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Employee welfare

INTRODUCTION:

Employee welfare work aims at providing such service facilities and


Amenities which enable the workers employed in an organization to perform
Their work in healthy congenial surrounding conductive to good health and
High morale.

Employee welfare is a comprehensive term including various services,


Benefits and facilities offered by the employer. Through such generous fringe
Benefits the employer makes life worth living for employees. The welfare
Amenities are extended in additional to normal wages and other economic
Rewards available to employees as per the legal provisions.

MEANING OF EMPLOYEE WELFARE:

The term is derived from the French word “WELFARE”. The of this
French word is “well being or happiness or prosperity of individuals’’

Welfare means faring or doing well. It is a comprehensive term and refers


The physical, mental, moral and emotional well being of individual
DEFINITION OF EMPLOYEE WELEARE:

Welfare measures may also be provided by the government, trade unions


And non-government agencies in addition to the employer. “International
Employee Organization efforts to make life worth living for workers” According
To the Oxford dictionary “Welfare is fundamentally an attitude of mind on the
Part of management influencing the method by which management activities
Are undertake

Employee Welfare as a term which is understood to include such services, facilities


and amenities as may be established in the vicinity of undertaking to enable the
persons employed in them to perform their work in healthy, congenial surrounding
to provide them amenities conductive to good and healthy and high moral.

-INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYEE ORGANIZATION


AT ASIAN RAGIONAL COFERENCE

ARTHUR JAMES TODD {1933} point welfare is “Anything” done for the
comfort and improvement, intellectual and social of the employees over and above
the wage paid, which is not necessary for the industry.

PROUD E.S. defines the welfare work as voluntary efforts on the part of
employers to improve the existing industrial system the condition of employment
in their own factories.

Objectives of employee welfare activities:-


Following are the objectives of the voluntary employee welfare services by
Employer-

1) To win over employees loyalty and increase their morale.


2) To develop efficiency and productivity among workers.
3) To reduce of threat of future government intervention.
4) To make recruitment more effective.
5) To earn goodwill and enhance public image.
6) To build up stable Employee force to reduce Employee turnover and
absenteeism.

Importance of employee welfare activities:-

Employee welfare in India has a special significance as the constitution


Provides for the promotion of welfare of the employee for human conditions of
Work and securing to all workers.

The various welfare measures provided by the employee will have


Immediate impact on the health, physical and mental efficiency, alertness,
Morale and overall efficiency of the workers and thereby contributing to the
highest productivity.
Social security measure provided by employer will act as a protection to
The workers.

Employee welfare means activities designed for the promotion of


The economic, social and cultural well being of the employees.
Includes both statutory as well as non-statutory activities undertaken by the
Employers, trade unions and both the central and state governments for the
Physical and mental development of the workers.

Employee welfare enables workers to have richer and more satisfying life. It
raises the standard of living of workers by indirectly reducing the burden on
their pocket. Welfare measures improve the physical and physiological health
Of the employees, which in turn enhance their efficiency and productivity.

Employee welfare promotes a sense of belongings among the workers,


Preventing them from resorting to unhealthy practices like absenteeism, Employee
unrest strike, etc. welfare work improves the relations between
Employees and employers.

The basic features of employee welfare measures are as follows:

1. Employee welfare includes various facilities, services and amenities


provided to workers for improving their health, efficiency, economic
betterment and social status.

2. Welfare measures are in addition to regular wages and other economic


benefits available to workers due to legal provisions and collective
bargaining

3. Employee welfare schemes are flexible and ever-changing. New welfare


measures are added to the existing ones from time to time.

4. Welfare measures may be introduced by the employers, government,


employees or by any social or charitable agency.
BENEFITS OF WELFARE FACILITIES:

DRINKER PAGER, mention the following points and benefits of


welfare facilities

1. Reduction in employee turnover


2. Reduction in absenteeism
3. Create a sense of belongingness
4. Reduction in employee dispute
5. Balanced development of employees
6. Increases the efficiency of the workers
7. Immunity from civil effect of industrialization

CONCEPT OF LABOUR WELFARE:

The National Commission on Labour has observed that the concept of


“welfare” is necessary dynamic bearing a different interpretation from country to
country and from time to time and even in the same country according to the value
system, social Institution, degree of industrialization and general level of social and
economic development. Even with one country its context may be different from
region to region.

AIM OF LABOUR WELFARE WORK:

C.B.Memoria (1966) points out the following aims of Labour Welfare Work.
1. It is partly humanistic to enable the workers to enjoy a fuller and richer
life.
2. It is partly economic to improve the efficiency of the workers, to increase
its availability where it is scarce and keep him contended so as to minimize the
inducement to form or join unions and to resort to strikes.

3. The aim of partly civic develop a sense of responsibility and dignity


among the workers and thus to make them worthy citizen of the nation.

In general, welfare measure are aimed at enabled the welfare to lead a more
satisfactory life.

THE HISTORY OF LABOUR WELFARE :

The history of Labour Welfare in India started with the abolition of slavery
system in 1833. Based on the recommendation of the International Labour
Conference in 1870 held in Berlin, the Government of India modified the factories
act in 1881.

Considering the suggestions given by the International Labour Organization,


which set up in the year 1919, the Government of India enacted the factories act in
1922, the Government of India launched scheme of Labour Welfare in their
ordnance ammunition and other factories in war production, to keep up the moral
of workers and also to increase their productivity.
After the Independence the amendment of factories act in 1948, the Labour
Welfare movement acquired new dimension, for one thing, the massive
investments in industry during various plans increased in number of workmen. It
was realized from the beginning that Labour Welfare had a positive role in
increasing productivity and reducing industrial tensions. At this State Government
enacted various legislations, regarding the welfare of the workers.
1. Workmen compensation Act, 1923.
2. Factories Act, 1948.
3. Employees State Insurance Act, 1948.
4. Coal Mines Labour Welfare Fund Act, 1947.
5. Employee’s Provident Fund and Miscellineous Provision Act, 1952.
6. Plantation Labour Act, 1957.
7. Mines Act, 1952.
8. Maternity benefits Act, 1962.
9. Payment of Bonus Act, 1965.
10.Payment of Gratuity Act, 1972.

The study team study appointment by the Government of India in 1959 to examine
Labour Welfare activities then existing divided the entire of these activities in to
THREE groups viz.,

1. Welfare measure inside the work place : Condition of the Work


Environment, Conveniences, Work Health Services, Women and Child
Welfare, Worker’s Recreation, Employment Follow-up Economic Services.
2. Welfare measure inside the work place : Housing, Water, Sanitation, Waste
Dioposal, Road, Recreation, Play Grounds, Schools, Markets, Bank,
Transport, Communication, Health and Medical Services, Security,
Community Leadership Development.
3. Social security measures : Welfare Services are “render to workers and their
families by an individual enterprise with the proposes of raising their morale,
material, social and cultural levels to adjust to better life”.

Welfare Activities of the Government of India :


The directive principles of state policy in the Indian Constitution refer
generally to the promotion of the welfare of people when lay down that the “state
shall strive to promote the welfare of the people by securing and protecting as
effectively as it may, a social order in which justice, social, economic and
political, shall inform all the institution of natural”.

In its specific application to the working class, “security and human


condition of work” has been highlighted with a view to ensure them provision of
a decent standard of life and full employment to leisure and social and culture
opportunities (Article 43).

