NPR

Why Are Black Women Less Likely To Stick With A Breast Cancer Follow-Up Treatment?

Black women are more likely to die from breast cancer than white women. One reason may be that they face economic and cultural barriers to taking the medications that can prevent recurrence.
As a counselor, Niasha Fray saw first-hand the obstacles black women face in breast cancer treatment. She's now program director of the Duke Center for Community and Population Health Improvement. Source: Justin Cook for NPR

When she was in graduate school for public health, Niasha Fray found a job she loved: counseling women with breast cancer about sticking to their treatment.

She offered what's called "motivational interviewing," a type of therapy intended to help women overcome obstacles keeping them from taking their medications — which can have unpleasant side effects

"They had just given up so much of their lives, so much of their bodies, so much of their family," Fray says. "They wanted to get back to life as usual."

Fray was doing the counseling as part of research into disparities in

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR2 min readPolitics
Streets Of San Juan A 'War Zone' As Protesters Call For Governor To Resign
Some of Puerto Rico's biggest stars attended, and tensions ratcheted up later when protesters burst through a barricade at the governor's mansion and security forces fired tear gas at the crowd.
NPR6 min read
The Water Crisis In Chennai: Who's To Blame, How Do You Fix It?
Reservoirs are dry in India's sixth biggest city. Municipal taps work only a few hours a day. Trains are delivering emergency water supplies.
NPR5 min readFood & Wine
Our Taste For Turtle Soup Nearly Wiped Out Terrapins. Then Prohibition Saved Them
By the turn of the 20th century, America's love affair with Diamondback Terrapin soup — a subsistence food turned gourmet fare — had left the turtle's population teetering. Booze ban to the rescue.