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Digital Unit Plan Template

Unit Title: Finding Your Voice Through Narrative

Name: Ms. Shelby Matthews

Content Area: English Language Arts

Grade Level: 9th and 10th Grade

CA Content Standard(s)/Common Core Standard(s):

Reading Literature (RL)


Key Ideas and Details
1.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text.
2.
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text,
including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
3.
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of
a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
Craft and Structure
4.
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative
meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language
evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone). (See grade 910 Language standards 46
for additional expectations.) CA
5.
Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots),
and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

Writing (W)

Text Types and Purposes


1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant
and sufficient evidence.
a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an
organization that establishes clear
relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and
evidence.
b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and
limitations of both in a manner that
anticipates the audiences knowledge level and concerns.
c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the
relationships between claim(s) and reasons,
between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and
counterclaims.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the
discipline in which they are writing.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details,
and well-structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple
point(s) of view, and introducing a
narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or
events.
b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop
experiences, events, and/or
characters.
c. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the
experiences, events, setting, and/or
characters.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the
course of the narrative.

Production and Distribution of Writing


4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task,
purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 13 above.)
5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach,
focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should
demonstrate command of Language standards 13 up to and including grades 910.
Range of Writing
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a
single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Big Ideas:

What is a narrative? How does a narrative depict an authors voice differently than other forms of literature? What do
our stories have to do with our identities? What do our stories have to do with the entirety of humanity?
Unit Goals and Objectives:

By the
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

end of this unit, students will:


Understand what a narrative is and all of its key components.
Know how to formulate their own narratives.
Approach writing in creative and innovative ways.
Have experience with workshopping and peer review.
Be knowledgeable in web-based tools used for brainstorming and writing.

Unit Summary:

The narrative, a style of writing and story-telling, will be the focus of this entire unit. We will be reading narratives,
analyzing these works, and eventually writing our own narratives. By reading others stories, well be able to see how

authors are able to find their voice through their own storytelling while also keeping in mind how we are supposed to
find our own individual voice within our writing. Writing can be an isolating experience, but we will be working and
collaborating to push ourselves to create a community of writers.
Assessment Plan:
Entry-Level:

Formative:

Summative:

Class Discussion: Essay by Edgar


Allan Poe called The Philosophy of
Composition

Critical Thinking Questions: Class


discussion and activities during The
Writers Voice Lecture.
Journals: Students will practice their
knowledge of different components of
the narrative as they learn them,
analyze narrative works assigned
weekly, and practice their own
creative writing skills.
Digital Brainstorming and Essay
Outlining Assignments: Students
will submit their cluster diagrams and
Essay outline to Website.
Concept Map: Students will use their
rough draft of their narrative essay to
analyze its conflict, the events, and
the relationship between them and
how it relates to their thesis.

Peer Review: Students will exchange


essays so analyze and give
constructive feedback on their
classmates work.
Reflection: Students reflect on what
theyve learned in this unit about the
narrative and how their own writing
has developed.
Essay: Students write a 4 to 6 page
narrative paper that is their own
original story and makes use of the
key components of the genre.

Lesson 1
Student Learning
Objective:

Students will be
learning about a
writer's voice: what
it is, what it means

Acceptable Evidence:

Students
completion and
answers to the
questions included
in their guided

Instructional
Strategies:
Communication
Collection
Collaboration
Presentation
Organization
Interaction

Lesson Activities:

Critical thinking questions that require students to


answer individually, in pairs, and together as a class.
Students will have to access prior knowledge of what
they know about narratives and also have to analyze
videos and an audio story included in the

to have one, and


how to start thinking
about developing
their own. We'll be
looking at what one
author says about it,
and we'll also view
and listen to some
stories and look at
their style of
storytelling.

notes. Level of
participation in
group and class
discussion.

presentation for this lecture.

Lesson 2
Student Learning
Objective:

Students will begin


understanding the
basics of the
narrative: its
structure, use of
language, etc. The
second half of this
activity is geared
towards getting
students started on
their own narrative
by brainstorming
and creating an
outline for their
work. All
components of this
exercise involve
different types of

Acceptable Evidence:

Students
completion of each
component included
in their webercise
assignment.

Instructional
Strategies:
Communication
Collection
Collaboration
Presentation
Organization
Interaction

Lesson Activities:

Students have to search through a website to garner


information to answer questions about the narrative,
they have to brainstorm for their essay assignment
for their unit by creating a cluster diagram and an
outline using web-based tools.

web-based tools and


resources.
Lesson 3
Student Learning
Objective:

Students will learn


how to formulate
their own narratives
and become
knowledgeable in
web-based tools
used for
brainstorming and
writing

Acceptable Evidence:

Students
completion of each
component of their
concept map and
one page write up.

Instructional
Strategies:
Communication
Collection
Collaboration
Presentation
Organization
Interaction

Unit Resources:

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The Narrative According to Owl Purdue and Norton.


Read Write Think
Essay Mapping
Descriptive Language Video
Creative Writing Tips
Thesaurus
Thesaurus Map Tool
List of Popular Narratives
The Philosophy of Composition
The Hiro Within
Taking on Mountains
Popplet

Useful Websites:

Lesson Activities:

Students will be analyzing their own writing by


creating a concept map of their narrative essay by
looking at the relationships between their storys
major conflict and events surrounding this conflict.
Once they achieve mapping that out, students must
relate these relationships to their essay's thesis and
determine whether or not there is a clear logical
connection that has been made for the reader.

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Owl English Purdue


Meriam Webster Dictionary and Thesaurus
Live Binders
Scoop It
Library of Congress
National Archives
Google Scholar
Teen Mental Health
Office of Adolescent Health
Crisis Text Line
Easy Bib
Quizlet
Chomp Chomp