NPR

In 'Nanaville,' Anna Quindlen Writes Of Her Adventures In Grandparenting

For decades, Quindlen has been channeling Baby Boomers' concerns, from motherhood and life-work balance to aging and downsizing. Her new book comes with a stern warning: Grandparents, know thy place.

I often refer to my grandson as an ambulatory antidepressant, a vivacious antidote to a time of life that has included the loss of my parents and the constant lashing of worrisome news.

Anna Quindlen ascribes similar jolts of joy to her grandson in her latest book, Nanaville: Adventures in"Sometimes Arthur sees me and yells 'Nana!' in the way some people might say 'ice cream!' and others say 'shoe sale!' No one else has sounded that happy to see me in many many years."

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR5 min readPolitics
Trump's 'Go Back' Rhetoric Is Sign Of A Racially Divisive And Turbulent Year To Come
President Trump has used white grievance to fuel his candidacy since he first came onto the political scene. So what he's doing now with four congresswomen of color is hardly a surprise.
NPR4 min readPolitics
Hoping For Improved U.S. Ties, Pakistan's Prime Minister Set To Visit White House
Tensions have beset the U.S.-Pakistan relationship for years. The planned July 22 meeting between President Trump and Imran Khan comes as the U.S. tries to finalize Afghanistan peace negotiations.
NPR4 min read
Notre Dame Fire Revives Demand For Skilled Stone Carvers In France
"With stone carving, we give life to an edifice and perpetuate history. We're also creating a link with the past and transmitting values that are important to conserve in society," one student says.