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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

TEDDS 10.0

Asia

Engineering Library

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

Beam analysis ............................................................................................................................................................................ 4


Beam end connection design (BS5950:Part1:2000) ................................................................................................................... 4
Bolted cover plate splice connection (BS5950:Part1:2000) ........................................................................................................ 5
Boundary column fire design (SCI P313).................................................................................................................................... 5
Building wind load (BS6399:Part2:1997) .................................................................................................................................... 6
Cold formed sections (BS5950:Part5:1998)................................................................................................................................ 7
Column base plate design (BS5950:Part1:2000) ........................................................................................................................ 8
Column load chase down (BS6399:Part1:1996) ......................................................................................................................... 9
Column splice design (BS5950:Part1:2000) ............................................................................................................................... 9
Composite beam design (BS5950:Part3:1990)......................................................................................................................... 10
Compound section properties ................................................................................................................................................... 11
Concrete industrial ground floor slab (TR34) ............................................................................................................................ 11
Concrete specification (BS8500) .............................................................................................................................................. 11
Concrete sub-frame analysis (BS8110:Part1:1997).................................................................................................................. 12
Co-ordinate conversion calculation ........................................................................................................................................... 12
Crane gantry girder (BS5950:Part1:2000) ................................................................................................................................ 13
Dead load calculation................................................................................................................................................................ 13
Drain & sewer design................................................................................................................................................................ 14
Flitch beam analysis & design (BS5268:Part2:2002) ................................................................................................................ 14
Flitch beam design (BS5268:Part2:2002) ................................................................................................................................. 15
Floor vibration (SCI P076/AD256) ............................................................................................................................................ 15
Foundations near trees (NHBC Standards Chapter 4.2)........................................................................................................... 16
Gable framing analysis ............................................................................................................................................................. 16
General member safe load tables (BS5950:Part1:2000) .......................................................................................................... 17
Hipped end loading ................................................................................................................................................................... 17
Historical steelwork simple beam analysis & design ................................................................................................................. 18
Holding down bolts ................................................................................................................................................................... 18
Horizontal alignment (Part 1 TD9/93)........................................................................................................................................ 19
Masonry bearing calculation (BS5628:Part1:2005)................................................................................................................... 19
Masonry rectangular column design (BS5628:Part1:2005)....................................................................................................... 19
Masonry wall panel design (BS5628)........................................................................................................................................ 20
Notional load chase down......................................................................................................................................................... 21
Open channel flow calculation .................................................................................................................................................. 21
Pile cap design (BS8110:Part1:1997) ....................................................................................................................................... 22
Pile group analysis.................................................................................................................................................................... 22
RC beam analysis & design (BS8110:Part 1:1997) .................................................................................................................. 23
RC beam design (BS8110:Part1:1997)..................................................................................................................................... 23
RC beam torsion design (BS8110:Part2:1985)......................................................................................................................... 24
RC column design (BS8110:Part1:1997) .................................................................................................................................. 25
RC crack width calculation (BS8110:Part2:1985) ..................................................................................................................... 25
RC flat slab design (BS8110:Part1:1997) ................................................................................................................................. 26
RC pad footing design (BS8110:Part1:1997)............................................................................................................................ 26
RC pad footing horizontal capacity (BS8110:Part1:1997)......................................................................................................... 27
RC pad footing uplift design (BS8110:Part1:1997) ................................................................................................................... 27
RC raft foundation (BS8110-1:1997/CP65-1:1999) .................................................................................................................. 28
RC simple beam analysis & design (BS8110:Part1:1997) ........................................................................................................ 29
RC slab design (BS8110:Part1:1997) ....................................................................................................................................... 29
RC strip footing design (BS8110:Part1:1997) ........................................................................................................................... 30
RC thermal crack widths (BS8007:1987) .................................................................................................................................. 30
RC wall design (BS8110:Part1:1997) ....................................................................................................................................... 31
Retaining wall analysis & design (BS8002:1994)...................................................................................................................... 32
Rolling load analysis ................................................................................................................................................................. 32

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

Section properties calculator..................................................................................................................................................... 33


Simple beam analysis & design ................................................................................................................................................ 33
Simple column safe load tables (BS5950:Part1:2000).............................................................................................................. 34
Soakaway design (BRE digest 365) ......................................................................................................................................... 35
Steel angle design (BS5950-1:2000) ........................................................................................................................................ 35
Steel beam analysis & design (BS5950:Part1:2000) ................................................................................................................ 36
Steel beams in torsion (SCI-P-057) .......................................................................................................................................... 36
Steel member design (BS5950:Part1:2000) ............................................................................................................................. 37
Steel simple beam analysis & design (BS5950:Part1:2000) ..................................................................................................... 37
Steel simple beam with torsion analysis & design (SCI-P-057) ................................................................................................ 38
Surface wind load (BS6399:Part2:1997)................................................................................................................................... 38
Swale & filter strip design.......................................................................................................................................................... 38
Timber beam design (BS5268:Part2:2002)............................................................................................................................... 39
Timber connection design (BS5268:Part2:2002) ...................................................................................................................... 39
Timber joist design (BS5268:Part2:2002) ................................................................................................................................. 40
Timber member design (BS5268:Part2:2002) .......................................................................................................................... 40
Timber simple beam analysis & design (BS5268:Part2:2002) .................................................................................................. 41
Underpinning needle beam design (BS8110:Part1:1997)......................................................................................................... 41
Valley beam analysis & design ................................................................................................................................................. 42
Vertical alignment (Part 1 TD9/93)............................................................................................................................................ 42
Vibration of hospital floors (SCI P331) ...................................................................................................................................... 42
Wall load chase down (BS6399:Part1:1996) ............................................................................................................................ 43
Wind girder analysis & design................................................................................................................................................... 44

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

BEAM ANALYSIS
• These calculations analyse any beam arrangement up to 10 spans. The analysis is suitable for simple beams and
continuous beams.
• The loading types available are point load, UDL, VDL, trapezoidal loading, partial UDL and point couple. The support
conditions available are fixed, pinned or spring. There are 20 user-definable load combinations.

BEAM END CONNECTION DESIGN (BS5950:PART1:2000)


• From Joints in Simple Construction Volume 1: Design Methods - 2nd Edition (The BCSA/SCI Green Book) and
updated in June 2000 for BS5950-1:2000. NOTE - the BCSA/SCI Green Book is currently undergoing revision both
for the BS5950-1:2000 amendment and to widen its scope. These calculations will be updated following its re-
publication.
• The following connection types are handled:-
o angle cleats.
ƒ beam to beam
ƒ beam to beam to beam
ƒ beam to column web
ƒ beam to column flange
ƒ beam to column web to beam
o end plates
ƒ beam to beam
ƒ beam to beam to beam
ƒ beam to column web
ƒ beam to column flange
ƒ beam to column web to beam
o fin plates
ƒ beam to beam
ƒ beam to beam to beam
ƒ beam to column web
ƒ beam to column flange
ƒ beam to column web to beam
• For a single connection, the calculations perform a check design in accordance with each of the checks as defined in
the BCSA/SCI Green Book for the applied loads.
• The calculations also consider the forces due to structural integrity if required.
• As appropriate, user defined notches are considered in beam to beam connections
• The results can be output in full - details for every check, as detailed in the Green Book or in a summary format - one
line per check.

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

BOLTED COVER PLATE SPLICE CONNECTION (BS5950:PART1:2000)


• From BS5950-1:2000
• These calculations determine the capacity of a bolted splice connection between two identical sections subjected to
bending, shear and axial forces, and formed using steel plates bolted to the flanges and web using high strength
friction grip (HSFG) bolts.

