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This is a publication of the Clemson University School of Architecture.

The work presented


here was carried out under the auspices of the Langston Charter Middle School in Greenville,
SC solely for their internal use in the planning of new facilities.

No part of this document may be duplicated without the expressed concent of the Langston
School or the School of Architecture.

February 2008
The Langston Charter Middle School

Planning the Future


Mission, Function and Sustainability Ideas for a
New Building

The work presented in this publication was performed in a graduate architecture studio under the
direction of Professors Jose Caban and Jori Erdman. The students whose projects are included are:

Aaron Bowman
Claire Bowman
Paul Kennedy
Shawn McKeever
Nathan Missel
Ashley Ortman
Matthew Santilli
Tim Takacs
Thomas Weir
Brian Williford.

Clemson University Graduate Architecture Program


The Langston
Charter Middle
School

Building on the legacy of Mission Statement Vision Statement


people like Dicey Langston,
The mission of Langston Langston will be a state and
Langston Charter Middle
Charter Middle School is to national model for excellence
School exists to provide
enrich and empower sixth, in academics, compassionate
academic excellence for
seventh and eighth graders community service and re-
students while instilling the
with personal responsibility sponsible leadership. These
values of personal responsi-
and a compassion for their characteristics will be the
bility and accountability. The
community through single hallmarks of the alumni as
students are required to par-
gender classes, innovative they pursue future endeavors
ticipate in community service
teacher, parent and com- and life long learning.
projects of their choosing.
munity collaborative learning.
Langston Charter Middle
We believe by taking what
School expects active paren- Student Body Mission
they are learning in their
tal involvement in their child’s Statement
academic classes and us-
academic, emotional and
ing it in the “Real World” the
social development. We, the Student Body of
students will become more
Langston Charter Middle
engaged in learning. Stu-
school strive to be posi-
dents at Langston increase
tive while working hard and
their sense of self-worth by
cooperating with others. We
making compassionate and
will take responsibility for our
real contributions to their
education in the classroom
community.
and beyond as we endeavor
to be the leaders of tomor-
row.
Faculty

Greg Abel - Principal


Cindy Armistead - Math
Bobby Black - Leadership
Bev Cannon - Social Studies
Forouzandeh Forghani - English
Liliana Fuentes - Spanish
Matt Griffin - Social Studies
Rachel Hamilton - English
David Leeke - Science
Sandy Lorick - Math
Jason Moore - PE
Beth Roueche` - Science
Susan Rundle - English
2007-08 Board of Directors
Larissa Stevens - Spanish
Front row:
Brett Pyle
Sheperd Porter
Rick Horne
Elaine Wiegert

Second row:
Tammy Ferrell
Terry Pilch
Susan Salamone
Lisa Stevens
Sandy Caffrey
Judy Johnson

Not pictured: Chris Stolarski


Policies to last a lifetime. Protecting
the integrity and effective-
Uniforms

& Values ness of the small classroom


is paramount in all school
decisions.
The purpose of the school
uniform is to focus students’
attention on academics by
reducing distractions.
Leadership Training and
Community Service Ethical Conduct

Core Academics Leadership training focuses All operations of Langston


on independent thinking, Charter Middle School will
Langston provides challeng- vision development, and exemplify integrity through
ing academic opportunities organizational skills. Through proper business protocol, fi-
with the primary focus on a personal commitment stu- nancial responsibility, and ac-
core curriculum of English, dents set and accomplish countability to all concerned
Math, Science, History and goals, thus inspiring others parties. The leadership of
Foreign language. We value to follow. Langston stu- Langston will unequivocally
highly qualified teachers who dents are trained to explore uphold the school charter,
are innovative and passion- service opportunities and to its bylaws and all state and
ate about students learning. look beyond “their world.” By federal laws.
personally accomplishing and
Single Gender Classes generating tangible results, Patriotism
students acquire true self es-
Classes are taught single/ teem and realize the value of The United States of America
same gender. Boys and their contributions to society. is our home by choice. A
girls learn differently and by true patriot is someone who
respecting the differences in Parent Involvement loves, supports, takes pride
learning styles and develop- in and is prepared to serve
ment, teachers can instruct Parent involvement is a ma- their country. Respect, devo-
more effectively. Students jor cornerstone in the daily tion and loyalty to the United
are educated in an environ- life and culture of Langston. States of America, its laws
ment that encourages and The Parent/Faculty Part- and constitution, shall be
equips them to reach their nership is vital to student upheld by Langston Charter
full potential. educational success. Par- Middle School faculty, staff,
ents shall lead, participate students, parents, board
Small Classes in and contribute to extra members and volunteers. To
curricular school activities. demonstrate these patriotic
The small classroom en- Parents sharing their knowl- values, Langston shall always
hances the opportunities edge, skills and talents model fly the American and South
for individual attention and service and leadership by Carolina state flags and shall
participation. Accomplish- example. always affirm the Pledge
ments and achievements in of Allegiance to the United
the classroom are designed States of America.
Leadership Training
Community Service

