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Ashland University

Dwight Schar College of Education

Standard Lesson Plan

Candidate: Jared Clemence


February 16-18, 2016
General
Informati
on

Date:

Subject
Grad
e
Learner Profile

History
12

Academic Learning
Standard(s)

15. As a result of overseas expansion, the Spanish-American War and World War I, the
United States emerged as a world power.

Class is 23 students, with 11 males and 12 females. The class is a College Credit Plus
(CCP) through North Central State. The students are all a part of the honors program at
Mansfield Senior. The class is primarily white, but with Caucasian, with several students
with black background.
Learner Profile: Write a description of the class demographics: number of males, females, students on IEP or
504 plans, racial and ethnic background, ELL, gifted, academic or physical disabilities, and any other factors
that might help you target your lesson to the learners in the class. Include relevant student assessment
data and add to it as your lessons progress.
Learning
Goals

Central Focus

Students will understand the influence imperialism had on the United States as a world
power
Learning Outcome
Students will be able to identify how the Spanish-American War turned the US into a
world power, both militarily and economically.
Academic language Foraker Act of 1900, yellow journalism, Monroe Doctrine, Manifest Destiny, USS Maine,
Teller Amendment, annexation, Rough Riders, Treaty of Paris of 1898, sphere of
influence, Open Door policy, Roosevelt Corollary
Prior Learning
Students should have learned most, if not all, of this in previous classes. Recently they
have been learning about the political side of the US at this time. At this point, the
students should be ready for some excitement in America.
Academic Learning Standard: Write the exact wording for the appropriate content standard(s).
Central Focus: Narrow down your standard to the specific focus of this lesson that is developmentally
appropriate for your students e.g. Identifying character traits to improve reading comprehension.
Learning Outcome: Define what the students will be able to do as a result of your lesson. It should be
specific and measurable: identify who, what, when, and how. Example: At the conclusion of todays lesson,
students will create a three-frame comic strip and use each of type of end punctuation appropriately (period,
exclamation point, and question mark) with 100% accuracy.

Updated 11/15/15

Ashland University
Dwight Schar College of Education

Standard Lesson Plan

Academic language: Identify content-specific words e.g. perimeter, instructional terms e.g. analyze, general
vocabulary: frenetic to be taught in the lesson. These words should be used by both you and the students.
Prior Learning: Describe what prior content that has been taught. Example: In the last lesson, students
learned how to measure the sides of an object accurately, which has now prepared them to find the area of an
object.

Instructio
n Delivery

Introduction

Activities /
Procedures

Differentiation

Day 1: To hook the students, I am going to ask what imperial holdings the US has had in
the past, and some of the more famous imperial holdings of the past.
Day 2: I will ask students what the shortest (declared) war in US history was. This will
lead into the Spanish-American War.
Day 3: Explain to the students how role playing and discussion can be great tool for
learning. Doing a bad impression of someone should be fun.
Day 1: Day one is mainly going to be lecture with involvement from the students. They
have learned most of this information before, so why should I bore them. I want to try
and get them to refresh not just themselves, but the rest of the class as well. From my
perspective, I am going to be facilitating a refresher than teach old material.
Day 2: I plan on lecturing again, but this time with more technology involvement. The
students should be familiar with the material, so trying to bore them to death is not
feasible. Some technology is playing Remember the Maine to strum up feelings about
the Spaniards, along with viewing images from this time period.
Day 3: I will have handed to students on day 1 some pieces from the time, either for or
against imperialism. Then, by random draw, I will split them into two groups, and have
them try to persuade me why imperialism is good or bad, without using anything after
1900. The goal is to try and get the students to have a mindset similar to those who
were in charge during that point in time.
The differentiation that will be occurring during this unit is there will be multiple ways to
understand the information. Some will be aural, some will be visual, and even a bit of