Plate to outside of top


flange showing four
rows of two bolts on
each side of the joint Web plate showing three
rows of bolts, one bolt per
row on each side of the joint

Plate to inside of bottom


flange showing four rows
of two bolts on each side
Plate to inside of the joint
of top flange

Steel beam section

Plate to outside of
bottom flange

BOUNDARY COLUMN FIRE DESIGN (SCI P313)


• From SCI document ‘SCI P313 – Single Storey Steel Framed Buildings in Fire Boundary Conditions’.
• These calculations analyse single or multi-span, symmetrical pitched portal frame in fire boundary condition under
normal loading.
• The validity of the portal frame geometry is checked, using the ratio L/h > 1.0 (SCI guide cl 5.1)

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

BUILDING WIND LOAD (BS6399:PART2:1997)


• Using either the standard or hybrid method, these calculations determine the dynamic pressure (qs) and the
unfactored net surface pressure (p) on the walls and roof of a rectangular building with a flat or pitched roof..
• One wind direction is considered for each run of the calculations. Hence up to four runs would be required to
determine the worst suction and pressure loads on any particular wall or roof surface from all wind directions.
• The pressures are calculated for all the appropriate wall and roof zones, as defined in the code. The lengths of the
various wall zones are also calculated.
• The overall load on a building from wind on two opposing walls can be calculated. You can also enter the values of
additional horizontal contributions from roof, parapet and frictional drag loads so that the overall wind load on the
building can be determined in accordance with code clause 2.1.3.6.
• BS 6399: Part 2: 1997 - Loading for buildings: Part 2. Code of practice for wind loads. Including Amendment No. 1.
• Recommended Application of BS 6399-2, SCI ED0001.
• BRE Digest 436

PLAN PLAN

B=L 0 deg D=L

90 deg

ELEVATION ELEVATION

H H

D=W B=W

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

COLD FORMED SECTIONS (BS5950:PART5:1998)


• This calculation is performed in accordance with BS5950-5:1998.
• It covers the design of plain and lipped channels and ‘top hat’ type sections subjected to compression and tension
loads plus plain angle sections subjected to tension only loading. The channels and top hat sections must have at
least one axis of symmetry.
• The user can select to specify either a welded or bolted end connection. For the bolted case, it is assumed that the
connection is made through the web for the channel and top hat sections and through the leg perpendicular to the x
axis for the angle ie through the leg with dimension D (note that the inertia about the x axis may be less than that
about the y axis unless the tension force is small (see last paragraph under ‘Limitations/Assumptions’) so effectively
the connection can be made through either leg). If appropriate, the moments arising due to the eccentric bolted
connection are calculated and considered in the design. For the case of welded end connection it is assumed that no
bending moments arise due to eccentricity of the connection.
• Additional externally applied bending moments about the y axis may also be included. It is considered that this may
be useful for the design of the top and bottom members of trusses or lattices where moments will occur if they are
modelled as continuous members or where purlins are not located at node points.
• The user has the option to take account of the increase in yield strength arising from the cold forming of the section.
The user’s attention, however, is drawn to clause 3.4 of BS5950-5:1998 which states that the effects of cold forming
should not be considered if the member is to undergo any form of heat treatment which may produce softening
following forming.

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

COLUMN BASE PLATE DESIGN (BS5950:PART1:2000)


• These calculations determine the minimum size of base plate required to transmit the forces in an axially loaded
column into the foundations. The calculations use the effective area method approach of BS 5950-1:2000 cl 4.13.2.
The calculations incorporate the column section size when calculating the required base plate size. This means that
the required base plate size will always be sufficient to take the footprint of the column section.
• The maximum bearing strength of the base is taken as 0.6 fcu, where fcu is the characteristic cube strength of the
concrete base or the bedding material.
• The required bearing area is calculated for the load applied in the column.
• Equating the calculated effective area and the required bearing area yields a quadratic equation - the solution of this
determines the minimum base plate size. The user can edit the automatically calculated values to specify the final
size of base plate that they want to use.
• The calculations determine the minimum thickness required for the base plate.
• The calculations use the specified base plate thickness to recalculate the value of c and determine the effective base
plate area.

Dp Dp

D
T
2c + T

D Bp B Bp

2c + T
T
2c + D

Dp

2c + B B Bp

2c + t

2c + T

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

COLUMN LOAD CHASE DOWN (BS6399:PART1:1996)


• BS 6399: Part 1: 1996 - Loading for buildings: Part 1. Code of practice for dead and imposed loads.
• These calculations work out the factored axial loads on each stack of a multi-storey column due to dead and
imposed loading.
• The calculations cover internal, edge and corner columns.
• Imposed loads can be reduced in accordance with clause 6.2 of the code, or the full imposed loads can be applied
with no reduction. If the option to include reduction factors is selected, they are set by default to the values in Table 2
of the code. The default reduction factors can be overridden with values chosen by the user. The calculations always
assume that the top ‘floor’ is a roof, not qualifying for reduction, and that all floors below this do qualify.

Y1 Internal column

Y1 / 2

Corner column Edge column

X1 / 2 X1

COLUMN SPLICE DESIGN (BS5950:PART1:2000)


• From Joints in Simple Construction Volume 1: Design Methods - 2nd Edition (The BCSA/SCI Green Book) and
updated in June 2000 for BS5950-1:2000. NOTE - the BCSA/SCI Green Book is currently undergoing revision both
for the BS5950-1:2000 amendment and to widen its scope. These calculations will be updated following its re-
publication.
• The following connection types are handled:-
bearing.
ƒ internal
ƒ external (no division plate)
ƒ external (with division plate)
non-bearing
ƒ internal
ƒ external
• For a single connection, the calculations perform a check design in accordance with each of the checks as defined in
the BCSA/SCI Green Book for the applied loads.
• The results can be output in full - details for every check, as detailed in the Green Book or in a summary format - one
line per check.

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

COMPOSITE BEAM DESIGN (BS5950:PART3:1990)


For industry leading specialised composite beam design software, visit www.fastrak5950.com and find out more about
Fastrak Composite Beam.
• BS 5950-1:2000 - Structural use of steelwork in building: Part 1. Code of practice for design - rolled and welded
sections.
• BS 5950:Part 3:Section 3.1:1990 - Structural use of steelwork in building: Part 3. Code of practice for design of
simple and composite beams.
• Calculations are performed for the design of simply supported primary or secondary composite internal or edge
beams with perpendicular or parallel decking.
• Primary beams can be loaded with up to 3 sets of point loads and a series of beam loads. Secondary beams can be
loaded with a series of slab area loads.
• Longitudinal shear can be resisted using no, discontinuous or continuous decking options and with bars, mesh or no
additional transverse reinforcement.
• Checks include for both construction stage design checks, including lateral torsional buckling for parallel decks, and
composite stage checks with additional deflection and natural frequency calculations.

A A
Primary
b1 Beam b1

Primary Beam Secondary Beam


for design for design
b b
2
2

PLAN PLAN

CROSS SECTION CROSS SECTION


L L

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

COMPOUND SECTION PROPERTIES


• These calculations determine the section properties of one of three possible combined section shapes, two I
sections (at 90 degs), an RSC on an I section or a plate on an I section.

CONCRETE INDUSTRIAL GROUND FLOOR SLAB (TR34)


• The calculations are based on Concrete Society Technical Report No.34, ‘Concrete Industrial Ground Floors - A
Guide to Design and Construction’ - Third Edition.
• The calculations check the design of an industrial concrete floor slab subjected to a series of point loads, line loads
and uniformly distributed loads.
• The calculations include the design of concrete slabs reinforced with either steel fibres or steel fabric placed to the
bottom of the slab.
• The calculations allow input of any number of load cases. Each load case may consist of between one and four point
loads, a line load or a uniformly distributed load.