Leadership and Community Langston students have won


Service are central to all we more awards in the Student
do at Langston. A unique Cam competition than any
class has been created at other school in the nation.
Langston to teach the stu- Students study books such
dents about Leadership and as 6 Most Important Deci-
help them explore ways to sions You Will Make, 7 Hab-
serve their community. Sixth its of Highly Effective Teens,
grade students are required Beyond the Lemonade Stand.
to complete 10 hours of Students of Today, Leaders
service each quarter and 7th of Tomorrow
and 8th graders are required
to perform 15 hours of com- The mission of Langston
munity service per quarter. Charter Middle School is to
Projects and opportunities enrich and empower sixth,
are discussed in class and seventh and eighth graders
students are then encour- with personal responsibility
aged to participate in those and a compassion for their
activities that interest them community through single
the most. gender classes, innovative
teacher, parent and com-
To learn about Leadership, munity collaborative learning.
the students participate in Langston Charter Middle
the YMCA Youth In Govern- School expects parental
ment program, organize and involvement in their child’s
lead class projects to raise academic, emotional and
money for Relay for Life, and social development.
explore current events and
produce a video for the C- Langston Charter Middle
SPAN Student Cam program. School is named after a cou-
rageous young girl, Laodicea opment, and as a group they
“Dicey” Langston, who during are widely scattered across
the Revolutionary War risked the spectrum of maturity.
her life on several occasions Langston Charter Middle
in our country’s fight for School will address these
freedom. Her selfless acts issues in an environment
and willingness to be involved where students will experi-
exemplify the character traits ence innovative approaches
that must exist in people if to teaching and single
their community is to be a gender classes. Parental
place of quality. Dicey’s acts involvement will go beyond
of heroism took place near just fund raising. Parents are
Greenville County. She later expected and encouraged to
lived and raised her family be on campus and to actively
in Travelers Rest, where a participate in the educational
monument has been erected process.
in her honor.
Our goal is to make educa-
Building on the legacy of tion relevant to the present
people like Dicey Langston and future lives of our stu-
we propose that Langston dents. By studying leaders
Charter Middle School exists from the past, we are inspir-
to provide academic excel- ing them to innovate, improve
lence for students while in- and have a positive impact on
stilling the values of personal the community.
responsibility and account-
ability. The curriculum will
incorporate service projects
chosen by the students
in order to enhance their
academic learning as well
as increase their sense of
self-worth by making compas-
sionate and real contribu-
tions to their community.

The middle school years


present a unique set of
challenges to students and
to the adults who teach and
parent them. These young
adolescents are truly caught
between two stages of devel-
Location
The 7-acre school site highlited in yellow above is on East Geor-
gia Road in Simpsonville adjacent to the proposed multi-use
OTTARAY develpment.
A New
Building for The Langston
School
Mission, Function and Sustainability

As a chartered unit of the ing this approach is extensive


Greenville County School research on the difference in
District, Langston receives learning patterns and the ac-
a per-pupil budget and oper- companying teaching styles
ates within local and state that best suit each group.
guidelines and requirements.
The available research offers
A Board of Directors com- indicators of factors relevant
prised of parents oversees to architecture such as size,
the mission and function of materials, colors and tex-
Background the school and promotes tures in a classroom. Day
active parental involvement in lighting and proportion of
Officials of the Langston
school activities. glass to the outside are also
Charter Middle School
factors that affect boys and
(LCMS) approached the Langston emphasizes service girls differently. Seating ar-
School of Architecture at and leadership education. rangements in classrooms
Clemson University in the The curriculum is well bal- can reflect a contrast be-
summer of 2007 with a anced with required classes tween the two groups and
proposal for a group of archi- typical for the grades, but the dynamics of their daily
tecture students to explore with the uniqueness of having interaction among them-
ideas for a new facility. core language and leader- selves and with the teachers;
Langston is a young charter ship classes. whether listening to lectures
middle school comprising or working independently or
The single-gender philoso-
three levels from sixth to in groups. Girls are more
phy adopted by Langston is
eighth grades and with a sensitive to sound (noise) as
founded on extensive experi-
total projected enrollment of they can hear seven times
ence and documentation
480 students. What makes better than boys, while boys
that supports the merits of
the school unique is its are more boisterous and
this approach. While the
parent-driven management given to more hyper kinetic
school enrolls boys and girls,
structure and its single-gen- behavior often accompanied
classes are held in single-
der pedagogical model. by a higher level of noise.
gender groups. Substantiat-
These factors point to a vehicular circulation and Math - 6th graders take
number of strategies that parking. advanced pre-algebra, 7th
would be required to address graders take either
diverse needs in the design The student projects that pre-algebra III or Algebra
of a new school building. resulted from the dialog I Honors for high school
The concept of sustainability between Clemson and the credit, 8th graders take
is also a major focus of the LCMS represent a range one of the following depend-
LCMS. In an age of indis- of possibilities that taken ing on their readiness - re-
criminate consumption of together, offer a wealth of take pre-algebra III,
energy and a global depletion ideas and strategies useful take Algebra I Honors, or
of non-renewable resources, to school officials as they take Geometry I Honors.
the awareness of a com- move ahead with the panning
mon responsibility to reverse and design of the new school
current trends needs to be building. 2. Spanish is taught as a
ingrained in students, par- regular class in all 3 grades.
ents and professionals’ mind It meets every
set. Langston is commit- day for every student. As
ted to setting an example of stated before, 6th and 7th
prudence and responsibility graders take it as an
by seeking an energy efficient
Curriculum exploratory or introductory
building idea. Clemson ar- course - focusing on under-
Social Studies - 6th Ancient
chitecture is equally focused standing and speaking.
History, 7th World Cultures,
on architectural approaches 8th graders take Spanish I
8th SC/American
that conserve energy, that for high school credit - focus-
History
lead to a reduced carbon ing more on the
footprint and that serve as mechanics, grammar, etc.
Science - 6th General Sci-
a way to educated building
ence, 7th Life Science, 8th
occupants about the possi-
Physical Science
bilities of design and building
materials more suitable to
Spanish - 6th and 7th are ex-
our age.
ploratory classes, 8th grad-
ers take Spanish I
LCMS has been given a tract
for high school credit
of land of some seven acres
adjacent to large proposed
English - 6th-8th State curric-
development on in the area
ulum standards, 8th graders
of Simpsonville outside of
may also take
Greenville, SC. The site is of
English I honors for high
moderate topography with
school credit
low vegetation cover and
PE - all grades
good drainage. The area is
adequate to accommodate
Leadership - all grades
the building and the required
Case
Studies
Benjamin Franklin
Elementary School
Kirkland, Washington

Photo credit: Benjamin Ben-


schneider
Overview
Location: Kirkland, WA
Building type(s): K-12 educa-
tion
New construction
56,800 sq. feet (5,280 sq.
meters)
Project scope: 2-story build-
ing
Suburban setting
Examples of buildings that Completed August 2005
exhibit relevant design ap- The Ben Franklin Elementary
proaches and sustainability School serves 450 students
strategies in school project in kindergarten through
and other building types. grade six. The students are

Numerous examples were


selected by individual stu-
dents and were discussed for
their merits and applicable
ideas. A selection of these is
presented ahead.

distributed within small learn-


ing communities, each includ-
ing a cluster of four naturally
ventilated and daylit class-
rooms around a multipur-
pose activity area. Stacked
within two-story wings that
extend toward the woods, roof runoff. Gathering areas
these communities are inte- for outdoor classes are lo-
grally linked with views and cated within the landscaping.
access to nature beyond.
Because daylight and indoor
This project was chosen as air quality profoundly impact
an AIA Committee on the student performance, the
Environment Top Ten Green school was designed to maxi-
Project for 2006. It was mize performance in these
submitted by Mahlum Archi- areas. The classroom areas
tects, in Seattle, Washing- of the school are entirely
ton. Additional project team naturally ventilated and daylit.
members are listed on the This design also led to exem-
“Process” screen. plary energy performance:
the school is anticipated to
Environmental Aspects use only 16,405 Btu per ft2
The new school expands per year. Comparing baseline
learning beyond the class- data from the old school to
room by connecting the dis- that resulting from a post-oc-
trict’s educational pedagogy cupancy evaluation planned
with environmental sustain- over the next year should
ability at every level. validate performance results.

