Popular Science

The truth about cat and dog food

Those little paws leave a big environmental footprint.
cat in a bowl

Meow?

Pexels

It’s enough to make an animal-loving eco-warrior cringe.

A new study that calculates the carbon footprint of cats and dogs brings troubling news for pet owners. It turns out the environmental impact of our four-legged friends is considerable, and not in a good way.

“I like dogs and cats, and I’m definitely not recommending that people get rid of their pets,” said Gregory Okin, a UCLA geography professor and study author, who points out that pets us with friendship and other social, health and emotional benefits that cannot be dismissed. “This paper is not about telling people what to do or what not to do. It’s about providing

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