Wearing surface

d Reinforced concrete slab


h
Steel fabric reinforcement
Slip membrane

Sub-base

Subgrade

CONCRETE SPECIFICATION (BS8500)


• ‘Designed’ or ‘designated’ concrete specification to BS8500-1:2002.
• The calculation determines the exposure class or classes for the concrete element under consideration.
• From the exposure class or classes the calculation determines, as applicable, the minimum concrete requirements
including cover, strength class, maximum water/cement ratio, minimum cement content, allowable cements and
combinations and allowable aggregates.
• The calculation covers reinforced, unreinforced, normal or lightweight concrete with intended working life of at least
50 or 100 years. The concrete may include air-entrainment or not.

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CONCRETE SUB-FRAME ANALYSIS (BS8110:PART1:1997)


• These calculations consider a simplified sub-frame consisting only of a beam, the columns attached to the ends of
the beam and the beams on either side, if any, using BS 8110: Part 1: 1997 cl. 3.2.1.2.3.
• The calculations firstly determine the geometry of the three spans (including area and second moment of area), the
stiffness of the end beams is modelled by applying a stiffness factor to the second moment of area (the fixity of the
beam remote ends determine the stiffness of the beams on either side of the central beam). The calculations use the
sub-frame geometry and properties within the continuous beam analysis program, where the loads can be added in
order to determine the design shear force and moment. These forces can then be optionally used in the RC beam
design calculations, to design span 2 (the central beam). The RC beam design calculations cover one moment
check so whether the check is for sagging or hogging must be determined before the design calculations are run.
• The size and stiffness of the columns are translated into vertical and rotational spring stiffnesses for the supports
used in the continuous beam. The moments generated in the supports are then used to determine the moments in
the columns of the sub-frame.

Col B Col C
SIMPLIFIED SUBFRAME
L L
B_upper BS 8110:Part 1:1997 cl 3.2.1.2.3 C_upper

Span 1 (hl x bl ) Span 2 (h x b) Span 3 (h2 x b2)


Beam to be designed
L L L
s1 s2 s3
L L
B_lower C_lower

h xb h xb
B B C C

CO-ORDINATE CONVERSION CALCULATION


• The calculation is based on the first principles of setting out co-ordinates, given the co-ordinates of a base station it
will determine either:
• The coordinates of the target if the bearing angle from north and distance along the bearing are known.
• The bearing angle from north and distance along the bearing to the target if the coordinates of the target are known.
North

Bearing
East
Station (E,N)
Len
gth
L
Target (ETarget,NTarget )

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

CRANE GANTRY GIRDER (BS5950:PART1:2000)


• This calculation is performed in accordance with BS5950-1:2000.
• It covers the design of simply supported gantry girders comprising of either a plain ‘I’ section (UB or UC), an ‘I’
section with a capping plate or an ‘I’ section with a capping channel carrying a conventional overhead travelling
crane ie not an underslung crane. In the case of the ‘I’ section with a capping channel the flanges of the channel are
assumed to point downwards.
• The user can select to input the values of the ultimate vertical and horizontal shear forces and bending moments or,
alternatively, the calculation can be used to determine the maximum wheel loads from the basic crane data input by
the user ie. crane and crab weight, safe working load, span of crane bridge, minimum hook approach, number of
wheels and class of crane in accordance with BS2573-1:1983. For the latter option, based on the number of wheels,
their spacing and the span of the gantry girder, the calculation determines the wheel arrangement giving the
maximum shear force and bending moment before proceeding to calculate them.
• For the case where the calculation is used to determine the bending moments and shear forces it can accommodate
one crane only on the simply supported span but covers the cases of the end carriage having two or four wheels.
• If an ‘I’ section with a capping plate or channel is selected the calculation determines both the elastic and plastic
section properties for the compound section.
• For the user specified girder, the calculation checks the vertical and horizontal shear capacity, the biaxial bending
capacity, the web buckling and bearing capacity beneath the concentrated wheel load, the capacity of the weld
connecting the plate or channel to the ‘I’ section and the vertical and horizontal deflections.

Crab
Crane Bridge

Gantry Girder
Safe Working Load, Wswl
Crab weight, Wcrab Crane bridge weight, Wcrane

Minimum hook approach, ah

Span of crane bridge, L c

Elevation on Crane Bridge

Bogie wheel centres, aw2

= = aw1 - aw2
Wheel centres, aw1
Bogie centres, aw1

2 Wheel End Carriage 4 Wheel End Carriage

DEAD LOAD CALCULATION


• These calculations determine the unfactored dead loads of a series of composite constructions.
• The composite constructions are intended to represent the various floor, wall and roof components of a building or
structure.
• The calculation includes a datalist of typical material densities as well as a datalist based on Tables A.1 to A.12 from
annex A of Eurocode 1: Actions on structures - Part 1-1: General actions - Densities, self-weight, imposed loads for
buildings.

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DRAIN & SEWER DESIGN


• These calculations allow the design of a surface water drain or foul sewer.

FLITCH BEAM ANALYSIS & DESIGN (BS5268:PART2:2002)


• The elastic analysis and design of simple beams including:-
o Steel beams (BS5950-1:2000)
o Steel beams with torsion (BS5950-1:2000 and SCI publication SCI-P-057)
o Concrete beams (BS8110-1:1997)
o Timber beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Flitch beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Historical steelwork (BCSA 11/84)
o Other beams (analysis only)
• The design may be run directly with no analysis should design shear forces and moments already be known. In this
instance, no analysis results are returned to your document.

+ve Sign Conventions


loads P P P
w

reaction R
a x b
deflection δ L

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

FLITCH BEAM DESIGN (BS5268:PART2:2002)


• From BS 5268-2:2002.
• These calculations check the design of a flitch beam consisting of one or more pieces of timber and one or more
steel plates bolted together to form a vertically laminated beam which acts as one unit.
• The flitch beam can be designed with either timber or steel elements to the outside of the member.

Timber Timber Steel Steel


Steel Timber
• The sizes of the timber and steel members are user defined, users enter a breadth and depth of section plus the
number of members. The steel plate should be no deeper than the timber members.
• The calculations generate the section properties of the individual timber and steel elements as well as the composite
section.
• The design is checked against applied bending, shear and bearing stresses. Further calculations check the
deflection of the beam, and determine the bolting requirements.

FLOOR VIBRATION (SCI P076/AD256)


• From the Steel Construction Institute publication “Design Guide on the Vibration of Floors” P076.
• Calculates the natural frequency of a floor system using the deflection method.
• Checks the natural frequency of the floor system and the corresponding response factor.

Case 1 Case 3
Lm

W W L
L
L

Case 2 Case 4
Lm

W1
W l L
W W2
L L

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

FOUNDATIONS NEAR TREES (NHBC STANDARDS CHAPTER 4.2)


• These calculations give guidance on meeting the technical requirements and recommendations of the NHBC with
regard to foundation depth when building near trees, hedgerows and shrubs, particularly in shrinkable soils.
• The depth calculations take into account of the effects of soil desiccation caused by previous or existing trees,
hedgerows or shrubs and trees, hedgerows or shrubs which are scheduled to be planted.

Hactual

Zreq

• NHBC Standards - Chapter 4.2, April 2003 edition.

GABLE FRAMING ANALYSIS


• BS 5950-1: 2000 - Structural use of steelwork in buildings - Part 1. Code of practice for design - Rolled and welded
section.
• These calculations cover the overall structural analysis and member design checks for gable framing arrangements
typically adopted for single-span portal-framed buildings. The structural concept for the gable frame bracing is as
shown in section 9.7, fig. 10, of the ISE/ICE 'Manual for the design of steelwork building structures' (Nov 1989
edition).
• Member design checks can be carried out for the following members:-
o Gable posts, corner posts, gable rafters, roof bracing, wall bracing and eaves strut/tie.
• One run of the analysis calculations covers one loading condition, i.e. one combination of simultaneous loads, for
which all the specified loads are applied. Thus several runs of the calculations will be required to determine the
critical load combination and wind direction for the design of each member.
• For each run of the analysis calculations, one particular intermediate gable post is chosen by the user and the
member load effects are calculated for this particular gable post. Typically, this will be the post directly below the
apex, but any post can be chosen. If restraint conditions or other factors indicate that another post may be critical,
additional calculation runs should be made for that post.
• A parapet with a horizontal top edge can be specified in the definition of the structure. Parapet posts are assumed to
coincide with the gable posts and to be continuous cantilever projections of the gable posts. The parapet posts
themselves are not analysed or designed.
• After the structure has been analysed using the 'Analysis calcs' item, multiple instances of the 'Member design calcs'
item can be run in separate calc sections, one for each member, to extract the appropriate member geometry and
loading details from the analysis calcs and automatically feed these into the standard 'General member design'
routine for each member, where further choices can be made on steel grade, section shape, buckling restraint
conditions etc.

