NPR

James H. Cone, Founder Of Black Liberation Theology, Dies At 79

The Arkansas native is remembered for his fierce challenges to traditional Christian norms of his era.

The Rev. James Hal Cone launched a radical spiritual conversation in 1969. With his book, he challenged the dominant white theological paradigm. Cone laid out his specific argument for "God's radical identification with black people in the United States," according to a statement from New York's — where he worked for

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