These principles also refer to taking of the steps to secure the participation
of workers in the management of industries. Article 45 also deals with provision
of free and compulsory education for children, which impliedly includes those of
workers.
Company profile:

GRASIM INDUSTRIES LTD


[BIRLA WHITE CEMENT DIVISION]
GRASIM INDUSTRIES LTD

[BIRLA WHITE CEMENT DIVISION]

Our Vision

To be a premium global conglomerate with a clear focus on each business.

Our Mission

To deliver superior value to our customers, shareholders, employees and


society at large.

Our Values

• Integrity

• Commitment

• Passion

• Seamlessness

• Speed

Grasim Industries Limited:


Grasim Industries was incorporated on 25 August 1947, exactly 10 days after India
achieved independence Originally a textile manufacturer, Grasim has successfully diversified
into VSF, cement and chemicals Aditya Birla Group is the world's largest producer of VSF The
Aditya Birla Group is the 11th largest cement producer in the world and the seventh largest in
Asia \Second largest producer of caustic soda in India Grasim and Graviera range of fabrics
signify the 'power of fashion.

Grasim Industries Limited is the brightest feather in the cap of the Aditya Birla Group which
one of the biggest private sector companies in India.

Grasim Industries was set up with the sole purpose of textiles manufacturing in the year
1948 but the company has entered into several commercial activities at a steady rate. Grasim
Industries is numero uno in many of the sectors where it operates.

In order to enter the Indian cement industry, Grasim Industries took over a big chunk of the total
shares and also the control of the management of the UltraTech Cement Limited, which was
merged with the Larsen and Toubro Cement Company in 2004. Within a very short span of time,
the company was able to penetrate a big portion of the market in India. Grasim industries,
including its subsidiaries, operates 7 split grinding units, 11 composite plants, 4 bulk terminals,
and 10 ready mix concrete units.

The divisions of Grasim Industries:

• Viscose staple fiber: This division of the Aditya Birla Group is the biggest producer of
viscose staple fiber worldwide. It fulfills the demand of the domestic market for the
viscose staple fiber.

• Cement: This division is ranked 11th in the international arena and 7th in Asia. It is
further divided into two grey cement and white cement.

○ White cement products

 Birla White GRC

 Birla White Kool N Seal

 Birla White Textura

 Birla White Wallcare Putty

 Birla White Levelplast


○ Grey cement products

 Rajashree Cement

 Vikram Cement

 Grasim Cement

 Aditya Cement

• Grasim Industries Limited, a flagship company of the Aditya Birla Group, ranks among
India's largest private sector companies, with consolidated net turnover of Rs.184 billion
and a consolidated net profit of Rs.22 billion (FY2009).

Starting as a textiles manufacturer in 1948, today Grasim's businesses comprise viscose


staple fibre (VSF), cement, chemicals and textiles. Its core businesses are VSF and
cement, which contribute to over 90 per cent of its revenues and operating profits.

• The Aditya Birla Group is the world’s largest producer of VSF, commanding a 23 per
cent global market share. Grasim, with an aggregate capacity of 333,975 tpa has a global
market share of 12 per cent. It is also the second largest producer of caustic soda (which
is used in the production of VSF) in India.

• In cement, Grasim along with its subsidiary UltraTech Cement Ltd. has a capacity of 45.7
million tpa as on 30 June 2009 and is a leading cement player in India. In July 2004,
Grasim acquired a majority stake and management control in UltraTech Cement Limited.
One of the largest of its kind in the cement sector, this acquisition catapulted the Aditya
Birla Group to the top of the league in India.

Viscose staple fibre


Grasim is India's pioneer in viscose staple fibre (VSF).

Cement
Grasim has grown to become a leading cement player in India.
chemicals
Grasim has India's second largest caustic soda unit

Textiles
Grasim has strong nation-wide retail network and also caters to international fashion
houses in USA and UK.

Textile

Aditya Birla Group operates over 40 companies in 12 countries across 4 continents. Grasim is
one of its flagship companies and It is the world’s second largest producer of Viscose Rayon
Fiber with about 21% market share. Textile and related products contributes to 15% of the group
turnover.

Global footsteps

Indo-Thai Synthetics Company Ltd was incorporated in 1969 in Thailand, started operations in
1970; this was Aditya Birla Group’s first foray into international venture. Aditya Birla Group
incorporated P.T. Elegant Textiles in 1973 in Indonesia. Thai Rayon incorporated in 1974, this
was the second company in Thailand, operating in Viscose Rayon Staple Fiber. Century Textiles
Co. Ltd. is taken over by Aditya Birla Group in 1974; this company is a weaving and dyeing
plant manufacturing and exporting variety of synthetic fabrics. PT Sunrise Bumi Textiles
incorporated in 1979, it produces yarn exported over 30 countries in 6 continents. P.T Indo
Bharat Rayon incorporated in 1980 produces Viscose Staple Fiber in Indonesia to become a
dominant player in the domestic market as well as export markets. Thai Polyphosphates and
Chemicals was started in 1984 in Thailand to produce Sodium Phosphates, presently merged
with Thai Epoxy and Allied Products Company Limited (1992), Thai Sulphites and Chemicals
Company Limited (1995) to form Aditya Birla Chemicals Ltd. This company supplies to sectors
such as food, textiles, electrical and electronics, composites, leather, plastics and automobiles.
PT Indo Liberty Textiles was incorporated in 1995 to manufacture synthetic spun yarn.

In 2004, the Staple Fibre Division of Grasim Industries Ltd was presented with the Stockholm
Industry Water Award for the company's efforts to reduce water usage and improve their overall
environmental impact.[citation needed]
Focus of Growth Post MFA

In late 1990’s and later, the focus was the textile business because of the end of Multi-Fiber
Arrangement (MFA) which opened a host of opportunities to Indian exporters. In this period,
Aditya Birla Group took a three route strategy for growth.

• Rapidly enhance existing capacities

• Acquire and Build Garment brands for local and international markets

Jayashree textiles was acquired by Aditya Birla Nuvo (formerly Indian Rayon), is a leading
producer and exporter of yarns and fabrics to 50 countries with a turnover of $413 million. It
acquired Madura Garments in 2000 to enter the branded garments business. Has brands such as
Louis Philippe, Van Heusen, Peter England, Allen Solly, SF Jeans among others and also a
global supplier to global buyers such as Marks & Spencer’s, Polo etc.

• Vertical integration to get cost advantage

AV Cell Inc., a joint venture between Aditya Birla Group and Tembec, Canada, established
operations in 1998 to produce softwood and hardwood pulp for the purpose of internal
consumption among different units of the Group.

Together, Aditya Birla Group and Tembec, Canada have acquired AV Nackawic Inc., which
produces dissolving pulp, as a further step to integrate. Grasim industries Ltd. is a leading player
in the Viscose Staple Fiber (VSP). The Aditya Birla Group's VSF manufacturing plants straddle
Thailand, Indonesia, India and China. At each of these locations, further capacity expansions are
under way — in Thailand by 31 ktpa; in Indonesia by 37 ktpa; in India by 64 ktpa and in China
by 30 ktpa. These brownfield expansions, slated to be completed by the second quarter of 2008,
will further notch up the Group's VSF production from 566 ktpa to 727 ktpa and entail an
investment close to US$ 260 million.

Grasim wants to follow a strategy of backward integration, right from plantation stage to the
final VSF stage. The Group's VSF business operates through its three companies — Grasim
Industries in India, Thai Rayon Corporation in Thailand and Indo Bharat Rayon in Indonesia,
which also oversees its Chinese operations at Birla Jingwei Fibres, China.

