The New York Times

How Much Does Your Education Level Affect Your Health?

Education is associated with better health outcomes, but trying to figure out whether it actually causes better health is tricky.

People with at least some college education have mortality rates (deaths per 1,000 individuals per year) less than half of those without any college education, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In addition, people who are more educated exhibit less anxiety and depression, have fewer functional limitations, and are less likely to have a serious health condition such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease or asthma.

But causality runs both ways. People in poor health from a young age might

This article originally appeared in .

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The New York Times

The New York Times4 min read
Baby Steps to Linking Mind and Machine
SAN FRANCISCO — Elon Musk aspires to make inserting a computer connection into your brain as safe and painless as Lasik eye surgery. On Tuesday evening, Neuralink, a company in which Musk has invested $100 million, was expected to detail the baby ste
The New York Times3 min read
Drug Overdose Deaths Drop in U.S. for First Time Since 1990
After three decades of ever-escalating drug overdose deaths, the tide of fatalities may have finally started to turn. Total drug overdose deaths in America declined by around 5% last year, the first drop since 1990, according to preliminary governmen
The New York Times5 min readTech
Don't Scoff at Influencers. They're Taking Over the World.
As social media expands its cultural dominance, the people who can steer the online conversation will have an upper hand.