whch threw a new
sunght over her beauty. The story was soon
tod. The father of the young hour was the
debtor of the hoary snner who stood by, en-
forcng ths deed of darkness and hs chd was
about to be torn from hm, and sod nto savery,
n defaut of other payment.
L. l.
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290 TH M C TH H M.
The voce of sorrow was soon turned nto
that of |oy, and the happy father ad the fore-
head of thanksgvng n the dust of grattude,
as Mohammed, out of the abundance of hs
generosty, pad down the requred sum, and
freed the beautfu ohara from the grasp of
her captor. ut, aas the son of HaU had but
transferred the chan of savery to hs own heart
and when, n obedence to the od man s prayer,
he passed the threshod of the father of ohara,
and saw her mother weepng at hs knees, whe
the maden hersef stood by n her young ove-
ness, partay shroudng her face n the fods of
her robe, he fet that the sun and moon of hs
earthy sky woud hereafter be the eyes of the
far creature whom he had rescued. lt was true
that at present the msts of sorrow obscured the
sunbeams of beauty, but ohara was ke the
water-y whch s ever the oveest n ts tears :
and as the young man qutted the roof to whch
he had now restored happness, he fet that an
arrow was n hs heart whch he sought not to
puck out.
Mornng tar.
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TH T T T L . 291
Mohammed had studed ke a mouah n the
coeges for whch chamache has so ong been
famous, and the boasted scences of the ranks
were no more than atoms n the beams of hs
knowedge but from ths tme forth he sheathed
the brght spear of study n the breast of ndo-
ence, and wandered durng whoe days besde
the streams of the vaey, or beneath the sha-
dows of the forest-boughs, weavng sweet fances
of whch the far ohara was ever the brant
sub|ect.
uch a passon as ths coud end ony n
marrage : and t was not ong ere Mohammed,
the son of the weathy Ha, asked for hs brde
the daughter of the pennyess Tmsah, whose
wordy possessons woud not have oaded the
weakest-backed came n the cty. lt s not df-
fcut to magne how he was answered and
whe the mother of the young man was pre-
parng to receve the wfe of her son, he passed
whoe hours besde her, ga ng on her fresh
cheek, where nature had crushed ts roses to
pant the farest skn that ever fushed at prase
and nto her deep eyes, where the ght seemed
o2
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292 TH M C TH H M.
to sumber, save when hs sme caed t forth n
vng fre. Gracefu was she as the safsaf, and
fawn-ke as the ght-footed madens of ngo
whe her voce was ow and sweet as the nght-
wnd among the tombs of the eary dead.
echd ga was the frend of Mohammed
they cung together ke doube pomegranates
and, n the e uberance of hs |oy, the unwary
young man poured nto the ear of hs chosen
assocate the tae of hs approachng happness.
echd stened, and a wd wsh grew n hs
sou, and posoned t ke the breath of the upas.
The panted wngs of vanty were foded about
hs heart and, as he cured hs dark and gossy
beard over hs fngers, he began to ask hmsef
wherefore the feech of Mohammed had shed a
ght upon hs path whch had been dened to
hm lf the maden was so far as the eyes of
hs frend had made her, she must be a banshed
per, condemned to vst earth for a tme, and to
be won by a morta hy then shoud he not be
that favoured one. nd as bhs thus prompted
hm, vague thoughts and hopes grew nto shape
and tangbty wthn hs bosom and he re-
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TH T T T L . 293
soved to earn a that the trustng frendshp of
Mohammed mght ead hm to revea se ng,
therefore, wth the hand of sport, the skrts of
confdence, he smngy asked a thousand ques-
tons, to whch hs frend reped wth unsus-
pcous frankness and thus the poverty of
Tmsah, and the obscurty of hs poston be-
came known to hm, as we as the beauty of
ohara, and the story of her rescue.
echd ga eft the presence of hs frend
wth treachery n hs heart. Hs fancy had been
taken captve by the gowng pcture of ths
peeress beauty so soon to be a brde, and he
resoved that shoud she be but haf as ovey as
she had been panted to hm, she shoud be hs, f
craft or voence coud wn her.
s the stee-hearted eopard sprngs on the
trembng chamos, so rushed the treacherous
ga on hs prey The house of the sumberng
Tmsah was fred at mdnght and the shrekng
ohara borne through the fames, ony to be
paced on a swft horse, encrced by the arm of
ts rder, and pantng wth affrght.
s day dawned the horseman rened up hs
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294 TH M C TH H M.
rapd steed, and sprngng to the earth, drew
after hm hs pae and snkng burthen.
lt was a gorous mornng and ther hat was
n a vaey where happy hearts, bessed n each
other, mght have been content to dwe for ever.
