• book

From the Publisher

“Beilock reveals one intriguing secret after another...That Beilock is supercharged with enthusiasm about her topic is evident and infectious” (Booklist, starred review).

The human body is not just a passive device carrying out messages sent by the brain, but rather an integral part of how we think and make decisions. In this groundbreaking book, Sian Beilock, award-winning scientist and author of the highly acclaimed Choke, draws on her own cutting-edge research to turn the conventional understanding of the mind upside down in ways that will revolutionize our lives.

At the heart of How the Body Knows Its Mind is the tantalizing idea that our bodies “hack” our brains. The way we move affects our thoughts, our decisions, and even our preferences for particular products. Called “embodied cognition,” this new science—of which Beilock is a foremost researcher—illuminates the power of the body and its physical surroundings to shape how we think, feel, and behave. For example, pacing around the room can enhance creativity; gesturing during a speech can help ensure you don’t draw a blank; teaching kids through body movement helps them learn better; walking in nature boosts concentration skills; using Botox could lead to less depression; and much more.

“Insightful, informative, and beautifully written” (Daniel Gilbert, author of Stumbling on Happiness), How the Body Knows Its Mind unveils a wealth of fascinating mind-body interconnections and explores how mastering them can make us happier, safer, and more successful.
Published: Atria Books on
ISBN: 9781451626704
List price: $11.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for How the Body Knows Its Mind by Sian Beilock
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Nautilus
3 min read
Psychology

Iron Curtain of the Mind—Our Tangled Thoughts on Geography

How well do we know the countries we call home? It seems obvious that travel and study would improve a person’s knowledge of geography. But could attitudes about politics also affect your mental map of the world? Psychologist Claus-Christian Carbon, of the University of Vienna, asked Germans to estimate the distance between several German cities. They found, even 15 years after German reunification, that people tended to overestimate the distance between cities that were on opposite sides of the former East-West German border. (The subjects also overestimated the distance between cities on the
TIME
1 min read
Science

How Mindfulness Can Save You Money

IF YOU PUT PEOPLE IN BRAIN SCANNERS and give them something delicious—say, wine or chocolate—the reward centers of their brains light up. In other words, it’s making them feel good. But if you promise them a delicious item in the future, there’s no reward-center activity. If it’s not in our hands (or mouths), we don’t care. Money is the rare exception to this rule, and studies show it has a unique ability to affect the way we think, feel and behave—even if we don’t have much or are unaware of its influence. Just as most people think they’re better than average at driving, they also think they
Literary Hub
11 min read

Durga Chew-Bose: “Writing Affords Me a Space to Have Contradictions”

I read once that every time we learn something new, neural pathways form in our brains, physical proof that we have been amazed or surprised or shocked by something. Knowing little about the the brain, I have always imagined that each of us carries inside our skulls a sprawling web, glowing like a city seen from an airplane at night, lighting up at new discoveries or re-discovery of old experiences as smells tumble into memories which build into slightly new variations of known feelings. Durga Chew-Bose’s writing feels to me like the intricacies of this glowing brain-map laid out to shine on