NPR

Ringling Bros. Curtain Call Is Latest Victory For Animal Welfare Activists

After decades of working on animal rights, some activists believe the movement has finally hit the mainstream, in part fueled by social media. It's changing American culture and the economy.
A pamphlet showing an image of Cecil the lion at a vigil in central London last year. After Cecil was killed by an American dentist and trophy hunter in Zimbabwe, the lion's story went viral online. Source: Daniel Leal-Olivas

When Feld Entertainment, owners of Ringling Bros., announced it's cancelling the circus after nearly 150 years, it was one of the biggest victories yet for animal welfare activists.

How the circus treats it animals — especially elephants and big cats — has long been a focus for groups like the Humane Society of the U.S and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. They see it as part of

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