Much tme was spent n restorng the maden to
conscousness, for her swoon was ong and
heavy and as echd ga hung over her, and
bathed her pae brow wth the pure water of a
mountan stream, and crushed n her sma hands
the aromatc bossoms of the henna-pant, he fet
that the words of Mohammed had been weak n
pantng her beauty. He had ad her down
beneath the ta boughs of a mape tree, at
whose roots the fresh moss grew ranky, cus-
tered wth deep-bue voets and when the far
ohara at ength opened her eyes, and behed
besde her the frend of her affanced husband,
she casped her hands n a transport of |oy and
grattude for she guessed not that he had
staned the skrts of hs honour wth the defe-
ments of treachery, but at once beeved that he
had preserved her from the fames n frendshp
for Mohammed.
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TH T T T L . 295
s the ga caught her meanng, he eagery
encouraged the deuson and, spreadng before
her some dred fruts, wth whch he had come
provded, he urged her to partake of them ere
the| pursued ther way back to the cty. The
gente ohara, gratefu for hs care, smngy
obeyed and, as her fase-hearted companon
hastened to the stream to procure for her a
draught of ts refreshng water, she ooked
eagery and admrngy about her, on the far
scene amd whch she was seated.
The couds, those gracefu cup-bearers of the
sky, were rdng ke snow-fakes upon the cear
bue bosom of space on every sde boomed cus-
ters of brght and many-tnted fowers, worthy to
be the envy of the consteatons the sun, a
heaven-nspred panter had sketched a thousand
beautfu desgns on ther eafy tabets and
sweeter than the musk of Tartary was the per-
fume whch accompaned hs touch. The forest-
boughs dropped honey, for the haunt of the
wd-bee was among ther eaves and the ruby
cups of the burstng buds were each seaed wth
a damond drop of dew. The dstant mountans
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296 TH M C TH H M.
bathed ther brows n ght and the esser
heghts were cothed n draperes of many co-
oured vegetaton the ta trees whch overhung
the stream ooked ke state / beautes mrrorng
ther gracefuness n the cear waters whe the
more fe be safsaf, the weepng wow, and the
feathery brch, bent ow nto the wave, as though
fant wth en|oyment. The sender- hoofed hnd
at ntervas bounded past, ght as the wnd that
waved the branches and the bubu nested
amd the eaves above her head, and not yet
weary of hs meodous grefs, was pourng out
a song to whch the pers mght have oved to
sten.
s ohara contempated ths fary scene, her
sou was steeped n the honey of dehght the
thorns of care, and the gnawng caustc of sorrow,
were ake shut out and when the ga hed the
cup to her ps, sparkng wth the cod rock
water, she thanked hm wth a sme whch
spread the gossy feathers of hope over the
back heart of fasehood.
ut ere ong the serpent-tongue of gut be-
trayed ts worthess purpose and the affrghted
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TH T T T L . 297
maden earnt the unhoy passon whch had
caused her to be thus borne away from the roof
of her father, wth a terror whch dened her
utterance. The vows breathed by her perfdous
sutor dd but rouse hatred n her bosom and
as she became more cam, she wedded the name
of echd ga to every reproachfu epthet
wth whch her memory supped her. he re-
mnded hm of the heavy chan of grattude that
had been fung around her by the generous ad
of Mahommed, ere yet she had earnt to ove
hm and she vowed by the sou of the prophet,
and by the grave of her father, that she woud
rather de by her own hand, than be the wfe of
another. The protestatons of the ga fe on
her ear ke water upon sand, and eft no m-
presson whe the young man gnashed the sharp
teeth of dsappontment aganst the shvered
weapon of defeat, as, wth her sma dagger n
her hand, whch she had drawn from amd the
fods of her grde, she threatened to sheathe
the stee of death n her heart, f he dd not eave
her on the nstant.
The ga urged and e postuated n van.
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298 TH M C TH H M.
He represented the mpossbty of her return
to the cty, aone and unprotected but the
maden spurned ake hs threats and hs en-
treates and she had rased her arm to strke,
preferrng death to further communon wth her
treacherous companon, when the tramp of horses
was heard n the dstance and before echd
ga coud warn her of the probabe danger, a
wd shrek from ohara summoned to ther sde
a party of predatory rabs.
The maden had scarcey tme to cover her
face wth her robe, when the foremost of the tran
checked hs steed under the shadow of the tree
beneath whch she was sttng whe n the ne t
nstant the ga, who had drawn hs scymtar on
the frst aarm, was wounded, overpowered, and
bound to one of ts branches.
o unooked-for a capture, amost n the v-
cnty of the cty, was haed wth dehght by the
rabs, whose chef mmedatey camed the
maden as hs spo and havng ooked upon
her beauty, taked e utngy of the number of
purses whch woud be freey pad down for so
far a purchase whe others approprated the
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TH T T T L . 299
horse and weapons of the ga, the whoe of
whch, as ther practsed gance at once detected,
were of great vaue. Havng satsfed them-
seves on ths pont, haf a do en of the most
dstngushed of the party seated themseves on
the grass, and prepared to partake of the fruts
whch were st spread before the maden whe
the rest, formed nto separate groupes on the
margn of the stream, drew from out of ther
traveng-bags ther ess decate contents, and
commenced a hurred mea.
ohara, meanwhe, ooked on trembngy,
and vague pro|ects of escape roed across her
mnd but, ke wreaths of vapour they eft
nothng tangbe behnd and as she turned
asde from her captors, and her eye fe on the
droopng and wounded ga, the orgn of a
her sufferngs, her heart fro e wthn her, and
her puses stood st, as though rae had
pressed hs fnger upon her brow.
