NPR

In Zora Neale Hurston's 'Barracoon,' Language Is The Key To Understanding

The book is based on conversations Hurston had with Cudjo Lewis, who was brought to this country on the last trans-Atlantic slave ship. It's a unique document of Lewis' life before and after slavery.

Zora Neale Hurston, one of the best known writers of the Harlem Renaissance — and the author of — has a new book. Well, that's not quite right; it's actually an old book that is only now being published. It's called , and it's based on a series of conversations Hurston had with Cudjo Lewis, who was brought

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