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GENERAL MEMBER SAFE LOAD TABLES (BS5950:PART1:2000)


• From BS 5950-1:2000.
• These calculations cover the design of beam and column elements using safe load tables.
• Beams
o The types of design available are major axis bending and shear, using UB or UC sections or the ultimate
UDL capacity for a fully restrained RSC or RSJ.
• Columns
o The types of design available are simple column check (UC only), tie check (angles only) and strut buckling
checks (all elements).
o For details on the Simple column check please refer to the Notes for this item (either from within the
calculation or in the Library Access System).
o For both element types, the relevant input information is entered and then a suitable section can be
selected from the relevant safe load/ultimate capacity table.

HIPPED END LOADING


• These calculations determine the loading on the gable frame, flat top portal and first portal frame resulting from a hip
extending over two frame centres.
• It is assumed that the flat top portal gives no support to the hip raker. This introduces a small error local to the
intersection of the flat top portal and the hip raker. All loads from the raker do pass to the flat top via the local jack
rafters.

Portal Frame

S3

Portal Frame

S2
Jack rafters
Flat Top Portal Frame

S1
Hip raker
Gable Frame
0 1 2 3
x1
α = Crsg =
x2
Point loads
x3

Lspan/2

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HISTORICAL STEELWORK SIMPLE BEAM ANALYSIS & DESIGN


• The elastic analysis and design of simple beams including:-
o Steel beams (BS5950-1:2000)
o Steel beams with torsion (BS5950-1:2000 and SCI publication SCI-P-057)
o Concrete beams (BS8110-1:1997)
o Timber beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Flitch beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Historical steelwork (BCSA 11/84)
o Other beams (analysis only)
• The design may be run directly with no analysis should design shear forces and moments already be known. In this
instance, no analysis results are returned to your document.

+ve Sign Conventions


loads P P P
w

reaction R
a x b
deflection δ L

HOLDING DOWN BOLTS


• From 'Holding down systems for steel stanchions' BCSA/Constrado guide to holding down systems.
• These calculations determine the embedment depth of one of a pair of holding down bolts, and using table 1 from
the BCSA/Constrado guide, calculate whether the effective conical surface area and concrete shear stress is
sufficient to withstand the tension (pull-out) force applied.
• The calculations also check that the bolt tension capacity for the bolts selected is adequate to resist the tension force

L_proj (Clear projection of bolt above nut)

t_was (Washer thickness) t_p (Base plate thickness)

t_gr (Thickness of bedding)

L_bolt (Overall length of bolts) Concrete

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HORIZONTAL ALIGNMENT (PART 1 TD9/93)


• From Part 1 TD 9/93 - Highway link design.
• Horizontal curve - These calculations design a circular horizontal curve (no transitions). The calculation uses a
'generic number of chords' method, which calculates the optimum chord length based on the criteria of the length of
chord required to approximate the arc length of the curve, or a standard set of 7 points. As well as either the 7
points, or the generic number of points, the start and end point of the curve are calculated.
• Optional calculations are:
o The minimum stopping sight distance.
o The minimum full overtaking sight distance.
o The transition curve length.
o A conversion of the input in degrees, minutes and seconds into decimal format.
• Vertical curve - These calculations design a vertical curve and provide the setting out information (reduced levels at
the relevant chainage points). This calculation can be phased with the horizontal curve design, to enable the same
setting out points to be used.
• For phasing of the horizontal and vertical curves, a reference point on the horizontal curve must be given. The
chainage points are then calculated in relation to this reference point. The chord length (or frequency of levels)
should also coincide with the chord length used in the horizontal alignment calculations. Where applicable the
appropriate default values are given.

MASONRY BEARING CALCULATION (BS5628:PART1:2005)


• From BS5628-1:2005

Beam Beam

Spreader

Masonry Masonry
wall wall

• These calculations check the design bearing stress at the bearing of a beam to determine the requirement for a
concrete spreader or padstone. If required the calculation will check the design bearing stress beneath the concrete
spreader. The calculation will finally check the design bearing stress at a depth of 0.4 × h below the beam bearing
level.

MASONRY RECTANGULAR COLUMN DESIGN (BS5628:PART1:2005)


• The calculations check the design vertical load resistance of a single leaf masonry column to BS 5628: Part 1: 2005.
They calculate the design vertical load resistance and compare this against the applied factored vertical load on the
column.
• The calculations also check that the column is within the slenderness limits given in cl 24.1.

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MASONRY WALL PANEL DESIGN (BS5628)


• In accordance with BS 5628 Code of practice for the use of masonry - Part 1: Structural use of unreinforced masonry
and Part 2: Structural use of reinforced and prestressed masonry.
• This calculation designs masonry wall panels and sub panels of single-leaf or cavity wall construction, either with or
without bed joint reinforcement and with or without masonry piers, subjected to horizontal and/or vertical loading.
• Walls may be designed using brick, conrete block, natural stone or random rubble masonry.
• Depending on the aspect ratio of the panel and the external support conditions the calculation uses either yield line
analysis or simple elastic analysis to determine the appropriate bending moment coefficient.
• Wall panels may include up to three openings, the calculation automatically divides the panel into two sets of sub
panels, arrangement A where the panels predominantly span vertically and arrangement B where the panels
predominantly span horizontally. The results reported in the calculation are based on the more favourable of the two
arrangements. Where the panel is only supported on three edges sub panel arrangements spanning toward the free
edge are automatically ignored.
1 2 4 1

2 4

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NOTIONAL LOAD CHASE DOWN


• These calculations work out the notional horizontal loads at the roof and each floor level of a multi-storey building.
• The floor area and perimeter wall lengths can be calculated for a range of building shapes, or values for these
parameters can be entered directly, by selecting the user-defined shape option.
• Notional horizontal loads are calculated at 1.0% of the factored dead load and at 0.5% of the combined factored
dead and imposed loads. The partial safety factors used are 1.4 for dead load and 1.6 for imposed load.

Wb Db Hb

Lb Lb

Hb
Lb

Lb Lb

OPEN CHANNEL FLOW CALCULATION


• These calculations determine the discharge of an open channel which may consist of multiple sections.

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PILE CAP DESIGN (BS8110:PART1:1997)


• BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 2. Code of practice for design and construction.
• These calculations offer the option to design a two, three or four pile pile cap, subject to vertical axial loading from a
concentric or eccentric column

4 Pile Cap, height h


w2 s with eccentricity
e φ e
2 1
3 Pile Cap, height h
P3 e
P2
P1
φ
Loaded width - y,x case 3 shear plane
Ldiag 3 3
ey

case 2 case 1
ex b y ex
0.866s s s
L
Loaded width - x, y
x φ/5 x
P2 P3
0.288s
w1 s w1 case 4 shear plane
4 4
φ
P1 P4
e

b
2 L 1

PILE GROUP ANALYSIS


• 1. Calculates the centroid and total value of all applied loads. Take moments about the origin in the x and y
directions and divide the resultant moment values by the total load to get the coordinates of the centroid.
• 2. Express all pile reactions in terms of the reaction of the first pile P1 plus a rate of increase in the X-direction, rateX
and a rate of increase in the Y-direction, rateY.
• 3. Take moments about the resultant load in both the X and Y direction, expressing the results in terms of P1, rate X
and rateY – eqn.1 and eqn.2.
• 4. Sum all the pile reactions in terms of P1, rateX and rate Y and equate them to the total load. Express P1 in terms
of rateX and rateY – eqn.3.
• 5. Substitute eqn.3 into eqn.1 and express rateX in terms of rateY – eqn.4.
• 6. Substitute eqn.3 and eqn.4 into eqn.2 to solve rateY.
• 7. Substitute rateY back into eqn.3 to solve rateX.
• 8. Substitute rateY and rate X into eqn.1 to solve P1.
• 9. Use rateX, rateY and P1 to solve remaining pile reactions.

