Bloomberg Businessweek

Why a Visa Crackdown Is Bad for Business

Without seasonal foreign workers, many small businesses can’t stay open
With visa restrictions forcing the restaurant to close, business at the Pentagoet is way down

Jesse Ellison

Kate Bridges should be waiting tables right now. She’s been a server at the lauded farm-to-table restaurant at the Pentagoet Inn in Castine, Maine, for six years, making enough during the summer season to carry her through the year. But in early June she was answering the phone at the inn, telling callers that the restaurant was closed for the foreseeable future.

“We depend on that income,” she says. “If the restaurant doesn’t open, I don’t know exactly what I’ll do. But if we don’t have cooks, then we don’t have a restaurant.”

The Pentagoet is the oldest continually running business in

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek4 min read
Chevron’s Long Game in Venezuela
The American oil giant is helping prop up the beleaguered nation’s energy industry, positioning itself for post-Maduro prosperity
Bloomberg Businessweek3 min read
Garbage, Now With Less Waste
A software provider promises the likes of Google and WeWork it can get them close to zero landfill
Bloomberg Businessweek3 min read
Beauty Houses’ Next Step: Men’s Makeup
When Yota Nakamura’s girlfriend said he should spruce up his look, he went shopping. The 22-year-old university student in Osaka purchased toner, moisturizer, and a tinted face primer—yes, makeup—made by a Japanese brand called Fiveism x Three. Now N