The New York Times

The Root of White House Chaos? A Weak President

TRUMP IS A BYSTANDER IN HIS OWN ADMINISTRATION — AND THAT COULD BE MORE TROUBLE THAN THE WOES OF HICKS OR KUSHNER.

Hope Hicks’s resignation, Jared Kushner’s security-clearance downgrade, the Rob Porter scandal and the gun-control debate appear to have very little in common. But they are in fact connected to a larger problem: President Trump’s lack of control over the White House and, consequently, his weakness as a president.

Presidents have a high-profile role in lawmaking and foreign policy, but a third function, executive administration, is arguably the most important. The implementation and execution of law provides the executive

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