Joint ventures

Thai Rayon
Promoted in 1974 by the Aditya Birla Group, Thai Rayon is the sole manufacturer of Viscose
Rayon Staple Fibre (VSF) in Thailand. More than 50 per cent of Thai Rayon's VSF throughput is
directly exported to more than 20 countries worldwide. The VSF meets the stringent quality
expectations of customers in USA, Mexico, Europe, Turkey, Canada, Israel, Australia, South
Korea, Philippines, Indonesia, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

PT Indo Bharat Rayon

Marketed under the brand name of 'Birla Cellulose', the company produces a wide range of VSF
in engineered specifications for textiles and non-woven applications. The company's strong focus
on environmental protection is reflected through its investments in a sophisticated state-of-the-art
waste-water treatment plant and scientific waste disposal systems

Grasim Cement
Grasim Cement was set up as a greenfield cement plant at Raipur, Chhatisgarh, in 1995. Based
on the most advanced technologies, this plant has an annual installed capacity of 2.06 million
tpa.
The plant’s unique features include:

:: Asia’s first gamma ray belt analyser from Gamma Matrix (USA) ensuring the highest
standards in online quality control.
:: India’s first polycom (blast furnace slag grinder) with a dynamic air separator from Krupp
Polysius Germany, which helps to generate the desired homogeneous particle size
distribution.
:: One of the few single kiln cement plants producing more than eight varieties of cement.
:: Its captive power generation ensures a reliable power supply. The plant is also an ISO
14001, ISO 9001, and IQRS L-5 certified unit.
Aditya Cement
Commissioned in a record time of 22 months as a Greenfield 1.0 mtpa plant in 1995 in
Shambupura, Rajasthan, its current capacity is about 1.50 million tpa.

Some of the prestigious awards won by this unit include:

:: Aditya Limestone Mines wins the following awards at the Mines Safety Week 2004,
Udaipur:

• Mines machinery and maintenance: first

• Safety, occupational health and VTC: first

• Mine working: second

• Environment protection, publicity, propaganda


and housekeeping: second

• Overall performance: second


:: Best Productivity Award by National Productivity Council for 1999
:: The National Energy Conservation Award by Ministry of Power, Government of India, and
Best Energy Efficient Unit Award by CII for the year 2000
:: IQRS level rating from DNV, Netherlands, in the year 2000
:: First in India to achieve Certification ISO 9001:2000 by DNV, Netherlands, 2001
:: TPM Excellence Award – first category by JIPM, Tokyo 2001
Rajashree and Birla Super cement
Commissioned in 1984, Rajashree Cement has a capacity of 4.20 million tpa. The salient facts
about Rajashree Cement are:

:: Coal-based thermal power plant with a 38.5 MW capacity


:: Modern dry process technology from KhD, Germany, with a state-of-the-art process control
system
:: The only cement plant in India with a captive coal washery
:: First in India to achieve Certification ISO 9001:2000 by DNV, Netherlands, 2001
:: Cement varieties catering to different segments: Rajashree Cement for residential and
commercial construction; Birla Super Cement for multi-storeyed buildings, dams and
bridges; UltraTech Cement (formerly Birla Plus) for mass concrete laying and non-
structural applications, Birla Coastal for foundation work and for use in coastal areas as well
as sugar and fertiliser plants, and OPC 53 - S (sleeper grade cement)

Some of the awards won by this unit are:


:: National Award for ‘Quality Excellence in the Indian Cement Industry’ by the National
Council for Cement and Building Materials, for the year 2000-01
:: IMC Ramakrishna Bajaj National Quality Award (certificate of merit) in 1999
:: Jamnalal Bajaj Uchit Vyavahar Puraskar for Fair Business Practices in 1995
:: Rajiv Gandhi National Quality Award in 1993
Grasim South
Grasim acquired Dharani Cements (since merged with the company) in April 1998. The
company has a cement plant at Ariyalur, Tamil Nadu. In April 2000, a state-of-the-art cement
plant, among the most modern in Asia, was commissioned at Reddipalayam, Tamil Nadu. This
unit now has a capacity of 1.16 million tpa.

Grasim ventured into cement production in the mid 1980s, setting up its first cement cement
player in India.

Grasim’s cement operations today span the length and breadth of India, with 11 composite
plants, 11 split grinding units, four bulk terminals and 64 ready-mix concrete plants as on 30
June 2009.

All the plants are located close to sizeable limestone mines and are fully automated to ensure
consistent quality. All units use state-of-the-art equipment and technology and are certified with
ISO 9001 for quality systems and ISO 14001 for environment management systems.

Leveraging the strong equity and goodwill of the house mark, the company has a strong national
brand UltraTech cement under the Aditya Birla Group logo. Grasim is also nurturing some
regional brands like Vikram Cement and Rajashree Cement.

Grasim is one of the largest ready mix concrete (RMC) players in India. RMC business is in a
rapid growth phase. The company has consolidated capacity of 11.31 million cubic meters with
the network of 64 plants as on 30 June 2009.

Grasim is also the largest producer of white cement in India, with a capacity of 560,000 tpa
as on 30 June 2009. Branded as "Birla White", white cement division manufactures world-class
white cement in a variety of textures and finishes. It has applications in floorings and exterior
wall finishes, apart from other innovative uses. The division also manufactures value added
products like putty, GRC etc. which are used in wall finishing and various architectural
applications.

Location of units Capacity (as on 30 June 2009)


Grey cement: Grasim
Composite plants: Jawad, Rawan, Shambhupura, 22.55 million tpa
Malkhed, Reddipalayam
Ready-mix concrete (35 plants) 6.7 million cubic metres
UltraTech Cement Ltd.
Composite plants: Pipava, Awarpur, Tadpatri, 23.10 million tpa
Hirmi, Jafrabad
Ready-mix concrete (29 plants) 4.6 million cubic metres
White cement
560,000
Kharia, Khangar

GRASIM INDUSTRIES MILESTONES:

Grasim, Harihar Polyfibres


2007
: IMC Ramakrishna Bajaj National Quality Special
: Award for performance excellence 2007 in the
manufacturing category

Grasim, Nagda
2006
: Greentech Environmental Excellence Award by Greentech
: Foundation
: Distinguished Achiever Award to Mr. Ravi Uppal from the
: Aditya Birla Group
: Young Achiever Award to Mr. Rakesh Jha from the Aditya
: Birla Group
2005
: Environmental and Ecological Gold Award by Greenland
: Society
: Golden Peacock Eco-Innovation Award by IOD
:
: Safety awards for longest accident-free period (Membrane
: Cell) and lowest average frequency rate (CSA plant) by the
Government of India
: CII National Energy Management Award for the most
: energy efficient unit
: Certificate for Strong Commitment to Excel CII-Exim
: Bank Award for business excellence
: Rajiv Ratna National Award — Best Chief Executive Gold
: Award by Greenland Society
: Greentech Environment Excellence Award by the
: Greentech Foundation
: Rajiv Ratna National Award – Best Pollution Control
: Implementation Gold Award by Greenland Society
: Greentech Safety Gold Award by the Greentech
: Foundation
: National Safety Award by the Government of India
:
: Indira Gandhi Memorial National Award by the Greenland
: Society
: Vishkarma National Award by the Government of India
:

2004
: Grasim, Nagda received the FICCI Annual Award 2003-
: 2004 in recognition of corporate initiative in rural

development

Vikram Cement
: The first Indian unit to win the coveted TPM award from
: the Japan Institute of Plant Maintenance, Tokyo, in 1995
: The Ramakrishna Bajaj National Quality award in 1998
:
: The first cement unit in the world to receive IQRS level 5
: rating from DNV, The Netherlands
: The first cement unit in India to be certified ISO 14001
: (1997) and OHSA 18001 (certifications from DNV,
Rotterdam, The Netherlands, in 2001)
: SA 8000 certification achieved
:

