Popular Science

You should not drink human blood. It will not keep you young.

No, just...no.
two glasses of red liquid

Does a new study suggest the old drink the blood of the young? Not even a little.

A recent study inspired headlines and tweets the likes of “drinking young people’s blood could help you live longer and prevent age-related diseases.” We at Popular Science would rather you not do that. Here are several arguments against drinking human blood.

Drinking human blood can make you very sick

For starters, a lot. Drinking infected blood is a great way to get your very own infection. And unlike animals who’ve evolved to live on blood, .

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