The school was designed to Owner & Occupancy


preserve and harness the Owned and occupied by Lake
environment as a learning Washington School District,
opportunity. The large wood- Local government
ed area along the north end Typically occupied by 483
of school’s site is valued as people, 38 hours per person
a community asset. Creat- per week; and 200 visitors
Colors contribute to students
ing connections to this rich per week, 20 hours per visi-
identification with their spaces
natural environment became tor per week
a primary goal in the design
process. Two-story class-
room wings reach like fingers
toward the woods and visu-
ally connect students with
nature. Between, courtyards
landscaped with native plants
and enhanced by integrated
artwork, serve as outdoor
classrooms and feature an
intermittent stream fed by
heat gain and insulates the
The floor plan of the school roof, allowing the school to
combines a traditional school spend less money on heating
layout with an open design. and cooling.
Bronx Charter Through the utilization of The incorporation of bright
School for the multi-use shared spaces color throughout the school
called “pods” the school is creates an identity with a
Arts able to expand learning spac- bold palette that evokes the
Bronx, N.Y.
es outside of classrooms into potential for a multitude of
color combinations. Bright
color glazed brick tiles,
floor tiles, door and window
frames, carpets and fur-
nishings are coordinated to
promote this idea of vibrancy
and unity.

zones that promote inter-


action between teachers,
The school explores educa-
students and faculty.
tional ideas about openness
The building incorporates
and easy communication that
various sustainable features
could be encouraged by the
and exceeds the minimum
build environment.
standards for air changes
The challenge was to turn an
and natural light. Filtered
old factory into a light filled,
fresh air and north facing
street friendly, sustainable
skylights supply the building
design with open planning
with a healthy environment
elements that meets the
for children. Additionally, the
needs of children in a nurtur-
natural top skylight reduces
ing arts environment.
Dalles Middle School
Location: Dalles, Oregon
Grades: 6-8
Designer: Boora
Completed: 2002
Enrollment: 600 students
Size: 96,000 square feet (sf)
Construction Cost: $12,000,000.00 ($101.oo/sf, not including site work)

Figure 1 Dalles Middle School Daylighting and Natural Ventilation

Figure 2 Dalles Middle School Exterior


Points of Interest
• Designed with geothermal systems using water from nearby dam dewatering piping
as a source. The piping was already in place.
• Daylighting is utilized using:
• School orientation so that no western light enters the building.
• Light shelves in order to bring more indirect lighting into classrooms.
• Light tubes, coated with reflective material, bring natural lighting further into
spaces.
• A natural ventilation system using convection.
• 176 bicycle spaces.
• Building includes a recycling center.
• Ceiling tiles made from 75% post-consumer recycled content.
• Exterior lighting is directed down in order to reduce night light pollution.
• Drought-resistant plants.
• Construction waste recycled or salvaged.
• Used locally produced building materials when possible in an effort to reduce trans-
porting from long distances.
• Low or No Volatile organic compounds in stains, paints, and sealers.
• A commissioning service was used so that all important systems could be check to
be in working order.
• Design team was compensated for research and development time using a build-
ing performance basis for fees. The more money the building saved the more the
design team would be paid. This bound the team to tangible goals.
• Water from dewatering pumps used to irrigate athletic fields.
• Occupancy and light level sensor are used to control artificial fixture output.

Sources:
Heinz, R., “The Dalles Middle School: High-Performance Design and Low-Cost Innova-
tion”, Company paper of Boora Architects, http://www.usgbc.org/Docs/Archive/
MediaArchive/601_Rudolf_PA137.pdf, accessed September 5, 2007.

http://www.aia.org/nwsltr_aiaj.cfm?pagename=aiaj_a_0408_techtalk, accessed Septem-


ber 5, 2007.

http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/school/docs/thedalles.pdf, accessed September


5, 2007.
Fearn Elementary School
Location: Aurora, Illinois
Grades: k-5
Designer: Perkins and Will
Completed: 2001
Enrollment: 600 students
Size: 58,000 square feet (sf)
Construction Cost: $7,000,000.00 ($120.oo/sf)

Points of Interest
• Fearn Elementary is a school design based on lessons learned from Crow Island
School. Crow Island School (Perkins, Wheeler & will, Eliel &Eero Saarinen) is consid-
ered the first modern school building; designed so that the best teaching methods
of the day could be utilized. Crow Islands was built on a child’s scale, unlike many
educational buildings of the time. Crow Island School served as a model for many of
the schools built after WWII.
• Fearn Elementary School, like Crow Island, “evolved through intense interaction
between Perkins & Will and the District’s Design Committee”... (Tanner,133) This
produced many of the design innovations that made it into the final building.
• Fearn Elementary is part of a larger campus, which includes a middle school; there-
fore community access Is provided to a multipurpose hall.
• Linked resource centers, library office, art room, and administrative offices provide
the school with a heightened sense of community.
• Meandering circulation, while providing supervision accomplished with the open plan.
• Natural light is utilized.
• A number of outdoor learning environments.
• Children from vehicles and service.
• A mobile media center allows for teachers to bring resources into the classroom.
• Classroom clusters are flexible with different teaching methods possibly used.
• Privacy niches for quiet studying.
• Each major learning space has direct access to the outside for quick evacuation.
• Operable walls allow for multiple classroom configurations.
• Classrooms have several corners so that multiple activities can occur at one time.

