The Atlantic

The Hoods Are Off

The “Unite the Right” gathering wasn’t a Klan rally at all. It was a pride march.
Source: AP

In July 2017, the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society invited members of the press to a private conference to discuss a sensitive pair of items from the organization’s collection: a pair of robes that might have originally belonged to founding members of the local Ku Klux Klan, established near Thomas Jefferson’s tomb in 1921.

The robes, which the society said were donated in 1993, drew attention when local. But Steven Meeks, the society’s president, declined to reveal who donated the artifacts. “I will tell you this much,” Meeks said to the newspaper, “neither one of them was a prominent person in the Charlottesville community.”

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