NPR

Buried In Trump's Nuclear Report: A Russian Doomsday Weapon

The administration's Nuclear Posture Review mentions a massive, nuclear-armed torpedo capable of incinerating cities. But is it real?
On March 1, 1954, the U.S. conducted its largest nuclear test with a yield of 15 megatons. The new Russian weapon would be up to 100 megatons, according to reports. Source: USAF Lookout Moutain Laboratory

Today, the Trump administration released a report on the state of America's nuclear weaponry. The assessment, known as a Nuclear Posture Review, mainly concerns U.S. nukes and missiles.

But buried in the plan is a mention of a mysterious Russian weapon called "Status-6." On paper, at least, Status-6 appears to be a kind of doomsday device. The report refers to it as "a new intercontinental, nuclear-armed, nuclear-powered, undersea autonomous torpedo."

"The radius of total or near-total destruction is the size of. "It's difficult to imagine in normal terms."

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR6 min read
Do You Need That Surgery? How To Decide, And How To Pick A Surgeon If You Do
When you have a serious health problem that calls for surgery, the last thing you need is the stress of navigating the health care system to find a skilled surgeon. We have tips to make it easier.
NPR4 min read
Notre Dame Fire Revives Demand For Skilled Stone Carvers In France
"With stone carving, we give life to an edifice and perpetuate history. We're also creating a link with the past and transmitting values that are important to conserve in society," one student says.
NPR5 min read
The Fallout From A Seemingly Sweet Oil Deal For Venezuela's Neighbors
The PetroCaribe program provided fuel to Venezuela's neighbors on long-term credit to spur economic growth. What has happened now that Venezuela is in free fall?