Sources:
http://www.designshare.com/Awards/2000/10023/10023_Prog.htm, Accessed Sep-
tember 6, 2007.

http://archrecord.construction.com/resources/conteduc/archives/0102anew.asp, Ac-
cessed September 6, 2007

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://rogershepherd.com/WIW/solution5/
images/plan.gif&imgrefurl=http://rogershepherd.com/WIW/solution5/crow2.html&h=2
52&w=430&sz=66&hl=en&start=8&tbnid=m_Z33KOYmbzXDM:&tbnh=74&tbnw=126&p
rev=/images%3Fq%3D%2522crow%2Bisland%2Bschool%2522%26gbv%3D2%26svnum
%3D10%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG, Accessed September 6, 2007.

Tanner, C., Lackney, J., “Educational Facilities Planning: Leadership, Architecture, and Man-
agement”, Pearson; Boston, 2006.

Perkins, B., “Building type Basics For Elementary and Secondary Schools”, Wiley; New York,
2001.
Image Gallery
Examples of
Sustainability
Strategies

Solar Water Heating


500 Gallon solar water heating system
Heritage Middle School
North Carolina
Daylighting
Baffles under roof monitors
Clerestories and
transparent walls
provide luminous spaces

Overhead natural light


Canopies and extended roof overhangs
protect facades from solar exposure and undesired interior
heat gain during hot months
Green roofs and light monitors
Interior-exterior visual connection
prevents claustrophobic learning spaces
Photovoltaic panels harnes solar energy for
power to satisfy many of the building’s needs
Light materials
and transparency provide a warm
and relaxed environment
Single-gender Education
• Create a design with the flexibility to organize the
school schedule by gender, grade levels, or subjects
• Building layout should facilitate central control of
access and egress of students and visitors
• Teaching areas should encourage teacher inter-
action and cooperation
• Classroom design should respond to the different
learning styles and preferences of boys and girls by
tailoring for each group design variables such as:
• room size,
• visual connection with the outside,
• seating arrangement,
• acoustical quality
• colors and textures
• natural vs artifical light
• Attach bathrooms to classrooms
• Create outdoor spaces easily accessible to class-
rooms for instruction, recreation and lunch
SINGLE-STORY, DOUBLE ROWS OF
CLASSROOMS AND AND A
PLAYFUL COURTYARD

1 Thomas Weir
TWO ROWS OF CLASSROOMS SURROUND AN ANIMATED OPEN SPACE OF GREAT
ENERGY AND PLAYFULNESS ENCLOSED AT THE ENDS BY MULTI-USE MEDIA AND
RESOURCE ROOMS

Two rows of classrooms face each other across an open courtyard that invites play, gath-
erings, exploration and socializing among students and teachers. The great playfulness
of the space is driven by the fanciful arrangement of overhead elements intermingled
with landscaping that echo a roof and provide cover in sharp contrast to the regulated
classroom wings. By its very bilateral quality, the scheme lends itself to the coordination
of single gender classes.
FROM THE METAPHOR OF WALL-
PAPER DERIVED A CONCEPT OF
PATTERNS

2 Tim Takacs
An idea grounded in the imagery of wallpaper produced explarations of repetition, superim-
position and field definition that led a translation into architectural space that solves great
intricacy and the need for clarity and programatic imperatives.

The organization of the complex is done along an axis that enters an atrium containing ad-
ministrative functions and splits into two clusters of classrooms that in turn can be viewed
as a grouping of smaller cells. This concept becomes suitable for a pedagogical formula of
distribution by gender or subject.
paper
educational wallpaper
tim takacs arch 871

Goals:

- Create a space that is educational for students


in and out of classrooms.
- Design a building that is flexible, in order to
adapt to future programs, administrations and
teaching philosophies .
- Incorporate the idea of “waist is food” from the
book “Cradle to Cradle” by McDonough and
Braungart. To this end, p rovide a building that
can return to nature at the end of its use, by
using natural materials or ones that can be up -
cycled.

Principles:
- Think of the building as a tree; how can it give
back to the environment and its occupants.
Strategies:

- Provide learning spaces outside the classroom.


- Blur the line between classroom and
circulation.
- Focus on a palette of materials used in the
cons truction of the school that is
sustainable and up-cycleable.
educational
tim takacs

SITE:
site area = 304,920 sq. ft. (
building footprint = 59,500
covered walkway (with permea
paving = 9,223 sq. ft.
permeable vehicular paving =
parking spaces = 34
drop-off/pick-up capacity = 94
paper
wallpaper
arch 871

(7 acres)
sq. ft.
able

= 41,677 sq. ft.

4 1/32” = 1’-0”
education
tim takacs

scienc

science

social s

Program:
Gross = 59,50
Classroom = 19,878
quantity = 22
average classroom
leadership = 2,938 s
Circulation = 11,953
Gym/Assembly = 6,678
capacity = 556 peo
Flex-space = 6,029 s
Bathrooms (Classroo
quantity = 22 (one
Administration = 1,17
Teacher Work Space =
Bathrooms(Gym) = 43
Storage (Gym) = 296
Offices(Gym) = 350 s
Service = 2719 sq. ft
paper
nal wallpaper
arch 871
C

assembly

storage
mech.

admin.

conf.
leadership
A english spanish
display

ce spanish
english

flex leadership

flex
spanish
social st.
math
st.
english
flex
math

english
A

math
00 sq. ft. social st. spanish

sq. ft.
science
m = 1,037 sq. ft. flex
sq. ft.
3 sq. ft.
8 sq. ft. science
ople
sq. ft. math
om) = 1,176 sq. ft. social st.
e per each classroom)
72 sq. ft.
= 1,112 sq. ft.
35 sq. ft.
sq. ft.
sq. ft. 1/16” = 1’-0”
t.
educationa
tim takacs

Detail Section Through C


1/4” = 1’ - 0”

Classroom Wing Section


1/8” = 1’ - 0”

Southwest Classroom Wi
1/8” = 1’ - 0”

Southeast Lobby/Administ
1/8” = 1’ - 0”
paper
al wallpaper Green Roof and Cisterns
as rain falls from the sky it brings
nourishment to the green roof located above
classrooms. The roof then does it’s duty by
removing CO2 from the atmosphere. Any extra
moisture draining from the roof is collected

arch 871
in cisterns, to be used when need for
irrigation and lavatory use.