Updated 11/15/15

Ashland University
Dwight Schar College of Education

Standard Lesson Plan

kinesthetic. The students will be hearing some time period pieces, while viewing some
time period images, and during the class debate, movement will be encouraged.
Learning Conditions The whole class will be learning this information as a whole group. However, on day
three, students will be split, and therefore working in large groups.
Materials
Projector, papers with time period pieces
Closure
To close the lesson, I plan or recapping the lesson by having a few students touch upon
what was learned/reviewed during the class period. Also, I will introduce the topic for the
next class at this point.
Introduction: State the objective for your lesson to the students using developmental appropriate language
(oral and/or written). You should reinforce this objective throughout the lesson. Link this objective to the
students background knowledge and/or experiences in motivating ways to hook the learners into your
lesson.
Activities/Procedures: Describe in detail how you will teach your SMART goal objectives and academic
language and what methods you will use e.g. demonstration, lecture. Then describe what activities the
students will do e.g. small group discussion, experiments. Your plans need to be detailed and clear enough for a
substitute teacher to follow. Your methods and activities must be aligned with the goals of your lesson.
Differentiation: Think about the students who need more help and the ones who will grasp the material quickly. What will you do to
enrich the learning for both groups? Here you might consider Blooms Taxonomy, Learning Styles, Tomlinsons Tiering approach, Universal
Design for Learning, and Multiple Intelligences. Also, be sure to include accommodations for students with specific learning needs
including students who are gifted and students on IEPs.
Learning Conditions: List how the lesson will be delivered e.g. whole class, small group and any special
circumstances: substitute teacher, new student, students on individual behavior plans, safety conditions for lab
work etc.
Materials: Include all materials needed for your lesson: books, equipment, technology, student materials.
Make sure these are organized and ready to use.
Closure: Describe how you will end your lesson by restating or reinforcing your lesson goals and encourage
students to use this new learning in other contexts.

Updated 11/15/15

Ashland University
Dwight Schar College of Education

Standard Lesson Plan

Assessme
nt

Formative

One way I will assess how much the students are refreshed is based on how much they
work with me. The more I have to talk, the less they remember, or wish to share. How
much they talk during the Day 3 activity will also help.
Summative
At the end of the unit, students will be tested on how well they remember the
information by receiving a test.
Formative: Describe how you will informally assess your students throughout the lesson (e.g., questioning,
whole class responses). Keep in mind that you may need to adjust your plans based upon student feedback you
receive.
Summative: Be very specific about the final formal assessment you will use at the end of the lesson/unit to
measure whether you have met your lesson goals. Attach the actual assessment if appropriate. This
assessment may need to be modified for individual students.
The information gained from your assessment should be used to provide feedback to your students and to
guide your future lessons.

Research

Research

Reflection
s
(Complet
ed after
the

Content
Delivery
Changes to improve
this lesson
Next steps

One thing that always worked with myself and many students is tying music the
education outside of the band room. Students who listen to time appropriate music tend
to remember more about a time period verses those who do not. This was tested by a
history instructor of mine before I had him. Though it was small scale, the music did
have a positive impact.
As a teacher, you need to be able to connect theory into practice. Cite educational research that supports your
instructional decisions. This could be in learning theory, instructional delivery, specific content area instruction
or assessment. State how your lesson aligns with the research findings i.e. Rasinski found that repeated
readings improve fluency which can have a positive effect on comprehension. I am having the students do
multiple choral readings of a poem while teaching them how close attention to punctuation and key words will
improve their fluency and comprehension.

Updated 11/15/15

Ashland University
Dwight Schar College of Education

Standard Lesson Plan

lesson)

Collect and record any assessment data from this lesson and use it to respond to these questions:
Content: Write a reflection on whether the students understood the content of your lesson and if you achieved
the goals of your lesson. Use your assessment data as evidence for this. What patterns of strengths and needs
of the students do you see?
Delivery: Write a reflection of the way you delivered your instruction. Were the students engaged in learning?
Did you need to change your plans based upon the students responses? What went well in the lesson? Could
you have done things differently?
Changes to improve the lesson: If you taught this lesson again, what would you do differently?
Next steps: Based on the results of this lesson, what should be the central focus of your next lesson?

Updated 11/15/15