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RC BEAM ANALYSIS & DESIGN (BS8110:PART 1:1997)


• From BS8110 Structural use of concrete - Part 1: Code of practice for design and construction.
• This calculation carries out the analysis and design of a reinforced concrete beam.
• The beam can feature a rectangular, a flanged T or a flanged L cross section.

bf bf
hf hf

h h h

b b b
Rectangular section Flanged T section Flanged L section

• Moment and shear force values are taken directly from the envelope results.
• The calculation can be run in two modes, the first mode calculates the area of sagging, hogging and shear
reinforcement required in the beam, outputting this data in a table. The second mode allows the user to prepare a full
design calculation for the beam.
• The full design mode allows the user to design the beam at any and every cross section they may choose,
identifying the appropriate design moments and loads to use in each instance and allowing different reinforcement to
be specified as required.
• The calculation includes checks on the beam slenderness, span/effective depth, reinforcement spacing and depth of
cover.

RC BEAM DESIGN (BS8110:PART1:1997)


• BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 2. Code of practice for design and construction.
• Rectangular rc beams not subject to significant axial load. (Design stress from uls loads less than 0.1 fcu)
• The calculations can include nominal or designed compression steel, and nominal or designed shear reinforcement.

Compression
Steel d'
As' - if req'd
NA
d

Tension
Steel - As

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RC BEAM TORSION DESIGN (BS8110:PART2:1985)


• The calculation allows the design to be performed in accordance with either clause 2.4 of BS8110-2:1985 or clause
2.4 of CP65:Part 2:1996 (1999). The two codes of practice are very similar in their approach but use slightly different
equations for calculating the shear strength of the beam vc. In addition, BS8110 adopts a material partial safety
factor for steel of 1.05 whereas CP65 uses 1.15. In all other respects, the two codes are identical.
• It determines the quantity of torsional reinforcement (links and longitudinal bars) required, if any, for a solid
rectangular section subjected to a combination of direct shear force and torsional moment.
• The dimensions of the beam are user defined, users enter the breadth and depth of the section plus the concrete
and reinforcement properties and both the direct shear force and torsional moment.
• The calculation checks the user input link properties for the applied shear force and torsional moment and also
calculates the area of longitudinal torsion reinforcement required.

Longitudinal torsion reinf't at max


b 300 ctrs (but see 3.12.11.2.6 of
BS8110-1:1997 or
CP65:Part1:1999) is additional to
that required for bending.
Perimeter link only is
considered in the design.
This link to be a closed
torsion link.

Internal links not included


in the design but may be h
required for spacing rules
(see 3.4.5.5 of
BS8110-1:1997 or
CP65:Part 1:1999) D
Area of steel at this level
includes that required for
L dia bending and torsion
c nom
c nom

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RC COLUMN DESIGN (BS8110:PART1:1997)


• BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 2. Code of practice for design and construction.
• By selecting the relevant material factors, the calculations can also be compliant to BS 8110 Part 1: 1985.
• Crack checks are performed to BS8110:Pt 2, Cl. 3.8 & BS8007 Cl 2.6 & Appendix B.
• Calculations are performed for the design of columns of solid rectangular section, symmetrically reinforced about the
major axis.
• Braced and unbraced columns can be defined under axial load with or without uni/bi-axial bending.
• Columns are automatically classed as short or slender. For slender columns, additional deflection-induced moments
are calculated in accordance with section 3.8.3 of the code.
• Shear perpendicular to the major axis and crack width checks can be included if required.

More highly
compressed Minor
faces Axis Y

Compression steel
(Asc)
h h'

X X
Major
Axis
Shear steel
(Asv)

"Tension" steel
(Ast) Y
ch
b
b'
Rectangular Column cb
Note for design D is the section depth,
d the depth to "tension" steel and is
dependent upon axis of bending under
consideration.

RC CRACK WIDTH CALCULATION (BS8110:PART2:1985)


• From BS8110:Part 2:1985 clause 3.8
• This calculation determines the design surface crack width to the tension face of a reinforced concrete section.

b
εc
fc .b.x / 2 S
x
Neutral axis φ
d
h z
c acr
εs fs .A s
ε1
S/2
Beam Stresses /
section Strain forces Key dimensions

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RC FLAT SLAB DESIGN (BS8110:PART1:1997)


• This calculation uses yield line theory to carry out an analysis of a reinforced concrete flat slab on a regular grid of
concrete columns.
• The slab is considered to be a one way continuous slab analysed and designed separately in both x and y directions.
• The calculations determine the optimum requirements for top reinforcement over each support to satisfy bending
criteria and bottom reinforcement for each span to satisfy bending and deflection criteria, based on the specified
default reinforcement diameter.
• The calculations include the option to check the slab for punching shear at each of the supports, calculating the
requirements for shear reinforcement at successive shear perimeters around each support.
• Once the calculation has determined the initial reinforcement design the user has the option of amending the
reinforcement diameter and spacing at any point within the slab.

A B
ex
Span x
l x1 lx
ey
1
l y1
ly
Span y

2
ly

RC PAD FOOTING DESIGN (BS8110:PART1:1997)


• These calculations offer the option to design rectangular reinforced pad footings for axial, shear and moment.
Square pad footings for uplift.
• BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 2. Code of practice for design and construction.

Punching area
M
F
V Ds
=
1.5d dx ex
Db
b cy L by

bcx = p p
1 2
Y L
2d1
X L c1
L x1 L c2
L L
bx 2d2

Rectangular Pad Base


(all base in contact with soil)

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RC PAD FOOTING HORIZONTAL CAPACITY (BS8110:PART1:1997)


• These calculations offer the option to check rectangular and square pad footings for uplift and for horizontal loading.
• The uplift calculations permit tension piles, anchors or the self-weight of the base to resist uplift.
• If required holding down bolts are checked.
• BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 2. Code of practice for design and construction.
• For the holding down bolt checks, BS 5950: Part 1: 2000: Sections 4.13 & 6.6 and 'Holding down systems for steel
stanchions' BCSA / Constrado 1980

Fup (Uplift)

Vcv
Ds
Lby
Vcu

Db

Lbx Note for a square pad footing the variable Lb is used on both axes
Pad footing details

RC PAD FOOTING UPLIFT DESIGN (BS8110:PART1:1997)


• These calculations offer the option to check rectangular and square pad footings for uplift and for horizontal loading.
• The uplift calculations permit tension piles, anchors or the self-weight of the base to resist uplift.
• If required holding down bolts are checked.
• BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 2. Code of practice for design and construction.
• For the holding down bolt checks, BS 5950: Part 1: 2000: Sections 4.13 & 6.6 and 'Holding down systems for steel
stanchions' BCSA / Constrado 1980

Fup (Uplift)

Vcv
Ds
Lby
Vcu

Db

Lbx Note for a square pad footing the variable Lb is used on both axes
Pad footing details

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RC RAFT FOUNDATION (BS8110-1:1997/CP65-1:1999)


• This calculation assesses the ability of elements of a raft to support various loading arrangements without exceeding
the allowable bearing pressure. It also determines the quantities of reinforcement required to support the loads whilst
spanning over theoretical circular depressions in the sub-soil which are assumed to form beneath the raft. The
design of the reinforced concrete elements of the raft can be performed in accordance with either BS8110-1:1997 or
CP65-1:1999.
• It is considered that the calculation is appropriate to low-rise type structures founded on relatively poor ground.
• The user has the option to input the basic diameter of the depression manually or to allow it to be determined by the
calculation. The calculated value is based on the number of sub-soil types present and their densities and ranges in
value from 1.5m to 3.5m. It should be noted that the calculated value is approximate only and the user should verify
that the value obtained is appropriate to their particular situation.
• The raft may comprise of a plain uniform thickness slab or may have edge thickening beams and optional internal
thickening beams. There is the option for the edge beams to have a boot to the outer face and/or a chamfer to the
inner face. For the internal beams there is the option to have chamfered sides.
• The slab element of the raft must be reinforced with square mesh. The mesh may be located in both the top and
bottom faces or in the top face only. The beam elements must be reinforced in the top and bottom faces with loose
bar reinforcement and in addition must have vertical shear reinforcement. If inclined reinforcement is provided, for
example in the chamfered face of a beam, this should not be included as part of the shear reinforcement.