The classroom wing roofs are comprised of


46,080 square feet. Greenville receives about
1” of rainfall per week. Assuming that
Greenville received rainfall at least once
every two weeks a cistern system with a
capacity of 57,458 gallons(7,682 cubic feet)
would be needed. A total of eight cisterns
would be used, with 4 on each side of the
classroom wings.
Plant Material
Soil Based on 400 student flushing a toilet
four time per day (1.6 gallons per flush)
Drainage Layer Langston Charter Middle School would use
Roofing Material Parapet 2,560 gallons of water per day.

styrofoam Glass
Roofing material Rebar
Insulation Foundation
Wood Decking
Wood Structure
Concrete Slab

Light Monitors
Brings natural daylighting into the interior
of spaces, reducing energy costs while
providing students with a better quality
light. A total of 32 monitor would be
provided, one for each classroom, flex space
and leadership room. These would face to the
south on the boys wing, and the southwest on
the girls.

Geothermal Heating &


Cooling
Uses water from below ground to enhance the
heating and cooling efficiency of mechanical
systems. Also allows a reduction in the
amount of ducting within a building. The geo
thermal system would an integal part of the
mechanical system, with equipment being located
Classroom in mechanical rooms.

Light Shelves
Helps to increase the amount of ambient light
deep into a space. Reduces heat gain from direct
sunlight and decreases glare. Located on
the southern and southwestern openings, the
light shelves are constructed of wood prodcuts.
the interior reflective shelf material is a high
reflective natural fabric.

Structural Insulated Rammed


Earth Walls
Uses naturally occuring earth to construct
walls capable of supporting 900 pounds/square
inch. With and R-Value of 36 (at 18” thick) the
A-A wall system combines thermal properties of
traditional rammed earth construction with
a high R-value thermal resistivity.

ing Elevation

tration Elevation Northeast Lobby/Administration/Classroom Wing Elevation


1/8” = 1’ - 0”
A LOW-SCALE, SINUOUS
FORM ON THE LANDSCAPE

3 Paul Kennedy
This scheme favors an alignment of teaching spaces into an elongated
arrangement that is intersected only by a perpendicular arm containing
administration, the multi-use space and support facilities.

Because of it’s configuration, the concept is one of two clearly defined


and separate wings conducive to single gender class scheduling. One
naturally conditioned corridor serves a main street facing south into
organized exterior spaces suitable for outside class, group gatherings,
and lunch.
ONE-STORY SCHEME WITH TWO
WINGS CONNECTED BY ADMINIS-
TRATION AND CIRCULATION UNDER
A TENSILE FABRIC COVER

4 Shawn Mckeever
An undulating tensile roof soars over the rectangular components of this two-wing, one-story
scheme creating an exciting series of interior spaces fully illuminated with the natural light
that filters through the roof membrane.
The two-wing scheme lends itself to separate gender classes while a perpendicular corridor
acts as a spine of administration and circulation leading at one end to a large multi-purpose
room that dominates the composition and its view from the road.


 














 












 
 
  
  
  
  
    
   
    
  
 
  
  
  
  
   
 
  
   
      
  


    
  
  
  
  
  













 








 





 













 


 

 



   









 




 














 




 





































 




















 


 
 

 


 
 

 
 


 
 











































 


TWO WINGS FAN OUT FROM AN
ADMINISTRATION AND GENERAL
SUPPORT CORE TO FRAME A
COURTYARD FOR TEACHING AND
STUDENT ACTIVITIES

5 Ashley Ortman
The two classroom wings that fan out from the entry area define an open courtyard of irregular
shape that is animated with small amphitheaters, landscaping and a green canopy. The wings
facilitate gender specific instruction while the central open space serves as a catalyst and gather-
ing field for open air activities. Central control is possible from one point access near administra-
tion and multi-purpose room closer to the site access.
A CLOISTER CONCEPT CREATES
A SCHEME THAT FOCUSES INTO
A QUIET AND ELEGANT INTERIOR
COURTYARD WITH GREENERY,
SHADE, AND WATER ELEMENTS

6 Brian Williford
The cloister concept provides an example of a traditional approach to the design of places of
learning or religious life. By its very nature, the focus is inward reflecting a desired character
conducive to focus and concentration. The environment is enhanced by the courtyard around
which clusters of classrooms are arranged in a circular fashion. The contained interior envi-
ronment is attractive for student socialization as well as instructional activities
A SERIES OF PAVILIONS
HELD TOGETHER BY A STRONG
AXIS IN THE FORM OF A CIRCULA-
TION CORRIDOR

7 Claire Bowman
Aligned along the soft slope of the site, three pavilions devoted to teaching, leadership
and curriculum delivery give the scheme flexibility and lightness. Each containing ample
exposure to the outside, their arangement also creates interstitial spaces of great conve-
nience for outdoor receation or educational purposes.
Articulation of light forms
integrated softly with the
landscape with patios,
terraces and plenty of
natural light and natural
ventilation
A TYPICAL WING
A SYMETRICAL ARRANGEMENT OF
TWO CLUSTERS OF CLASSROOMS
AROUND INTERIOR COURTYARDS

8 Matthew Santilli
The school can operate in two separate zones in the scheme that creates two groups of
classrooms, each arranged around an ineterior courtyard giving the area the character of
cloister. Classrooms are fitted with light monitors that capture sufficient natural light to
minimize the amount of power needed on the average day.

Central functions of multi-purpose room and administration establish the boundary between
the two cloisters of teaching spaces.
Langston Charter Middle School

C B

C B
A

A
Floor Plan
Scale: 1/16” = 1’-0”
Langston Charter Middle School
Section A
Scale: 1/16” = 1’-0”

Section B
Scale: 1/16” = 1’-0”

Section C
Scale: 1/16” = 1’-0”
Langston Charter Middle School
1

4
Materials Key:

1-Roof Lantern- Allows


light to penetrate
deeper into the
classroom createing a
more evenly lit learning
environment.\

2-High recycled content


metal roof- High
reflectance value to
reduce heat sink.

