The Atlantic

Kyle Kashuv Becomes a Symbol to Conservatives Who Say the Left Can’t Forgive

The 18-year-old gun-rights activist and Parkland-shooting survivor is being touted by the right as the latest victim of “cancel culture.”
Source: Michael S. Schwartz / Getty

At 9 o’clock eastern time yesterday morning, Kyle Kashuv—a gun-rights activist and survivor of the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida—announced on Twitter that Harvard University had rescinded its offer of admission to him. One hour and 12 minutes later, Kashuv and his now-uncertain educational future had been officially declared victims of an overzealous progressive agenda that was either unwilling or unable to forgive.

“The progressive black balling of Kyle Kashuv is a reminder that there’s no concept of grace in the secular religion,” the conservative commentator Erick Erickson tweeted.

Erickson’s read on the situation turned out to be a popular one across social media. In the hours since Kashuv tweeted about Harvard’s decision, a number of conservative commentators and publications have weighed in. Many of them have situated Kashuv against the backdrop of what they perceive to be a larger problem on the left: “cancel culture.” When a public figure’s racist, sexist, or otherwise offensive behavior comes

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic3 min readPolitics
Trump Supporters Don’t Make Chants About Men
Where the president’s fans once called for a female opponent’s imprisonment, now they are longing for another woman to be literally banished from the country.
The Atlantic6 min read
The Blind Spot of Beyoncé’s Lion King Soundtrack
The singer’s musical accompaniment for the new CGI remake neglects to include any artists from the region that inspired the film—a curious lapse in narrative fidelity.
The Atlantic3 min read
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Getting Heated (Again)
July 2019 is on track to be the hottest July ever recorded. Plus: To be reelected in 2020, Trump has to win over this subset of voters, but his rhetoric isn’t helping.