A sedgetop Asslabtop

A sedgelink hslab

hedge hhcoreslab

hboot aedge A sslabbtm

hhcorethick

Asedgebtm
bboot bedge

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RC SIMPLE BEAM ANALYSIS & DESIGN (BS8110:PART1:1997)


• The elastic analysis and design of simple beams including:-
o Steel beams (BS5950-1:2000)
o Steel beams with torsion (BS5950-1:2000 and SCI publication SCI-P-057)
o Concrete beams (BS8110-1:1997)
o Timber beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Flitch beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Historical steelwork (BCSA 11/84)
o Other beams (analysis only)
• The design may be run directly with no analysis should design shear forces and moments already be known. In this
instance, no analysis results are returned to your document.

+ve Sign Conventions


loads P P P
w

reaction R
a x b
deflection δ L

RC SLAB DESIGN (BS8110:PART1:1997)


• These calculations check solid slabs supported by beams or walls to BS 8110: Part 1: 1997 - cl 3.5. The calculations
will check one way spanning or two-way spanning slabs and cater for simply supported or continuous support
conditions.
• The checks performed are, optionally, moment, shear, punching shear, deflection and a cover check. For details of
what each check does, see the notes under ‘Results’ below.

h dx

Asy N o m in a l 1 m w id th Asx

S h o rte r S p a n

h dy

Asy N o m in a l 1 m w id th Asx

Longer Span

T w o -w a y s p a n n in g s la b
(sim p le )

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RC STRIP FOOTING DESIGN (BS8110:PART1:1997)


• These calculations start from an applied load per metre run and an allowable bearing pressure, and determine the
minimum foundation width required to keep the net bearing pressure below the permissible bearing pressure.
• For mass concrete foundations, the calculations check that the spread of the load in the footing is >45 degrees and
hence an unreinforced solution is adequate.
• For reinforced footings the calculations calculate the shear and moment at the face of the wall and calculate the
minimum reinforcement required for the base.
• The calculations require that the wall type (internal, party or cavity) is selected. This wall type is only relevant if a wall
load chase down calculation has been run before this calculation. The correct loads will be picked up automatically in
this instance if the same wall type is selected.
• The effective depth is calculated using the nominal cover and half the estimated bar diameter. Once the actual bars
have been selected, the effective depth is assumed to stay the same and the cover is assumed to be dependant
upon the bar size. The actual cover is calculated and compared against the allowable cover. The effect of this is that
if the bar diameter is greater than the initial estimated value, then the cover check may fail and the calculations need
to be re-run. In reality if the placement of the bars is dependant upon the cover then the effect of a greater bar size
than that estimated is that the effective depth may be overestimated and hence the calculations should be re-run
anyway. If a smaller bar size is selected, then the effective depth may be underestimated and hence be slightly
conservative. As a result it is recommended that the initial estimate of bar size is the greatest size that might possibly
be used, this will result in accurate or slightly conservative results.

tw tw

ds ds

hw dw hw
cw
bw
Pult
bw
Wall Wall
Mass Concrete Foundation Reinforced Foundation
Note:- The variables with subscript 'w' will have Note:- The variables with subscript 'w' will have
an additional i,c or p subscript representing an additional i,c or p subscript representing
internal, cavity or party walls respectively internal, cavity or party walls respectively

RC THERMAL CRACK WIDTHS (BS8007:1987)


• This calculation is performed in accordance with BS8007:1987.
• It calculates the estimated maximum crack width in each surface zone of wall, suspended or ground bearing slab
elements resulting from thermal shrinkage induced direct tension.
• The calculation also checks the users input reinforcement against the minimum requirements of BS8007:1987. The
reinforcement can be different in each face of the element and can be either loose bar or mesh but not a
combination in a single element.

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RC WALL DESIGN (BS8110:PART1:1997)


• BS 8110 Part 1: 1997 - Structural use of concrete: Part 2. Code of practice for design and construction.
• By selecting the relevant material factors, the calculations can also be compliant to BS 8110 Part 1: 1985.
• Crack checks are performed to BS8110:Pt 2, Cl. 3.8 & BS8007 Cl 2.6 & Appendix B.
• Braced and unbraced walls in simply supported or monolithic construction can be defined under axial load with or
without transverse shear and bending.
• Walls are automatically classed as stocky or slender. For slender walls, additional deflection-induced moments are
calculated in accordance with section 3.8.3 of the code.
• Crack width checks can be included if required.

Compression steel
(Asc)

h'
h
Horizontal steel
(Ahor)

Tension steel
(Ast) 1000 mm

Wall
(assumed symmetric)

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RETAINING WALL ANALYSIS & DESIGN (BS8002:1994)


• The calculations are in accordance with BS8002:1994 - Code of Practice for Earth Retaining Structures.
• The calculations check the stability of a retaining wall which may feature a sloped or stepped back or face with or
without a downstand, either propped or unpropped, against sliding and overturning, and determines the maximum
and minimum base pressures beneath the wall.

W Surcharge

β
Moist retained Virtual
material back
of wall
Water level
Wall

h stem

h eff
Saturated

h wall
Depth of
excavation retained
material

h water
dcover d exc
Heel

t base Toe
d ds
Base material
Downstand
t ds
l toe t wall l heel
l base

ROLLING LOAD ANALYSIS


• Rolling load analysis on a continuous steel beam with up to 10 spans. Load train comprising up to 10 point loads.
• Length of each span, and size and spacing of point loads are defined individually.

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SECTION PROPERTIES CALCULATOR


• The Section Properties Calculator calculates the section properties for a section constructed from rectangles,
triangles and circles, with or without holes.
• The calculated section properties are returned to the TEDDS document as variables for use in further calculations.
• User defined sections can be created and saved for re-use at a later date.
• Existing datalists can be used to import sections either as a starting point for new sections or to create combined
sections (such as a channel on an I section). Datalists are available for the UK, USA, Canada, Japan, Singapore and
Australian sections.
• Two examples are also provided that allow the input of variables to specify the shape created by the Section
Properties Calculator. The first example allows the parameters of an I section to be entered, and the section is
created automatically. The second example allows the parameters of a standard rectangle, circle or triangle to be
entered and the section is created automatically.

SIMPLE BEAM ANALYSIS & DESIGN


• The elastic analysis and design of simple beams including:-
o Steel beams (BS5950-1:2000)
o Steel beams with torsion (BS5950-1:2000 and SCI publication SCI-P-057)
o Concrete beams (BS8110-1:1997)
o Timber beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Flitch beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Historical steelwork (BCSA 11/84)
o Other beams (analysis only)
• The design may be run directly with no analysis should design shear forces and moments already be known. In this
instance, no analysis results are returned to your document.