Coed among the branches above her head,
she behed an enormous serpent, sowy movng
aong towards the bough to whch the unhappy
young man had been secured. The sunght
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300 TH M C TH H M.
fe fckerng through the eaves, and touchng
at ntervas the brght scaes wth whch he was
covered, turned them nto |ewes : hs deep
green eyes ooked ke emerads, and hs forked
tongue protruded ts posoned ance from the
bood-staned cavern of hs yawnng |aws. n,
on he moved and ohara coud not str a mb,
nor utter a cry for hep on, on, unt hs head
rested on the shouder of the wounded man, and
hs geamng fods were coed around hs body.
Here for awhe he remaned, as though contem-
patng the scene beneath and then gdng
away nto the thck foage as noseessy as he
had stoen forth, he dsappeared among the
eaves.
gan ohara breathed freey and she woud
have warned her captors of the vcnty of ther
dangerous enemy, and besought of them to
rescue the nsensbe ga from so horrbe a
death but at ths moment, the rabs, havng
drunk too deepy from ther wne-skns, began
to wrange among themseves, and never ceased
ther dspute unt the sumber of nebrety stoe
upon them, when, one by one, they ad ther
beads upon the earth, and sept.
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TH T T T L . 301
ow ndeed the maden began to et the
wngs of hope futter about her heart but she
yet fet the necessty of cauton, for athough the
groupes by the rver bank foowed the e ampe
of ther chefs, and fung themseves nto the
atttude of repose, she knew that ther s woud
be but the orhter sumbers of fato ue, whch
an unguarded movement mght serve to dsspate.
he, therefore, she was carefuy turnng n
her mnd the most feasbe means of success, her
thoughts dvded between her terror of the ser-
pent, and her hope of escape from her enemes
the mghty snake once more appeared above her
head, and as her eye agan rested upon t, she
crouched down wth casped hands and cenched
teeth, wthout power to wthdraw hersef from
the danger.
The serpent, however, gded down the tree,
and passed her by unheeded, attracted by the
scent of the wne-skns whch yet ay besde the
seepng rabs. Twce, thrce, he rearc d hs
crested head hgh above them and then pung-
ng t nto the qud, he drank deep, and fung
back nto the wne a few heavy back drops of
the fou poson whch hung about hs |aws.
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302 TH M C TH H M.
The nose of hs retreat, as he agan gded
swfty nto the underwood wth a rattng
sound, accompaned by a shr hssng nose,
aroused the rabs, who started from the earth,
and cutched ther weapons but when on ook-
ng around they coud dscover no cause of
aarm, and saw one pae captve seated beneath
the tree, and the other yet bound to ts branches,
they ony muttered an mprecaton and se ng
the skns of wne, passed them one to the other,
and resumed ther rest.
ow was the moment come when ohara
fet wthn her the courage whch grows out of
per. he gded to the sde of the ga, but
he dd not uncose hs eyes she touched hs
hand, t was cod and nerveess and the maden
started wth a new terror, for she fet that she
ooked on death.
sudden mpuse shook her, and she drew
forth her dagger. ere not they who were
seepng but a few paces off, her enemes and
mght she not dever hersef from ther grasp
Those at her feet coud n|ure her no further,
for she knew that they had quaffed poson wth
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TH T T T L . 303
ther ast draught he moved towards the mar-
gn of the stream, but her heart grew sck she
fet that, f w hen the sword s n the hand of
power, generosty s the scabbard of heroes, so
much more shoud mercy be that of woman
The steed of the ga was standng, fastened to
a mmosa bush, not ffty paces from her and
wth the speed of ghtnng she dsengaged the
brde, and sprang upon hs back but ere she
coud commence her fght, a second trampng
of horses sounded through the vaey, and at
once the seepng rabs vauted nto ther sad-
des, and, shoutng to ther chefs, prepared
to meet the comng enemy. ut ther chefs
answered not they ay prone and motoness
upon the earth, ther faces backenng n the
wnd, and the poson oo ng from ther parted
ps : and the wonderng trbe were yet bused
n endeavourng to awaken them, when a band
of horsemen, ed by Mohammed the son of
Hah, came ke a thunder-coud across the va-
ey, sweepng down a before them.
ohara was saved The Mornng- tar
once more t up the sky of Mohammed s happ-
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304 TH M C TH H M.
ness and the dark-hearted ga pad the forfet
of hs treachery. ut here we are on the
mountan brow, f endm and, wth the hep
of the prophet, we shoud be past the dark rdge
whch cuts aganst the couds yonder, before
sun-set so we have tte tme to waste. nd
as af ceased speakng he gave hs good horse
the ren, and, foowed by Manoopoo, was soon
descendng nto the vaey.
D L. T.
L D :
. H L, |U ., 51, UP T T T, H M T.
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