3-Built up roof deck


R-28 value

4-GluLam structural
system with
6 incorporated exterior

Front Elevation
Scale: 1/16” = 1’-0”

Rear Elevation
Scale: 1/16” = 1’-0”

Side Elevation
Scale: 1/16” = 1’-0”
Langston Charter Middle School

Main Entry

Classroom View
5

Cooridor / Courtyard View


Courtyards are accessible from a perimeter corridor connecting all classrooms
TWO STORIES ORGANIZE THIS
SCHEME INTO LAYERS FOR SEP-
ARATE GENDER INSTRUCTION
WHILE REDUCING THE BUILDING
FOOTPRINT ON THE SITE

9 Nathan Missel
The large footprint of a one-story solution added to the particularly large area of pave-
ment needed for vehicular cerculation and parking influenced the decision to organize this
scheme in two stories thereby retaining a larger proportion of undisturb site area.
An added benefit of the solution is trhe ability to divide the students by gender on sepa-
rate floors. Also, given the symmetrical layout with two wings per floor separated by
vertical circulatin, it would be possible to articulate other schemes of student distribution
within the buildin which can also be seen as having four distinct and separate zones.
Langston
Charter 852

Middle
School

848
856
GIA ROAD
EAST GEOR

SITE INFORMATION:
acerage: 6.21 acres
(289,411 sq. ft. )

HARD SURFACES:
4 lane road: 60, 765 sq. ft.
paved surface on site: 30, 850 sq. ft.
total hard surface: 91,525 sq. ft.
impermeable surface: 9283 sq. ft.
permeable parking areas: 21,567 sq. ft.

PARKING DETAILS:
west lot: 36 spaces
3 handicap accessible
east lot: 11 spaces
2 handicap accessible
parking lane loop: 60 spaces
both loop lanes capacity: 120 spaces
total parking capacity: 125 spaces

BUILDING FOOTPRINT:
21, 225 SQ. FT.
total square footage: 42,451 SQ. FT.

12 . 05 . 2007 836
844

844
840

836

832

SCALE : 1 in. = 40 ft.

10 ft.
824

828
8
4
852

8Langston
Charter
Middle
School outdoor
activity

veranda

class
science storage
class class prep

VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
K-3458
CHINA
VITREOUS
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
K-2032
CHINA

K-2032
GREENWICH
LAVATORY
VITREOUS
CHINA

K-3458
WELLWORTH
VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
CHINA
bath
bath
class

VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
K-3458
CHINA
VITREOUS
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
K-2032
CHINA

bath office
K-2032
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
VITREOUS
CHINA

office janitor storage


class

K-3458
VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
CHINA
VITREOUS
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
K-2032
CHINA

K-2032
GREENWICH
VITREOUS
LAVATORY
CHINA

VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
K-3458
prep

CHINA
bath bath
office
office
corridor

flex room

A NI H C
SUOE
RTIV

A NI H C
SUOE
RTIV

A NI H C
OERT SU
IV
HS
TTRE
O8L
W5ILO
4LT
3E_
-W
K
C

HS
TTRE
O8L
W5IL4
OL3
TE-
_WK
C

HS
TTRE
O8L
W5ILO
4LT
3E_
-WC
K
bath
bamboo for
est GREENWICH
K-2032
LAVATORY
VITREOUS
CHINA

K-2032
GREENWICH
VITREOUS
LAVATORY
CHINA
VITREOUS
K-2032
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
CHINA

VITREOUS
LAVATORY
K-2032
GREENWICH
CHINA
lo
bath
plenum wall

HS
TTRE
O8L
W5ILO
4LT
3E_
-W
CK

HS
TTRE
O8L
W5IL4
OL3
TE-
_WC
K

HS
TTRE
O8L
W5IL4
OL3
TE-
_W
KC
ANIH C
SUOER
TIV

A NI HC
SUOER
TIV

A NIH C
S U O ER
TIV
BUILDING INFORMATION:
24 classrooms with boy on the bottom
floor and girls on the top floor.

SURFACES:
to the rear of the building is the
childrens play area, and the rest
of the site is in preserve for
nature to flourish

LANDSCAPE DETAILS:

the site is a sub xeric site


requireing specially adapted
vegetation to cope with the heat
requirments and low moisture
exposure found there.

BUILDING FOOTPRINT:
21, 225 SQ. FT.
total square footage: 42,451 SQ. FT.
main entrance
outdoor
activity

small veranda
conference volunteer
lobby
workroom
reception
class science
reception storage class
storage
storage lab prep class

K-3458
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
VITREOUS
CHINA
CHINA
K-2032
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
VITREOUS

CHINA
LAVATORY
K-2032
GREENWICH
VITREOUS

vice copy

VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
K-3458
CHINA
bath bath

K-3458
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
VITREOUS
bath

CHINA
CHINA
K-2032
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
VITREOUS

principal bath
class office bath
office janitor office
CHINA
K-2032
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
VITREOUS

storage office
class lab prep
lab prep
C_TOILETS
VITREOUS
WELLWORTH
K-3458
CHINA

CHINA
K-2032
GREENWICH
VITREOUS
LAVATORY

CHINA
K-2032
VITREOUS
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
C_TOILETS
VITREOUS
WELLWORTH
K-3458
CHINA

media bath bath


large leadership center office
office
corridor
conference
room
e
greenhous
flex room

elevator
obby office
mechanical office
ll
plenum wa
forest
bamboo
storage storage
booth

FIRST FLOOR PLAN SCALE : 1 in. = 20 ft.


assembly
BOYS FLOOR

FRONT ELEVATION
8
4
852

8Langston
Charter
Middle
School outdoor
activity

veranda

class
science
class class prep

WELLWORTH
K-3458
VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
CHINA
K-2032
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
VITREOUS
CHINA

GREENWICH
K-2032
LAVATORY
VITREOUS
CHINA

VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
K-3458
CHINA
bath
bath
class

VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
K-3458
CHINA
GREENWICH
K-2032
LAVATORY
VITREOUS
CHINA

bath office
VITREOUS
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
K-2032
CHINA

office janitor

class

K-3458
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
VITREOUS
CHINA
VITREOUS
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
K-2032
CHINA