+ve Sign Conventions


loads P P P
w

reaction R
a x b
deflection δ L

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SIMPLE COLUMN SAFE LOAD TABLES (BS5950:PART1:2000)


• From BS 5950-1:2000 cl 4.7.7 - columns in simple construction.
• These calculations allow the design of a column in simple construction using the appropriate safe load tables. The
column can be based on one of three levels - top (column below), intermediate (columns above and below) and
bottom (column above).
• Initial sections are selected for each applicable level and used to determine the moment distribution factors.
• Using the calculated moment distribution factors (determined from the section’s properties), the entered loads and
eccentricities of the incoming elements, the calculations determine the x and y axis moments for the column.
• The loads also include for up to 4 incoming beams at both top and bottom of the column section being designed
(dependent upon which level is selected).
• The moments and axial load can be used to determine the optimum section from the safe load tables. For the
easiest selection of a section use the search facility in the safe load tables to narrow down the range of sections that
can be selected. The values used for the final check are the buckling resistance Mbs, and the minimum of the
compressive resistances for major and minor axes - Pcx and Pcy.

RC Labove
RA
RB
RD

L
RC
RA
RB
RD

Lbelow

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SOAKAWAY DESIGN (BRE DIGEST 365)


• From BRE digest 365 - Soakaway designs for either rectangular or concentric ring soakaways.
• These calculations determine the maximum storage required for each rainfall duration over a return period of
between 5 and 100 years. In order to allow a range of return periods to be selected, table 2 has been extended to
include Z2 growth factor values for 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 years using figures taken from “Volume 4 – The Modified
Rational Method”, of the DOE publication, “Design and analysis of urban storm drainage – The Wallingford
procedure”, published in 1981.
• The maximum value is compared with the calculated soakaway storage capacity to determine whether the soakaway
is suitable.
• The calculations also check that the soakaway discharges from full to half volume within 24 hours.
• These calculations determine the M5 rainfalls using table 1 and then calculate the growth factor for table 2 and,
using this, calculate the relevant rainfall for each rainfall duration. Using these values the inflow for each duration is
calculated along with the outflow (given the soil infiltration rate)
• The calculations can (optionally) determine the soil infiltration rate - from trial pit size and the test results for the time
taken for the water level to fall from 75% to 25% of the effective storage depth in the pit.

Circular ring pit soakaway

w
Incoming invert dia

d
l

w w
Rectangular pit soakaway Pit is depth - d

STEEL ANGLE DESIGN (BS5950-1:2000)


• Design of single equal and unequal leg angles subjected to compression or tension and/or uni/bi-axial bending all to
BS5950-1:2000.
• Effective length for compression capacity calculated in accordance with either clause 4.7.10.2 (single angle struts) or
using Table 22 end restraint factors.
• Tension capacity is calculated either as a simple tension member in accordance with clause 4.6.3.1 or as a general
tension member in accordance with clause 4.6.1.
• Section may be restrained or unrestrained against lateral torsional buckling when subjected to bending. The buckling
resistance moment is calculated using the ‘basic method’ given in clause 4.3.8.2.

F +ve

x
y
Mx +ve My +ve
Fvx
Fvy

y x

b d

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STEEL BEAM ANALYSIS & DESIGN (BS5950:PART1:2000)


• The elastic analysis and design of continuous beams including:-
o Steel beams (BS5950-1:2000)
o Concrete beams (BS8110-1:1997)
• These calculations analyse any beam arrangement up to 10 spans. The analysis is suitable for simple beams and
continuous beams.
• The loading types available are point load, UDL, VDL, trapezoidal loading, partial UDL and point couple. The support
conditions available are fixed, pinned or spring.

STEEL BEAMS IN TORSION (SCI-P-057)


• BS 5950-1: 2000 - Structural use of steelwork in buildings - Part 1. Code of practice for design - Rolled and welded
section.
• Design for torsion, and combined effects including torsion, follows the guidance in the Steel Construction Institute's
publication SCI-P-057 Design of Members Subject to Combined Bending and Torsion.
• Single span, simply supported, straight steel beam loaded normal to the major axis.
• Full torsional restraint at both ends of beam.
• At each end, the section may be may be free to warp or fully fixed against warping.
• No intermediate lateral, torsional or warping restraint.
• No axial loading or applied loading perpendicular to the minor axis. (Induced minor axis moments are covered.)
• Hot-rolled RHS, SHS, CHS, UB, UC, RSJ or Channel section.
• One load combination, comprising any number and arrangement of concentric loads, acting simultaneously with one
pattern of eccentric loading, from the following:
o an eccentric uniformly distributed load;
o one eccentric point load, anywhere on the span;
o two eccentric point loads, at third points; or
o three eccentric point loads, at quarter points.

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STEEL MEMBER DESIGN (BS5950:PART1:2000)


• BS 5950-1:2000 - Structural use of steelwork in building: Part 1. Code of practice for design – rolled and welded
sections.
• The following section types and design loading are handled by the general member design:-
o UB, UC, RSJ – axial (T/C), with or without bending (X and/or Y)
o RC, RC(P) – axial (T/C), with or without bending (X and/or Y)
o SHS, RHS – axial (T/C), with or without bending (X and/or Y)
o CHS – axial (T/C), with or without bending (X and/or Y)
o Tees – axial (T/C), with or without bending (X and/or Y)
o Angles – axial (T/C)
o Double angles – axial (T/C)
o Flats – axial (T/C)
• These calculations cover the numerical design checks required on individual members of a 'non-sway' structure, in
accordance with the following sections of the code:
o 3.4 Section properties
o 3.5 Classification of cross-sections
o 4.2.3 Shear capacity
o 4.2.5 Moment capacity
o 4.3.5 Effective length for lateral-torsional buckling (up to 4 segment lengths can be defined for LTB) in a
single member
o 4.3.6 Resistance to lateral-torsional buckling
o 4.6 Tension members
o 4.7 Compression members
o 4.8 Members with combined moment and axial force
o 4.9 Members with biaxial moments

STEEL SIMPLE BEAM ANALYSIS & DESIGN (BS5950:PART1:2000)


• The elastic analysis and design of simple beams including:-
o Steel beams (BS5950-1:2000)
o Steel beams with torsion (BS5950-1:2000 and SCI publication SCI-P-057)
o Concrete beams (BS8110-1:1997)
o Timber beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Flitch beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Historical steelwork (BCSA 11/84)
o Other beams (analysis only)
• The design may be run directly with no analysis should design shear forces and moments already be known. In this
instance, no analysis results are returned to your document.

+ve Sign Conventions


loads P P P
w

reaction R
a x b
deflection δ L

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STEEL SIMPLE BEAM WITH TORSION ANALYSIS & DESIGN (SCI-P-057)


• The elastic analysis and design of simple beams including:-
o Steel beams (BS5950-1:2000)
o Steel beams with torsion (BS5950-1:2000 and SCI publication SCI-P-057)
o Concrete beams (BS8110-1:1997)
o Timber beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Flitch beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Historical steelwork (BCSA 11/84)
o Other beams (analysis only)
• The design may be run directly with no analysis should design shear forces and moments already be known. In this
instance, no analysis results are returned to your document.

+ve Sign Conventions


loads P P P
w

reaction R
a x b
deflection δ L

SURFACE WIND LOAD (BS6399:PART2:1997)


• Using the hybrid method, these calculations will determine the dynamic pressure (qs) and the unfactored net surface
pressure (p) on a wall or roof surface.
• One wind direction is considered for each run of the calculations.
• BS 6399: Part 2: 1997 - Loading for buildings: Part 2. Code of practice for wind loads. Including Amendment No. 1.
• BRE Digest 436

SWALE & FILTER STRIP DESIGN


• Allows the design of swales and filter strips in accordance with the design guidance set out in the CIRIA publications
Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems - Design Manual for England and Wales, Sustainable Urban Drainage
Systems - Design Manual for Scotland and Northern Ireland, and BRE Digest 365 - Soakaway Design.
• A filter strip is an area of vegetated land through which run off water is directed,they usually lie between a hard-
surfaced area and a receiving stream, surface water collector or disposal system. Filter strips can take any natural
vegetated form, from grass verge to shrub area.
• A swale is a linear grassed drainage feature in which surface water can be stored or conveyed. Swales have a
significant pollutant removal potential and can be designed to allow infiltration under appropriate conditions. They are
particularly suitable for diffuse collection of water runoff from small residential or commercial developments, paved
areas and roads.