Aditya Cement
2004
: Aditya Limestone Mines wins the following awards at the
: Mines Safety Week 2004, Udaipur:

• Mines machinery and maintenance: first

• Safety, occupational health and VTC: first

• Mine working: second

• Environment protection, publicity, propaganda


and housekeeping: second

• Overall performance: second


1999
: Best productivity award by the National Productivity
: Council
2000
: National energy conservation award by Ministry of Power,
: Government of India
: Best energy efficient unit award by CII
:
: IQRS level 6 rating from DNV, The Netherlands
:
2001
: First in India to be certified ISO 9001:2000, by DNV, The
: Netherlands (2001)
: TPM Excellence award, first category, by JIPM, Tokyo
:

Rajashree Cement
2004
: Birla Super Cement received the Environment Excellence
: Award under the silver category by GreenTech Foundation
: Birla Super Cement certified with the OHSAS 18001:1999
: for their occupational health and safety management
system by Det Norske Veritas (DNV)
2001
: National award for 'Quality excellence in the Indian
: Cement Industry' from the National Council for Cement
and Building Materials
1999
: IMC Ramakrishna Bajaj National Quality award
: (certificates of merit)
1995
: Jamnalal Bajaj Uchit Vyavahar Puraskar for fair business
: practices
1993
: Rajiv Gandhi National Quality award
:

Viscose Staple Fibre


2004
: The 2004 Stockholm Industry Water award
:
2003
: Deming Quality Control award
:
: IMC Ramkrishna Bajaj National Quality award
:
: IMC Ramkrishna Bajaj National Quality award —
: commendation certificate for Grasilene Division
: CII Exim Bank award — commendation for business
: excellence
: Greentech Gold award for environmental excellence
:
2002
: Chairman's Gold award for manufacturing excellence
:
: CII Exim Bank award — commendation for commitment
: of TQM
: Rajiv Gandhi National Quality award — best of all
:
: ISO - 9001 certification
:
: ISO - 14001 certification
:
2001
: Rajiv Gandhi National Quality award — commendation
: certificate
: Corporate Citizen award for excellent contribution in the
: area of social development
2000
: Chairman's Silver award for manufacturing excellence
:
: Rajiv Gandhi National Quality award — commendation
: certificate

Board of Directors of Grasim Industries:

• Mr. Kumar Mangalam Birla, Chairman


• Mrs. Rajashree Birla

• Mr. M. L. Apte

• Mr. S. G. Subhrahmanyan

• Mr. R. C. Bhargava

• Mr. Cyril Shroff

• Mr. S. B. Mathur

• Mr. B. V. Bhargava

• Mr. Shailendra K. Jain

• Mr. D. D. Rathi

Business Heads at Grasim Industries:

• Mr. Shailendra K. Jain, Viscose Staple Fiber

• Mr. Vikram Rao, Textiles

• Mr. Ravi Kastia, Sponge iron

• Mr. Saurabh Misra, Cement

• Mr. K. K. Maheshwari, Chemicals

• Mr. D. D. Rathi, Chief Financial Officer

• Mr. Ashok Malu, Company Secretary

Community services by Grasim Industries:

• Adult education

• Non-formal education

• Medical camps

• Mobile clinics

• Health training and awareness

• Irrigation

• Check dam

• Land developmen
REVIEW OF LITERATURE

 The OXFORD dictionary defines labour welfare an effort to make life worth
living for work man.

 CHANDRA and SING (1983) found that the condition under which brick kiln
workers live subhuman. There were no rest hours and workman in klin was
made to work even in the advanced stage of pregnancy.

 PRASAD (1984) pointed out that in many mines in Bihar workers were
provided with facilities for drinking water, toilets and other facilities.

 A series of study carried out by the labour bureau of India in a variety of


industries showed a large of women working in Menes did not have separate
arrangements, latrines and rest rooms shelters and crèches were in
neglected condition (1979).

 NATIONAL COMMISSION (1969) The report of this commission was


appointed in 1966 had reviewed many aspects of labour welfare in India such
as existing conditions of labour. Legislative measures available to protect
their interest level of workers earnings, standard of living and various welfare
facilities, canteens, crèches, housing, transportation, recreational facilities,
provisions.

 NATIONAL COMMISSION (1972) In conjunction with the passage of 1970


of the occupational Safety and Health Act Congress established a National
Commission undertake a compensation laws in order to determine if such
provide an adequate, prompt, equitable system of compensation.
 MANTRA has undertake research on such areas as pollution control,
mechanical and wet processing. Some of the on-going projects and effluent
treatment and cleanliness of drinking water.

 PETER ROGERS Chairman, The strategic forum for construction has taken
up research in industries and have concluded that unsafe, disorganized and
dirty organizations lead to poor standards and settling for a compromise in
the needs mean risking of lives.

EMPLOYEE WELFARE IN INDIA :

The chapter on the directive principles of state policy first our


constitution expresses the need for labour welfare thus :

Article 38. The state shall strive to promote the welfare of the people
by securing and protecting as effectively as it may a social order in which,

Justice, social, economic and political shall inform all the institution of
the national life.

Article 39. The state shall, in particular, direct its policy towards
security.

a). That the citizen, men and women equally, have the rights to an adequate
means of livelihood.

b). That the ownership and control of the material resource are so distributed
so as to sub serve the common good.

c). That the operation of the economic system does not result in the
concentration of wealth and means of protection to the common determine.
d). That there is equal work for both men and women, and Article 42. The
State shall make provision for securing just and human condition for work
and for maternity relief.

OBJECTIVES OF STUDY:

• To study the welfare facilities provided to employees by GRASIM


INDUSTRIES.LTD Chennai.

• To study how the organization motivate the employees by identifying


and satisfying their unsatisfied needs.

• To find out the expectations of workers with regard to welfare facilities.

• To analyze the extent of utilizations of welfare facilities.

• To make constructive suggestion to improve the welfare.


SCOPE OF THE STUDY:

The study mainly focused on Employee welfare


measures at Grasim Industries Ltd, Chennai and the
researcher analyze this topic on the following criteria’s;

• Relationship between blue color and white color


employees.
• Relationship between employer’s and employee’s
• The statutory welfare facilities Provided to the employees,

• Motivation level of the workers with respect to welfare

facilities.

LIMITATION OF THE STUDY:

 The sample size was limited to BIRLA WHITE.

• Time factor is a major limitation

• The result depends on the answers received

from respondent which may be biased


RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

INTRODUCTION:

Research is the process of systematic and in-depth study or search for any
Particular topic, subject or area of investigation, backed by collection,
Compilation, presentation and interpretation of relevant details or data.
Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem.
It may be understood as a science of studying how research is done
Scientifically.

Research may develop hypothesis and test it. In it we study the various
Steps that are generally adopted by the researcher in studying his research
Problem along with the logic behind them.

Research must be based on fact observable data forms a sound basis for
Research inductive investigation lead better support to research finding for
Analyzing facts a scientific methodology of analysis must be developed and
Result interpreted logically.

It is necessary for the researcher to know not only the research method
or techniques but also the methodology. Thus, when we talk of research
Methodology we not only talk of the research methods but also consider the
Logic behind the methods we use in the context of our research study and
Explain why we are using a particular method or technique and why we are
Not using others so that research results are capable of being evaluated
Either by the researcher himself or by others.