K-2032
LAVATORY
VITREOUS
GREENWICH
CHINA

VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
K-3458
prep

CHINA
bath
bath
office
office

flex room corridor

A NI H C
SUO E
R TI V

A NI H C
SUOE
RTIV

A NI H C
SUOE
R TI V
HS
TTRE
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W5ILO
4LT
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C

HS
TTRE
O8L
W5ILO
4LT
3E_
-WK
C

HS
TTRE
O8L
W5IL
4
OL3
TE-
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bamboo for
est VITREOUS
LAVATORY
K-2032
GREENWICH

GREENWICH
K-2032
VITREOUS
LAVATORY
CHINA
CHINA

VITREOUS
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
K-2032

LAVATORY
GREENWICH
K-2032
VITREOUS
CHINA
CHINA

plenum wall
th
ba

HS
TTRE
O8L
W5ILO
4LT
3E_
-WC
K

HS
TTRE
O8L
W5ILO
4LT
3E_
-WK
C

HS
TTRE
O8L
W5ILO
4LT
3E_
-WK
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BUILDING INFORMATION:

ANIHC
S U O ER
TI V

ANI H C
S UO E R
TI V

ANIHC
SUOER
TI V
24 classrooms with boy on the bottom
floor and girls on the top floor.

SURFACES:
to the rear of the building is the
childrens play area, and the rest
of the site is in preserve for
nature to flourish

LANDSCAPE DETAILS:

the site is a sub xeric site


requireing specially adapted
vegetation to cope with the heat
requirments and low moisture
exposure found there.

BUILDING FOOTPRINT:
21, 225 SQ. FT.
total square footage: 42,451 SQ. FT.
outdoor
activity

veranda
lobby

class science
breakout area breakout area class
reception storage

lab prep class

VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
K-3458
CHINA
CHINA
VITREOUS
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
K-2032

CHINA
VITREOUS
LAVATORY
K-2032
GREENWICH

K-3458
VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
CHINA
bath bath

VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
K-3458
CHINA
CHINA
VITREOUS
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
K-2032

class office bath


office
CHINA

janitor
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
VITREOUS
K-2032

storage
class lab prep
C_TOILETS
VITREOUS
WELLWORTH
K-3458
CHINA

CHINA
LAVATORY
GREENWICH
K-2032
VITREOUS

CHINA
K-2032
GREENWICH
LAVATORY
VITREOUS
VITREOUS
C_TOILETS
WELLWORTH
K-3458
CHINA

teacher work bath


bath
large
leadership room office
corridor
conference office
room
e
greenhous
flex room

elevator
elevator office
mechanical mechanical office

SECOND FLOOR PLAN SCALE : 1 in. = 20 ft.


assembly
GIRLS FLOOR

REAR ELEVATION
Langston
Charter 852

Middle
School

ROOM INFORMATION:
AVERAGE SQ Ft: 1000 ft.

HARD SURFACES:
floors to be covered in
recycled high density rubber,
or other recycled resilient
flooring .
Plastics and wood articles are
aeasily found with recycled
content and is standrad for
products today.

LIGHTING DETAILS:
room to be lit with spot lighting and
ambient lighting when artificial light
is neccessary . Day lighting will
contribute the larger portion of
needed light and lighting
expenditures should be minimal.

STUDENT INFORMATION:
460 Students
LANDSCAPE:
The approach to the building is a processional
experience, and should be planned as participation with
a landscape worth participating in. Parking seas and the
lack of any substantiative landscape plan have aided in
creating a low expectation educational experience for
the modern students.

MATERIALS:
the materials of a building should be inexpensive and of
high effieciency. The materials composing this building
are a simple blend of pre manufactured components
that can brough to the site and easily assembled with
the a reduced labor force. A redundancy of
components is important in order for the simplicity of
this system to work.

Lightweight concrete castings serve as the buildings


support. These are placed at the corners and hold up a
concrete slab. Under the slab are precast wall panels of 3
different configurations . These configurations include
glazing and other architectural elements necessary to on the veranda, in the plant diffused sunlight
the functioning of the building.

Between these precast concrete structural elements are placed premanufactured panels. These are simply dense fom, of 8-10 inches in
thickness, with a lamination of recycled plastic on both sides. This creates an extremely rigid panel capable of bearing many tens of
times its own weight. these panels may take the loading of minor beams and joists.

The roof of this building is a multi layered construction. From the substrate of precast concrete elements and Structural Insulated Panels,
joists and beams arise. From these arched aluminum trusses arise and support a metal roof skin. Below the skin in the interstitial spaces
of the trusses is thick inulating material. In some of these spaces there are water holding cells. These hold water collected off of the
roof , to be used in the buildings heating system. Above the metal skin roof, is another roof structure. This structure is a light weight
space frame, whose sole purpose is to support a shade cloth fabric. This shade cloth fabric will work to shade the building in a
completely passive condition. By doing this up to 90% of the UV rays from the sun that is responsible for solar heat gain can be diffused,
saving tremendous amounts of energy in the warm months.

ORIENTATION:

Because the building will be primarily used during the fall through the winter, the building requires more heating functionality , that
cooling. The hot months when the building is essentially empty, the windows and vents can be opend to create a continuous air flow
through the building , which will keep it cool enough for light usage and provide excellent sanitation of contained air. Because the
building uses a passive active system for the majority of its heating requirements, the largest facadeof the building has been oriented to
the south west. From this vantage point the building may harness as much solar energy as possible during cold winter months.
Langston
Charter852

Middle
School

SITE DIRECTIVES:
retain as much native vegetation as
. ft. possible, and create additive landscape
condition where, endemic species are
. selected for hardiness and ecology
sq. ft. type.

PLANTS:
species of subxeric plants and trees
will do best in this site typology, on the
north side of the building shade tolerant
trees and evergreens are
recommended, while on the west side,
es sage brush type species will do best.

VINES:
vine walls over the front and sides of
the building provide shade in the
T. summer and a thermal buffer between
the building and the sun. In the winter,
the leaves drop and allow sunlight to
wash over the walls of the building.

