The Atlantic

The Terrifying Simplicity of the Stockholm Attack

“Very few actually comprehend the deadly and destructive capability of the motor vehicle,” an ISIS publication advises.
Source: TT News Agency / Fredrik Sandberg / Reuters

Updated on April 7, 2017

Shortly after a stolen delivery truck sliced through a crowd of shoppers in Stockholm on Friday, killing and injuring multiple people, Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven assessed the carnage. “Sweden has been attacked,” he said. “Everything indicates an act of terror.” The terror, in this case, came in one of its crudest forms: a truck, a driver, and a crowd of people. An assailant had weaponized everyday life in a country of nearly 10 million people, 4.5 million cars

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