Research problems would result in certain conclusions by means of logical


Analysis which the decision-maker may use for his action or solution.

RESEARCH DESIGN:

After formulating the problem the research design has to be Prepared. Preparation of research
design involves selection of means of Obtaining information, time available for research and
selection of Method of tabulation & presentation of data.

The research of my project is descriptive study. I have obtained Information by the HODof the
HR Department and some of the Employees of the organization & also from annual reports of
company, Newspapers, magazines and websites.
The way of selecting a sample is known as the sample design. Here the researcher used
Simple Random Sampling.

SAMPLING DESIGN:

Sampling is the process of selecting a sufficient number of elements from the


population, so that a study of the sample and an understanding of its properties or characteristics
would make it possible for us to generalize such properties or characteristics to the population
elements.

Descriptive research design:

It provides description of something. It is undertaken in order to ascertain and describe the


characteristics of variables of interest in a particular situation. It is a preplanned and structure
design
‘Descriptive research design is used in this project’

SAMPLING TECHNIQUES:

The sampling technique used for carrying out this study is RANDOM
Sampling technique.
SIMPLE RANDOM SAMPLING :{ meaning]:

Simple Random Sampling is the foundation of probability sampling. It’s a special case of
probability sampling in which every unit in the population has an equal chance of being included
in a sample. Simple random sampling also makes the selection of every possible combination of
the desired number of units likesly.sampling may be done with or without replacement

SAMPLE UNIT:

Worker in GRASIM INDUSTRIES .LTD at Chennai.

A smallest non-divisible part of the population is called a unit. A unit should be well defined and
should not be ambiguous.

TARGET POPULATION:

The total population is 200 in GRASIM INDUSTRIES.LTD in Chennai.

SAMPLE SIZE:

A Sample of 100 was taken from the workers.

A finite subset of a population is a sample and the number of units in a sample is


called its sample size.

HYPOTHESIS:

Employees of GRASIM INDUSTRIES.LTD are found to be satisfied with the


Welfare facilities provided by their organization.

SAMPLING METHOD:

The statistical tools used such percentage; diagrams, Chi-square test& one way ANOVA
‘F’ test have been used.
CHI – SQUARE TEST :

The Chi – square test amongst the several tests of significance developed by statisticians.
A very powerful testing the significance of the discrepancy between theory and experiment is
given by Prof. Karl Pearson in the year 1990 and is known as “Chi-square test of goodness
of fit ”.
It enables us to find it the deviation of the experiment from theory is just by chance (or) is it
really due to inadequacy of the theory to fit the observed data. If Oi (I = 1,2,3…n) is a set of
observed [experimental / frequencies] and E (I = 1,2,3…) is the corresponding set of expected
[theoretical or hypothetical] frequencies then Karl Pearson’s Chi – square given by

X2=i=0n[Oi-EiEi]

The Chi – square is applicable in large number of problems. The test is in fact a technique
through the use of researchers to test the goodness of fit, test the significance of association
between two attributes and test the homogeneity or the significance of popular varience.

One-Way ANOVA’F’Test:

The t test is commonly used to test the equality of two population means when the data
are composed of two random samples. We wish to extend this procedure so that the equality of
population means can be tested using r independent samples. Thus the hypothesis and the
r≥2
alternative are

H 0 : µ1 = µ2 = ... = µ r
H1 : at least two means are not equal
Where
µ j , j = 1, 2,..., r is the mean of the jth population.
In designing an experiment for a one-way classification, units are assigned at random to any one
of the r treatments under investigation. For this reason, the one-way classification is sometimes
referred to as a completely randomized design.

Table No – 4.1.1

Distribution of the respondents and their age

No. of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Age
(n=100) (100%)

1 18 to 25yrs 33 33

2 26 to 32yrs 34 34

3 33 to 40yrs 21 21

4 41 to 50yrs 12 12

The above table shows that one third (34percent) of the respondents were in 26 to 32yrs age, 33
percent of the respondents were in 18 to 25yrs, 21 percent of the respondents were in 33 to 40yrs
and remaining 12 percent of the respondents were in 41 to 50yrs.

Frequency

Age of the respondents

Table No – 4.1.2

Distribution of the respondents and their educational qualification

Educational No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no
qualification (n=100) (100%)

1 UG 51 51
2 PG 49 49

The above table indicates that half (51 percent) of the respondents were in under graduates and
remaining 49percent of the respondents were in PG.

Frequency

Educational qualification of respondents


Table No – 4.1.3

Distribution of the respondents and their salary

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Salary
(n=100) (100%)

1 Rs.10000 43 43

2 Above Rs.10000 57 57

The above table indicates that more than half (57 percent) of the respondents were in above
Rs.10000 and remaining 43 percent of the respondents were in Rs.10000.

Frequency

Income of the respondents

Table No – 4.1.4

Distribution of the respondents and their experience

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Experience
(n=100) (100%)

1 Below 5yrs 54 54
2 Above 5yrs 46 46

The above table indicates that more than half (54 percent) of the respondents were in below 5yrs
experience and remaining 46 percent of the respondents were in above 5yrs.

Frequency

Experience of the respondents


Table No – 4.1.5

Distribution of the respondents and their level of job satisfaction

Job No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no
satisfaction (n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 47 47

2 Satisfied 32 32

3 Neutral 11 11

4 Dissatisfied 5 5

Strongly
5 5 5
dissatisfied

The above table reveals that nearly half (47 percent) of the respondents were in highly satisfy for
the job satisfaction, 32 percent of the respondents were in satisfied, 11 percent of the respondents
were in neutral and remaining equally 5 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied and
highly dissatisfied.

Frequency

Job satisfaction of the respondents

Table No – 4.1.6

Distribution of the respondents and their satisfaction with regard to company

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Company satisfaction
(n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 17 17
2 Satisfied 50 50

3 Neutral 23 23

4 Dissatisfied 8 8

5 Strongly dissatisfied 2 2

The above table reveals that half (50 percent) of the respondents were in satisfy for the company
satisfaction, 23 percent of the respondents were in neutral, 17 percent of the respondents were in
highly satisfied, 8 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied and remaining 2 percent of the
respondents were in strongly dissatisfied.

Frequency

Company satisfaction of the respondents

Table No – 4.1.7

Distribution of the respondents and their relevancy of job for graduation

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Relevant job
(n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 30 30

2 Satisfied 37 37

3 Neutral 15 15

4 Dissatisfied 13 13

5 Strongly dissatisfied 5 5

The above table reveals that one third (37 percent) of the respondents were in satisfy for the
relevant job, 30 percent of the respondents were in highly satisfied, 15 percent of the respondents
were in neutral, 13 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied and remaining 5 percent of the
respondents were in strongly dissatisfied.

Frequency

Job Relevant of the respondents

Table No – 4.1.8

Distribution of the respondents about salary

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Good salary
(n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 20 20

2 Satisfied 33 33

3 Neutral 25 25

4 Dissatisfied 13 13

5 Strongly dissatisfied 9 9

The above table reveals that one third (33 percent) of the respondents were in satisfy for the offer
good salary, 25 percent of the respondents were in neutral, 20 percent of the respondents were in
highly satisfied, 13 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied and remaining 9 percent of the
respondents were in strongly dissatisfied.