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TIMBER BEAM DESIGN (BS5268:PART2:2002)


• From BS5268-2:2002
• These calculations check the design of a solid timber, glulam, structural timber composite or flitch beam.
• For solid timber, glulam and structural timber composite beams it is possible to define notches to either the top or
bottom of the beam section at either one or both bearings.
• For solid timber, glulam and structural timber composite beams there is an option of setting the beam section on an
incline as may be the case in the design of a purlin.
• If required it is possible to define grade stresses and modulii for timber, glulam and timber composite materials.
• The beam section is checked against applied bending, shear and bearing stresses. Further calculations check the
beam deflection.

Nxb b
Nx
y y

x h
x x h
x
θ
y y

Typical section with Inclined section with Underside of beam Top of beam
multiple members multiple members notched at support notched at support

TIMBER CONNECTION DESIGN (BS5268:PART2:2002)


• From BS5268-2:2002

Connected member Connected member

Main member Main member

• These calculations check the design of a simple bolted, nailed, screwed or toothed-plate, timber-to-timber or timber-
to-steel connection consisting of two members.

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TIMBER JOIST DESIGN (BS5268:PART2:2002)


• From BS5268-2:2002
• These calculations check the design of a solid, simply supported timber joist subjected to a uniformly distributed load
and a point load.
• The dimensions of the timber joists are user defined, users enter a breadth and depth of section plus the joist
spacing, clear span and both dead and imposed loads.
• If required the user is able to define notches to either the top or bottom flanges at either bearing.
• The calculations generate the section properties of the individual joists.
• The joist is checked under two separate load cases, one where the joist is subjected to an imposed UDL and one
where the joist is subjected to an imposed point load.
• For each load case the joist section is checked against applied bending, shear and bearing stresses. Further
calculations check the joist deflection.

Multiple floor joists

10 mm
s <= 6

span
Clear

• Joist deflection is limited to the lesser of 0.003 times the joist span or 14 mm.

TIMBER MEMBER DESIGN (BS5268:PART2:2002)


• From BS 5268-2:2002.
• These calculations check a timber section to BS 5268-2:2002. The timber section can be user defined, by entering a
breadth and depth of section, or selected from a datalist of pre-defined timber sections.
• The calculations check for shear, bending and deflection. Also available is axial loading (either tension or
compression) in which case both the axial load, and the combined effects are checked.
• The calculations allow the entry of a notch in the member, either top or bottom and check the shear accordingly.

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TIMBER SIMPLE BEAM ANALYSIS & DESIGN (BS5268:PART2:2002)


• The elastic analysis and design of simple beams including:-
o Steel beams (BS5950-1:2000)
o Steel beams with torsion (BS5950-1:2000 and SCI publication SCI-P-057)
o Concrete beams (BS8110-1:1997)
o Timber beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Flitch beams (BS5268-2:2002)
o Historical steelwork (BCSA 11/84)
o Other beams (analysis only)
• The design may be run directly with no analysis should design shear forces and moments already be known. In this
instance, no analysis results are returned to your document.

+ve Sign Conventions


loads P P P
w

reaction R
a x b
deflection δ L

UNDERPINNING NEEDLE BEAM DESIGN (BS8110:PART1:1997)


• These calculations allow the entry of a needle (ground) beam geometry. This information is used to set up the
continuous beam analysis program. The analysis results are then used in the RC member design calculations to
perform checks on the pre-defined element size and reinforcement details. For more details on the RC member
design please read the appropriate notes for that calculation.

wall

exg. foundation
ground beam, width - b
h

eo e mini piles

et
s
uplift

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VALLEY BEAM ANALYSIS & DESIGN


• These calculations calculate the forces on a valley beam from the basic geometry and loading. The calculations also
optionally allow the design of the valley and optionally calculate the stiffness of the beam (see
Limitations/Assumptions below).
• The number of spans available are 1 to 5 which equates to 2 bays to 10 bays.
• The calculations take the geometry and loads entered and set up the correct information in the continuous beam
analysis program for analysis. At the point of analysis the input data can be edited.
• The design of the beam can be via the TEDDS general member design (recommended) or by linking the data
provided manually to the S-Steel scratch pad.

VERTICAL ALIGNMENT (PART 1 TD9/93)


• From Part 1 TD 9/93 - Highway link design.
• Horizontal curve - These calculations design a circular horizontal curve (no transitions). The calculation uses a
'generic number of chords' method, which calculates the optimum chord length based on the criteria of the length of
chord required to approximate the arc length of the curve, or a standard set of 7 points. As well as either the 7
points, or the generic number of points, the start and end point of the curve are calculated.
• Optional calculations are:
o The minimum stopping sight distance.
o The minimum full overtaking sight distance.
o The transition curve length.
o A conversion of the input in degrees, minutes and seconds into decimal format.
• Vertical curve - These calculations design a vertical curve and provide the setting out information (reduced levels at
the relevant chainage points). This calculation can be phased with the horizontal curve design, to enable the same
setting out points to be used.
• For phasing of the horizontal and vertical curves, a reference point on the horizontal curve must be given. The
chainage points are then calculated in relation to this reference point. The chord length (or frequency of levels)
should also coincide with the chord length used in the horizontal alignment calculations. Where applicable the
appropriate default values are given.

VIBRATION OF HOSPITAL FLOORS (SCI P331)


• From the Steel Construction Institute publication “Design Guide on the Vibration of Floors in Hospitals” P331.
• Calculates the natural frequency of a floor system using the deflection method.
• Checks the natural frequency of the floor system and the corresponding response factor.

Secondary beam Primary beam Tie

ny Ly

Span of
Ly
slab

Lx Secondary beam
W = nx L x

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WALL LOAD CHASE DOWN (BS6399:PART1:1996)


• From BS6399:part 1:1996.
• These calculations determine the factored and unfactored design loads on the foundations under the walls in
consideration for a multi-storey building, based on the loading from the floors either side of the wall on each level
and the self weight of the wall.
• These calculations also calculate the factored wall design load at each level of the building, again based on the
loading from the floors above the wall on each level and the self weight of the wall. The total load includes the whole
self weight of the wall on the level at which it is being considered.
• The dead loads are built up from the separate elements of each area, such as the roof, including sensible default
values e.g. under roof loading the total dead load is built up from Tiles, Battens, Felt and Rafters etc., all of which
have default values but which can changed to suit.
• The walls types that can be considered are party, internal or cavity walls.
• The roof can be timber or steel and sloping or flat. Each floor can be timber, in-situ or precast concrete.

Roof h3
3rd floor

h2
2nd floor

h1
1st floor

h grnd
Ground floor

w
h below
Wall load chase down

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TEDDS 10 – Asia Engineering Library

WIND GIRDER ANALYSIS & DESIGN


• These calculations calculate the design forces for a 3-6 bay wind girder.
• The loading can be entered as point loads at each girder node position, or as a UDL across the whole girder.
• Optionally the calculations will design the elements using the safe load tables. The user is presented with the forces
in the member and can then select an appropriate section from CHS, RHS or SHS, depending upon what was
chosen originally.

Leeward boom

L R
RLH RRH

Diagonals

αL αR Windward boom

Bay 1 Bay 2 Bay 3

Span

PLH P12 P23 PRH

Wind

Wind Girder Sketch - 3 bays - concept applicable up-to 6 bays

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