From the Publisher

Think like Albert! Learn the techniques used by Einstein, and other great geniuses, to expand your mind and dream up the craziest, but most practical solutions of your life. Whether you're trying to develop a new product for your company, get your kids to bed on time or eliminate world hunger, this audiobook provides the tools for discovering breakthrough answers to common, and not-so-common, challenges.
Published: Listen & Live Audio on
ISBN: 9781593162597
Abridged
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