Frequency

Company offer good salary to respondents


Table No – 4.1.9

Distribution of the respondents and their convenient duty time

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Convenient duty time
(n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 16 16

2 Satisfied 43 43

3 Neutral 27 27

4 Dissatisfied 9 9

5 Strongly dissatisfied 5 5

The above table shows that nearly half (43 percent) of the respondents were in satisfy for the
convenient duty time, 27 percent of the respondents were in neutral, 16 percent of the
respondents were in highly satisfied, 9 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied and
remaining 5 percent of the respondents were in strongly dissatisfied.

Frequency

Convenient duty time of the respondents

Table No – 4.1.10

Distribution of the respondents and their allowances

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Allowances
(n=100) (100%)

1 Bonus 24 24

2 Vehicle 32 32
3 Mobile 13 13

4 Medical 14 14

5 Loans 17 17

The above table shows that one third (32 percent) of the respondents were in vehicle allowances,
24 percent of the respondents were in bonus, 17 percent of the respondents were in loan, 14
percent of the respondents were in medical and remaining 13 percent of the respondents were in.
Mobile

Frequency

Allowances of the respondents

Table No – 4.1.11

Distribution of the respondents and their promotional policy

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Promotion policy
(n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 19 19

2 Satisfied 38 38

3 Neutral 19 19

4 Dissatisfied 17 17

5 Strongly dissatisfied 7 7

The above table shows that one third (38 percent) of the respondents were in satisfied
promotional policy, equally 19 percent of the respondents were in highly satisfied and neutral, 17
percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied and remaining 7 percent of the respondents were
in strongly dissatisfied.

Frequency

Promotional policy of the respondents

Table No – 4.1.12

Distribution of the respondents and their welfare facility duration of prescribed time

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Sanction time
(n=100) (100%)

1 1-2weeks 24 24

2 2-3weeks 31 31

3 3-4weeks 19 19

4 4-5weeks 17 17

5 5-6weeks 9 9

The above table reveals that one third (31 percent) of the respondents were in 2 to 3 weeks take
time for sanction welfare facility, 24 percent of the respondents were in 1to2 weeks, 19 percent
of the respondents were in 3 to 4 weeks, 17 percent of the respondents were in 4 to 5 weeks and
remaining 9 percent of the respondents were in 5 to 6 weeks.

Frequency

Sanction time of the respondent


Table No – 4.1.13

Distribution of the respondents and their ventilation.

Ventilation for good No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no
environment (n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 17 17

2 Satisfied 40 40

3 Neutral 29 29

4 Dissatisfied 4 4

5 Strongly dissatisfied 10 10

The above table shows that one third (40 percent) of the respondents were in satisfied for good
environment, 29 percent of the respondents were in neutral, 17 percent of the respondents were
in highly satisfied, 10 percent of the respondents were in strongly dissatisfied and remaining 4
percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied.

Frequency

Ventilation good environment

Table No – 4.1.14

Distribution of the respondents and their work place cleanliness

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Work place cleanliness
(n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 26 26

2 Satisfied 38 38
3 Neutral 23 23

4 Dissatisfied 8 8

5 Strongly dissatisfied 5 5

The above table shows that one third (38 percent) of the respondents were in satisfied for work
place cleanliness, 26 percent of the respondents were in highly satisfied, 23 percent of the
respondents were in neutral, 8 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied and remaining 5
percent of the respondents were in strongly dissatisfied.

Frequency

Cleanliness facility
Table No – 4.1.15

Distribution of the respondents and their welfare facility

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Provide welfare facility
(n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 18 18

2 Satisfied 42 42

3 Neutral 20 20

4 Dissatisfied 11 11

5 Strongly dissatisfied 9 9

The above table reveals that more than half (42 percent) of the respondents were in satisfied for
provision for welfare facilities, 20 percent of the respondents were in neutral, 18 percent of the
respondents were in highly satisfied, 11 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied and
remaining 9 percent of the respondents were in strongly dissatisfied.

Frequency

Welfare facility

Table No – 4.1.16

Distribution of the respondents and their job security

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Job security
(n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 20 20
2 Satisfied 43 43

3 Neutral 25 25

4 Dissatisfied 12 12

5 Strongly dissatisfied 0 0

The above table reveals that more than half (43 percent) of the respondents were in satisfied for
our job security, 25 percent of the respondents were in neutral, 20 percent of the respondents
were in highly satisfied and remaining 12 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied.

Frequency

Job security of the respondents


Table No – 4.1.17

Distribution of the respondents and their top management relationship

Top management No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no
relationship (n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 20 20

2 Satisfied 40 40

3 Neutral 23 23

4 Dissatisfied 16 16

5 Strongly dissatisfied 1 1

The above table reveals that more than half (40 percent) of the respondents were in satisfied for
the top level management relationship, 23 percent of the respondents were in neutral, 20 percent
of the respondents were in highly satisfied, 16 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied and
remaining 1 percent of the respondents were in highly dissatisfied.

Frequency

Top management relationship

Table No – 4.1.18

Distribution of the respondents and their assured insurance

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Assured insurance
(n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 24 24
2 Satisfied 37 37

3 Neutral 28 28

4 Dissatisfied 7 7

5 Strongly dissatisfied 4 4

The above table reveals that one third (37 percent) of the respondents were in satisfied for the
assured insurance, 28 percent of the respondents were in neutral, 24 percent of the respondents
were in highly satisfied, 7 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied and remaining 4
percent of the respondents were in highly dissatisfied.

Frequency

Insurance assured of the respondents


Table No – 4.1.19

Distribution of the respondents and their time to spend with their family

Gives time to spent No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no
family (n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 26 26

2 Satisfied 35 35

3 Neutral 30 30

4 Dissatisfied 8 8

5 Strongly dissatisfied 1 1

The above table reveals that one third (35 percent) of the respondents were in satisfied for
company provide time to spent your family, 30 percent of the respondents were in neutral, 26
percent of the respondents were in highly satisfied, 8 percent of the respondents were in
dissatisfied and remaining 1 percent of the respondents were in highly dissatisfied.

Frequency

Time to spent family

Table No – 4.1.20

Distribution of the respondents and their PF withdrawal facility

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no PF withdrawal facility
(n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 19 19

2 Satisfied 44 44
3 Neutral 23 23

4 Dissatisfied 10 10

5 Strongly dissatisfied 4 4

The above table reveals that nearly half (44 percent) of the respondents were in satisfied for
provident fund with drawl facility, 23 percent of the respondents were in neutral, 19 percent of
the respondents were in highly satisfied, 10 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied and
remaining 4 percent of the respondents were in highly dissatisfied.

Frequency

PF withdrawal facility
Table No – 4.1.21

Distribution of the respondents and top management commitment to solve the problems.

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Help to problem solving
(n=100) (100%)

1 Always 21 21

2 Sometimes 34 34

3 Never 31 31

4 No opinion 14 14

The above table reveals that one third (34 percent) of the respondents were in sometimes to help
their help to problem solving, 31 percent of the respondents were in never, 21 percent of the
respondents were in always and remaining 14 percent of the respondents were in no opinion.

Frequency

Problem solving of the respondents

Table No – 4.1.22

Distribution of the respondents and their leave facility

No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no Leave facility
(n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 31 31

2 Satisfied 38 38
3 Neutral 20 20

4 Dissatisfied 7 7

5 Strongly dissatisfied 4 4

The above table reveals that one third (38 percent) of the respondents were in satisfied for leave
facility for festival and family functions, 31 percent of the respondents were in highly satisfied,
20 percent of the respondents were in neutral, 7 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied
and remaining 4 percent of the respondents were in highly dissatisfied.