BUILDING:
the building is a simple and affordable
component built structure. Materials
include lightweight cast concrete and
foam core sip panels, panelized with
recycled plastic sheeting. redundancy
of components speeds the building
process and using manufacturing
efficiciency to save on materials and
labor.
BUILDING ECOLOGY:

A building is an ecology to it self, even outside of its role within the lansdscape. Likewise, a forest has a canopy, water retention elements,
organic apparati, and organisms that function within it. Because the role of building has aways been as a shelter against elements, only
recently have we understood that buildings should communicate with those elements and take advantage of them as much as possible .

In this building, as much passive cooperation as possible has been the goal. From using daylight for most of the lighting needs, to harnessing
the otherwise destructive power of solar radiation, to heat the water and air used in the building through a terrarium like structured called a
plenum wall. Light, Heat and Rain are all elements that are neccessary for life. Harvest all of those for the use in our buildings is also a
neccessity in an age of ever increasing energy prices brought on by ever increasing greed and speculation.

When buildings begin to respire and breathe like organisms, they will the create metabolites that will serve as the energy supply for the needs
of the occupants. A self sustaining building is possible, if we look towards the organic mechanisms that are at work all around us.
The ecology of our planet is self sustaining, and all hierarchies below that scale can also be self sustaining.

PLANT WALLS and SYSTEMS


Plants are the basis of all life in typical terrestrial ecosystems. They plant an increasing number of roles in the lives of man and his buildings.
Plants should be integrated into buildings as much as the structure will allow, in that they provide shade, oxygen, soil retention and unlimited
other benefits. In this building the Eastern facade is composed of open veranda. Between the floor plates is stretched a mesh made of high
tensile cable. upon this cable grows a prolific community of vines, that overtake the facade and provide shade to the veranda.

The Vine is deciduous, and in the winter it will shed its leaves to allow un to shine on the building. In the summer the foliage is dense and it
blocks the harsh rays that could be damaging to the building, and the environment within. Bothe the front facade and the rear of the
assembly hall has plant walls that function in this way. The species of vines that are capable of doinng this task is high in variety.

REAR ELEVATION

Facade in Winter
during the winter the vine wall will lose its foliage revealing the skin of the building to the sunlight low on the horizon.
that are capable of doing this task is high in variety.

Facade in Summer
during the summer the vine wall will put on its foliage shielding the skin of the building to the sunlight high on the
horizon.

Plenum wall system is the main source of heat


in the winter for the entire building
serving to heat water and the air used in the
building

NORTH ELEVATION
Langston
Charter 852
light weight, porous shade
light weight aluminum
space frame to support
shade cloth material

Middle
cloth, of 70% emmittance ,
taught over aluminum metal decked roofing
space frame struc ture to system with r-40 inulation.
provide passive cooling water run off is collected.

School
solar accumulator
structural member
copper material textile diffus
14 foot ceilings to create diffuse light
air mass, and psycological warm air ba
conditions right for
deciduous vines, to block learning
sun in the summer and
allow sun in the winter.

high strength concrete


slab, of lightweight
construction.

triple pained plenum


window, allowing air
currents to pass up.
ligh
lightweight insulated con
concrete, corner posts SIP Panel Walls, rid foam core sup
support structure. construction panel with
recycle plastic exterioir

SITE INFORMATION: radiant heat floorimg


system, energy gathered
acerage: 6.21 acres from the sun, and geo
coupled heat pump system
(289,411 sq. ft. )

HARD SURFACES:
4 lane road: 60, 765 sq. ft.
paved surface on site: 30, 850 sq. ft.
total hard surface: 91,525 sq. ft.
impermeable surface: 9283 sq. ft.
permeable parking areas: 21,567 sq. ft.

PARKING DETAILS:
west lot: 36 spaces
3 handicap accessible
east lot: 11 spaces
2 handicap accessible
parking lane loop: 60 spaces
both loop lanes capacity: 120 spaces
total parking capacity: 125 spaces

BUILDING FOOTPRINT:
21, 225 SQ. FT.
total square footage: 42,451 SQ. FT.
gravity feed cisterning vessels
pump storage of water collected held between the structural pergola member acts as a conduit for
from run off of roof. this water to be members of the roof structure water circulating down through the building
gravity fed for building and tenent and into the radiant flooring system. Air
usage. also moves up through this conduit from
the building, is heatined and then recycled
through the plenum glass.

plant wall solar diffusion,


deciduous vines on the
ser hung to south western face of the
and act as assembly hall.
double glazed window to
affle.
the bamboo forest

“PLENUM WALL” a double glazed


chamber that is constructed to heat
an air mass and use the heated air
in the building. this plenum wall also
works in heating water
and cirulatin it through the floor.
(see detail at the bottom of this
sheet)

htweight insulated
ncrete, corner posts
pport structure.
prescast concrete
structural member
supporting all corners of
the building.

Bamboo forest acts as solar


buffer, bewteen the plenum
watter and the building facade.

plenum conduit for moving


immediate holding tank, of
PLENUM WALL HEATING SYSTEM water that has been diverted
warm air into the building
and warm water into the
from the metal roof layer.
floor of the building.

pump storage tanks that


are held in the structural
members of the ceiling

bamboo forest doubled glazed plenum wall


is of low -e glass
construction, the low-e
coating is faced to the
water line to return to inside of the wall, and as
storage in the pump radiation increases in the
storage tanks, after it has glass box the air becomes
passed through slab warmer more efectively.

bamboo forest acts as a solar


buffer for the building after
radiation passes through
plenum wall structure.

air is warmed by the sun


air return to plenum wall,
and as it warms it passes
from building headinng
up through convection and
towards exterior,
into the building

water line of heated water


pump returning to builing and
coils in slab.

radiant heat coils cast into


the concrete floor slab,
radiate the heat gathered
at the plenum wall, and
warm the floor.
AN ENCLOSED ATRIUM SERVES
AS PIVOT FOR MOVEMENT
THROUGHOUT THE TWO LEVELS
OF THE SCHOOL

10 Aaron Bowman
The flow of students at drop-off and pick-up times, as well as the circulation between classes
and other functions of the school is mostly negotiated through a two-story atrium that con-
tains vertical circulsation and open space with access to the spouth open courtyard.

The two stories and their layout provide great flexibility for the arrangement of classes by
gender or by subject..
Entry atrium
Protected courtyard on the south side of the building opposite the access road