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'We Pray For The Caliphate To Return': ISIS Families Crowd Into Syrian Camps

"The women and children who have been raised on the mentality of ISIS and terrorism need to be rehabilitated," warns an official. "Otherwise, they will be the foundations of future terrorism."
Women carry children near the al-Hol camp in Syria's Kurdish-majority region of Rojava. The camp is filled with more than 72,000 people — most of them women and children who came out of the last ISIS-held territory. Source: Jane Arraf

The women huddle for shelter from the rain under a corrugated iron roof, their long black cloaks dragging in the mud as they wait in line for food and pray for the return of the ISIS caliphate.

The squalid al-Hol camp, in the Kurdish-majority region of Syria known as Rojava, is filled with more than 72,000 people — most of them women and children who came out of the last piece of ISIS-held territory in Baghouz.

They include thousands of Iraqis and Syrians who believe they will usher in a new caliphate. And they pose a risk to the Iraqi government, seeking to repatriate the Iraqis,

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