Frequency

Leave facility

Table No – 4.1.23

Distribution of the respondents and their time to spent BIRLA WHITE

Time to spent BIRLA No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no
WHITE (n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 25 25

2 Satisfied 42 42

3 Neutral 16 16

4 Dissatisfied 13 13

5 Strongly dissatisfied 4 4

The above table reveals that nearly half (42 percent) of the respondents were in satisfied for time
to spent Birla white, 25 percent of the respondents were in highly satisfied, 16 percent of the
respondents were in neutral, 13 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied and remaining 4
percent of the respondents were in highly dissatisfied.
Frequency

Respondents Time to spent BIRLA WHITE

Table No – 4.1.24

Distribution of the respondents and their gratuity present method of calculation

Gratuity present No.of respondents Percentage


Sl.no
method (n=100) (100%)

1 Highly satisfied 23 23

2 Satisfied 32 32

3 Neutral 28 28

4 Dissatisfied 15 15

5 Strongly dissatisfied 2 2

The above table reveals that on third (32 percent) of the respondents were in satisfied for present
gratuity method, 28 percent of the respondents were in neutral, 23 percent of the respondents
were in highly satisfied, 15 percent of the respondents were in dissatisfied and remaining 2
percent of the respondents were in highly dissatisfied.

Frequency

Method of calculation

Table No – 4.1.25

Association between age of the respondents and their job satisfaction

Sl.n Age Job satisfaction Statistic


Highly al
Satisfie Neutra Strongly
o satisfie Dissatisfi inferenc
d l dissatisfi
d ed (n=5) e
(n=32) (n=11) ed (n=5)
(n=47)

18 to
16 9 3
1 25yr 2 (6.1%) 3 (9.1%)
(48.5%) (27.3%) (9.1%)
s X2 =

26 to 5.346
17 11 3
2 32yr 2 (5.9%) 1 (2.9%)
(50%) (32.4%) (8.8%) Df = 12
s
P > 0.05
33 to
8 7 4
3 40yr 1 (4.8%) 1 (4.8%) Not
(38.1%) (33.3%) (19%)
s Significan
41 to t
5 1
4 50yr 6 (50%) 0 0
(41.7%) (8.3%)
s

The above table shows that there is no significant association between age of the respondents and their
job satisfaction. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value. (Table value = 21.026)

Research hypothesis

There is a significant association between age of the respondents and their job satisfaction.

Null hypothesis

There is no significant association between age of the respondents and their job satisfaction.

Statistical test

Chi-square test was used the above hypothesis

Findings

The above table shows that there is no significant association between age of the respondents and their
job satisfaction. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value. So the research hypothesis rejected
and the null hypothesis accepted.
Table No – 4.1.26

Association between gender of the respondents and their welfare measures help to solve the
problem

Welfare measures help to solve the problem


Sl.n Gende No Statistical
Always Sometimes Never
o r opinion inference
(n=21) (n=34) (n=31)
(n=14)

20 X2=4.521
1 Male 8 (16.3%) 15 (30.6%) 6 (12.2%)
(40.8%)
Df = 3

P > 0.05
13 11
2 Female 19 (37.3%) 8 (15.7%)
(25.5%) (21.6%) Not
Significant

The above table shows that there is no significant association between gender of the respondents and their
welfare measures help to solve the problem. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value. (Table
value = 7.815)

Research hypothesis

There is a significant association between gender of the respondents and their welfare measures help to
solve the problem.

Null hypothesis

There is no significant association between gender of the respondents and their welfare measures help to
solve the problem.

Statistical test

Chi-square test was used the above hypothesis

Findings
The above table shows that there is no significant association between gender of the respondents and their
welfare measures help to solve the problem. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value. So the
research hypothesis rejected and the null hypothesis accepted.
Table No – 4.1.26

Association between educational qualification of the respondents and their relevant job

Relevant job

Highly Statistic
Education Neutr
Sl.n satisfi Satisfi Dissatisfi Strongly al
qualificati al
o ed ed ed dissatisfi inferenc
on (n=15
(n=30 (n=37) (n=13) ed (n=5) e
)
)

19 7 X2=2.681
17
1 UG (37.3% (13.7 6 (11.8%) 2 (3.9%)
(33.3%) Df = 4
) %)
P > 0.05
11 8
20 Not
2 PG (22.4% (16.3 7 (14.3%) 3 (6.1%)
(40.8%) Significa
) %)
nt

The above table shows that there is no significant association between educational qualification of the
respondents and their relevant job. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value. (Table value =
9.488)

Research hypothesis

There is a significant association between educational qualification of the respondents and their relevant
job.

Null hypothesis

There is no significant association between educational qualification of the respondents and their relevant
job.

Statistical test

Chi-square test was used the above hypothesis

Findings
The above table shows that there is no significant association between educational qualification of the
respondents and their relevant job. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value. So the research
hypothesis rejected and the null hypothesis accepted.
Table No – 4.1.27

Association between salary of the respondents and their company offering good salary

Company offering good salary


Statistic
Highly Neutr
Sl. Satisfi Dissatisf Strongly al
Salary satisfi al
no ed ied dissatisfi inferenc
ed (n=25
(n=33) (n=13) ed (n=9) e
(n=20) )

13 X2=2.270
Rs.1000 14
1 6 (14%) (30.2% 6 (14%) 4 (9.3%)
0 (32.6%) Df = 4
)
P > 0.05
Above 12
14 19 Not
2 Rs.1000 (21.1% 7 (12.3%) 5 (8.8%)
(24.6%) (33.3%) Significa
0 )
nt

The above table shows that there is no significant association between salary of the respondents and their
company offering good salary. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value. (Table value = 9.488)

Research hypothesis

There is a significant association between salary of the respondents and their company offering good
salary.

Null hypothesis

There is no significant association between salary of the respondents and their company offering good
salary.

Statistical test

Chi-square test was used the above hypothesis

Findings

The above table shows that there is no significant association between salary of the respondents and their
company offering good salary. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value. So the research
hypothesis rejected and the null hypothesis accepted.
Table No – 4.1.28

Association between salary of the respondents and their job security

Job security
Statistic
Highly Neutr
Sl. Satisfi Dissatisf Strongly al
Salary satisfi al
no ed ied dissatisfi inferenc
ed (n=25
(n=43) (n=12) ed (n=0) e
(n=20) )

7 X2=4.987
Rs.1000 7 23
1 (16.3% 6 (14%) 0
0 (16.3%) (53.5%) Df = 3
)
P > 0.05
Above 18
13 20 Not
2 Rs.1000 (31.6% 6 (10.5%) 0
(22.8%) (35.1%) Significa
0 )
nt

The above table shows that there is no significant association between salary of the respondents and their
job security. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value. (Table value = 7.815)

Research hypothesis

There is a significant association between salary of the respondents and their job security.

Null hypothesis

There is no significant association between salary of the respondents and their job security.

Statistical test

Chi-square test was used the above hypothesis

Findings
The above table shows that there is no significant association between salary of the respondents and their
job security. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value. So the research hypothesis rejected and
the null hypothesis accepted.
Table No – 4.1.29

Association between experience of the respondents and their time to spent BIRLA WHITE

Time to spent BIRLA WHITE


Statistic
Highly Neutr
Sl. Experie Satisfi Dissatisf Strongly al
satisfie al
no nce ed ied dissatisfi inferenc
d (n=16
(n=42) (n=13) ed (n=4) e
(n=25) )

6 X2=7.799
Below 18 24
1 (11.1% 5 (9.3%) 1 (1.9%)
5yrs (33.3%) (44.4%) Df = 4
)
P > 0.05
10
Above 7 18 Not
2 (21.7% 8 (17.4%) 3 (6.5%)
5yrs (15.2%) (39.1%) Significa
)
nt

The above table shows that there is no significant association between experience of the respondents and
their time to spent BIRLA WHITE. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value. (Table value =
7.815)

Research hypothesis

There is a significant association between experience of the respondents and their time to spent BIRLA
WHITE.

Null hypothesis

There is no significant association between experience of the respondents and their time to spent BIRLA
WHITE.

Statistical test

Chi-square test was used the above hypothesis

Findings
The above table shows that there is no significant association between experience of the respondents and
their time to spent BIRLA WHITE. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value. So the research
hypothesis rejected and the null hypothesis accepted.
Table No – 4.1.30

Difference between age of the respondents and their promotional policy

Sl.n Promotional Mea S.D SS Df MS Statistical


o policy n inference

1 Between
1.258 3 .419
Groups

1.32
G1 (n=33) 2.61
1

1.12 F = .293
G2 (n=34) 2.62
9
P > 0.05
1.15
G3 (n=21) 2.33
5 Not Significant

1.08
G4 (n=12) 2.58
4

2 137.49 1.43
Within Groups 96
2 2

G1 = 18 to 25yrs/ G2 = 26 to 32yrs/ G3 = 33 to 40yrs/ G4 = 41 to 50yrs

The above table shows that there is no significant difference between age of the respondents and their
promotional policy. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value.

Research hypothesis

There is a significant difference between age of the respondents and their promotional policy.

Null hypothesis

There is no significant difference between age of the respondents and their promotional policy.

Statistical test

One way ANOVA ‘f’ test was used the above hypothesis

Findings
The above table shows that there is no significant difference between age of the respondents and their
promotional policy. Hence, the calculated value greater than table value. So the research hypothesis
rejected and the null hypothesis accepted.
I. FINDING RELATED TO MAJOR SOCIO – DEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS :

1. 32% of the respondents are in the age group of 26%32 yrs (Table 4.1)
2. 51% of the respondents are in the under graduates (Table 4.2)
3. 57% of the respondents are in the Income group of Rs. 10,000 (Table 4.3)
4. 54% of the respondents are in the 5 yrs experience (Table 4.4)

I. FINDING RELATED TO HYPOTHESIS :

FINDINGS:

1. The finding reveals that there is no significant between respondents age


and job satisfactions. Hence the null hypothesis is to be accepted.
2. The finding reveals that there is no significant between respondents gender
and welfare measure help to solve the problem. Hence the null hypothesis
is to be accepted.
3. The finding reveals that there is no significant between respondent
educational qualification and relevant job. Hence the null hypothesis is to
be accepted.
4. The finding reveals that there is no significant between re3spondent
experience and job security. Hence the null hypothesis is to be accepted.
5. The finding reveals that there is no significant between respondents age
and promotional policy. Hence the null hypothesis is to be accepted.
6. The finding reveals that there is no significant between respondent salary
and company offering good salary. Hence the null hypothesis is to be
accepted.

I. GENERAL FINDINGS :

1. Majority of the respondents are extremely satisfied with the


welfare facilities (42%).
2. Majority of the respondents are satisfied with Provident Fund
withdrawal facility (44%).
3. Majority of the respondents are satisfied with spend time to Birla
White (42%).
4. Majority of the respondents are satisfied relationship with top
management (40%).
Suggestion:

 Need to provide more welfare facilities, environment with cleanliness

 Sanctioning time of special welfare facility should be reduced.

 New facilities should be added to the existing ones by early action


taken by management.
CONCLUSION:

Grasim Industries Ltd is the largest cement manufacturing company in India. It is


located at Chennai.

The researcher has found after visiting the spots and places related with welfare
facilities the statutory conditions. According to the factories act 1948, are fulfilled in welfare
activities. Most of the employees are satisfied with the welfare facilities and most of the
employee are well aware with the measures activity. The company takes good care of its
employees.

With available information the researcher suggest that the company should
further, to reduce the bad opinion’s about the facilities provided. Welfare facilities to employees
not only to increase productivity but also increase the standard of the living of the employees.

The researcher hope that the company must considered the suggestion and pay
more attention for further improvement.
BIBLIOGRAPHY

MAMORIA.MAMORIA.MAMORIA, (2004) “DYNAMICS OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS” 14th


EDITION
.

SEWA SINGH CHAUHAN, (1993) “LABOUR WELFARE ADMINISTRATION IN INDIA” FIRST

EDITION.

AJAY GARG, (1995) “LABOUR LAWS” 8th REVISED EDITION.

C.R.KOTHARI, (1997), “RESEARCH METHODOLOGY- METHODS AND TECHNIQUES” 2nd

EDITION.

ARUN MONAPPA, (1994), “INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS” 8th EDITION.

UMA SEKAREN, (2009),”RESEARCH METHODS FOR BUSINESS”4thEDITION


A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE WELFARE MEASURE

IN

GRASIM INDSUTRIES.LTD, CHENNAI

QUESTIONNAIRE

I introduce myself as SRINATH.V.R.S, II M.B.A student from JJ College of


Engineering&Technology affiliated to ANNA UNIVERSITY. I’m intend to do the project in
HUMAN RESOURSE MANEGEMENT. My project area is EMPLOYEE WELFARE
MEASURES. I wish you free and frank answer to exhibit the views to help in getting useful
results and ensure that the project for academic purpose and identify will be strictly confidential.

I. PERSONAL INFORMATION:

• Name [optional ] :

• Age : 18-25 [ ] 26-32 [ ] 33-40 [ ] 41-50[ ]

• Education : UG[ ] PG[ ]

• Sex : MALE [ ] FEMALE [ ]

• Salary : 10,000 [ ] above10,000 [ ]

• Work Experience : below 5yrs [ ] above 5yrs [ ]


I. WELFARE:

1. Are you satisfied with the job

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

2. Are you satisfied with the company

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

3. Is the job relevant to your graduation

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]


Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

4. Is the company offering you good salary

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

5. The duty time in BIRLA WHITE is very convenient

Strongly Agree [ ] Agree [ ] No opinion [ ]


Disagree Highly [ ] Dissatisfied [ ]
6. What are the allowances paid by your company?

Bonus [ ] Vehicle [ ] Mobile [ ]


Medical [ ] Loans [ ]

7. Are you satisfied with the promotion policy in your organization

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

8. How much time it will take for sanctioning special welfare facility?

1-2 week [ ] 2-3 week [ ] 3-4 week [ ]


4-5week [ ] 5-6 week [ ]

9. Is there suitable ventilation and good environment in the work place?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

10.Is the work place regularly cleaned?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

11.Does welfare benefits provided by the organization plays a


Motivational factor?
Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

12.Are you satisfied with the job security in BIRLA WHITE

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]


Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

13.The top management interest with you

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]


Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

14.Are you satisfied with the Insurance assured in BIRLA WHITE

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]


Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

15.Are you satisfied with the time that Birla White gives, to spend with
your family at home?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]


Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

16. Are you satisfied with the withdrawal facilities in the employee
provident fund Scheme?
Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]
Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]
17. Do the welfare measures help in solving the problems faced by
employees?
Always [ ] Sometimes [ ] Never [ ] No opinion [ ]

18. Are you satisfied with the festival or family function to provide
leave in BIRLA WHITE?
Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

19. How would you rate the time spent in BIRLA WHITE

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

20. Are you satisfied with the present method of calculation of gratuity

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

THANKS FOR YOUR CO-OPERATION

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